Virginia (Roman legend)

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Virginia

■ ACT COLLEGE D-13

1100 Wilson Blvd.
Arlington, VA 22209
Web Site: http://www.healthtraining.com

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed.

■ ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE J-15

5700 Southern Blvd.
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
Web Site: http://www.aticareers.com

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed.

■ ARGOSY UNIVERSITY/WASHINGTON D.C. D-13

1550 Wilson Blvd., Ste. 600
Arlington, VA 22209
Tel: (703)526-5800; (866)703-2777
Fax: (703)243-8973
Web Site: http://www.argosyu.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, upper-level, coed. Part of Argosy Education Group. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1994. Setting: urban campus with easy access to Washington D.C.. Total enrollment: 13. Full-time: 13 students, 62% women, 38% men. 0% Native American, 8% Hispanic, 15% black, 8% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international. Calendar: semesters.

Collegiate Environment:

Social organizations: 1 open to all. Most popular organization: Student Government Association. Major annual event: Common Hours. College housing not available.

■ THE ART INSTITUTE OF WASHINGTON D-13

1820 North Fort Meyer Dr., Ground Floor
Arlington, VA 22209
Tel: (703)358-9550; 877-303-3771
Admissions: (703)247-6857
Fax: (703)358-9759
Web Site: http://www.artinstitutes.edu/arlington/

Description:

Proprietary, 4-year, coed. Part of Education Management Corporation. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 2000. Setting: urban campus. Total enrollment: 1,200. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: electronic application. Required: essay, high school transcript, interview. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Tuition: $385 per quarter hour part-time. College room only: $9500. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student services: personal-psychological counseling.

■ AVERETT UNIVERSITY K-7

420 West Main St.
Danville, VA 24541-3692
Tel: (434)791-5600
Free: 800-AVE-RETT
Admissions: (434)791-7301
Fax: (434)791-5637
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.averett.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Baptist General Association of Virginia. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1859. Setting: 19-acre small town campus with easy access to Greensboro and Raleigh. Endowment: $22 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5708 per student. Total enrollment: 1,487. Faculty: 102 (56 full-time, 46 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 1,745 applied, 56% were admitted. 9% from top 10% of their high school class, 34% from top quarter, 67% from top half. Full-time: 230 students, 37% women, 63% men. Part-time: 11 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 29 states and territories, 20 other countries, 30% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 23% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 9% 25 or older, 56% live on campus, 82% transferred in. Retention: 48% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; liberal arts/general studies; security and protective services. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Hong Kong Baptist University, Consortium for Global Education, American University. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.2 high school GPA, College Prep curriculum, SAT or ACT, SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT, TOEFL for international students; nontraditional students are not required to submit ACT or SAT scores.. Recommended: essay, 1 recommendation, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 7/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $25,600 includes full-time tuition ($18,040), mandatory fees ($1000), and college room and board ($6560). College room only: $4800. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $305 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $250 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, location, and program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 30 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 3% of eligible men and 2% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Baptist Student Union, Phi Sigma Sigma, Pi Kappa Phi, Averett Gospel Choir. Major annual events: homecoming, Spring Formal, President's Lunch on the Lawn. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 521 college housing spaces available; 453 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Mary B. Blount Library with 103,193 books, 243,938 microform titles, 11,358 serials, 291 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $585,099. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ AVIATION INSTITUTE OF MAINTENANCE-MANASSAS D-12

9821 Godwin Dr.
Manassas, VA 20110
Tel: (703)257-5515; 877-604-2121
Fax: (703)257-5523
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.aviationmaintenance.edu/aviation-washingtondc.asp

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year. Awards certificates and terminal associate degrees.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: High School Diploma or GED.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25.

■ AVIATION INSTITUTE OF MAINTENANCE-VIRGINIA BEACH J-15

1429 Miller Store Ro
Virginia Beach, VA 23455
; 888-349-5387
Admissions: (757)363-2121
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.aviationmaintenance.edu/aviation-norfolk.asp

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year. Awards certificates and terminal associate degrees.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: High school diploma or GED.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Tuition: $10,260 full-time, $220 per credit hour part-time.

■ BETA TECH H-12

1610 Forest Ave. - Ste214
Richmond, VA 23229
Tel: (804)673-7110

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year.

■ BLUE RIDGE COMMUNITY COLLEGE F-8

PO Box 80
Weyers Cave, VA 24486-0080
Tel: (540)234-9261
Admissions: (540)453-2332
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.brcc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1967. Setting: 65-acre rural campus. Endowment: $2.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $1491 per student. Total enrollment: 3,804. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 22:1. 681 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 1,513 students, 49% women, 51% men. Part-time: 2,291 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 29 states and territories, 2 other countries, 2% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 4% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 36% 25 or older, 42% transferred in. Retention: 41% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for veterinary technology, nursing programs. Options: electronic application, early admission. Required for some: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2040 full-time, $68 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6420 full-time, $214 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $146 full-time, $4.85 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Phi Theta Kappa, Christian Fellowship, intramural athletics, special interest groups. Major annual event: Folk Arts Festival. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Houff Library with 59,735 books, 206 serials, 1,646 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $414,447. 285 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Weyers Cave is a rural community located near Staunton and Harrisonburg.

■ BLUEFIELD COLLEGE I-2

3000 College Dr.
Bluefield, VA 24605-1799
Tel: (276)326-3682
Free: 800-872-0175
Admissions: (276)326-4217
Fax: (276)326-4288
Web Site: http://www.bluefield.edu/

Description:

Independent Southern Baptist, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1922. Setting: 85-acre small town campus. Endowment: $4.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3179 per student. Total enrollment: 776. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 537 applied, 50% were admitted. 23% from top 10% of their high school class, 44% from top quarter, 83% from top half. 3 valedictorians. Full-time: 692 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 84 students, 68% women, 32% men. Students come from 14 states and territories, 3 other countries, 37% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 18% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.4% international, 45% 25 or older, 48% live on campus, 16% transferred in. Retention: 58% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; law/legal studies; psychology. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Required for some: recommendations, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $18,337 includes full-time tuition ($11,675), mandatory fees ($630), and college room and board ($6032). College room only: $2371. Part-time tuition: $382 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $155 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 6 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities; 2% of eligible men and 2% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Baptist Student Union, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Student Union Board, Student Government Association, Bluefield Singers. Major annual events: Homecoming Parade and Dance, Spring Formal, Mud Pig Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: controlled dormitory access, night security patrols. 240 college housing spaces available; 209 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Easley Library with 74,150 books, 14,000 serials, 2,210 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $247,602. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

A suburban area in the Virginia Highlands, Bluefield is a center of diversified industry. Products of its industries are fabric dyes, mattresses, hardwood flooring, textiles, and mining equipment. All commercial transportation is available. Public libraries, churches, hospitals, and a number of civic and service organizations are a part of the community. Nearby mountains provide opportunities for numerous recreational activities. Some part-time employment is available.

■ BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE E-8

402 East College St.
Bridgewater, VA 22812-1599
Tel: (540)828-8000
Free: 800-759-8328
Admissions: (540)828-5375
Fax: (540)828-5481
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bridgewater.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Church of the Brethren. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1880. Setting: 190-acre small town campus. Endowment: $48.8 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5770 per student. Total enrollment: 1,506. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 1,502 applied, 86% were admitted. 17% from top 10% of their high school class, 44% from top quarter, 85% from top half. 12 valedictorians, 146 student government officers. Full-time: 1,495 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 11 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 22 states and territories, 9 other countries, 23% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 8% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 1% 25 or older, 83% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 77% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Advanced placement, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA, interview. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $29,250 includes full-time tuition ($20,190) and college room and board ($9060). College room only: $4595. Part-time tuition: $650 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $30.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 42 open to all. Most popular organizations: Eagle Productions, pep band, Oratorio Choir, Baptist Student Union, Brethren Student Fellowship. Major annual events: Spring Carnival, Homecoming, May Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, controlled dormitory access. 1,308 college housing spaces available; 1,256 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Alexander Mack Memorial Library with 138,020 books, 411,972 microform titles, 650 serials, 9,188 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $716,165. 160 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Bridgewater is located in the Shenandoah Valley, seven miles south of Harrisonburg. The community facilities include churches, banks, restaurants, parks, museums, and shops. The city, its suburbs and the surrounding area offer entertainment, fine dining experiences, a shopping mall, libraries, a hospital, historic towns, civil war battlefields, the George Washington National Forest, the Massanutten Four Seasons Resort, the Shenandoah Regional Airport, various civic organizations, and events at James Madison University Convocation Center. The College is conveniently located 10 minutes from Harrisonburg, 50 minutes from Charlottesville, an hour and 40 minutes from Roanoke and approximately 2 hours from Richmond or Washington, D.C.

■ BRYANT AND STRATTON COLLEGE, RICHMOND H-12

8141 Hull St. Rd.
Richmond, VA 23235-6411
Tel: (804)745-2444
Fax: (804)499-7799
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bryantstratton.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of Bryant and Stratton Business Institute, Inc. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1952. Setting: suburban campus. Total enrollment: 421. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 0% from top 10% of their high school class, 0% from top quarter, 0% from top half. Full-time: 137 students, 88% women, 12% men. Part-time: 284 students, 82% women, 18% men. 0% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 71% black, 0.5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 75% 25 or older. Academic area with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview, entrance evaluation and placement evaluation, TABE, CPAt. Recommended: SAT or ACT. Required for some: recommendations. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Tuition: $18,675 full-time, $415 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $25 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 7 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Beta Lambda, Alpha Beta Gamma, Student Council, Medical Assisting Club, Paralegal Club. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Bryant and Stratton Library with 3,176 books and 84 serials. 50 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ BRYANT AND STRATTON COLLEGE, VIRGINIA BEACH J-15

301 Centre Pointe Dr.
Virginia Beach, VA 23462-4417
Tel: (757)499-7900
Fax: (757)499-7799
Web Site: http://www.bryantstratton.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of Bryant and Stratton Business Institute, Inc. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1952. Setting: suburban campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $1050 per student. Total enrollment: 340. 268 applied, 84% were admitted. Full-time: 238 students, 81% women, 19% men. Part-time: 102 students, 84% women, 16% men. 0% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 61% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 60% 25 or older, 12% transferred in. Retention: 85% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application. Required: interview, CPAt. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 7 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Beta Lambda, Alpha Beta Gamma, Student Government Association, Medical Club, Law Society. Major annual events: Toy Drive, Red Cross Blood Drive, Southeastern Virginia Food Bank Drive. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. campus library with 9,646 books, 8,271 microform titles, 126 serials, and 359 audiovisual materials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $40,000. 61 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ CENTRAL VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE I-8

3506 Wards Rd.
Lynchburg, VA 24502-2498
Tel: (434)832-7600
Admissions: (434)832-7630
Fax: (434)386-4700
Web Site: http://www.cvcc.vccs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: 104-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $1.7 million. Total enrollment: 4,741. Students come from 11 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 42% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required for some: high school transcript, interview. Placement: ACT ASSET or ACT COMPASS required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 12 open to all. Most popular organizations: Black Student Union, Data Processing Management Association, Radiology Club, Phi Theta Kappa, Respiratory Club. Major annual events: Semi-Annual Picnic, graduation. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Bedford Learning Resources Center with 37,000 books, 230 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 130 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Lynchburg College.

■ CHRISTENDOM COLLEGE D-10

134 Christendom Dr.
Front Royal, VA 22630-5103
Tel: (540)636-2900
Free: 800-877-5456
Fax: (540)636-1655
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.christendom.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1977. Setting: 100-acre rural campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Endowment: $3.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5077 per student. Total enrollment: 435. Faculty: 39 (23 full-time, 16 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 249 applied, 76% were admitted. 60% from top 10% of their high school class, 86% from top quarter, 100% from top half. 2 National Merit Scholars, 2 class presidents, 2 valedictorians, 16 student government officers. Full-time: 372 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 7 students, 71% women, 29% men. Students come from 43 states and territories, 2 other countries, 75% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 1% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 3% 25 or older, 95% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 88% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: history; theology and religious vocations; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action. Required: essay, high school transcript, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA, interview. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 3/1, 12/1 for early action. Notification: 4/1, 12/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $22,806 includes full-time tuition ($16,290), mandatory fees ($450), and college room and board ($6066).

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 15 open to all. Most popular organizations: drama, choir, Shield of Roses, Legion of Mary, debate team. Major annual events: Christmas Dinner Dance, St. Patrick's Day, Spring Formal. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service, night patrols by trained security personnel. 339 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. O'Reilly Memorial Library with 64,265 books, 851 microform titles, 249 serials, 1,302 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $271,069. 60 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in northwestern Virginia, the College community offers a wide variety of attractions. Visitors can choose from a wide variety of facilities and activities: fine restaurants, historic Bed & Breakfasts, Civil War battlefields, countless hiking trails, numerous golf courses, and tours of Skyline Drive and Skyline Caverns.

■ CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT UNIVERSITY J-14

1 University Place
Newport News, VA 23606-2998
Tel: (757)594-7000
Free: 800-333-4268
Admissions: (757)594-7015
Fax: (757)594-7333
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cnu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1960. Setting: 175-acre suburban campus with easy access to Norfolk. Endowment: $3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4358 per student. Total enrollment: 4,699. Faculty: 239 (218 full-time, 21 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 5,104 applied, 62% were admitted. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 48% from top quarter, 90% from top half. Full-time: 4,204 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 332 students, 55% women, 45% men. Students come from 28 states and territories, 10 other countries, 3% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 8% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.02% international, 16% 25 or older, 30% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 75% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; psychology. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Thomas Nelson Community College, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, College of William and Mary. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay, 3 recommendations, interview. Application deadlines: 3/1, 12/1 for early action. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $3442 full-time, $143 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,464 full-time, $436 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $2384 full-time, $99. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $7500. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 50 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 8% of eligible men and 12% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Virginia Education Association, Student Government Association. Major annual events: Homecoming, Fall Fest, Spring Fest. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, campus police. College housing designed to accommodate 2,333 students; 2,400 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Option: coed housing available. Captain John Smith Library with 328,319 books, 765,028 microform titles, 1,695 serials, 10,238 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 1,000 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The 125-acre campus located in Newport News, VA, is easily accessible to residents of that city. The campus is centrally located between recreational centers at Colonial Williamsburg and the Norfolk/Virginia Beach resorts.

■ THE COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARY I-14

PO Box 8795
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
Tel: (757)221-4000
Admissions: (757)221-4223
Fax: (757)221-1242
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wm.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1693. Setting: 1,200-acre small town campus with easy access to Richmond. Endowment: $409.9 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $34.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8778 per student. Total enrollment: 7,544. Faculty: 763 (596 full-time, 167 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 11:1. 10,610 applied, 31% were admitted. 79% from top 10% of their high school class, 97% from top quarter, 100% from top half. 15 National Merit Scholars, 29 class presidents, 121 valedictorians, 564 student government officers. Full-time: 5,527 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 67 students, 73% women, 27% men. Students come from 50 states and territories, 52 other countries, 33% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 5% Hispanic, 6% black, 7% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 1% 25 or older, 75% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 95% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; business/marketing; psychology. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: 1 recommendation, SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 1/1, 11/1 for early decision. Notification: 4/1, 12/1 for early decision. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $60. State resident tuition: $4730 full-time, $180 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $20,000 full-time, $710 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $3048 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Part-time tuition varies according to program. College room and board: $6417. College room only: $3856. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 300 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities. Most popular organizations: Alpha Phi Omega, College Partnership for Kids, student assembly, Flat Hat (student newspaper), Resident Housing Association. Major annual events: Yule Log Ceremony, King and Queen Ball, Opening Convocation Exercises. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 4,206 college housing spaces available; 4,189 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, women-only housing available. Swem Library plus 9 others with 2 million books, 2.2 million microform titles, 11,688 serials, 29,316 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $8.9 million. 225 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Williamsburg, the historic capital of Colonial Virginia, has been restored as nearly as possible to its 18th-century appearance. The Colonial Williamsburg project has been made possible by the generous provisions of the late John D. Rockefeller, Jr. The restored town offers excellent facilities, and the colonial shops on Merchant's Square provide historical interest. Williamsburg is a popular tourist center and has recreational activities such as fishing, boating, golf, and hunting. Major historic points of interest include William and Mary's Sir Christopher Wren Building (1695), the Bruton Parish Church, the Capitol, Governor's Palace, Peyton Randolph House, Raleigh Tavern, and the Wythe House.

■ DABNEY S. LANCASTER COMMUNITY COLLEGE G-6

100 Dabney Dr., PO Box 1000
Clifton Forge, VA 24422
Tel: (540)863-2800
Admissions: (540)863-2815
Fax: (540)863-2915
Web Site: http://www.dl.vccs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1964. Setting: 117-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 1,453. Students come from 5 states and territories, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 5% black, 0.5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 59% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1740 full-time, $72.50 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5648 full-time, $235.35 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $157 full-time, $6.55 per credit part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. College housing not available. 37,716 books and 376 serials.

Community Environment:

A rural community, Clifton Forge is served by limited modes of transportation. Libraries, churches of major denominations, a hospital, and various civic and service organizations are part of the community. Some part-time job opportunities are available. A state park, lakes and streams provide facilities for fishing and outdoor sports; other activities include baseball, basketball, football, tennis, canoeing, backpacking and skiing.

■ DANVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE K-7

1008 South Main St.
Danville, VA 24541-4088
Tel: (434)797-2222
Free: 800-560-4291
Admissions: (434)797-8490
Fax: (434)797-8541
Web Site: http://www.dcc.vccs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1967. Setting: 76-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 4,089. Full-time: 1,366 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 2,723 students, 61% women, 39% men. Students come from 9 states and territories, 3 other countries, 2% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 0.5% Hispanic, 34% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.02% international, 58% 25 or older. Retention: 100% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT ASSET required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to district residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2150 full-time, $71.65 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6596 full-time, $219.85 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $111 full-time, $3.65 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. Learning Resource Center with 41,600 books, 345 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 265 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Averett College.

■ DEVRY UNIVERSITY (ARLINGTON) D-13

2450 Crystal Dr.
Arlington, VA 22202
Tel: (703)414-4000; (866)563-3900
Fax: (703)414-4040
Web Site: http://www.devry.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Part of DeVry University. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 2001. Total enrollment: 585. Faculty: 62 (20 full-time, 42 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. Full-time: 310 students, 45% women, 55% men. Part-time: 153 students, 54% women, 46% men. 0% Native American, 10% Hispanic, 63% black, 7% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international. Retention: 28% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: computer and information sciences; business/marketing; engineering technologies. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. One-time mandatory fee: $40. Tuition: $13,060 full-time, $475 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $270 full-time, $160 per year part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. Learning Resource Center with 7,800 books, 6,500 serials, 210 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 380 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ DEVRY UNIVERSITY (MCLEAN) D-12

1751 Pinnacle Dr., Ste. 250
McLean, VA 22102-3832
Tel: (703)556-9669
Fax: (703)556-9420
Web Site: http://www.devry.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Calendar: semesters.

Costs Per Year:

One-time mandatory fee: $40. Tuition: $13,060 full-time, $475 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $60 full-time, $30 per year part-time.

■ EASTERN MENNONITE UNIVERSITY E-8

1200 Park Rd.
Harrisonburg, VA 22802-2462
Tel: (540)432-4000
Free: 800-368-2665
Admissions: (540)432-4118
Fax: (540)432-4444
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.emu.edu/

Description:

Independent Mennonite, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and first professional degrees. Founded 1917. Setting: 93-acre small town campus. Endowment: $17.5 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $26,553. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $10,246 per student. Total enrollment: 1,301. Faculty: 163 (116 full-time, 47 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 9:1. 636 applied, 77% were admitted. 21% from top 10% of their high school class, 44% from top quarter, 77% from top half. 9 valedictorians. Full-time: 970 students, 62% women, 38% men. Part-time: 42 students, 74% women, 26% men. Students come from 35 states and territories, 20 other countries, 54% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 7% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 9% 25 or older, 66% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 74% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; liberal arts/general studies; health professions and related sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, James Madison University, The Catholic University of America, Brethren College Abroad, Howard University, Bridgewater College. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.2 high school GPA, statement of commitment, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Required for some: 2 recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $27,220 includes full-time tuition ($20,612), mandatory fees ($58), and college room and board ($6550). College room only: $3550. Part-time tuition: $862 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $2 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 47 open to all. Most popular organizations: YPCA, Students in Free Enterprise, Student Government Association, Student Education Association, International Student Organization. Major annual events: Fall Festival, Multicultural Week, Spring Fling. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, controlled dormitory access, night watchman. 684 college housing spaces available; 517 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Sadie Hartzler Library with 163,932 books, 89,094 microform titles, 1,112 serials, 3,570 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $681,288. 110 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus.

Community Environment:

The college is located in the heart of Virginia's beautiful Shenandoah Valley, near a national park.

■ EASTERN SHORE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

29300 Lankford Hwy.
Melfa, VA 23410-3000
Tel: (757)789-1789; 877-871-8455
Admissions: (757)789-1731
Fax: (757)789-1739
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.es.cc.va.us/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1971. Setting: 117-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 807. 390 applied, 83% were admitted. 0% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 44% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 45% 25 or older. Retention: 36% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. Off campus study at members of the Virginia Tidewater Consortium for Continuing Higher Education.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to county residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2040 full-time, $68 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6420 full-time, $214 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $110 full-time, $3.65 per credit part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: night security guard. College housing not available. Learning Resources Center with 20,479 books, 95 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 53 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located midway down the Delmarva Peninsula, which separates Chesapeake Bay from the Atlantic Ocean, Melfa has a population of 450. The area is known for vegetables, poultry, oysters, fish, sailing, and swimming.

■ ECPI COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (NEWPORT NEWS) J-14

1001 Omni Blvd., No. 100
Newport News, VA 23606
Tel: (757)838-9191
Fax: (757)827-5351
Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, terminal associate, and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: suburban campus. Total enrollment: 556. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. Full-time: 556 students, 39% women, 61% men. Students come from 34 states and territories, 2% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 6% Hispanic, 45% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 64% 25 or older, 77% transferred in. Core. Calendar: trimesters. Advanced placement, freshman honors college, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, interview. Recommended: SAT, SAT or ACT, SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: moderately difficult. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 6 open to all. Most popular organizations: SETA, IEEE, NVTHS, Accounting Society, CSI. Major annual events: Commencement, picnic. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: building and parking lot security. College housing not available. ECPI-Virginia Beach Library with 13,014 books, 168 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ECPI COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (VIRGINIA BEACH) J-15

5555 Greenwich Rd.
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
Tel: (757)671-7171
Free: 800-986-1200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, terminal associate, and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: 8-acre suburban campus. Total enrollment: 4,391. 1,433 applied, 69% were admitted. Full-time: 4,312 students, 47% women, 53% men. Part-time: 79 students, 43% women, 57% men. Students come from 6 states and territories, 10% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 43% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 50% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: trimesters. Advanced placement, freshman honors college, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview. Recommended: SAT, SAT or ACT, SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: moderately difficult. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100. Tuition: $9750 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 6 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 25% of eligible men and 20% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: SETA, IEEE, NVTHS, ITE, Accounting Society. Major annual event: picnic. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: building and parking lot security. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. ECPI-Virginia Beach Library with an OPAC and a Web page. 600 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ECPI TECHNICAL COLLEGE (GLEN ALLEN) O-9

4305 Cox Rd.
Glen Allen, VA 23060
Tel: (804)934-0100
Free: 800-986-1200
Fax: (804)934-0054
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ecpitech.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, terminal associate, and bachelor's degrees. Setting: urban campus with easy access to Richmond. Total enrollment: 473. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 148 applied, 82% were admitted. Full-time: 473 students, 38% women, 62% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 36% black, 4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 48% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript, interview. Recommended: SAT, SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT, SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

Collegiate Environment:

Most popular organizations: CSI, OPMA, SETA, NVTHS, ITE. Campus security: building and parking lot security. College housing not available.

■ ECPI TECHNICAL COLLEGE (RICHMOND) H-12

800 Moorefield Park Dr.
Richmond, VA 23236
Tel: (804)330-5533
Free: 800-986-1200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ecpitech.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, terminal associate, and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: urban campus. Total enrollment: 400. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 176 applied, 75% were admitted. Students come from 2 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 46% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Advanced placement, freshman honors college, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview. Recommended: SAT, SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT, SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100. Tuition: $9750 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Most popular organizations: Collegiate Secretaries International, Data Processing Management Association, Student Electronics Technicians Association, Future Office Assistants, National Vocational-Technical Honor Society. Major annual event: picnics. Campus security: building and parking lot security. College housing not available. ECPI-Richmond Library with 3,165 books, 81 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 190 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ECPI TECHNICAL COLLEGE (ROANOKE) I-6

5234 Airport Rd.
Roanoke, VA 24012
Tel: (540)563-8080
Free: 800-986-1200
Fax: (540)362-5400
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ecpi.net/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, terminal associate, and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: 3-acre suburban campus. Total enrollment: 300. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 159 applied, 65% were admitted. Students come from 4 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 47% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview. Recommended: SAT, SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100. Tuition: $9750 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Most popular organizations: SETA, NVTHS, SAFA, FOAMA, ITE. Major annual events: picnic, Christmas Lunch. Campus security: building and parking lot security. College housing not available. ECPI-Roanoke Library plus 1 other with 1,703 books, 43 serials, and a Web page. 80 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ EMORY & HENRY COLLEGE

PO Box 947
Emory, VA 24327-0947
Tel: (276)944-4121
Free: 800-848-5493
Admissions: (276)944-6133
Fax: (276)944-6934
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ehc.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1836. Setting: 331-acre rural campus. Endowment: $72.5 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $389,118. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6140 per student. Total enrollment: 1,101. Faculty: 95 (68 full-time, 27 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 1,329 applied, 76% were admitted. 18% from top 10% of their high school class, 44% from top quarter, 82% from top half. 9 valedictorians. Full-time: 999 students, 50% women, 50% men. Part-time: 28 students, 39% women, 61% men. Students come from 23 states and territories, 2 other countries, 29% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 4% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.3% international, 5% 25 or older, 66% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 72% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; education; business/marketing. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Required for some: 2 recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: Rolling, 11/1 for early decision. Notification: continuous until 8/1, 12/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $26,570 includes full-time tuition ($19,530) and college room and board ($7040). College room only: $3500. Full-time tuition varies according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $815 per hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 50 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities; 11% of eligible men and 26% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Alpha Phi Omega, Student Virginia Education Association, student radio station, Campus Christian Fellowship. Major annual events: Winter Forum, Homecoming, Opening Street Dance. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 691 college housing spaces available; 612 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Kelly Library with 337,290 books, 42,359 microform titles, 9,946 serials, 4,577 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $726,232. 250 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Emory, in the Virginia Highlands, is approximately 20 miles north of Bristol, VA, just off exit 26 of I-81. The area is known for its scenic beauty, recreational opportunities, and abundance of talented craftspeople. In Abingdon, an historic town dating from the middle 1700's, the annual Virginia Highlands Festival brings together artists and craftspeople from throughout the eastern U.S. Just twenty minutes from the college campus is Mt. Rogers National Recreational Area, featuring numerous campgrounds, mountain streams, and miles of the Appalachian Trail.

■ FERRUM COLLEGE J-5

PO Box 1000
Ferrum, VA 24088-9001
Tel: (540)365-2121
Free: 800-868-9797
Admissions: (540)365-4290
Fax: (540)365-4266
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ferrum.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1913. Setting: 720-acre rural campus. Endowment: $39.6 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5427 per student. Total enrollment: 991. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 1,248 applied, 72% were admitted. 1% from top 10% of their high school class, 13% from top quarter, 39% from top half. 1 valedictorian. Full-time: 962 students, 41% women, 59% men. Part-time: 29 students, 76% women, 24% men. Students come from 24 states and territories, 8 other countries, 15% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 20% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 9% 25 or older, 70% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 55% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; liberal arts/general studies; computer and information sciences; psychology. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, interview. Required for some: interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $24,320 includes full-time tuition ($17,990), mandatory fees ($30), and college room and board ($6300). Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $360 per hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 60 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Agriculture Club, BACCHUS, Panther Productions, African American Student Association, Students in Free Enterprise. Major annual events: Homecoming, Folklife Festival, Spring Fling. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 840 college housing spaces available; 640 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: coed, women-only housing available. Stanley Library with 154,370 books, 7,733 microform titles, 10,618 serials, 2,094 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $486,586. 470 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, Ferrum has an ideal environment for study and cultural enrichment. The College's proximity to the mountains and lakes enables students to enjoy outdoor activities such as hiking, camping, fishing, boating, swimming and skiing. Ferrum is 35 miles south of Roanoke, Virginia, which has excellent shopping, living, cultural and recreational facilities. Bus service and air transportation are available in Roanoke.

■ GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY D-12

4400 University Dr.
Fairfax, VA 22030
Tel: (703)993-1000
Admissions: (703)993-2400
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.gmu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1957. Setting: 677-acre suburban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Endowment: $38 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $43.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6274 per student. Total enrollment: 29,728. Faculty: 1,955 (997 full-time, 958 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 10,344 applied, 69% were admitted. 14% from top 10% of their high school class, 44% from top quarter, 90% from top half. Full-time: 13,578 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 4,513 students, 53% women, 47% men. Students come from 52 states and territories, 129 other countries, 8% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 8% Hispanic, 8% black, 17% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 22% 25 or older, 23% live on campus, 12% transferred in. Retention: 84% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; health professions and related sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at members of the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area, Shenandoah University. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, interview, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA, recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 1/15. Notification: 4/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $60. State resident tuition: $4356 full-time, $181.50 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,636 full-time, $651.50 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1524 full-time, $63.50 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $6480. College room only: $3700. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 255 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 5% of eligible men and 5% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: intramurals, student government, club sports, volunteer and community service. Major annual events: homecoming, Patriots' Day, Mason Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 3,500 college housing spaces available; 3,000 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Fenwick Library plus 1 other with 1.5 million books, 2.7 million microform titles, 27,708 serials, 27,344 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $12.8 million. 1,500 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Fairfax is a rapidly growing residential area on the western fringes of Washington, DC. Shopping facilities, commercial transportation, recreation activities, part-time employment and moderate-to-expensive rental apartments are available nearby.

■ GERMANNA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

2130 Germanna Hwy.
Locust Grove, VA 22508-2102
Tel: (540)727-3000
Admissions: (540)891-3016
Fax: (540)727-3207
Web Site: http://www.gcc.vccs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1970. Setting: 100-acre rural campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Total enrollment: 4,799. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. 838 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 1,359 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 3,440 students, 68% women, 32% men. Students come from 5 states and territories, 1 other country, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 13% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.04% international, 53% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs. Off campus study at Mary Washington College, other members of the Virginia Community College System.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Option: early admission. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1632 full-time, $68 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5136 full-time, $214 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $118 full-time, $4.90 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 11 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Nurses Association, Student Government Association, Phi Theta Kappa, Students Against Substance Abuse. Major annual events: Germanna Day, graduation. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. 22,412 books and 160 serials. 55 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE

PO Box 667
Hampden-Sydney, VA 23943
Tel: (434)223-6000
Free: 800-755-0733
Admissions: (434)223-6120
Fax: (434)223-6346
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hsc.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, men only, affiliated with Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1776. Setting: 660-acre rural campus with easy access to Richmond. Endowment: $113.3 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $13,119. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $9522 per student. Total enrollment: 1,060. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 1,376 applied, 67% were admitted. 12% from top 10% of their high school class, 25% from top quarter, 75% from top half. 6 class presidents, 6 valedictorians, 64 student government officers. Full-time: 1,060 students. Students come from 36 states and territories, 6 other countries, 33% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 4% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 0.4% 25 or older, 93% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 83% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; history; business/marketing. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, internships. Off campus study at Seven-College Exchange Program, Longwood College Cooperative Program. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, early action, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA, interview, SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 3/1, 11/15 for early decision, 1/15 for early action. Notification: continuous until 4/15, 12/15 for early decision, 2/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $34,295 includes full-time tuition ($25,166), mandatory fees ($1004), and college room and board ($8125). College room only: $3436. Part-time tuition: $748 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 45 open to all; national fraternities; 24% of eligible undergrads are members. Most popular organizations: Republican Society, Pre-Health Society, Outsiders Club, Tiger Athletic Club, Pre-Law Society. Major annual events: homecoming, Greek Weekend, Macon Week/Midwinters. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. 1,060 college housing spaces available; 1,000 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: men-only housing available. Eggleston Library with 219,221 books, 948 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $994,875. 140 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ HAMPTON UNIVERSITY J-15

Hampton, VA 23668
Tel: (757)727-5000
Free: 800-624-3328
Admissions: (757)727-5328
Fax: (757)727-5084
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hamptonu.edu/

Description:

Independent, university, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1868. Setting: 210-acre urban campus with easy access to Norfolk. Endowment: $185.8 million. Total enrollment: 6,209. Faculty: 447 (323 full-time, 124 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 5,401 applied, 77% were admitted. 20% from top 10% of their high school class, 45% from top quarter, 90% from top half. Full-time: 4,913 students, 65% women, 35% men. Part-time: 412 students, 47% women, 53% men. Students come from 38 states and territories, 85% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 94% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 11% 25 or older, 59% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 85% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; health professions and related sciences; psychology. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at 11 members of the Virginia Tidewater Consortium for Continuing Higher Education. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 3/1, 12/1 for early decision. Notification: continuous until 7/31, 12/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $20,928 includes full-time tuition ($12,722), mandatory fees ($1460), and college room and board ($6746). College room only: $3580. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $320 per credit.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 80 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 5% of eligible men and 4% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student government, student leaders, Student Union Board, student recruitment team, resident assistants. Major annual events: Homecoming, Commencement, Convocation. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, controlled dormitory access, emergency call boxes. 3,066 college housing spaces available; 2,692 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. William R. and Norma B. Harvey Library plus 3 others with 336,092 books, 711,759 microform titles, 1,414 serials, 2,286 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 1,300 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Hampton is the oldest English settlement still in existence in the nation; the city was settled in 1610. Hampton is the center of the fishing industry of Virginia. All modes of transportation are available. The Syms-Eaton Academy, first free school of America, and Hampton University, of which Booker T. Washington was an alumnus, are only two of the area's important sites. St. John's Church, which survived a partial burning during the Civil War, is another historic point of interest. Its most precious relic is communion silver made in 1618. The window dedicated to Pocahontas was donated by Indian students at Hampton Institute.

■ HOLLINS UNIVERSITY I-6

PO Box 9603
Roanoke, VA 24020-1603
Tel: (540)362-6000
Free: 800-456-9595
Admissions: (540)362-6401
Fax: (540)362-6218
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hollins.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1842. Setting: 475-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $101.2 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $42,952. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $14,084 per student. Total enrollment: 1,123. Faculty: 109 (68 full-time, 41 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 686 applied, 86% were admitted. 19% from top 10% of their high school class, 55% from top quarter, 87% from top half. Full-time: 790 students, 99% women, 0.3% men. Part-time: 58 students, 93% women, 7% men. Students come from 46 states and territories, 9 other countries, 48% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 8% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 12% 25 or older, 79% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 79% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: English; visual and performing arts; social sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at member of the Seven-College Exchange Program. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 3 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 11/15 for early decision. Notification: continuous, 12/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $31,105 includes full-time tuition ($22,470), mandatory fees ($475), and college room and board ($8160). College room only: $4880. Part-time tuition: $702 per credit.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 45 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, SHARE (volunteer group), Religious Life Association, Student Athletic Association, campus political organizations. Major annual events: Literary Festival, Founders' Day, Tinker Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, emergency call boxes. 925 college housing spaces available; 637 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: women-only housing available. Wyndham Robertson Library plus 1 other with an OPAC and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $870,150. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

In this suburban area, the city of Roanoke is the business, cultural, and commercial center of Southwest Virginia. Air and bus transportation are available in Roanoke. Other community facilities of Roanoke are accessible to the students. There is also a symphony, opera company, ballet company, theatre company, art and science museums, and a farmers' market.

■ ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (CHANTILLY) O-3

14420 Abermarle Point Place, Ste. 100
Chantilly, VA 20151
Tel: (703)263-2541; 888-895-8324
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of ITT Educational Services, Inc. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 2002. Core.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview. Recommended: recommendations. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available.

■ ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (NORFOLK) J-15

863 Glenrock Rd., Ste. 100
Norfolk, VA 23502-3701
Tel: (757)466-1260
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of ITT Educational Services, Inc. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1988. Setting: 2-acre suburban campus. Core.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Recommended: recommendations. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. College housing not available.

■ ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (RICHMOND) H-12

300 Gateway Centre Parkway
Richmond, VA 23235
Tel: (804)330-4992
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of ITT Educational Services, Inc. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees. Core.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Recommended: recommendations. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available.

■ ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (SPRINGFIELD) Q-6

7300 Boston Blvd.
Springfield, VA 22153
Tel: (703)440-9535; (866)817-8324
Fax: (703)440-9561
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of ITT Educational Services, Inc. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 2002. Core.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Recommended: recommendations. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available.

■ J. SARGEANT REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE H-12

PO Box 85622
Richmond, VA 23285-5622 Tel: (804)371-3000
Admissions: (804)371-3029
Fax: (804)371-3650
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.reynolds.edu

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1972. Setting: 207-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $2.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2508 per student. Total enrollment: 11,678. Full-time: 2,871 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 8,807 students, 62% women, 38% men. 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 36% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.4% international. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at Rappahannock Community College, Southside Virginia Community College.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2282 full-time, $76.05 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6728 full-time, $224.25 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 20 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Student Nurses Association, SGA, Phi Beta Lambda. Major annual events: Semester Kick Off, Spring Fest, Graduation reception. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: security during open hours. College housing not available. Learning Resource Center plus 2 others with 80,736 books, 11,173 microform titles, 465 serials, 1,575 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.1 million. 1,069 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of Richmond.

■ JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY E-8

800 South Main St.
Harrisonburg, VA 22807
Tel: (540)568-6211
Admissions: (540)568-5681
Fax: (540)568-3332 E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.jmu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees (also offers specialist in education degree). Founded 1908. Setting: 605-acre small town campus. Endowment: $23.7 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $5.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5115 per student. Total enrollment: 16,938. Faculty: 1,164 (795 full-time, 369 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 16,388 applied, 68% were admitted. 28% from top 10% of their high school class, 74% from top quarter, 98% from top half. Full-time: 14,885 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 733 students, 49% women, 51% men. Students come from 47 states and territories, 47 other countries, 30% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 3% black, 5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 2% 25 or older, 39% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 91% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; health professions and related sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 1/15, 11/1 for early action. Notification: 4/1, 1/15 for early action. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $5886 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,322 full-time. College room and board: $6372. College room only: $3278. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 286 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 9% of eligible men and 11% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Ambassadors, sports clubs, service organizations, special interest groups. Major annual events: Homecoming, Parents' Weekend, Commencement. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, lighted pathways. 5,500 college housing spaces available; 5,474 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Option: coed housing available. Carrier Library plus 2 others with an OPAC and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $5.6 million. 600 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in the geographic center of Shenandoah Valley, Harrisonburg is an attractive city of 30,000 people. The Shenandoah National Park and the George Washington National Forest are here. All forms of commercial transportation are available. Community facilities include a number of churches, a library, hospital, and various civic and service organizations. Recreational facilities are available for camping, fishing, and picnicking. A snow skiing resort is also nearby.

■ JEFFERSON COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES I-6

PO Box 13186
Roanoke, VA 24031-3186
Tel: (540)985-8483; 888-985-8483
Admissions: (540)985-9083
Fax: (540)985-9773
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.jchs.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1982. Setting: 1-acre urban campus. Endowment: $3.8 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5912 per student. Total enrollment: 697. 303 applied, 35% were admitted. Full-time: 423 students, 73% women, 27% men. Part-time: 274 students, 87% women, 13% men. Students come from 7 states and territories, 7% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 11% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 56% 25 or older, 15% live on campus, 27% transferred in. Retention: 51% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: early decision. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA. Recommended: SAT. Required for some: recommendations, interview, volunteer experience, SAT or ACT, ACT ASSET. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 7/31, 10/15 for early decision. Notification: continuous until 7/31, 12/1 for early decision.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Student Nurse Association, Student Occupational Therapy Association, Student Physical Therapist Assistant Assembly, Crossroads. Major annual events: Health Care Futures, Orientation Picnic, Back to School Party. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 100 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. Learning Resource Center with 10,533 books, 16 microform titles, 376 serials, 1,071 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $218,456. 56 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ JOHN TYLER COMMUNITY COLLEGE I-12

13101 Jefferson Davis Hwy.
Chester, VA 23831-5316 Tel: (804)796-4000
Admissions: (804)796-4150
Fax: (804)796-4163
Web Site: http://www.jtcc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1967. Setting: 160-acre suburban campus with easy access to Richmond. Endowment: $399,044. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3226 per student. Total enrollment: 6,314. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 27:1. 470 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 1,607 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 4,707 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 38 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 25% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.05% international, 51% 25 or older, 14% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs. Off campus study. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Recommended: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to district residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1708 full-time, $71.15 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5264 full-time, $219.35 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $50 full-time, $25 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. John Tyler Community College Learning Resource and Technology Center with 49,393 books, 47,469 microform titles, 179 serials, 1,544 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $607,093. 465 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located 10 miles from Richmond, the state capital, and Petersburg.

■ LIBERTY UNIVERSITY I-8

1971 University Blvd. Lynchburg, VA 24502
Tel: (434)582-2000
Free: 800-543-5317
Admissions: (434)592-3015
Fax: (434)582-2304
Web Site: http://www.liberty.edu/

Description:

Independent nondenominational, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates (also offers external degree program with significant enrollment not reflected in profile). Founded 1971. Setting: 230-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $6.2 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $155,613. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2489 per student. Total enrollment: 12,458. Faculty: 501 (336 full-time, 165 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 27:1. 6,504 applied, 67% were admitted. 4% from top 10% of their high school class, 14% from top quarter, 41% from top half. 7 National Merit Scholars. Full-time: 8,427 students, 53% women, 47% men. Part-time: 1,548 students, 47% women, 53% men. Students come from 52 states and territories, 63 other countries, 64% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 10% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 29% 25 or older, 53% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 73% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: psychology; business/marketing; interdisciplinary studies. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA, recommendations. Required for some: recommendations, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: 6/30. Notification: continuous until 8/15.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $20,750 includes full-time tuition ($14,400), mandatory fees ($950), and college room and board ($5400). Part-time tuition: $480 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $425 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 32 open to all. Most popular organizations: College Republicans, Youthquest, Circle K. Major annual events: SuperConference, Homecoming, Block Party. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service, 24-hour emergency dispatch. 5,332 college housing spaces available; 4,645 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. A. Pierre Guillermin Integrated Learning Resource Center plus 1 other with 199,150 books, 558,483 microform titles, 12,426 serials, 5,856 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2 million. 406 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Lynchburg, with a population of 70,000, is in the heart of Virginia on the south bank of the historic James River, with the scenic Blue Ridge Mountains nearby. The city is over 200 years old and is noted for its culture, beauty and educational advantages. It is at the crossroads of U.S. highways 29 and 460 and has adequate transportation facilities by bus, railway and air.

■ LONGWOOD UNIVERSITY I-9

201 High St.
Farmville, VA 23909
Tel: (434)395-2000
Free: 800-281-4677
Admissions: (434)395-2060
Fax: (434)395-2332
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.longwood.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV). Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1839. Setting: 160-acre small town campus with easy access to Richmond. Endowment: $31.2 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $20,578. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3913 per student. Total enrollment: 4,289. 3,401 applied, 76% were admitted. 9% from top 10% of their high school class, 38% from top quarter, 85% from top half. Full-time: 3,604 students, 67% women, 33% men. Part-time: 135 students, 53% women, 47% men. Students come from 25 states and territories, 11 other countries, 10% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 6% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.5% international, 2% 25 or older, 67% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 80% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Hampden-Sydney College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.7 high school GPA. Required for some: recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 3/1, 12/1 for early action. Notification: continuous until 6/1, 1/1 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $3586 full-time, $150 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,270 full-time, $428 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $3434 full-time. College room and board: $5586. College room only: $3288. Room and board charges vary according to board plan.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 125 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 14% of eligible men and 19% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Alpha Phi Omega, Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship, Longwood Ambassadors, Wellness Advocates. Major annual events: Oktoberfest, Spring Weekend, Battle of the Bands. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, security lighting. 2,444 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, women-only housing available. The Janet D. Greenwood Library with 325,290 books, 720,205 microform titles, 5,018 serials, 18,771 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.9 million. 270 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Farmville is a small residential town. Bus transportation is available. Most major religious denominations are represented, and a community hospital is 5 blocks from campus. Nearby state parks provide swimming, boating, camping and hiking facilities.

■ LORD FAIRFAX COMMUNITY COLLEGE C-10

173 Skirmisher Ln.
Middletown, VA 22645
Tel: (540)868-7000
Free: 800-906-5322
Admissions: (540)868-7105
Fax: (540)868-7100
Web Site: http://www.lfcc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1969. Setting: 100-acre rural campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Total enrollment: 5,492. Full-time: 1,535 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 3,957 students, 63% women, 37% men. 2% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 5% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 49% 25 or older. Retention: 52% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: early admission. Recommended: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1740 full-time, $72.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5748 full-time, $235.35 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $117 full-time, $4.30 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group. Social organizations: 11 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Phi Beta Lambda, Performing Arts Club, Scientific Society, Ambassadors Club. Major annual events: Honors Convocation, Fall Activities Day, Spring Fling. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Learning Resources Center with 41,000 books, 300 serials, and an OPAC. 450 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The area is rural and does not offer public transportation. There is medium industry and seasonal employment in the apple industry.

■ LYNCHBURG COLLEGE I-8

1501 Lakeside Dr.
Lynchburg, VA 24501-3199
Tel: (434)544-8100
Free: 800-426-8101
Admissions: (434)544-8300
Fax: (434)544-8653
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.lynchburg.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1903. Setting: 214-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $70.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7747 per student. Total enrollment: 2,428. Faculty: 237 (142 full-time, 95 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 4,009 applied, 72% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 26% from top quarter, 72% from top half. Full-time: 1,924 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 125 students, 62% women, 38% men. Students come from 36 states and territories, 13 other countries, 36% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 8% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.4% international, 19% 25 or older, 81% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 74% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; communications/journalism; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at members of the Tri-College Consortium. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: Rolling, 11/15 for early decision. Notification: continuous, 12/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $30,645 includes full-time tuition ($23,700), mandatory fees ($545), and college room and board ($6400). College room only: $3200. Part-time tuition: $335 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 56 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 10% of eligible men and 11% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Association of Commuter Students, Omicron Delta Kappa, Ski and Snowboarding Club, Kappa Delta, Baptist Student Union. Major annual events: homecoming, Turkey Bowl, Sibs-n-Kids Weekend. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,496 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Option: coed housing available. Knight-Capron Library with 287,601 books, 12,909 microform titles, 636 serials, 9,360 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $711,329. 217 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Founded in 1786, Lynchburg is rich in history. It is a modern community with diversified industry in a traditional, handsome setting. Although it has a metropolitan area population of 150,000, Lynchburg maintains intimate contact with the countryside since it is very near the Blue Ridge Mountains and is in the center of perhaps the most historic of states. Washington, D.C., is less than 4 hours away, Williamsburg approximately 3, and Richmond about 2 1/2. The area provides excellent climate, convenient shopping, and many cultural opportunities. There is an active Lynchburg Fine Arts Center, and professional musical and theatrical groups visit. Some of the 7 colleges in the area also present fine arts programs.

■ MARY BALDWIN COLLEGE F-8

201 East Frederick St.
Staunton, VA 24401-3610
Tel: (540)887-7000
Free: 800-468-2262
Admissions: (540)887-7019
Fax: (540)886-6634
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.mbc.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1842. Setting: 54-acre small town campus. Endowment: $37.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8925 per student. Total enrollment: 1,740. Faculty: 134 (76 full-time, 58 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 1,307 applied, 75% were admitted. 14% from top 10% of their high school class, 29% from top quarter, 72% from top half. Full-time: 1,002 students, 96% women, 4% men. Part-time: 533 students, 83% women, 17% men. Students come from 36 states and territories, 5 other countries, 38% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 21% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 1% 25 or older, 81% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 65% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; psychology; business/marketing; visual and performing arts. Core. Calendar: 4-4-1. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, double major, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at members of the Seven-College Exchange Program. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: Rolling, 11/15 for early decision. Notification: continuous, 12/1 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $26,465 includes full-time tuition ($20,405), mandatory fees ($200), and college room and board ($5860). College room only: $3738. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $345 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to degree level.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 48 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Senate, Baldwin Program Board, President's Society, Black Student Alliance, Stars. Major annual events: Apple Day, Junior Dads Weekend, Christmas Cheer. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 760 college housing spaces available; 658 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: women-only housing available. Grafton Library with 140,466 books, 69,644 microform titles, 11,889 serials, 6,668 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $153,195. 227 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Staunton, one of the oldest cities west of the Blue Ridge Mountains, originated the city manager form of government. Annual snowfall here is 16 inches. All modes of commercial transportation are available. Community facilities include a public library, YMCA, hospital, many churches, shopping areas, and civic and service organizations. Recreational activities include golf, tennis, skiing, horseback riding, bowling, swimming, fishing, and hunting. Some of the points of interest are the birthplace of Woodrow Wilson, the Old Trinity Church, and American Frontier Museum. Opportunities for part-time work are available.

■ MARYMOUNT UNIVERSITY D-13

2807 North Glebe Rd.
Arlington, VA 22207-4299
Tel: (703)522-5600
Free: 800-548-7638
Admissions: (703)284-1500
Fax: (703)522-0349
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.marymount.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Roman Catholic Church. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees and post-master's certificates (Associate). Founded 1950. Setting: 21-acre suburban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Endowment: $20.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6247 per student. Total enrollment: 3,684. Faculty: 352 (134 full-time, 218 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 1,802 applied, 86% were admitted. 12% from top 10% of their high school class, 30% from top quarter, 72% from top half. Full-time: 1,871 students, 74% women, 26% men. Part-time: 456 students, 79% women, 21% men. Students come from 42 states and territories, 62 other countries, 43% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 11% Hispanic, 14% black, 9% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 7% international, 25% 25 or older, 30% live on campus, 14% transferred in. Retention: 73% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: visual and performing arts; business/marketing; psychology. Core. Calendar: semesters plus 2 summer terms. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: Rolling, Rolling for nonresidents. Notification: continuous, continuous for nonresidents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $25,934 includes full-time tuition ($17,970), mandatory fees ($144), and college room and board ($7820). Part-time tuition: $582 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $6 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 30 open to all. Most popular organizations: American Society of Interior Design, Student Nurses Association, Fashion Club, International Club, One 2 One (drama club). Major annual events: Portfolio in Motion, Snowball, International Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 670 college housing spaces available; 667 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Emerson C. Reinsch Library plus 1 other with 187,097 books, 315,786 microform titles, 1,048 serials, 908 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.3 million. 177 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in Arlington, Virginia, just minutes from Washington, DC, Marymount provides students with an easy access to the resources of the nation's capital, including the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the Smithsonian Institution, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and the Capitol. The University location offers both professional and scholarly opportunities for faculty; the opportunity to bring leaders from government, commerce, and the professions to the University campus; resources for instruction and research; internships placements for students; and employment opportunities for graduates.

■ MEDICAL CAREERS INSTITUTE (NEWPORT NEWS) J-14

1001 Omni Blvd., Ste. 200
Newport News, VA 23606
Tel: (757)873-2423
Fax: (757)873-2472
Web Site: http://www.medicalcareersinstitute.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Founded 1978. Calendar: semesters.

■ MEDICAL CAREERS INSTITUTE (RICHMOND) H-12

800 Moorefield Park Dr., Ste. 302
Richmond, VA 23236-3659
Tel: (804)521-0400
Fax: (804)521-0406
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.medicalcareersinstitute.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Calendar: semesters.

■ MEDICAL CAREERS INSTITUTE (VIRGINIA BEACH) J-15

5501 Greenwich Rd.
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
Tel: (757)497-8400
Web Site: http://www.medical.edu

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, and terminal associate degrees. Calendar: semesters.

■ MOUNTAIN EMPIRE COMMUNITY COLLEGE C-3

PO Drawer 700
Big Stone Gap, VA 24219-0700
Tel: (540)523-2400
Admissions: (276)523-2400
Web Site: http://www.me.vccs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1972. Setting: small town campus with easy access to Kingsport. Total enrollment: 2,885. 3 valedictorians. Students come from 3 states and territories, 1 other country, 1% from out-of-state, 30% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, respiratory care programs. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: minimum 2.0 high school GPA. Placement: ACT ASSET, ACT COMPASS required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to state residents.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group. Social organizations: 8 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Lambda Alpha Epsilon, MECC Group Artists, Phi Beta Lambda, Players on the Mountain. Major annual events: Spring Fest, Home Crafts Day, humanities series. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. College housing not available. Robb Hall with 21,600 books, 100 microform titles, 105 serials, 200 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. 400 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Big Stone Gap is a rural community in the southwest corner of Virginia, situated in the Cumberland Mountains. It has a population of 4,847. Many state parks and recreational areas are within an easy drive of the campus. Kingsport, Tennessee is approximately 30 miles south of the campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (BLUEFIELD) I-2

100 Logan St.
PO Box 629
Bluefield, VA 24605-1405
Tel: (276)326-3621
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (276)322-5731
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1886. Setting: small town campus. Total enrollment: 203. Core. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Recommended: interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. 35 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (CHARLOTTESVILLE) F-9

1819 Emmet St.
Charlottesville, VA 22901
Tel: (434)295-0136
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (434)986-1344
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards certificates, diplomas, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1975. Setting: small town campus with easy access to Richmond. Total enrollment: 163. Core. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Recommended: interview. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. 35 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (DANVILLE) K-7

734 Main St.
Danville, VA 24541-1819
Tel: (434)793-6822
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (434)793-3634
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1975. Setting: small town campus. Core. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Recommended: interview. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. 3,010 books and 12 serials. 35 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (HARRISONBURG) E-8

51 B Burgess Rd.
Harrisonburg, VA 22801-9709
Tel: (540)432-0943
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (540)986-1344
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1988. Setting: small town campus. Total enrollment: 233. Core. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Recommended: interview. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. 35 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (LYNCHBURG) I-8

104 Candlewood Ct.
Lynchburg, VA 24502-2653
Tel: (434)239-3500
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (434)986-1344
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1979. Setting: 2-acre small town campus. Total enrollment: 383. Students come from 15 other countries, 24% 25 or older. Core. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Recommended: interview. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. 10 serials. 35 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (MARTINSVILLE) K-6

10 Church St., PO Box 232
Martinsville, VA 24114
Tel: (276)632-5621
Free: 800-664-1866
Fax: (276)986-1344
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1975. Setting: small town campus. Total enrollment: 383. Core. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Recommended: interview. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. 35 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (SALEM) I-5

1813 East Main St.
Salem, VA 24153
Tel: (540)986-1800
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (540)986-1344
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, terminal associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1886. Setting: 3-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 756. 346 applied, 100% were admitted. Students come from 15 other countries, 24% from out-of-state. Retention: 70% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: Peterson's Universal Application. Required: high school transcript. Recommended: interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. Main library plus 1 other with 25,867 books and 40 serials. 35 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NEW RIVER COMMUNITY COLLEGE I-4

PO Box 1127
Dublin, VA 24084-1127
Tel: (540)674-3600
Fax: (540)674-3644
Web Site: http://www.nr.cc.va.us/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1969. Setting: 100-acre rural campus. Endowment: $1.9 million. Total enrollment: 4,345. Full-time: 2,008 students, 49% women, 51% men. Part-time: 2,337 students, 56% women, 44% men. Students come from 22 states and territories, 21 other countries, 3% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 5% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 40% 25 or older, 5% transferred in. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to local residents.

Collegiate Environment:

Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Phi Beta Lambda, Instrument Society of America, Human Service Organization, Sign Language Club. Major annual events: Fall Bash, Freaky Friday, Spring Fling. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. New River Community College Library with 33,993 books, 258 serials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $551,572. 120 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NORFOLK STATE UNIVERSITY J-15

700 Park Ave.
Norfolk, VA 23504
Tel: (757)823-8600
Admissions: (757)823-8396
Fax: (757)823-9435
Web Site: http://www.nsu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1935. Setting: 134-acre urban campus. Endowment: $4.8 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $5.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5082 per student. Total enrollment: 6,096. Faculty: 386 (280 full-time, 106 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 21:1. 4,696 applied, 71% were admitted. 5% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 56% from top half. Full-time: 4,420 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 917 students, 66% women, 34% men. Students come from 43 states and territories, 38 other countries, 27% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 89% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 23% 25 or older, 32% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 65% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: interdisciplinary studies; business/marketing; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Old Dominion University, Virginia Wesleyan College, Christopher Newport University, Tidewater Community College, Paul D. Camp Community College, Eastern Shore Community College, Thomas Nelson Community College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.3 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, minimum SAT score of 800 or ACT score of 17, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 5/31.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $4670 full-time, $204 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $14,480 full-time, $531 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $125 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $6474. College room only: $4110.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 112 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 30% of eligible men and 30% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Phi Psi, Sigma Gamma Rho. Major annual events: Martin Luther King Commemorative Activity, Black History Month activities, Homecoming events. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, campus call boxes. 1,944 college housing spaces available; 1,893 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Lymon Beecher Brooks Library with 378,323 books, 18,919 microform titles, 124,460 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.8 million. 512 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Old Dominion University.

■ NORTHERN VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE P-6

4001 Wakefield Chapel Rd.
Annandale, VA 22003-3796
Tel: (703)323-3000
Admissions: (703)323-3195
Web Site: http://www.nv.cc.va.us/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1965. Setting: 435-acre suburban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Endowment: $1.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2301 per student. Total enrollment: 39,353. 2% from out-of-state, 2% Native American, 10% Hispanic, 15% black, 12% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 57% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for veterinary technology, dental hygiene, other health-related programs. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 65 open to all. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, campus police. College housing not available. 228,009 books, 132,449 microform titles, 1,949 serials, 12,227 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.3 million. 2,000 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Northern Virginia Community College is a five campus college located in the suburban communities of Northern Virginia, just outside Washington, D.C. The Northern Virginia region is rapidly growing, provides excellent job opportunities and has high quality public schools and community services. Part-time job opportunities are excellent for students and graduates of the occupational and technical programs and career placements attractive. Students seeking transfer to a university to earn a Bachelor's degree can enroll in appropriate programs that parallel most university programs.

■ OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY J-15

5215 Hampton Blvd.
Norfolk, VA 23529
Tel: (757)683-3000
Free: 800-348-7926
Admissions: (757)683-3648
Fax: (757)683-5357
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.odu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1930. Setting: 188-acre urban campus with easy access to Virginia Beach. Endowment: $138.9 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $34.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5996 per student. Total enrollment: 21,274. Faculty: 900 (617 full-time, 283 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 7,067 applied, 69% were admitted. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 44% from top quarter, 88% from top half. 20 valedictorians. Full-time: 10,828 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 4,447 students, 60% women, 40% men. Students come from 37 states and territories, 79 other countries, 8% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 23% black, 6% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 29% 25 or older, 24% live on campus, 10% transferred in. Retention: 77% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; health professions and related sciences; English. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at 6 members of the Virginia Tidewater Consortium for Continuing Higher Education, Academic Common Market. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.7 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Application deadlines: 3/15, 12/15 for early action. Notification: continuous, 1/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $5430 full-time, $181 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,394 full-time, $507 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $181 full-time, $39 per term part-time. College room and board: $6292. College room only: $3442.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 220 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 4% of eligible men and 3% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Black Student Alliance, Council of International Student Organizations, Student Activities Council, Filipino-American Student Association. Major annual events: Mainstreet, Homecoming, Monarch Spring Fest. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center, career, veteran's, and financial aid counseling, campus ministries. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. College housing designed to accommodate 2,380 students; 3,167 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. Douglas and Patricia Perry Library plus 3 others with 985,801 books, 1.8 million microform titles, 10,579 serials, 40,628 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $6 million. 800 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Virginia Wesleyan College.

■ PARKS COLLEGE D-13

801 North Quincy St., Ste. 501
Arlington, VA 22203
Tel: (703)248-8887
Fax: (703)351-2202
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.parks-college.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates and terminal associate degrees. Founded 2001. Setting: urban campus. 0% Native American, 7% Hispanic, 75% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international.

■ PATRICK HENRY COLLEGE C-11

One Patrick Henry Circle
Purcellville, VA 20132
Tel: (540)338-1776
Fax: (540)338-8707
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.phc.edu/

Description:

Independent nondenominational, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1999. Setting: 106-acre small town campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Total enrollment: 348. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 3 National Merit Scholars, 1 valedictorian. Full-time: 325 students, 50% women, 50% men. Part-time: 23 students, 57% women, 43% men. Students come from 43 states and territories, 88% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 0% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 2% 25 or older, 94% live on campus, 0.3% transferred in. Retention: 85% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Calendar: semesters.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: essay, high school transcript, 2 recommendations, interview, SAT or ACT. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadline: 4/1. Notification: 5/1.

Costs Per Year:

Comprehensive fee: $21,730 includes full-time tuition ($16,000) and college room and board ($5730).

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 13 open to all. Most popular organizations: student government, intramural athletics, debate, intercollegiate soccer, drama troupe. Major annual events: Town Hall, drama presentations, Serve America. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, after hours patrols by trained security personnel. 312 college housing spaces available; 230 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available.

■ PATRICK HENRY COMMUNITY COLLEGE K-6

PO Box 5311
Martinsville, VA 24115-5311
Tel: (276)638-8777
Admissions: (276)656-0315
Fax: (276)656-0247
Web Site: http://www.ph.vccs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards transfer associate and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1962. Setting: 137-acre rural campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2723 per student. Total enrollment: 3,456. Students come from 3 states and territories, 58% 25 or older. Retention: 48% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT ASSET required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to district residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1632 full-time, $68 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5136 full-time, $214 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $81 full-time, $3.15 per credit hour part-time, $5 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Student Support Services, Phi Theta Kappa, Gospel Choir, Black Student Association. Major annual events: Fall Festival, Spring Play Day, Awards Banquet. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Lester Library with 26,160 books, 259 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $84,738. 505 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Martinsville is an important textile and furniture market as well as an industrial city with a wide range of products. It provides all forms of commercial transportation. Job opportunities are excellent and shopping is good. Philpott Reservoir, about 19 miles northwest of Martinsville, is a popular spot for fishing, boating, water skiing, and swimming. Other facilities within the city provide for swimming, baseball, and football.

■ PAUL D. CAMP COMMUNITY COLLEGE K-13

PO Box 737, 100 North College Dr.
Franklin, VA 23851-0737
Tel: (757)569-6700
Admissions: (757)569-6725
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.pc.vccs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1971. Setting: 99-acre small town campus. Endowment: $16,121. Total enrollment: 1,636. 410 applied, 100% were admitted. 5% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 45% from top half. Full-time: 391 students, 68% women, 32% men. Part-time: 1,245 students, 65% women, 35% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 2 other countries, 1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 41% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.1% international, 55% 25 or older, 3% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at members of the Virginia Consortium for Continuing Higher Education.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT COMPASS required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to state residents.

Collegiate Environment:

Student-run newspaper. Most popular organizations: African-American History Club, Phi Beta Lambda, Phi Theta Kappa, Student Government Association. Major annual events: Fall Festival, Christmas Parade, Spring Fling. Campus security: security staff until 7 p.m. College housing not available. Paul D. Camp Community College Library with 22,000 books, 200 serials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $258,883. 90 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Franklin is in a rural setting with a population of 96,000 in the area.

■ PIEDMONT VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE F-9

501 College Dr.
Charlottesville, VA 22902-7589
Tel: (434)977-3900
Admissions: (434)961-5400
Fax: (434)971-8232
Web Site: http://www.pvcc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1972. Setting: 114-acre suburban campus with easy access to Richmond. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2990 per student. Total enrollment: 4,163. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. Full-time: 1,079 students, 51% women, 49% men. Part-time: 3,084 students, 62% women, 38% men. Students come from 12 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 13% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.4% international, 44% 25 or older, 48% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission. Required for some: high school transcript, for nursing program: completion of any developmental studies; grade 'C' or better in high school or college developmental chemistry course; high school diploma/GED; and completion of nursing program application.. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2175 full-time, $72.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7126 full-time, $237.55 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $159 full-time, $5.30 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 10 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Black Student Alliance, Science Club, Masquers, Christian Fellowship Club. Major annual events: plays and concerts, fall/spring picnics. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. Jessup Library with 72,574 books, 25,713 microform titles, 209 serials, 10,254 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $251,877. 60 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Charlottesville is situated in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The area has many old homes and estates. Albemarle County is renown for its horses, dogs and fruit orchards. Outdoor activities available include: golf, tennis, hunting, fishing and hiking. Points of interest are the Lewis and Clark Memorial, Monticello, and the University of Virginia. Commercial transportation and part-time employment are available.

■ RADFORD UNIVERSITY I-4

PO Box 6890, RU Station
Radford, VA 24142
Tel: (540)831-5000
Free: 800-890-4265
Admissions: (540)831-5371
Fax: (540)831-5138
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.radford.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1910. Setting: 177-acre small town campus. Endowment: $41.7 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $220,767. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5501 per student. Total enrollment: 9,552. Faculty: 570 (377 full-time, 193 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. 5,792 applied, 81% were admitted. 4% from top 10% of their high school class, 22% from top quarter, 69% from top half. Full-time: 8,028 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 454 students, 61% women, 39% men. Students come from 39 states and territories, 43 other countries, 8% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 6% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 6% 25 or older, 39% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 79% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; interdisciplinary studies; security and protective services. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Virginia Western Community College, Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center, Roanoke Higher Education Center. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 2/1, 12/15 for early action. Notification: 3/20, 1/9 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $3235 full-time, $214 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,473 full-time, $515 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1895 full-time, $78.90 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $6120. College room only: $3300. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 159 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 6% of eligible men and 8% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Student Education Association, International Club, Ski Club, Student Life Committee. Major annual events: Club Fair, Family Weekend, Highlander Homecoming. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 3,360 college housing spaces available; 3,081 were occupied in 2003-04. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Option: coed housing available. McConnell Library plus 1 other with 395,643 books, 1.5 million microform titles, 4,162 serials, 15,656 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.9 million. 500 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located on the banks of the scenic New River in the foothills of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains, the city of Radford, Virginia (population 16,000), is 45 miles southwest of Roanoke. First settled in 1756, the city features a number of churches, a public library, hospital, and many civic and service organizations. The city is clean and the weather is moderate. Outdoor sports enthusiasts can enjoy nearby Claytor Lake, the New River, the Appalachian Trail and many other streams, lakes and trails in close proximity.

■ RANDOLPH-MACON COLLEGE G-12

PO Box 5005
Ashland, VA 23005-5505
Tel: (804)752-7200
Free: 800-888-1762
Admissions: (804)752-7305
Fax: (804)752-4707
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.rmc.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1830. Setting: 110-acre suburban campus with easy access to Richmond. Endowment: $102.3 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $245,333. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $9291 per student. Total enrollment: 1,125. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 1,727 applied, 79% were admitted. 20% from top 10% of their high school class, 43% from top quarter, 82% from top half. 7 class presidents, 1 valedictorian, 57 student government officers. Full-time: 1,102 students, 51% women, 49% men. Part-time: 23 students, 61% women, 39% men. Students come from 30 states and territories, 17 other countries, 32% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 7% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 0% 25 or older, 84% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 76% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; business/marketing; psychology. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships. Off campus study at members of the Seven-College Exchange Program. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview, SAT Subject Tests. Placement: SAT Subject Tests recommended. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 3/1, 11/15 for early decision, 12/1 for early action. Notification: 4/1, 12/1 for early decision, 1/1 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $31,250 includes full-time tuition ($23,310), mandatory fees ($635), and college room and board ($7305). College room only: $4000. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $863 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 76 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 33% of eligible men and 33% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Macon Outdoors Club, Campus Activities Board/Student Government Association, Drama Guild, intramural sports, Student Honors Association. Major annual events: Dance Marathon, football game against Hampden-Sydney College, Springfest. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 950 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. McGraw-Page Library with 182,368 books, 209,300 microform titles, 1,455 serials, 5,116 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $733,347. 350 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Ashland is a suburban area 15 miles from Richmond, and 90 miles south of Washington DC. Community facilities include a public library, six churches, 2 medical centers, and a number of civic and service organizations.

■ RANDOLPH-MACON WOMAN'S COLLEGE I-8

2500 Rivermont Ave.
Lynchburg, VA 24503-1526
Tel: (434)947-8000
Free: 800-745-7692
Admissions: (434)947-8100
Fax: (434)947-8996
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.rmwc.edu/

Description:

Independent Methodist, 4-year, women only. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1891. Setting: 100-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $133.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $12,867 per student. Total enrollment: 712. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 9:1. 774 applied, 87% were admitted. 36% from top 10% of their high school class, 70% from top quarter, 93% from top half. 2 National Merit Scholars, 3 class presidents, 10 valedictorians, 40 student government officers. Full-time: 685 students. Part-time: 27 students. Students come from 46 states and territories, 39 other countries, 61% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 9% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 10% international, 8% 25 or older, 89% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 78% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; biological/life sciences; visual and performing arts. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at members of the Tri-College Consortium, Seven-College Exchange Program, American University Washington Semester Programs, Woods Hole, Marine Biological Laboratory Consortium. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 3/1, 11/15 for early decision. Notification: 10/1, 12/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $31,540 includes full-time tuition ($22,550), mandatory fees ($380), and college room and board ($8610). Part-time tuition: $940 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $45 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 41 open to all. Most popular organizations: Pan World Club, Macon Activities Council, Model United Nations, BIONIC (Believe It or Not, I Care volunteer organization), Black Woman's Alliance. Major annual events: Tacky Party/Never Ending Weekend, Pumpkin Parade, Ring Night. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 700 college housing spaces available; 633 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: women-only housing available. Lipscomb Library with 197,332 books, 187,000 microform titles, 618 serials, 3,600 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $692,589. 154 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ RAPPAHANNOCK COMMUNITY COLLEGE

12745 College Dr.
Glenns, VA 23149-2616
Tel: (804)758-6700
Admissions: (804)758-6742
Fax: (804)758-3852
Web Site: http://www.rcc.vccs.edu/

Description:

State-related, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1970. Setting: 217-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 2,824. Students come from 1 other country, 0.5% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 18% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 36% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: early admission. Placement: CPT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 21 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Culture Club, Poetry Club, student government. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. The College Library with 46,000 books, 85 serials, and an OPAC. 195 computers available on campus for general student use.

Community Environment:

Glenns is centrally located in the Rappahannock River Tidewaters serving a 13-county region.

■ REGENT UNIVERSITY J-15

1000 Regent University Dr.
Virginia Beach, VA 23464-9800
Tel: (757)226-4000
Free: 800-373-5504
Admissions: (757)226-4826
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.regent.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1977. Endowment: $267.6 million. Total enrollment: 3,919. Faculty: 99 (10 full-time, 89 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. 1,416 applied. Full-time: 490 students, 69% women, 31% men. Part-time: 444 students, 66% women, 34% men. 45% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 25% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international. Calendar: trimesters.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: essay. Required for some: high school transcript, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, SAT, ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. Tuition: $11,850 full-time, $375 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Student services: personal-psychological counseling. 49 college housing spaces available; 10 were occupied in 2003-04.

■ RICHARD BLAND COLLEGE OF THE COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARY I-12

11301 Johnson Rd.
Petersburg, VA 23805-7100
Tel: (804)862-6100
Admissions: (804)862-6225
Fax: (804)862-6189
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.rbc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of College of William and Mary. Awards transfer associate degrees. Founded 1961. Setting: 712-acre rural campus with easy access to Richmond. Total enrollment: 1,437. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 23:1. 528 applied, 88% were admitted. 6% from top 10% of their high school class, 27% from top quarter, 63% from top half. Full-time: 814 students, 62% women, 38% men. Part-time: 623 students, 72% women, 28% men. Students come from 8 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 19% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 18% 25 or older, 7% transferred in. Retention: 61% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Option: Peterson's Universal Application. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, In-State Residency Form, ACT COMPASS. Recommended: SAT or ACT. Required for some: recommendations, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/15. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. State resident tuition: $2350 full-time, $91 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $9608 full-time, $398 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $170 full-time, $4 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and location. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and location.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 13 open to all; local fraternities. Most popular organizations: RBC Newspaper, Multicultural Alliance, student government, Spanish Club, Biology Club. Major annual events: Spring Fling, Fall Orientation, International Forum. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. Richard Bland College Library with 91,000 books, 33,000 microform titles, 9,000 serials, 2,400 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $319,682. 128 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ROANOKE COLLEGE I-5

221 College Ln.
Salem, VA 24153-3794
Tel: (540)375-2500
Free: 800-388-2276
Admissions: (540)375-2270
Fax: (540)375-2267
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.roanoke.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1842. Setting: 68-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $102 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $279,847. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8785 per student. Total enrollment: 1,936. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 3,016 applied, 74% were admitted. 23% from top 10% of their high school class, 50% from top quarter, 85% from top half. 7 class presidents, 9 valedictorians, 75 student government officers. Full-time: 1,833 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 103 students, 51% women, 49% men. Students come from 40 states and territories, 25 other countries, 41% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 4% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 5% 25 or older, 60% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 85% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; English. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at Hollins College. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, 3 recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 3/15. Notification: 4/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $30,748 includes full-time tuition ($22,848), mandatory fees ($605), and college room and board ($7295). College room only: $3526. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $1084 per course.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 84 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities. Most popular organizations: Outdoor Adventures, Habitat for Humanity, Honors Association, Campus Activities Board, Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. Major annual events: Founders' Ball, Alumni Weekend, Winterfest. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,150 college housing spaces available; 1,106 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Fintel Library plus 1 other with 134,035 books, 307,716 microform titles, 719 serials, 7,635 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $987,663. 170 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Salem is located in the heart of the Roanoke Valley between the Blue Ridge Mountains to the east, and the Allegheny Mountains to the west. Many national manufacturing companies contribute to the diversified industry of Salem. Plane and bus transportation are available. Part-time employment opportunities are excellent. The Dixie Caverns subterranean wonderland is seven miles away. State parks, the Blue Ridge Parkway & the Appalachian Trail provide outdoor activities, and facilities within the city provide for tennis, skating, and golf.

■ SAINT PAUL'S COLLEGE K-11

115 College Dr.
Lawrenceville, VA 23868-1202
Tel: (434)848-3111
Free: 800-678-7071
Admissions: (434)848-6493
Fax: (434)848-0403
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.saintpauls.edu/

Description:

Independent Episcopal, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1888. Setting: 75-acre small town campus with easy access to Richmond. Total enrollment: 531. 408 applied, 88% were admitted. Students come from 12 states and territories, 0% Native American, 0% Hispanic, 97% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 1% 25 or older. Retention: 57% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, 1 recommendation. Recommended: essay, interview. Placement: SAT or ACT required. Entrance: minimally difficult. Notification: continuous until 8/15.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 28 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 2% of eligible men and 2% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Dance Troupe, Literary Society, College Choir, Drama Club. Major annual events: Homecoming, Founders' Day Celebration, MLK Celebration. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, alarms on doors. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. 100,000 books and 275 serials. 34 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SHENANDOAH UNIVERSITY C-10

1460 University Dr.
Winchester, VA 22601-5195
Tel: (540)665-4500
Free: 800-432-2266
Admissions: (540)665-4581
Fax: (540)665-4627
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.su.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1875. Setting: 100-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $44.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $10,452 per student. Total enrollment: 2,998. Faculty: 351 (181 full-time, 170 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 9:1. 1,479 applied, 70% were admitted. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 37% from top quarter, 68% from top half. Full-time: 1,530 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 76 students, 62% women, 38% men. Students come from 33 states and territories, 25 other countries, 45% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 0.4% Hispanic, 2% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 16% 25 or older, 44% live on campus, 14% transferred in. Retention: 75% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: visual and performing arts; business/marketing; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.4 high school GPA. Required for some: essay, interview, audition. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $27,600 includes full-time tuition ($19,900), mandatory fees ($150), and college room and board ($7550). Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $610 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 50 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 2% of eligible men and 1% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Harambee Singers, Alpha Psi Omega, Phi Mu Alpha, Student Government Association, Inter-Varsity Student Council. Major annual events: homecoming, Spring Fling Weekend, Sun Block Party. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, side door alarms, guard gate house, bike patrols. 674 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: coed housing available. Alson H. Smith Jr. Library plus 1 other with 126,097 books, 134,500 microform titles, 1,340 serials, 18,299 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.1 million. 175 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Winchester/Frederick County, a community of approximately 70,000 persons, is located 72 miles from Washington, D.C. near the northern end of the historic Shenandoah Valley. Winchester was founded in 1732 and played an important part in the French and Indian War and the Civil War. Bus transportation is available. Community facilities include a public library, museums, churches of major denominations, a medical center, excellent shopping areas, and a number of various civic and service organizations. Winchester is the host to the Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival. George Washington began his career in Winchester in 1748 as surveyor to Lord Fairfax. Some of the historical points of interest are Abram's Delight (the Hollingsworth Home), Sheridan's Headquarters, "Stonewall" Jackson's Headquarters, Glen Burnie (home of James Wood), and Washington's Office.

■ SOUTHERN VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY G-7

One College Hill Dr.
Buena Vista, VA 24416
Tel: (540)261-8400
Free: 800-229-8420
Admissions: (540)261-2756
Fax: (540)261-8559
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.southernvirginia.edu/

Description:

Independent Latter-day Saints, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1867. Setting: 155-acre small town campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4954 per student. Total enrollment: 685. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 2,098 applied, 41% were admitted. 5% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 45% from top half. Full-time: 648 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 37 students, 49% women, 51% men. Students come from 12 other countries, 81% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 3% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 4% 25 or older, 85% live on campus, 13% transferred in. Retention: 37% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; parks and recreation; visual and performing arts. Core. Calendar: semesters. Summer session for credit, co-op programs. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Option: Common Application. Required: high school transcript, ecclesiastical endorsement, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA. Required for some: essay, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 7/31, 7/31 for nonresidents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $20,126 includes full-time tuition ($15,826) and college room and board ($4300). College room only: $2800. Part-time tuition: $525 per hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations:; 45% of eligible men and 55% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student association, LDS Institute of Religion. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. 400 college housing spaces available. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Von Canon Library with 107,630 books, 37,000 serials, 4,350 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC.

■ SOUTHSIDE VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

109 Campus Dr.
Alberta, VA 23821-9719
Tel: (804)949-1000
Admissions: (434)949-1012
Fax: (804)949-7863
Web Site: http://www.sv.vccs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1970. Setting: 207-acre rural campus. Endowment: $527,455. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3767 per student. Total enrollment: 4,686. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. Full-time: 1,359 students, 66% women, 34% men. Part-time: 3,327 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 3 states and territories, 2 other countries, 1% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 46% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.04% international, 46% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program. Off campus study at Hampden-Sydney College, Saint Paul's College, Longwood College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to district residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2040 full-time, $68 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6420 full-time, $214 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $155 full-time, $5.15 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group. Most popular organizations: Student Forum, Phi Theta Kappa, Phi Beta Lambda, Alpha Delta Omega. Major annual events: women's festivals, cultural events, Kwanza celebration. College housing not available. Julian M. Howell Library plus 1 other with 27,691 books, 164 serials, 1,307 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $260,114. 200 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Hampden-Sydney College.

■ SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE B-5

PO Box SVCC
Richlands, VA 24641-1101
Tel: (276)964-2555
Admissions: (276)964-7300
Fax: (276)964-9307
Web Site: http://www.sw.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 100-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 3,666. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 14% from top 10% of their high school class. Full-time: 1,514 students, 63% women, 37% men. Part-time: 2,152 students, 57% women, 43% men. Students come from 6 other countries, 0.1% Native American, 0.2% Hispanic, 2% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 57% 25 or older, 4% transferred in. Retention: 91% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for allied health, engineering programs. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Preference given to district residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1904 full-time, $68 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5992 full-time, $214 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $130 full-time, $4.65 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Most popular organizations: PTK, PBL, Intervoice, Black Student Union, Service Club. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols. College housing not available. 58,000 books, 225 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 150 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Richlands is a rural community in the Appalachian Mountain region. Bus and plane transportation are available. The main industries of the area are agriculture, mining, and manufacturing.

■ STRATFORD UNIVERSITY O-6

7777 Leesburg Pike, Ste. 100 South
Falls Church, VA 22043
Tel: (703)821-8570
Free: 800-444-0804
Fax: (703)556-9892
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.stratford.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1976. Setting: suburban campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8379 per student. Total enrollment: 486. Faculty: 61 (20 full-time, 41 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. Full-time: 189 students, 42% women, 58% men. Part-time: 256 students, 52% women, 48% men. Students come from 9 states and territories, 40% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 9% Hispanic, 43% black, 9% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 61% 25 or older, 7% transferred in. Retention: 73% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; personal and culinary services; computer and information sciences. Core. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early decision. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, interview. Recommended: SAT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadlines: 7/30, 4/29 for early decision. Notification: continuous until 8/6, 6/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $15,750 includes full-time tuition ($10,260), mandatory fees ($50), and college room and board ($5440). Part-time tuition: $285 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Stratford University Library with 1,800 books, 75 serials, and 283 audiovisual materials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $58,630. 7 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SWEET BRIAR COLLEGE

Sweet Briar, VA 24595
Tel: (434)381-6100
Free: 800-381-6142
Admissions: (434)381-6142
Fax: (434)381-6173
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.sbc.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, women only. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1901. Setting: 3,250-acre rural campus. Endowment: $91.8 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $576,625. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $17,254 per student. Total enrollment: 752. Faculty: 99 (64 full-time, 35 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 8:1. 623 applied, 79% were admitted. 25% from top 10% of their high school class, 64% from top quarter, 94% from top half. 3 class presidents, 1 valedictorian, 7 student government officers. Full-time: 703 students. Part-time: 36 students. Students come from 44 states and territories, 14 other countries, 54% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 3% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 4% 25 or older, 90% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 75% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; psychology; visual and performing arts. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at Seven-College Exchange Program, Tri-College Exchange Program, American University. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview, SAT Subject Tests. Required for some: portfolio with courses taken, list of texts covered, essay about homeschooling, campus visit, interview for homeschooled applicants. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 2/1, 12/1 for early decision. Notification: 3/1, 12/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $32,820 includes full-time tuition ($23,340) and college room and board ($9480). College room only: $3810. Part-time tuition: $775 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 43 open to all. Most popular organizations: WNRS radio station, American Chemical Society, cheerleading, Sweet Tones, Student Government Association/Campus Events Organization. Major annual events: Fall Weekend, Singer/Songwriter Festival, Parents' Weekend. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, front gate security. 551 college housing spaces available; 498 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: women-only housing available. Mary Helen Cochran Library plus 3 others with 255,175 books, 450,838 microform titles, 12,464 serials, 10,826 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1 million. 117 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Sweet Briar is located on U.S. 29, 165 miles southwest of Washington, D.C., 50 miles south of Charlottesville, VA., and 100 miles west of Richmond. The nearest shopping area is in the town of Amherst, two miles north of Sweet Briar. Lynchburg, home of three other colleges, is 12 miles south of Sweet Briar. The Blue Ridge Mountains, visible a few miles to the west, offer numerous recreational possibilities, including the ski slopes at Wintergreen.

■ TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY D-13

6315 Bren Mar Dr.
Alexandria, VA 22312-6342
Tel: (703)354-1005
Free: 800-48-TESST
Admissions: (703)548-4800
Fax: (703)354-3661
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Founded 1986.

■ THOMAS NELSON COMMUNITY COLLEGE J-15

PO Box 9407
Hampton, VA 23670-0407
Tel: (757)825-2700
Admissions: (757)825-2800
Web Site: http://www.tncc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 85-acre suburban campus with easy access to Virginia Beach. Total enrollment: 8,595. Full-time: 2,658 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 5,937 students, 59% women, 41% men. 1% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 34% black, 4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.05% international. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Hampton University, Old Dominion University, Christopher Newport University.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2175 full-time, $72.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7061 full-time, $235.35 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $116 full-time, $3.15 per credit hour part-time, $10.50 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 19 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Future Nurses Association, Human Services Education Club, Student Government Association, Health Care Advocates. Major annual events: Fall Festival, Spring Fest, Literature Circles. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. Learning Resource Center with 66,281 books and 467 serials. 80 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Hampton University.

■ TIDEWATER COMMUNITY COLLEGE J-15

121 College Place
Norfolk, VA 23510
Tel: (757)822-1122
Admissions: (757)822-1068
Fax: (757)822-1060
Web Site: http://www.tcc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 520-acre suburban campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3674 per student. Total enrollment: 23,718. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. Students come from 53 states and territories, 12% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 32% black, 5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 53% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at members of the Virginia Tidewater Consortium for Continuing Higher Education.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1944 full-time, $72.50 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5,905 full-time, $246.05 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $8.50 per credit part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. 147,126 books and 913 serials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $535,000.

Community Environment:

A metropolitan area, Tidewater is located on the Chesapeake Bay, and has been a strategic military location in this country's conflicts because of its shipbuilding and ship repair. All forms of commercial transportation are available. Recreational activities are numerous, all water sports are enjoyed on nearby beaches. There is excellent hunting and fishing in the area also. Part-time employment opportunities are limited.

■ TIDEWATER TECH J-15

2697 Dean Dr., Ste. 100
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
Tel: (757)340-2121
Fax: (757)340-9704
Web Site: http://www.tidetech.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Founded 1969.

■ UNIVERSITY OF MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY D-13

1901 North Fort Myers Dr.
Arlington, VA 22209
Tel: (703)516-0035
Fax: (703)516-0985
Web Site: http://www.umtweb.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1998. Setting: urban campus with easy access to Washington, D.C.. 0% from out-of-state. Calendar: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Tuition: $10,800 full-time, $390 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $90 full-time, $30 per term part-time. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment.

Collegiate Environment:

College housing not available.

■ UNIVERSITY OF MARY WASHINGTON F-12

1301 College Ave.
Fredericksburg, VA 22401-5358
Tel: (540)654-1000
Free: 800-468-5614
Admissions: (540)654-2000
Fax: (540)654-1073
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.umw.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1908. Setting: 176-acre small town campus with easy access to Richmond and Washington, DC. Endowment: $25.3 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $279,049. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5095 per student. Total enrollment: 4,734. Faculty: 338 (231 full-time, 107 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 4,635 applied, 64% were admitted. 38% from top 10% of their high school class, 83% from top quarter, 97% from top half. 1 National Merit Scholar, 150 class presidents, 7 valedictorians, 350 student government officers. Full-time: 3,519 students, 66% women, 34% men. Part-time: 566 students, 66% women, 34% men. Students come from 44 states and territories, 15 other countries, 35% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 4% black, 4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.3% international, 11% 25 or older, 70% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 85% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; business/marketing; English. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadline: 2/1. Notification: 4/1. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $5634 full-time, $199 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $14,776 full-time, $579 per credit part-time. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. College room and board: $6002. College room only: $3484. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 96 open to all. Most popular organizations: Community Outreach, debate team, Washington Guides, Trek Club, entertainment committee. Major annual events: Fall Homecoming, Junior Ring Week, Multicultural International Festival. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, self-defense and safety classes. 2,500 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Simpson Library with 355,478 books, 559,809 microform titles, 2,419 serials, 1,079 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.9 million. 244 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Fredericksburg is located an hour south of Washington, DC and an hour north of Richmond, in one of the fastest growing regions in the state. One of the most historic cities in the country, Fredericksburg was the childhood home of George Washington and was the site of several major battles of the Civil War. Today the surrounding metropolitan population reaches upwards of 150,000 people yet still maintains the charm of a small town. The 40-block Historic District is located within easy walking distance of the campus and includes fine shopping, restaurants, movie theaters as well as historic attractions. Located on I-95, Fredericksburg offers access to both Washington and Richmond by Amtrak, various bus lines, and transportation service to National Airport in Washington and Richmond International. Fredericksburg is on the regularly scheduled commuter rail to Washington.

■ UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA

10021 Balls Ford Rd.
Manassas, VA 20109
Tel: (703)392-0771
Fax: (703)392-6368
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.unva.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1998.

■ UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-NORTHERN VIRGINIA CAMPUS C-12

11730 Plaza American Dr., Ste. 2000
Reston, VA 20190
Tel: (703)435-4402
Free: 800-228-7240
Admissions: (480)557-1712
Web Site: http://www.phoenix.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Total enrollment: 1,377. Faculty: 154 (5 full-time, 149 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 7:1. 53 applied. Full-time: 1,020 students, 50% women, 50% men. 0.3% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 9% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 11% international, 94% 25 or older. Core. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, graduate courses open to undergrads.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: 1 recommendation. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $110. Tuition: $11,805 full-time, $393.50 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time, $70 per course part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

College housing not available. University Library with 444 books, 666 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. System-wide operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.2 million.

■ UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-RICHMOND CAMPUS H-12

6802 Paragon Place, Ste. 420
Richmond, VA 23230
Tel: (804)288-3390
Free: 800-228-7240
Admissions: (480)557-1712
Web Site: http://www.phoenix.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Total enrollment: 383. Faculty: 38 (4 full-time, 34 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 7:1. 45 applied. Full-time: 301 students, 66% women, 34% men. 0% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 0% Hispanic, 2% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international. Academic area with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing. Core. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, graduate courses open to undergrads.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: 1 recommendation. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $110. Tuition: $11,370 full-time, $379 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time, $70 per course part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

University Library with 444 books, 666 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. System-wide operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.2 million.

■ UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND

28 Westhampton Way
University of Richmond, VA 23173
Tel: (804)289-8000
Free: 800-700-1662
Admissions: (804)289-8640
Fax: (804)287-6003
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.richmond.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and first professional degrees. Founded 1830. Setting: 350-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $1.2 billion. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $21,282 per student. Total enrollment: 3,685. Faculty: 320 (262 full-time, 58 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 5,778 applied, 47% were admitted. 58% from top 10% of their high school class, 88% from top quarter, 98% from top half. 101 National Merit Scholars, 81 class presidents, 9 valedictorians, 217 student government officers. Full-time: 2,881 students, 51% women, 49% men. Part-time: 39 students, 41% women, 59% men. Students come from 48 states and territories, 88 other countries, 85% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 4% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 0% 25 or older, 92% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 93% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; English. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at American University, Duke University. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, signed character statement, SAT or ACT. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 1/15, 11/15 for early decision plan 1, 1/15 for early decision plan 2. Notification: 4/1, 12/15 for early decision plan 1, 2/15 for early decision plan 2.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $42,610 includes full-time tuition ($36,550) and college room and board ($6060). College room only: $2710. Part-time tuition: $1460 per semester hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 225 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 29% of eligible men and 65% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Volunteer Action Council, Student Government Association, Campus Activities Board, Multicultural Student Union, intramurals. Major annual events: UR Century Bike Race, Homecoming, Greek Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, campus police. College housing designed to accommodate 2,686 students; 2,769 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Boatwright Memorial Library plus 2 others with 1.1 million books, 85,336 microform titles, 20,831 serials, 17,684 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $9.5 million. 650 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA F-9

Charlottesville, VA 22903
Tel: (434)924-0311
Admissions: (434)982-3200
Fax: (434)924-3587
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.virginia.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1819. Setting: 1,160-acre suburban campus with easy access to Richmond. Endowment: $2.2 billion. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $258.8 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $10,108 per student. Total enrollment: 23,765. Faculty: 1,330 (1,193 full-time, 137 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 15,657 applied, 38% were admitted. 86% from top 10% of their high school class, 97% from top quarter, 99% from top half. 152 valedictorians. Full-time: 13,395 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 818 students, 54% women, 46% men. Students come from 52 states and territories, 102 other countries, 28% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 9% black, 11% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 2% 25 or older, 46% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 97% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; engineering; business/marketing; psychology. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early decision, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, 1 recommendation, SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT, two SAT subject tests (student's choice). Entrance: most difficult. Application deadlines: 1/2, 11/1 for early decision. Notification: 4/1, 12/1 for early decision. Preference given to state residents, children of alumni.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $60. State resident tuition: $5602 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $22,346 full-time. Mandatory fees: $1768 full-time. College room and board: $6389. College room only: $3289. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 300 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities; 30% of eligible men and 30% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Madison House, student government, University guides, University Union, The Cavalier Daily. Major annual events: Family Weekend, Homecoming, Finals Weekend. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center, transfer student advising. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 6,779 college housing spaces available; 6,294 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Option: coed housing available. Alderman Library plus 14 others with 4.9 million books, 5.5 million microform titles, 53,015 serials, 534,662 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $29.4 million. 1,645 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Charlottesville, situated in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, was the home of Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe. Numerous old homes and estates in Charlottesville and the surrounding areas, reveal Jefferson's architectural influence. All forms of commercial transportation are available. Albemarle County is known for its horses, dogs, fox hunting, and for its peach and apple orchards. The many outdoor activities include golf, tennis, hunting, fishing, and hiking. Some part-time employment is available for students. Points of interest include the Lewis and Clark Memorial, Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson, Old Courthouse, and the University of Virginia-founded by Thomas Jefferson.

■ THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA'S COLLEGE AT WISE C-4

1 College Ave.
Wise, VA 24293
Tel: (276)328-0100; 888-282-9324
Admissions: (276)328-0322
Fax: (276)328-0251
Web Site: http://www.uvawise.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 4-year, coed. Part of University of Virginia. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1954. Setting: 396-acre small town campus. Endowment: $20.6 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4029 per student. Total enrollment: 1,836. 1,019 applied, 79% were admitted. 25% from top 10% of their high school class, 50% from top quarter, 86% from top half. Full-time: 1,432 students, 50% women, 50% men. Part-time: 404 students, 71% women, 29% men. Students come from 9 states and territories, 9 other countries, 6% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 5% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.3% international, 23% 25 or older, 30% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 73% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, early action, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.3 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: 2 recommendations. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 8/1, 2/1 for early action. Notification: continuous until 8/20, 2/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $2984 full-time, $123 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,062 full-time, $539 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $2097 full-time, $38 per semester hour part-time, $14.25 per term part-time. College room and board: $6200. College room only: $3488.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 50 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 39% of eligible men and 32% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student government, Student Activities Board, Multicultural Association, Residence Hall Association. Major annual events: Holly Ball, Homecoming, Jam for Man. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, self-defense, informal discussions, pamphlets/posters/films, and crime prevention office. 550 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Wyllie Library with 95,861 books, 62,155 microform titles, 1,029 serials, 11,582 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $683,647. 130 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY H-12

901 West Franklin St.
Richmond, VA 23284-9005
Tel: (804)828-0100
Free: 800-841-3638
Admissions: (804)828-1222
Fax: (804)828-1899
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vcu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's and first professional certificates. Founded 1838. Setting: 126-acre urban campus. Endowment: $235.3 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $145.8 million. Total enrollment: 29,349. Faculty: 2,813 (1,744 full-time, 1,069 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 11,764 applied, 68% were admitted. 16% from top 10% of their high school class, 44% from top quarter, 82% from top half. 11 valedictorians. Full-time: 16,109 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 4,399 students, 59% women, 41% men. Students come from 48 states and territories, 75 other countries, 5% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 20% black, 9% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 17% 25 or older, 22% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 80% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: visual and performing arts; business/marketing; health professions and related sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay. Application deadline: 2/1. Notification: continuous until 4/1. Preference given to state residents for some health science programs.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $5385 full-time, $165.40 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $17,440 full-time, $668 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $52.05 per credit part-time. College room and board: $7042. College room only: $4102. Room and board charges vary according to board plan.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities. Most popular organizations: Student Government Organization, Activities Programming Board, Muslim Student Association, Black Caucus. Major annual events: Homecoming, Annual Fall Step Show, Spring Fest. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, security personnel in residence halls. 4,706 college housing spaces available; 3,703 were occupied in 2003-04. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries plus 6 others with 1.8 million books, 3.1 million microform titles, 12,973 serials, 44,434 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $9.9 million. 400 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of Richmond.

■ VIRGINIA HIGHLANDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE K-1

PO Box 828
Abingdon, VA 24212-0828
Tel: (276)739-2400; 877-207-6115
Admissions: (276)739-2414
Fax: (276)739-2590
Web Site: http://www.vhcc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1967. Setting: 100-acre small town campus. Total enrollment: 3,867. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 35% from top quarter, 65% from top half. Students come from 7 states and territories, 52% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, radiology, physical therapy programs. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: SCAT, ACT ASSET recommended; SCAT, ACT ASSET required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to district, then state residents.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. College housing not available. 29,683 books and 174 serials. 240 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Abingdon is known as a handicraft center as well as being the largest burley tobacco market and the largest livestock auction in Virginia. Commercial transportation is available. The Blue Ridge and Holston Mountains are nearby providing facilities for many outdoor activities.

■ VIRGINIA INTERMONT COLLEGE D-5

1013 Moore St.
Bristol, VA 24201-4298
Tel: (276)669-6101
Free: 800-451-1842
Admissions: (276)466-7856
Fax: (276)669-5763
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vic.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Baptist Church. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1884. Setting: 13-acre small town campus. Endowment: $2.8 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3859 per student. Total enrollment: 1,138. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 11:1. 802 applied, 63% were admitted. 11% from top 10% of their high school class, 24% from top quarter, 70% from top half. 2 valedictorians. Full-time: 986 students, 71% women, 29% men. Part-time: 152 students, 63% women, 38% men. Students come from 36 states and territories, 36 other countries, 45% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 7% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 43% 25 or older, 56% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 72% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; visual and performing arts. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at King College. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. Comprehensive fee: $22,200 includes full-time tuition ($15,500), mandatory fees ($950), and college room and board ($5750). College room only: $2750. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time and program. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $220 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $50 per credit. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, course level, course load, and program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 21 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Student Activities Committee, Christian Student Union, Equestrian Club, Business Organization for Student Success. Major annual events: Family Weekend, Homecoming, Christmas at VI. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service. 490 college housing spaces available; 434 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. J. F. Hicks Library with 93,382 books, 9,350 microform titles, 76 serials, 2,247 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $154,390. 80 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The name"Intermont" meaning"among the mountains," is descriptive of the College's setting. Virginia Intermont is located in Bristol, VA, off Exit 5 of Interstate 81, almost halfway between Roanoke, VA and Knoxville, TN. The campus is situated only eight blocks from the city's downtown district and two miles from the Bristol Mall.

■ VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE G-7

Lexington, VA 24450
Tel: (540)464-7207
Free: 800-767-4207
Admissions: (540)464-7211
Fax: (540)464-7746
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vmi.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1839. Setting: 134-acre small town campus. Endowment: $281.4 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $622,851. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6827 per student. Total enrollment: 1,362. 1,579 applied, 50% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 54% from top quarter, 89% from top half. 82 student government officers. Full-time: 1,362 students, 6% women, 94% men. Students come from 45 states and territories, 17 other countries, 48% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 5% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 1% 25 or older, 100% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 87% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, internships. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, early decision, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 3/1, 11/15 for early decision. Notification: continuous, 12/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. One-time mandatory fee: $1678. State resident tuition: $4382 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $18,582 full-time. Mandatory fees: $2606 full-time. College room and board: $5666.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 47 open to all. Most popular organizations: Newman Club, Officers Christian Fellowship, strength and fitness organizations, Promaji, Pre-Law Society. Major annual events: New Market Day, Parents' Weekend, Founders' Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols. 1,362 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: coed housing available. Preston Library plus 1 other with 162,053 books, 18,137 microform titles, 785 serials, 4,896 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.2 million. 200 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

VMI offers a small town flavor, with a hallowed history and breathtaking scenery.

■ VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY I-4

Blacksburg, VA 24061
Tel: (540)231-6000
Fax: (540)231-3242
Web Site: http://www.vt.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1872. Setting: 2,600-acre small town campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7979 per student. Total enrollment: 27,979. Faculty: 1,532 (1,304 full-time, 228 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 17,619 applied, 70% were admitted. 35% from top 10% of their high school class, 79% from top quarter, 97% from top half. Full-time: 21,087 students, 41% women, 59% men. Part-time: 540 students, 37% women, 63% men. Students come from 52 states and territories, 104 other countries, 28% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 5% black, 7% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 41% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 88% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; engineering; family and consumer sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 1/15, 11/1 for early decision. Notification: 4/1, 12/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $4959 full-time, $206.75 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $16,298 full-time, $679 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1419 full-time, $169 per term part-time. College room and board: $4400. College room only: $2346. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and location.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 524 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities; 13% of eligible men and 15% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Virginia Tech Union, Student Government Association, international student organizations. Major annual events: Military Ball, International Street Fair, Homecoming Week. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 8,900 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Newman Library plus 4 others with 2.2 million books, 6.3 million microform titles, 28,596 serials, 23,420 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $12.8 million. 8,000 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Blacksburg is a town with a population of 35,000 located on a plateau between the Blue Ridge and Allegheny Mountains, 38 miles southwest of Roanoke. Bus service is convenient and free to the university community. Civic and service organizations are active and welcome student participation. Outdoor recreation opportunities include hiking, horseback riding, fishing, swimming, boating, water skiing, and camping. Nearby are the Jefferson National Forest, the Appalachian Trail, the New River, and other parks and lakes.

■ VIRGINIA STATE UNIVERSITY I-12

1 Hayden St.
Petersburg, VA 23806-0001
Tel: (804)524-5000
Free: 800-871-7611
Admissions: (804)524-5902
Fax: (804)524-5055
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vsu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1882. Setting: 236-acre suburban campus with easy access to Richmond. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.4 million. Total enrollment: 5,055. Faculty: 327 (226 full-time, 101 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 4,000 applied, 79% were admitted. 4% from top 10% of their high school class, 19% from top quarter, 59% from top half. Full-time: 4,060 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 272 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 35 states and territories, 32% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 96% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 10% 25 or older, 58% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; liberal arts/general studies. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.2 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: 5/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $2317 full-time, $161 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $9668 full-time, $402 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $2575 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. College room and board: $6484. College room only: $3760. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 44 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 10% of eligible men and 10% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: NAACP, Betterment of Brothers/Sisters, Student Government Association, dormitory cabinets, pre-alumni associations. Major annual events: Homecoming, Spring Fling, Commencement. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 2,530 college housing spaces available; 2,418 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Johnston Memorial Library with 284,213 books, 740,888 microform titles, 2,381 serials, 26,492 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.3 million. 750 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The immediate environs of the university offer an exciting atmosphere involving a variety of interesting sites and events for leisure-time activities. The Petersburg National Battlefield and Old Blandford Church are historical landmarks that are recognized in the National Historical Register. Other popular attractions include museums, art exhibits, parks, the Petersburg Symphony, and theatrical groups. The close proximity of Virginia's capital, Richmond, 25 minutes north, enhances the"VSU experience." Colonial Williamsburg and nearby Busch Gardens; Norfolk, home of one of America's busiest seaports; Virginia Beach, the top tourist attraction in the state; and the Blue Ridge Mountains are within easy driving distance.

■ VIRGINIA UNION UNIVERSITY H-12

1500 North Lombardy St.
Richmond, VA 23220-1170
Tel: (804)257-5600
Free: 800-368-3227
Admissions: (804)257-5881
Web Site: http://www.vuu.edu/

Description:

Independent Baptist, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1865. Setting: 72-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 1,700. Faculty: 140 (84 full-time, 56 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 3,933 applied, 58% were admitted. 4% from top 10% of their high school class, 8% from top quarter, 36% from top half. Full-time: 1,309 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 35 students, 63% women, 37% men. Students come from 29 states and territories, 50% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 96% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 6% 25 or older, 4% transferred in. Retention: 69% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: law/legal studies; business/marketing; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, honors program, summer session for credit, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at University of Richmond, Virginia Commonwealth University, Virginia State University. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, 3 recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $18,432 includes full-time tuition ($11,600), mandatory fees ($1170), and college room and board ($5662). College room only: $2662. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. Part-time tuition: $483 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $370 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: national fraternities, national sororities; 10% of eligible men and 10% of eligible women are members. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, controlled dormitory access. 710 college housing spaces available; 619 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Option: coed housing available. L. Douglas Wilder Learning Resource Center and Library with 147,611 books, 311 serials, and an OPAC. 128 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of Richmond.

■ VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY OF LYNCHBURG I-8

2058 Garfield Ave.
Lynchburg, VA 24501-6417
Tel: (804)528-5276
Fax: (804)528-4257
Web Site: http://www.vulonline.org/

Description:

Independent religious, comprehensive, coed. Founded 1886. Calendar: semesters.

■ VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE J-15

1584 Wesleyan Dr.
Norfolk, VA 23502-5599
Tel: (757)455-3200
Free: 800-737-8684
Admissions: (757)455-3208
Fax: (757)461-5238
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vwc.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1961. Setting: 300-acre urban campus with easy access to Norfolk/Virginia Beach. Endowment: $43.5 million. Total enrollment: 1,392. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 1,357 applied, 81% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 31% from top quarter, 66% from top half. Full-time: 1,121 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 271 students, 77% women, 23% men. Students come from 32 states and territories, 10 other countries, 22% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 15% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 21% 25 or older, 42% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 66% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; communications/journalism. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at Old Dominion University, Norfolk State University, Virginia Tidewater Consortium for Higher Education. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $29,986 includes full-time tuition ($22,976), mandatory fees ($160), and college room and board ($6850). Part-time tuition: $957 per semester hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 60 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 10% of eligible men and 15% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student government, student radio station, student newspaper, Black Student Union, Leadership Council. Major annual events: homecoming, Lake Taylor Music Festival, Seafood Party in the Dell. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, well-lit pathways. 633 college housing spaces available; 609 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: coed housing available. H. C. Hofheimer II Library with 140,400 books, 15,844 microform titles, 923 serials, 3,810 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Tidewater, Virginia, is the cultural center of the Commonwealth. Norfolk features the Chrysler Museum, MacArthur Memorial, Scope Arena, Chrysler Hall for professional theatre, an opera house, and is headquarters of the Virginia Orchestra Group, Feldman String Quartet, and the Tidewater Ballet Association. Virginia Beach, in addition to its world-famous beaches, is proud of Seashore State Park, the Little Theater, Edgar Cayce's Association for Research and Enlightenment, the Virginia Beach Pops and other groups. Within one hour's driving time are Colonial Williamsburg, Yorktown and Jamestown, several nationally known museums including the Mariners Museum, and Busch Gardens.

■ VIRGINIA WESTERN COMMUNITY COLLEGE I-6

PO Box 14007
Roanoke, VA 24038
Tel: (540)857-7311
Admissions: (540)857-7231
Fax: (540)857-7204
Web Site: http://www.virginiawestern.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: 70-acre suburban campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5940 per student. Total enrollment: 8,124. Full-time: 2,128 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 5,996 students, 59% women, 41% men. 1% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 10% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 46% 25 or older, 16% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for health technology programs. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: SAT or ACT recommended. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to local residents.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. College housing not available. Brown Library with 67,129 books, 402 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $344,730. 200 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Roanoke is a manufacturing, regional service and trading center, and a metropolitan area with all modes of transportation available. Community facilities include libraries, YMCA, YWCA, many churches, hospitals, and a number of the civic and service organizations. Part-time employment opportunities are available to certain students. Roanoke is headquarters for the Norfolk and Western Railway System and the Blue Ridge Parkway. Smith Mountain Lake is a favorite water recreation area. Carvin's Cove Lake nine and one-half miles north offers fishing, boating, and picnicking. Some of the points of interest are the Crystal Spring, Mill Mountain, and Transportation Museum.

■ WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY G-7

Lexington, VA 24450-0303
Tel: (540)458-8400
Admissions: (540)458-8710
Fax: (540)463-8062
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wlu.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and first professional degrees. Founded 1749. Setting: 322-acre small town campus. Endowment: $532 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.6 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $19,722 per student. Total enrollment: 2,179. Faculty: 217 (215 full-time, 2 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 3,950 applied, 29% were admitted. 76% from top 10% of their high school class, 96% from top quarter, 100% from top half. 32 National Merit Scholars, 39 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,766 students, 50% women, 50% men. Part-time: 4 students, 25% women, 75% men. Students come from 47 states and territories, 35 other countries, 85% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 4% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 0% 25 or older, 61% live on campus, 0.2% transferred in. Retention: 95% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; business/marketing; history. Core. Calendar: 4-4-2. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, internships. Off campus study at 6 members of the Seven-College Exchange Program, Bates College, Duke University, Virginia Military Institute. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 3 recommendations, SAT or ACT, 2 unrelated SAT Subject Tests. Recommended: interview. Entrance: most difficult. Application deadlines: 1/15, 11/15 for early decision plan 1, 1/3 for early decision plan 2. Notification: 4/1, 12/22 for early decision plan 1, 2/1 for early decision plan 2.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $35,860 includes full-time tuition ($27,960), mandatory fees ($675), and college room and board ($7225). College room only: $3425. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility and student level. Part-time tuition: $935 per credit.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 127 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 78% of eligible men and 76% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Outing Club, Student Activities Board, Nabors Service League, Mock Convention, College Republicans. Major annual events: Fancy Dress Ball, Homecoming, Alumni Weekend. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,272 college housing spaces available; 1,081 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. James G. Leyburn Library plus 4 others with 907,325 books, 1 million microform titles, 8,027 serials, 16,079 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $4.4 million. 297 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Lexington is located in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia between the Blue Ridge and Allegheny Mountains. Two of the greatest Confederate heroes, Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, lived and are buried in Lexington, the "Shrine of the South." Bus transportation is available. Some of the points of interest are the Natural Bridge, Lee Chapel, Home of "Stonewall" Jackson, Virginia Military Institute, and Washington and Lee University. Cyrus McCormick, inventor of the reaper, lived nearby. Lexington is also the home of the Virginia Horse Center.

■ WESTWOOD COLLEGE-ANNANDALE CAMPUS

7611 Little River Turnpike, 3rd Floor
Annandale, VA 22003
Tel: (703)642-3770
Free: 800-281-2978
Web Site: http://www.westwood.edu/locations/virginia-colleges/annandale-college.asp

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Awards transfer associate, terminal associate, and bachelor's degrees.

■ WESTWOOD COLLEGE-ARLINGTON BALLSTON CAMPUS D-13

1901 North Ft. Myer Dr.
Arlington, VA 22209
Tel: 800-281-2978
Admissions: 877-268-5218
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.westwood.edu

Description:

Proprietary, 4-year, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: interview, Accuplacer Test. Entrance: minimally difficult.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100. Tuition: $12,300 full-time, $467 per credit part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Student services: personal-psychological counseling.

■ WORLD COLLEGE J-15

5193 Shore Dr., Ste. 105
Virginia Beach, VA 23455-2500
Tel: (757)464-4600
Free: 800-696-7532
Web Site: http://www.worldcollege.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees (offers only external degree programs). Founded 1992. Setting: suburban campus. Total enrollment: 281. Students come from 50 states and territories, 25 other countries, 94% 25 or older. Academic area with the most degrees conferred: engineering technologies. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, accelerated degree program, distance learning, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Tuition: $3540 per year part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

College housing not available.

■ WYTHEVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE J-3

1000 East Main St.
Wytheville, VA 24382-3308
Tel: (276)223-4700
Admissions: (276)223-4755
Fax: (276)223-4860
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wcc.vccs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Virginia Community College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1967. Setting: 141-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 2,450. 794 applied, 100% were admitted. Students come from 22 states and territories, 1 other country, 54% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: early admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to service region residents for allied health programs.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: national fraternities. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. College housing not available. Wytheville Community College Library with 29,000 books and 261 serials. 105 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Wytheville is located in a rich agricultural and cattle-raising area with most forms of commercial transportation available. A growing number of industries are located in the area, providing good part-time employment opportunities. Community facilities include a public library, churches, Jewish Synagogues in the neighboring towns of Bluefield and Bristol, a hospital, shopping areas, and a number of the civic and service organizations. Claytor Lake and the Jefferson National Forest provide opportunities for hunting, fishing, camping, and picnicking; other facilities within the city offer swimming and golf.

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Virginia

Commonwealth of Virginia

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Named for Queen Elizabeth I of England, the "Virgin Queen."

NICKNAME: The Old Dominion.

CAPITAL: Richmond.

ENTERED UNION: 25 June 1788 (10th).

SONG: "Carry Me Back to Old Virginia" was formally retired from use in 1997 but has not yet been replaced.

MOTTO: Sic semper tyrannis (Thus ever to tyrants).

FLAG: On a blue field, the state seal is centered on a white circle.

OFFICIAL SEAL: obverse: the Roman goddess Virtus, dressed as an Amazon and holding a sheathed sword in one hand and a spear in the other, stands over the body of Tyranny, who is pictured with a broken chain in his hand and a fallen crown nearby. The state motto appears below, the word "Virginia" above, and a border of Virginia creeper encircles the whole. reverse: the Roman goddesses of Liberty, Eternity, and Fruitfulness, with the word "Perseverando" (by persevering) above.

BIRD: Cardinal.

FLOWER: Dogwood.

TREE: Dogwood.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year's Day, 1 January; Lee-Jackson Day, 13 January; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Washington's Birthday, 3rd Monday in February; Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Columbus Day, 2nd Monday in October; Veterans' Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving Day, 4th Thursday in November and the day following; Christmas Day, 25 December.

TIME: 7 AM EST = noon GMT.

LOCATION, SIZE, AND EXTENT

Situated on the eastern seaboard of the United States, Virginia is the fourth-largest of the South Atlantic states and ranks 36th in size among the 50 states.

The total area of Virginia is 40,767 sq mi (105,586 sq km), of which land occupies 39,704 sq mi (102,833 sq km) and inland water 1,063 sq mi (2,753 sq km). Virginia extends approximately 440 mi (710 km) e-w, but the maximum point-to-point distance from the state's noncontiguous Eastern Shore to the western extremity is 470 mi (756 km). The maximum n-s extension is about 200 mi (320 km).

Virginia is bordered on the nw by West Virginia; on the ne by Maryland and the District of Columbia (with the line passing through the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay); on the e by the Atlantic Ocean; on the s by North Carolina and Tennessee; and on the w by Kentucky. The state's geographic center is in Buckingham County, 5 mi (8 km) sw of the town of Buckingham.

Virginia's offshore islands in the Atlantic include Chincoteague, Wallops, Cedar, Parramore, Hog, Cobb, and Smith. The boundaries of Virginia, including the Eastern Shore at the tip of the Delmarva Peninsula, total 1,356 mi (2,182 km), of which 112 mi (180 km) is general coastline; the tidal shoreline extends 3,315 mi (5,335 km).

TOPOGRAPHY

Virginia consists of three principal physiographic areas: the Atlantic Coastal Plain, or Tidewater; the Piedmont Plateau, in the central section; and the Blue Ridge and Allegheny Mountains of the Appalachian chain, in the west and northwest.

The long, narrow Blue Ridge rises sharply from the piedmont, reaching a maximum elevation of 5,729 ft (1,747 m) at Mt. Rogers, the state's highest point. Between the Blue Ridge and the Allegheny Mountains of the Appalachian chain in the northwest lies the Valley of Virginia, consisting of transverse ridges and six separate valleys. The floors of these valleys ascend in altitude from about 300 ft (90 m) in the northern Shenandoah Valley to 2,400 ft (730 m) in the Powell Valley. The Alleghenies average 3,000 ft (900 m) in height. The mean elevation of the state is approximately 950 ft (290 m).

The Piedmont, shaped roughly like a triangle, varies in width from 40 mi (64 km) in the far north to 180 mi (290 km) in the extreme south. Altitudes in this region range from about 300 ft (90 m) at the fall line in the east to a maximum of about 1,000 ft (300 m) at the base of the Blue Ridge in the southwest. The Tidewater, which declines gently from the fall line to sea level (the lowest point of the state), is divided by four long peninsulas cut by the state's four principal riversthe Potomac, Rappahannock, York, and Jamesand the Chesapeake Bay. On the opposite side of the bay is Virginia's low-lying Eastern Shore, the southern tip of the Delmarva Peninsula. The Tidewater has many excellent harbors, notably the deep Hampton Roads estuary. Also in the southeast lies the Dismal Swamp, a drainage basin that includes Lake Drummond, about 7 mi (11 km) long and 5 mi (8 km) wide near the North Carolina border. Other major lakes in Virginia are Smith Mountainat 31 sq mi (80 sq km) the largest lake wholly within the stateClaytor, and South Holston. The John H. Kerr Reservoir, covering 76 sq mi (197 sq km), straddles the Virginia-North Carolina line.

CLIMATE

A mild, humid coastal climate is characteristic of Virginia. Temperatures, most equable in the Tidewater, become increasingly cooler with the rising altitudes as one moves westward. The normal daily average temperature at Richmond is about 58°f (14°c), ranging from 38°f (3°c) in January to 78°f (25°c) in July. The record high, 110°f (43°c), was registered at Balcony Falls (near Glasgow) on 15 July 1954; the record low, 30°f (34°c), was set at Mountain Lake on 22 January 1985. The frost-free growing season ranges from about 140 days in the mountains of the extreme west to over 250 in the Norfolk area.

Annual precipitation at Richmond averages about 42.7 in (108 cm); at Norfolk, annual precipitation averages 44.8.7 in (113 cm) per year. The average annual snowfall amounts to nearly 13.9 in (35 cm) at Richmond but only 7.4 in (18 cm) at Norfolk.

FLORA AND FAUNA

Native to Virginia are 12 varieties of oak, 5 of pine, and 2 each of walnut, locust, gum, and popular. Pines predominate in the coastal areas, with numerous hardwoods on slopes and ridges inland; isolated stands of persimmon, ash, cedar, and basswood can also be found. Characteristic wild flowers include trailing arbutus, mountain laurel, and diverse azaleas and rhododendrons. In 2006, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed 14 plant species as threatened or endangered in Virginia, including the Virginia round-leaf birch, Virginia sneezeweed, Northeastern bulrush, and small whorled pogonia.

Among indigenous mammalian species are white-tailed (Virginia) deer, elk, black bear, bobcat, woodchuck, raccoon, opossum, nutria, red and gray foxes, and spotted and striped skunks, along with several species each of moles, shrews, bats, squirrels, deermice, rats, and rabbits; the beaver, mink, and river otter, once thought to be endangered, have returned in recent decades. Principal game birds include the ruffed grouse (commonly called pheasant in Virginia), wild turkey, bobwhite quail, mourning dove, woodcock, and Wilson's snipe. Tidal waters abound with croaker, hogfish, gray and spotted trout, and flounder; bass, bream, bluegill, sunfish, perch, carp, catfish, and crappie live in freshwater ponds and streams. Native reptiles include such poisonous snakes as the northern copperhead, eastern cottonmouth, and timber rattler.

In April 2006, 47 animal species were listed as threatened or endangered in Virginia, including the puma; Indiana, gray, and Virginia big-eared bats; bald eagle; red-cockaded woodpecker; Virginia fringed mountain snail; Lee County cave isopod; four species of pearly mussel; three species of pigtoe; tan riffleshell; and three species of whale. At least one-fourth of the rare or endangered species in the state are found in the Dismal Swamp.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), established in 1993, is under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of Natural Resources. The mission of the DEQ is to protect the environment of Virginia in order to promote the health and well-being of the citizens of the Commonwealth. The DEQ administers state and federal environmental programs; issues environmental permits and ensures compliance with regulations; and coordinates planning among Virginia's environmental programs. The DEQ provides staff support to assist the State Water Control Board in administering the federal Clean Water Act and enforcing state laws to improve the quality of surface water and groundwater for aquatic life and human health; the State Air Pollution Control Board in administering the federal Clean Air Act and enforcing state laws and regulations to improve air quality; and the Waste Management Board in administering waste management programs created by legislation such as the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Virginia Waste Management Act.

In 2002, Virginia waste treatment facilities received about 12% less total solid waste (municipal solid waste, construction and demolition debris, sludge and other types of waste), or about 824,000 tons less that they received in 2001.

The Commission of Game and Inland Fisheries manages land wildlife and freshwater fish resources, while the Marine Resources Commission manages the wetlands, commercial fishery resources, and the use of the marine environment in the Tidewater area. About 1 million acres (404,685 hectares) of wetlands are found in the state. These areas are generally regulated by the Virginia Water Protection Permit. The Chesapeake Bay Estuarine Complex, the largest estuary and most important wetland in the United States, was designated as a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance in 1987.

Virginia has implemented programs to improve air quality in the Northern Virginia, Richmond, and Hampton Roads regions; to enhance water quality monitoring for streams and lakes statewide; to continue restoration efforts for the Chesapeake Bay; and to promote voluntary cleanups of contaminated industrial sites.

In 2003, Virginia had 250 hazardous waste sites listed in the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) database, 29 of which were on the National Priorities List as of 2006, including the Langley Air Force Base and NASA Langley Research Center, The Marine Corps Combat Development Command in Quantico, the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Norfolk Naval Shipyards. Also in 2003, 74.2 million lb of toxic chemicals were released in the state. In 2005, the EPA spent over $3.4 million through the Superfund program for the cleanup of hazardous waste sites in the state. The same year, federal EPA grants awarded to the state included $22 million for the wastewater revolving loan fund and $11.4 million for the drinking water revolving fund.

POPULATION

Virginia ranked 12th in population in the United States with an estimated total of 7,567,465 in 2005, an increase of 6.9% since 2000. Between 1990 and 2000, Virginia's population grew from 6,187,358 to 7,078,515, an increase of 14.4%. The population is projected to reach 8.4 million by 2015 and 9.3 million by 2025. The population density in 2004 was 188.5 persons per sq mi. In 2004 the median age was 36.9. Persons under 18 years old accounted for 24.2% of the population while 11.4% was age 65 or older.

From the outset, Virginia was the most populous of the English colonies, with a population that doubled every 25 years and totaled more than 100,000 by 1727. By 1790, the time of the first US census, Virginia's population of 821,287 was about 21% of the US total and almost twice that of second-ranked Pennsylvania. Although surpassed by New York State at the 1820 census, Virginia continued to enjoy slow but steady growth until the Civil War. During the 1860s, the loss of its western counties (which became the new state of West Virginia) and wartime devastation caused a decline of 23%. The population passed the 2 million mark in 1910, and the number of Virginians doubled between 1920 and 1970. The population growth rates for the five decades following 1940 were 23.9%, 19.5%, 17.2%, 15%, and 15.7%, in each case above the US average.

VirginiaCounties, County Seats, and County Areas and Populations
COUNTY COUNTY SEAT LAND AREA (SQ MI) POPULATION (2005 EST) COUNTY COUNTY SEAT LAND AREA (SQ MI) POPULATION (2005 EST)
Accomack Accomac 476 39,424 King William King William 278 14,732
Albemarle Charlottesville 725 90,717 Lancaster Lancaster 133 11,593
Alleghany Covington 446 16,715 Lee Jonesville 437 23,686
Amelia Amelia 357 12,273 Loudoun Leesburg 521 255,518
Amherst Amherst 478 32,134 Louisa Louisa 497 30,020
Appomattox Appomattox 336 13,967 Lunenburg Lunenburg 432 13,194
Arlington Arlington 26 195,965 Madison Madison 322 13,398
Augusta Staunton 989 69,725 Mathews Mathews 87 9,194
Bath Warm Springs 537 4,937 Mecklenburg Boydton 616 32,529
Bedford Bedford 747 65,286 Middlesex Saluda 134 10,493
Bland Bland 359 6,943 Montgomery Christiansburg 390 84,303
Botetourt Fincastle 545 32,027 Nelson Lovingston 475 15,101
Brunswick Lawrenceville 563 17,920 New Kent New Kent 213 16,107
Buchanan Grundy 504 24,755 Northampton Eastville 226 13,548
Buckingham Buckingham 583 16,058 Northumberland Heathsville 185 12,874
Campbell Rustburg 505 52,339 Nottoway Nottoway 317 15,560
Caroline Bowling Green 536 25,563 Orange Orange 342 30,246
Carroll Hillsville 478 29,438 Page Luray 313 23,831
Charles City Charles City 181 7,119 Patrick Stuart 481 19,209
Charlotte Charlotte 476 12,404 Pittsylvania Chatham 995 61,854
Chesterfield Chesterfield 434 288,876 Powhatan Powhatan 261 26,598
Clarke Berryville 178 14,205 Prince Edward Farmville 354 20,455
Craig New Castle 330 5,154 Prince George Prince George 266 36,725
Culpeper Culpeper 382 42,530 Prince William Manassas 3,392 348,588
Cumberland Cumberland 300 9,378 Pulaski Pulaski 318 35,081
Dickenson Clintwood 331 16,243 Rappahannock Washington 267 7,271
Dinwiddie Dinwiddie 507 25,391 Richmond Warsaw 193 9,114
Essex Tappahannock 263 10,492 Roanoke Salem 251 88,172
Fairfax Fairfax 393 1,006,529 Rockbridge Lexington 603 21,242
Fauquier Warrenton 651 64,997 Rockingham Harrisonburg 865 71,251
Floyd Floyd 381 14,649 Russell Lebanon 479 28,949
Fluvanna Palmyra 290 24,751 Scott Gate City 536 22,962
Franklin Rock Mount 683 50,345 Shenandoah Woodstock 512 39,184
Frederick Winchester 415 69,123 Smyth Marion 452 32,640
Giles Pearisburg 362 17,098 Southampton Courtland 603 17,585
Gloucester Gloucester 225 37,787 Spotsylvania Spotsylvania 404 116,549
Goochland Goochland 281 19,360 Stafford Stafford 271 117,874
Grayson Independence 446 16,366 Surry Surry 281 7,013
Greene Standardsville 157 17,418 Sussex Sussex 496 12,071
Greensville Emporia 300 11,088 Tazewell Tazewell 522 44,795
Halifax Halifax 816 36,284 Warren Front Royal 219 35,556
Hanover Hanover 468 97,426 Washington Abingdon 578 52,085
Henrico Richmond 238 280,581 Westmoreland Montross 250 17,227
Henry Martinsville 283 56,501 Wise Wise 405 41,997
Highland Monterey 416 2,475 Wythe Wytheville 460 28,421
Isle of Wight Isle of Wight 319 33,417 York Yorktown 122 61,758
James City Williamsburg 153 57,525 Independent Cities 1,605 2,400,181
King and Queen King and Queen 317 6,796 TOTALS 42,705 7,567,465
King George King George 180 20,637

In the 1990s approximately three-fourths of all Virginians lived in metropolitan areas, the largest of which in 2004 was the Norfolk-Virginia Beach-Newport News area, with an estimated 1,644,250 people; the Richmond metropolitan area had 1,154,317 people. Virginia's most populous cities proper with their estimated 2004 populations are Virginia Beach, 440,098; Norfolk, 237,835; Chesapeake, 214,725; Richmond, 192,494; Arlington, 186,117; Newport News, 181,913; Hampton, 145,951; and Alexandria, 128,206.

ETHNIC GROUPS

When the first federal census was taken in 1790, more than 306,000 blacksof whom only 12,000 were freemade up more than one-third of Virginia's total population. After emancipation, blacks continued to be heavily represented, accounting in 1870 for 512,841 (42%) of the 1,225,163 Virginians. Blacks numbered 1,390,293 in 2000, and their proportion of the total estimated population was 19.6%. That percentage had increased slightly, to 19.9%, by 2004.

In 2000, Virginia had 329,540 Hispanic and Latino residents, chiefly Mexicans and Salvadorans. In 2004, 5.7% of the population was Hispanic or Latino. The 2000 census counted some 261,025 Asians, including 47,609 Filipinos, 45,279 Koreans, 36,966 Chinese, 37,309 Vietnamese, 48,815 Asian Indians, and 9,080 Japanese. In 2000, Pacific Islanders numbered 3,946. In 2004, 4.4% of the population was Asian and 0.1% Pacific Islander. Equal to the national average, 1.5% reported origin of more than one race. An estimated 570,279 Virginians8.1% of all state residentswere of foreign birth in 2000, compared with 177,000 in 1980. The Native American population, including Eskimos and Aleuts, numbered 21,172 in 2000. In 2004, 0.3% of the population was American Indian or Alaskan Native.

LANGUAGES

English settlers encountered members of the Powhatan Indian confederacy, speakers of an Algonkian language, whose legacy includes such place-names as Roanoke and Rappahannock.

Although the expanding suburban area south of the District of Columbia has become dialectically heterogeneous, the rest of the state has retained its essentially Southern speech features. Many dialect markers occur statewide, but subregional contrasts distinguish the South Midland of the Appalachians from the Southern of the piedmont and Tidewater. General are batter bread (a soft corn cake), batter cake (pancake), comfort (tied and filled bed cover), and polecat (skunk). Widespread pronunciation features include greasy with a /z/ sound; yeast and east as sound-alikes, creek rhyming with peek, and can't with paint; coop and bulge with the vowel of book; and forest with an /ah/ sound.

The Tidewater is set off by creek meaning a saltwater inlet, fishing worm for earthworm, and fog as /fahg/. Appalachian South Midland has redworm for earthworm, fog as /fawg/, wash as /wawsh/, Mary and merry as sound-alikes, and poor with the vowel of book. The Richmond area is noted also for having two variants of the long /i/ and /ow/ diphthongs as they occur before voiceless and voiced consonants, so that the vowel in the noun house is quite different from the vowel in the verb house, and the vowel in advice differs from that in advise. The Tidewater exhibits similar features.

In 2000, Virginia residents five years of age and over who spoke only English at home numbered 5,884,075, or 88.9% of the total population, down from 92.7% in 1990.

The following table gives selected statistics from the 2000 Census for language spoken at home by persons five years old and over. The category "African languages" includes Amharic, Ibo, Twi, Yoruba, Bantu, Swahili, and Somali. The category "Other Indic languages" includes Bengali, Marathi, Punjabi, and Romany. The category "Other Asian languages" includes Dravidian languages, Malayalam, Telugu, Tamil, and Turkish.

LANGUAGE NUMBER PERCENT
Population 5 years and over 6,619,266 100.0
  Speak only English 5,884,075 88.9
  Speak a language other than English 735,191 11.1
Speak a language other than English 735,191 11.1
  Spanish or Spanish Creole 316,274 4.8
  French (incl. Patois, Cajun) 40,117 0.6
  Korean 39,636 0.6
  Tagalog 33,598 0.5
  German 32,736 0.5
  Vietnamese 31,918 0.5
  Chinese 29,837 0.5
  Arabic 25,984 0.4
  African languages 21,164 0.3
  Persian 19,199 0.3
  Urdu 15,250 0.2
  Other Indic languages 13,767 0.2
  Other Asian languages 12,115 0.2
  Hindi 11,947 0.2
  hahan 10,099 0.2

RELIGIONS

The Anglican Church (later the Episcopal Church), whose members founded and populated Virginia Colony in the early days, was the established church during the colonial period. The first dissenters to arrive were Scotch-Irish Presbyterians in the late 17th century; they were followed by large numbers of German Lutherans, Welsh Baptists, and English Quakers, who settled in the Valley of Virginia in the early 18th century. The General Assembly's adoption in 1785 of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, drafted by Thomas Jefferson, disestablished the Episcopal Church and made religious toleration the norm in Virginia. Although the Episcopal and Presbyterian churches retained the allegiance of the landed gentry during the 19th century, the Methodists and Baptists became the largest church groups in the state.

Protestant denominations combined had the greatest number of known adherents in 2000. That year, the leading group was the Southern Baptist Convention, with 774,673 adherents. The United Methodist Church is considered to be the second-largest denomination in the state, with 343,580 members reported in 2003. Other major denominations in 2000 included the Presbyterian Church USA, 135,435 members, and the Episcopal Church, 126,874. In 2004, there were about 603,190 Roman Catholics in the state. The Jewish population in 2000 was estimated at 76,140 and there were an estimated 51,021 Muslims. Over 4.1 million people (about 58.4% of the population) were not counted as members of any religious organization.

Headquarters for the Baptist World Alliance are located in Falls Church.

TRANSPORTATION

Virginia has one of the nation's most extensive highway systems, one of the leading portsHampton Roadsand two of the nation's busiest air terminals.

Virginia was a leader in early railroad development. Rail lines were completed between Richmond and Fredericksburg in 1836, from Portsmouth to Roanoke in 1837, and from Richmond to Washington, DC, in 1872. Virginia's 1,290 mi (2,076 km) of track formed a strategic supply link for both the Confederate and Union armies during the Civil War. Railroads remained the primary system of transportation until the rise of the automobile in the 1920s. As of 2003, there were nine railroads operating in the state, with a combined track mileage of 3,428 mi (5,519 km). Of these, two were Class I railways with a combined trackage of 3,184 rail mi (5,126 km). The two Class I railroads were CSX, and Norfolk Southern. As of 2006, Amtrak passenger trains served 18 communities in Virginia providing north-south and east-west services.

Virginia's road network, at first built mainly for hauling tobacco to market, had expanded across the Blue Ridge by 1782, to the Cumberland Gap by 1795, and into the Shenandoah Valley by means of the Valley Turnpike in 1840. As of 2004, Virginia had 71,534 mi (115,169 km) of public roads, some 6.486 million registered vehicles, and 5,112,523 licensed drivers. Major interstate highways are I-95 extending north-south from Washington, DC, via Richmond to the North Carolina border (and, eventually, to Florida); I-81, connecting northern Virginia with the southwest; and I-64, linking the Hampton Roads area with West Virginia via Clifton Forge and Covington in the west. The 18-mi (29-km) Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel, completed in 1964, connects the Eastern Shore with the southeastern mainland. Popular scenic highways include the Blue Ridge Parkway, Colonial National Historical Parkway, and George Washington Memorial Parkway.

Virginia's District of Columbia suburbs are linked to the nation's capital by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority's bus and rail systems. Norfolk, Newport News-Hampton, and Richmond have extensive bus systems.

Virginia's Hampton Roads has one of the largest and strongest commercial port complexes in the world. Three state-owned general cargo marine terminals: Newport News Marine Terminal; Norfolk International Terminals; and Portsmouth Marine Terminal, share the harbor with more than 20 privately owned bulk terminals. The Hampton Roads harbor has the greatest volume of total tonnage on the US east coast and leads the world in coal exports. In 2004, the Port of Hampton Roads handled 48.446 million tons of cargo, making it the 15th-busiest port in the United States. Located on a naturally deep, ice-free harbor, 18 mi (29 km) from the open sea, Virginia's ports have the largest landside inter-modal facilities on the US east coast. Each general cargo terminal in the port has on-site rail connections that offer single and double-stack train service from the docks. Virginia's mid-Atlantic location and transportation infrastructure offer users of the port access to two-thirds of the US population within 24 hours. In addition to the marine terminals, the Virginia Inland Port (VIP) terminal, just west of Washington, DC, in Front Royal, Virginia, offers daily rail service to the marine terminals in Hampton Roads and allows direct access to the international trade routes of the 75 international shipping lines calling at the ports. In addition to the movement of international export and import cargo, the VIP is a full-service domestic rail ramp for Norfolk Southern's domestic service. In 2003, waterborne shipments totaled 50.033 million tons. As of 2004, Virginia had 674 mi (1,085 km) of navigable inland waterways.

In 2005, Virginia had a total of 429 public and private-use aviation-related facilities. This included 291 airports, 130 heliports, 3 STOLports (Short Take-Off and Landing), and 4 seaplane bases. Dulles International Airport located in the Washington, DC, suburb of Chantilly is the state's main airport, with 10,961,614 passengers enplaned in 2004, followed by Ronald Reagan Washington National in Arlington with 7,661,532 enplanements in that same year, making these two airports the 21st- and 30th-busiest airports in the United States, respectively. Other major airports in the state were Norfolk International, with 1,895,472 enplanements and Richmond International with 1,251,406 enplanements in 2004.

HISTORY

Distinctively fluted stone points found at Flint Run in Front Royal and at the Williamson Site in Dinwiddie County testify to the presence in what is now the Commonwealth of Virginia of nomadic Paleo-Indians after 8000 bc. Climatic changes and the arrival of other Indian groups about 3500 bc produced the Archaic Culture, which lasted until about ad 500. These Indians apparently were great eaters of oysters, and shell accumulations along riverbanks mark their settlement sites. The Woodland Period (ad 500-1600) marked the Indians' development of the bow and arrow and sophisticated pottery. At the time of English contact, early in the 17th century, Tidewater Virginia was occupied principally by Algonkian-speakers, planters as well as hunters and fishers, who lived in pole-framed dwellings forming small, palisaded towns. The piedmont area was the home of the Manahoac, Monacan, and Tutelo, all of Siouan stock. Cherokee lived in Virginia's far southwestern triangle.

The first permanent English settlement in America was established at Jamestown on 13 May 1607 in the new land named Virginia in honor of Elizabeth I, the "Virgin Queen." The successful settlement was sponsored by the London Company (also known as the Virginia Company), a joint-stock venture chartered by King James I in 1606. The charter defined Virginia as all of the North American coast between 30° and 45°n and extending inland for 50 mi (80 km). A new royal charter in 1609 placed Virginia's northern and southern boundaries at points 200 mi (320 km) north and south of Point Comfort, at the mouth of the James River, and extended its territory westward to the Pacific; a third charter issued in 1612 pushed Virginia eastward to embrace the Bermuda Islands. Thus, Virginia at one time stretched from southern Maine to California and encompassed all or part of 42 of the present 50 states, as well as Bermuda and part of the Canadian province of Ontario.

Upon landing at Jamestown, the 100 or more male colonists elected from among 12 royally approved councillors a governor and captain general, Edward Maria Wingfield. Much internal strife, conflict with the Indians, and a "starving time" that reduced the settlers to eating their horses caused them to vote to leave the colony in 1610, but just as they were leaving, three supply ships arrived; with them came Thomas West, Baron De La Warr (Lord Delaware), who stayed to govern the Virginia Colony until 1611. Finally, however, it was the energy, resourcefulness, and military skill of Captain John Smith that saved the colony from both starvation and destruction by the Indians. He also charted the coast and wrote the first American book, A True Relation, which effectively publicized English colonization of the New World.

Smith's chief Algonkian adversary was Powhatan, emperor of a confederacy in eastern Virginia that bore his name. Although Smith was taken prisoner by Powhatan, he was able to work out a tenuous peace later cemented by the marriage in 1614 of the emperor's favorite daughter, Pocahontas, to John Rolfe, a Jamestown settler who founded the colonial tobacco industry.

Three events marked 1619 as a red-letter year in Virginia history. First, women were sent to the colony in large numbers. Any man marrying one of a shipment of 90 "young maids" had to pay 120 lb of tobacco for the cost of her transportation. The women were carefully screened for respectability, and none had to marry if she did not find a man to her liking. The second key event was the arrival in Jamestown of the first blacks, probably as indentured servants, a condition from which slavery in the colony evolved (the first legally recognized slaveholder, in the 1630s, was Anthony Johnson, himself black). The third and most celebrated event of 1619 was the convening in Jamestown of the first representative assembly in the New World, consisting of a council chosen by the London Company and a House of Burgesses elected by the colonists. Thus, self-government through locally elected representatives became a reality in America and an important precedent for the English colonies.

King James I, for whom the colonial capital was named, was at first content with colonization under the London Company's direction. But in 1624, he charged the company with mismanagement and revoked its charter. Virginia remained a royal colony until 1776, although royal governors such as Sir Francis Wyatt and Sir George Yeardley continued to convoke the General Assembly without the Crown's assent. A serious challenge to self-government came in 162935 with Governor John Harvey's "executive offenses"including the knocking out of a councillor's teeth and the detaining of a petition of protest to the kingwhich sparked a rebellion led by Dr. John Pott. Harvey was bloodlessly deposed by the council, which turned, significantly, to the House of Burgesses for confirmation of the action the council had taken.

Despite serious setbacks because of Indian massacres in 1622 and 1644, the colony's population expanded rapidly along the James, York, Rappahannock, and Potomac rivers, and along the Eastern Shore. In 1653, the General Assembly attempted to collect taxes from the Eastern Shore although that area had no legislative representation. At a mass meeting, Colonel Thomas Johnson urged resistance to taxation without representation. The resulting Northampton Declaration embodied this principle, which would provide the rallying cry for the American Revolution; the immediate result was the granting of representation to the Eastern Shore.

Virginia earned the designation Old Dominion through its loyalty to the Stuarts during England's Civil War, but the superior military and naval forces of Oliver Cromwell compelled submission to parliamentary commissioners in 1652. In the eight years that followed, the House of Burgesses played an increasingly prominent role. Colonial governors, while at least nominally Puritan, usually conducted affairs with an easy tolerance that did not mar Virginia's general hospitality to refugee Cavaliers from the mother country.

With the restoration of the royal family in 1660, Sir William Berkeley, an ardent royalist who had served as governor before the colony's surrender to the Commonwealth, was returned to that office. In his first administration, his benign policies and appealing personality had earned him great popularity, but during his second term, his dictatorial and vindictive support of royal prerogatives made him the most hated man in the colony. When he seemed unable to defend the people against Indian incursions in 1676, they sought a general of their own. They found him in young Nathaniel Bacon, a charismatic planter of great daring and eloquence, whose leadership attracted many small planters impatient by this time with the privileged oligarchy directing the colony. Bacon's war against the Indians became a populist-style revolt against the governor, who fled to the Eastern Shore, and reform legislation was pushed by the burgesses. Berkeley regained control of the capital briefly, only to be defeated by Bacon's forces; but Jamestown was burned by the retreating Bacon, who died of fever shortly afterward. Berkeley's subsequent return to power was marked by so many hangings of offenders that the governor was summoned to the court of Charles II to answer for his actions. Bacon's Rebellion was cited as a precedent when the colonies waged war against George III a century later.

The 17th century closed on a note of material and cultural progress with the gubernatorial administration of Francis Nicholson. The College of William and Mary, the second institution of higher learning in America, was chartered in 1693, and Middle Plantation (renamed Williamsburg in 1722), the site of the college, became the seat of government when the capital was moved from Jamestown in 1699. The new capital remained small, although it was crowded when the legislature was in session. A new era of cultural and economic progress dawned with the administration of Alexander Spotswood (171022), sometimes considered the greatest of Virginia's colonial governors. He discouraged the colony's excessively heavy dependence on a single crop, tobacco; promoted industry, especially ironwork; took a humane interest in blacks and Indians' strengthened fortification; ended the depredations of the notorious pirate Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard; and, by leading his "Knights of the Golden Horseshoe" across the Blue Ridge, dramatized the opening of the transmontane region.

In the decades that followed, eastern Virginians moving into the Valley of Virginia were joined by Scotch-Irish and Germans moving southward from Maryland and Pennsylvania. Virginians caught up in western settlement lost much of their awe of the mother country during the French and Indian War (175663). A young Virginia militiaman, Colonel George Washington, gave wise but unheeded advice to Britain's Major General Edward Brad-dock before the Battle of Monongahela, and afterward emerged as the hero of that action.

Virginia, acting independently and with other colonies, repeatedly challenged agents of the Crown. In 1765, the House of Burgesses, swept by the eloquence of Patrick Henry, adopted five resolutions opposing the Stamp Act, through which the English Parliament had sought to tax the colonists for their own defense. In 1768, Virginia joined Massachusetts in issuing an appeal to all the colonies for concerted action. The following year, Virginia initiated a boycott of British goods in answer to the taxation provisions of the hated Townshend Acts. In 1773, the Old Dominion became the first colony to establish an intercolonial Committee of Correspondence. And it joined the other colonies at the First Continental Congress, which met in Philadelphia in 1774 and elected Virginia's Peyton Randolph president.

Virginia was the first colony to instruct its delegates to move for independence at the Continental Congress of 1776. The congressional resolution was introduced by one native son, Richard Henry Lee, and the Declaration of Independence was written by another, Thomas Jefferson. In the same year, Virginians proclaimed their government a commonwealth and adopted a constitution and declaration of rights, prepared by George Mason. The declaration became the basis for the Bill of Rights in the US Constitution. Virginians were equally active in the Revolutionary War. George Washington was commander in chief of the Continental Army, and other outstanding Virginia officers were George Rogers Clark, Hugh Mercer, Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee, William Campbell, Isaac Shelby, and an adopted son, Daniel Morgan. In addition, the greatest American naval hero was a Scottish-born Virginian, John Paul Jones. Virginia itself was a major battlefield, and it was on Virginia soil, at Yorktown on 19 October 1781, that British General Charles Cornwallis surrendered to Washington, effectively ending the war.

During the early federal period, Virginia's leadership was as no-table as it had been during the American Revolution. James Madison is honored as the "father of the Constitution," and Washington, who was president of the constitutional convention, became the first US president in 1789. Indeed, Virginians occupied the presidency for all but four of the nation's first 28 years. Far more influential than most presidents was another Virginian, John Marshall, who served as US chief justice for 34 years, beginning in 1801.

During the first half of the 19th century, Virginians became increasingly concerned with the problem of slavery. From the early 1700s, the General Assembly had repeatedly prohibited the importation of slaves, only to be overruled by the Crown, protecting the interests of British slave traders. In 1778, no longer subject to royal veto, the legislature provided that any slave brought into the state would automatically be freed upon arrival. (There was no immediate legal termination of the bondage of those already enslaved, or of their offspring.) The number of free blacks grew tenfold by 1810, and though some became self-supporting farmers and artisans, many could find no employment. Fearing that unhappy free blacks might incite those who were still slaves to rebellion, the General Assembly in 1806 decreed that each slave emancipated in due course must then leave Virginia within a year or after reaching the age of 21. Nat Turner's slave revoltwhich took the lives of at least 55 white men, women, and children in Southampton County in 1831increased white fears of black emancipation. Nevertheless, legislation to end slavery in Virginia failed adoption by only seven votes the following year.

The slavery controversy did not consume all Virginians' energies in the first half of the 19th century, an era that saw the state become a leading center of scientific, artistic, and educational advancement. But this era ended with the coming of the Civil War, a conflict about which many Virginians had grave misgivings. Governor John Letcher was a Union man, and most of the state's top political leaders hoped to retain the federal tie. Even after the formation at Montgomery, Alabama, of the Confederate States of America, Virginia initiated a national peace convention in Washington, DC, headed by a native son and former US president, John Tyler. A statewide convention, assembled in Richmond in April 1861, adopted an ordinance of secession only after President Abraham Lincoln sought to send troops across Virginia to punish the states that had already seceded and called upon the commonwealth to furnish soldiers for that task. Virginia adopted secession with some regret and apprehension but with no agonizing over constitutional principles, for in ratifying the Constitution the state had reserved the right to secede. Shortly afterward, Richmond, the capital of Virginia since 1780, became the capital of the Confederacy. It was also the home of the Tredegar Ironworks, the South's most important manufacturer of heavy weaponry.

Robert E. Lee, offered field command of the Union armies, instead resigned his US commission in order to serve his native state as commander of the Army of Northern Virginia and eventually as chief of the Confederate armies. Other outstanding Virginian generals included Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, J. E. B. "Jeb" Stuart, Joseph E. Johnston, and A. P. Hill. Besides furnishing a greater number of outstanding Confederate generals than any other state, the Old Dominion supplied some of the Union's military leaders, George H. Thomas, the "Rock of Chickamauga," among them. More than 30 Virginians held the rank of brigadier general or major general in the federal forces.

Virginia became the principal battlefield of the Civil War, the scene of brilliant victories won by General Lee's army at Bull Run (about 30 mi/48 km southwest of Washington, DC), Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville (Spotsylvania County). But the over-whelming numbers and industrial and naval might of the Union compelled Lee's surrender at Appomattox on 9 April 1865. Virginia waters were the scene of one of the most celebrated naval engagements in world history, the first battle of the ironclads, when the USS Monitor and CSS Virginia (Merrimac), rebuilt in the Portsmouth Shipyard, met at Hampton Roads. The war cost Virginia one-third of its territory when West Virginia was admitted to the Union as a separate state on 20 June 1863. Richmond was left in ruins, and agriculture and industry throughout the commonwealth were destroyed. Union General Philip H. Sheridan's systematic campaign of demolition in the Shenandoah Valley almost made good his boast that a crow flying over the valley would have to carry its own rations.

In 1867, Virginia was placed under US military rule. A constitutional convention held in Richmond under the leadership of carpetbaggers and scalawags drafted a constitution that disqualified the overwhelming majority of white Virginians from holding office and deprived about 95% of them of the right to vote. In this crisis, a compromise was negotiated under which white Virginians would accept Negro suffrage if they themselves were permitted to vote and hold office. The amended constitution, providing for universal manhood suffrage, was adopted in 1869, and Virginia was readmitted to the Union on 26 January 1870.

Although the bankrupt state was saddled with a debt of more than $45 million, the Conservative Democrats undertook repayment of the entire debt, including approximately one-third estimated to be West Virginia's share. Other Democrats, who came to be known as Readjusters, argued that the commonwealth could not provide education and other essential services to its citizens unless it disclaimed one-third of the debt and reached a compromise with creditors concerning the remainder. William Mahone, a railroad president and former Confederate major general, engineered victory for the Readjusters in 1880 with the aid of the Republicans. His election to the US Senate that year represented another success for the Readjuster-Republican coalition, which was attentive to the needs of both blacks and underprivileged whites.

Throughout the 1880s and 1890s, life in public places in Virginia continued in an unsegregated fashion that sometimes amazed visitors from northern cities. As the 19th century neared an end, however, Virginia moved toward legal separation of the races. In 1900, the General Assembly by a one-vote majority enacted segregation on railroad cars. The rule became applicable the following year to streetcars and steamboats. In 1902, the Virginia constitutional convention enacted a literacy test and poll tax that effectively reduced the black vote to negligible size.

Two decades later, just when the Old Dominion seemed permanently set in the grooves of conservatism, two liberals, each with impeccable old-line backgrounds, found themselves battling for the governor-ship in a Democratic primary campaign that changed the course of Virginia's political history. Harry F. Byrd defeated G. Walter Mapp in the election of 1925 and immediately after taking office launched the state on an era of reform. In a whirlwind 60 days, the General Assembly revised the tax system, revised balloting procedures, and adopted measures to lure industry to Virginia. The Anti-Lynch Act of 1927 made anyone present at the scene of a lynching who did not intervene guilty of murder; there has not been a lynching in Virginia since its passage. Byrd also reorganized the state government, consolidating nearly 100 agencies into 14 departments. Later, as US Senator, Byrd became so renowned as a conservative that many people forgot his earlier career as a fighting liberal.

Following the depression of the 1930s, Virginia became one of the most prosperous states of the Southeast. It profited partly from national defense contracts and military and naval expansion, but also from increased manufacturing and from what became one of the nation's leading tourist industries. Few states made so great a contribution as Virginia to the US effort in World War II. More than 300,000 Virginians served in the armed forces; 9,000 lost their lives, and 10 were awarded the Medal of Honor. Virginians were proud of the fact that General George C. Marshall was a Virginia resident and a graduate of Virginia Military Institute, and even delighted in the knowledge that both General Dwight D. Eisenhower, commander in the European theater, and General Douglas MacArthur, commander in the Pacific, were sons of Virginia mothers.

The postwar period brought many changes in the commonwealth's public life. During the first administration of Governor Mills E. Godwin Jr. (196670), the state abandoned its strict pay-as-you-go fiscal policy, secured an $81-million bond issue, and enacted a sales tax. Much of the increased revenue benefited the public school system; funding for the four-year colleges was greatly expanded, and a system of low-tuition community colleges was instituted.

In 1970, A. Linwood Holton Jr., became the first Republican governor of Virginia since 1874. Pledging to "make today's Virginia a model in race relations," Holton increased black representation on state boards and in the higher echelons of government. He reversed the policies of his immediate predecessors, who had generally met the US Supreme Court's desegregation ruling in 1954 with a program of massive resistance, eschewing violence but adopting every legal expedient to frustrate integration. By the mid-1970s, public school integration in Virginia had been achieved to a degree not yet accomplished in many northern states.

The northeast and Virginia Beach/Norfolk area of Virginia boomed in the early 1980s, spurred by an expansion of federal jobs and a national military build-up. The population in Virginia Beach grew by 50% between 1980 and 1990. Non-agricultural employment rose by 29% between 1980 and 1988. The economies of rural parts of the state to the west and south, however, remained stagnant.

In the late 1980s, Virginia was hit by a recession. Douglas Wilder, the nation's first black governor and a moderate Democrat, responded to a significant shortfall in state revenues by refusing to raise taxes and by insisting on maintaining a $200 million reserve fund. Instead, Wilder reduced the budgets and staff of state services and of the state's college and university system. Wilder's cuts created particular hardship for the less affluent counties that relied heavily on state aid for their funding of schools, libraries, and road maintenance. Wilder, limited by law to one term in office, was succeeded in 1993 by conservative Republican Richard Allen. In 1994, nationwide attention was focused on the US Senate race in which the Democratic incumbent, Charles S. Robb, defeated Republican challenger Oliver North, known for his role in the Iran-contra affair of the 1980s.

In the mid-1990s Virginia's economy was strong, thanks to its diversified base of agriculture, manufacturing, and service industries (the latter dominated by federal government employment). Pollution from industry and agricultural chemicals remained a significant concern, and the state was investing in cleanup efforts in the Chesapeake Bay.

In 1994, the Walt Disney Company abandoned its much-publicized plan to build a history theme park, "Disney's America," in Virginia, following strong opposition from residents, environmentalists, and historians.

Virginia was in the midst of its worst state revenue performance in 40 years in 2003. To help it overcome massive budget deficits, the state cut funding for higher education by more than 25% over the previous two years. Nearly all state universities raised tuition in response. Despite this fact, the State Council of Higher Education said Virginia needed to come up with an additional $350 million per year to maintain the quality of its public higher education system.

In November 2005, Democratic Lt. Governor Tim Kaine defeated Republican nominee Jerry Kilgore to become governor of Virginia. Whether justified or not, the votealong with Senator Jon Corzine's defeat of Republican nominee Doug Forrester for governor of New Jerseywas seen to be a referendum on President George W. Bush's stewardship of the nation.

STATE GOVERNMENT

Since 1776, Virginia has had six constitutions, all of which have expanded the power of the executive branch. The last constitution, framed in 1970 and effective 1 July 1971, governs the state today. As of January 2005, this document had been amended 40 times.

The General Assembly consists of a 40-member Senate, elected to four-year terms, and a 100-member house of delegates, serving for two-year terms. Senators and delegates must be US citizens, at least 21 years old, state residents for at least one year, district residents, and qualified voters. The assembly convenes annually on the second Wednesday in January for 60-day sessions in even-numbered years and 30-day sessions in odd-numbered years, with an option to extend the annual session for a maximum of 30 days or declare a special session by two-thirds vote of each house. In 2004 legislative salaries were $18,000 for state senators and $17,640 for delegates, unchanged from 1999.

The governor and lieutenant governor (elected separately), and attorney general, all serving four-year terms, are the only officials elected statewide. Elections for these offices are held in odd-numbered years, following presidential elections. The governor, who must be at least 30 years old, a US citizen, and a state resident and qualified voter for five years, may not serve two successive terms. As of December 2004, the governor's salary was $124,855. Most state officialsincluding the secretaries of administration and finance, commerce and resources, education, human resources, public safety, and transportationare appointed by the governor but must be confirmed by both houses of the legislature.

Bills become law when signed by the governor or left unsigned for seven days (including Sundays) while the legislature is in session; a bill dies if left unsigned for 30 days after the legislature has adjourned. A two-thirds majority of those present in each house is needed to override a gubernatorial veto. The constitution may be amended by constitutional convention or by a majority vote of two sessions of the General Assembly; ratification by the electorate is required.

Voters must be US citizens, at least 18 years old, and residents of their voting precinct. Restrictions apply to convicted felons and those declared mentally incompetent by the court.

POLITICAL PARTIES

Virginia has exercised a unique role in US politics as the birthplace not only of representative government but also of one of America's two major parties. The modern Democratic Party traces its origins to the original Republican Party (usually referred to as the Democratic-Republican Party, or the Jeffersonian Democrats), led by two native sons of Virginia, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. Virginians have also been remarkably influential in the political life of other states: a survey published in 1949 showed that 319 Virginia natives had represented 31 other states in the US Senate and House of Representatives.

From the end of Reconstruction through the 1960s, conservative Democrats dominated state politics, with few exceptions. Harry F. Byrd was the state's Democratic political leader for 40 years, first as a reform governor (192630) and then as a conservative senator (193395). During the 1970s, Virginians, still staunchly conservative, turned increasingly to the Republican Party, whose presidential nominees carried the state in every election from 1952 through 1984, except for 1964. Linwood Holton, the first Republican governor since Reconstruction, was elected in 1969. His Republican successor, Mills E. Godwin Jr., the first governor since the Civil War to serve more than one term, had earlier

Virginia Presidential Vote by Political Parties, 19482004
YEAR ELECTORAL VOTE VIRGINIA WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN STATES' RIGHTS DEMOCRAT PROGRESSIVE SOCIALIST SOCIALIST LABOR
*Won US presidential election
**Candidates of the nationwide Citizens and Socialist Workers parties were listed as independents on the Virginia ballot; another independent, John Anderson, won 95,418 votes.
1948 11 *Truman (D) 200,786 172,070 43,393 2,047 726 234
1952 12 *Eisenhower (R) 268,677 349,037 504 1,160
CONSTITUTION
1956 12 *Eisenhower (R) 267,760 386,459 42,964 444 351
VA. CONSERVATIVE
1960 12 Nixon (R) 362,327 404,521 4,204 397
1964 12 *Johnson (D) 558,038 481,334 2,895
AMERICAN IND. PEACE AND FREEDOM
1968 12 *Nixon (R) 442,387 590,319 320,272 1,680 4,671
AMERICAN
1972 12 *Nixon (R) 438,887 988,493 19,721 9,918
LIBERTARIAN US LABOR SOC. WORKERS
1976 12 Ford (R) 813,896 836,554 16,686 4,648 7,508 17,802
CITIZENS
1980 12 *Reagan (R) 752,174 989,609 12,821 **14,024 1,9861
1984 12 *Reagan (R) 796,250 1,337,078
NEW ALLIANCE
1988 12 *Bush (R) 859,799 1,309,162 14,312 8,336
IND. (Perot) IND. (laRouche)
1992 13 Bush (R) 1,038,650 1,150,517 3,192 5,730 348,639 11,937
1996 13 Dole (R) 1,091,060 1,138,350 9,174 159,861
GREEN
2000 13 *Bush, G. W. (R) 1,217,290 1,437,490 59,398 15,198
WRITE-IN (Nader) CONSTITUTION. (Peroutka) WRITE-IN (Cobb).
2004 13 *Bush, G. W. (R) 1,454,742 1,716,959 2,393 11,032 10,161 104

won election as a Democrat. The election in 1977 of another Republican, John N. Dalton, finally proved that Virginia had become a two-party state. In 1981, however, the governorship was won by Democrat Charles S. Robb, who appointed a record number of blacks and women to state offices. Robb, prohibited by law from seeking a consecutive second term, was succeeded by Democrat Gerald L. Baliles in 1985 when Virginians also elected L. Douglas Wilder as lieutenant governor and Mary Sue Terry as attorney general. Wilder became the highest-ranking black state official in the United States, and Terry was the first woman to win a statewide office in Virginia. Wilder was elected governor in 1989, followed by Republican George Allen in 1993. Another Republican, James S. Gilmore III, was elected to the office in the 1997 election. Democrats Mark Warner and Tim Kaine were elected governor in 2001 and 2005, respectively.

Former governor Robb won election to the US Senate in 1988 and reelection in 1994 when he was opposed by Republican Oliver North, a former Marine and Reagan White House aide who gained fame for his role in the Iran-contra affair. Republican George F. Allen won the seat in 2000. Senior Senator John Warner, a Republican, was elected to a fifth term in 2002.

After the 2004 elections, Virginia's delegation to the US House of Representatives consisted of three Democrats and eight Republicans. As of the 2005 state legislative elections, control of the state Senate and house was in the hands of the Republicans. Republicans controlled the state House, 58-39, with 3 independents; the state Senate was split 24-16, Republicans to Democrats.

In 2000, Republican George W. Bush won 52% of the presidential vote; Democrat Al Gore received 45%; and Green Party candidate Ralph Nader garnered 2%. In 2004, incumbent Bush won 54% over Democratic challenger John Kerry's 45%. In 2004 there were 4,528,000 registered voters; there is no party registration in the state. The state had 13 electoral votes in the 2004 presidential election.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

As of 2005, Virginia had 125 counties and 229 municipal governments, as well as 196 special districts and 135 school districts.

During the colonial period, most Virginians lived on plantations and were reluctant to form towns. In 1705, the General Assembly approved the formation of 16 "free boroughs." Although only Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Norfolk chose at that time to avail themselves of the option and become independent municipalities, their decision laid the foundation for the independence of Virginia's present-day cities from county government. In 1842, Richmond became the commonwealth's first charter city. Cities elect their own officials (typically including council members and city managers), levy their own taxes, and are unencumbered by county obligations. Incorporated towns, on the other hand, remain part of the counties.

In general, counties are governed by elected boards of supervisors, with a county administrator or executive handling day-today affairs; other typical county officials are the clerk of the circuit court (chief administrator of the court), the county treasurer, the commissioner of the revenue, the commonwealth's attorney, and the sheriff. Incorporated towns have elected mayors and councils.

In 2005, local government accounted for about 298,240 full-time (or equivalent) employment positions.

STATE SERVICES

To address the continuing threat of terrorism and to work with the federal Department of Homeland Security, homeland security in Virginia operates under executive order and state statute; a special assistant to the governor is designated as the state homeland security advisor.

Under the jurisdiction of the secretary of education are the Department of Education, which administers the public school system, and the State Council of Higher Education, which coordinates the programs of the state-controlled colleges and universities. The secretary of transportation oversees the Department of Transportation, Department of Rail and Public Transportation, Department of Aviation, Virginia Port Authority, Department of Motor Vehicles, the Motor Vehicle Dealer Board. The Virginia National Guard falls under the authority of the Department of Military Affairs.

Within the purview of the secretary of health and human resources are the Department of Health; Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Substance Abuse Services; Department of Health Professions, Department of Social Services, and Department of Rehabilitative Services, as well as special offices dealing with problems that affect women, children, the elderly, and the disabled. The departments of State Police, Corrections, Criminal Justice Services, Fire Programs, and Alcoholic Beverage Control are under the aegis of the secretary of public safety.

The secretary of commerce and trade oversees the departments of Housing and Community Development, Labor and Industry, Business Assistance, the Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy, and the Tourism Corporation, as well as a profusion of boards, councils, offices, divisions, and commissions. The secretary of administration exercises jurisdiction over budgeting, telecommunications, accounting, computer services, taxation, the state treasury, records, and personnel, as well as over the State Board of Elections. Regulatory functions are concentrated in the quasi-independent State Corporation Commission, consisting of three commissioners elected by the legislature to staggered six-year terms. The commission regulates all public utilities; licenses banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, and small loan companies; enforces motor carrier and certain aviation laws and sets railroad rates; supervises the activities of insurance companies; and enforces laws governing securities and retail franchising. Natural resources are protected by the Department of Environmental Quality, the Department of Forestry, and the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

JUDICIAL SYSTEM

The highest judicial body in the commonwealth is the Supreme Court, consisting of a chief justice and six other justices elected to 12-year terms by the General Assembly. The court of appeals has ten judges serving 8-year terms. The state is divided into 31 judicial circuits/districts. Each city and county has a circuit court, a general district court, and a juvenile and domestic relations district court. Circuit court judges are elected by the legislature for eight-year terms. General district courts hear all misdemeanors, including civil cases involving $1,000 or less, and have concurrent jurisdiction with the circuit courts in claims involving $1,000 to $15,000. General district courts also hold preliminary hearings concerning felony cases. Each of the 31 judicial districts has a juvenile and a domestic relations court, with judges elected by the General Assembly to six-year terms. Each city or county has at least one local magistrate.

As of 31 December 2004, a total of 35,564 prisoners were held in Virginia's state and federal prisons, an increase from 35,067 of 1.4% from the previous year. As of year-end 2004, a total of 2,706 inmates were female, up from 2,681 or 0.9% from the year before. Among sentenced prisoners (one year or more), Virginia had an incarceration rate of 473 per 100,000 population in 2004.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Virginia in 2004, had a violent crime rate (murder/nonnegligent manslaughter; forcible rape; robbery; aggravated assault) of 275.6 reported incidents per 100,000 population, or a total of 20,559 reported incidents. Crimes against property (burglary; larceny/theft; and motor vehicle theft) in that same year totaled 199,668 reported incidents or 2,676.6 reported incidents per 100,000 people. Virginia has a death penalty which allows prisoners to choose either lethal injection or electrocution. From 1976 through 5 May 2006, the state has carried out 95 executions (the second-highest in the United States, after Texas), of which the most recent execution took place in 2006 (prior to May 5). There were no executions in 2005 As of 1 January 2006, Virginia had 22 inmates on death row.

In 2003, Virginia spent $1,958,536,955 on homeland security, an average of $267 per state resident.

ARMED FORCES

In 2004, there were 90,088 active-duty military personnel and 78,792 civilian personnel stationed in Virginia. The Hampton Roads area, one of the nation's major concentrations of military facilities, includes Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, the Norfolk naval air station and shipyard, the naval air station at Virginia Beach, the Marine Corps air facility and command and staff college at Quantico, and Forts Eustis, Belvoir, and Lee. Langley hosts the 1st Fighter Wing which operates and maintains one of the largest fighter bases in Air Combat Command. The wing flies the F-15 Eagle. Norfolk is the home base of the Atlantic Fleet, and several major army and air commands are in Virginia. Virginia's major defense establishments also include an army base at Arlington. Also, located there is Arlington National Cemetery established by Brig. Gen. Montgomery C. Meigs for use as a military cemetery on June 15, 1864.

In 2004, Virginia firms received more than $23.5 billion in defense contracts, second to California. In addition, Virginia had the highest defense payroll outlays in the United States, $15.99 billion, highest in both civilian pay and military active duty pay.

In 2003, there were 750,950 veterans of US military service living in Virginia. Of these, 70, 802 saw service in World War II; 60,921 during the Korean conflict; 216,388 during the Vietnam era; and 168,444 during the Persian Gulf War. Veterans' benefits allocated to Virginia totaled more than $1.7 billion in 2004.

As of 31 October 2004, the Virginia State Police employed 1,840 full-time sworn officers.

MIGRATION

Virginia's earliest European immigrants were Englishonly a few hundred at first, but 4,000 between 1619 and 1624, of whom fewer than 1,200 survived epidemics and Indian attacks. Despite such setbacks, Virginia's population increased, mostly by means of immigration, from about 5,000 in 1634 to more than 15,000 in 1642, including 300 blacks. Within 30 years, the population had risen to more than 40,000, including 2,000 blacks. In the late 17th and early 18th centuries, immigrants came not only from England but also from Scotland, Wales, Ireland, Germany, France, the Netherlands, and Poland. In 1701, about 500 French Huguenots fled Catholic France to settle near the present site of Richmond, and beginning in 1714, many Germans and Scotch-Irish moved from Pennsylvania into the Valley of Virginia.

By the early 19th century, Virginians were moving westward into Kentucky, Ohio, and other states; the 1850 census showed that 388,000 former Virginians (not including the many thousands of slaves sold to other states) were living elsewhere. Some of those who leftHenry Clay, Sam Houston, Stephen Austinwere among the most able men of their time. The Civil War era saw the movement of thousands of blacks to northern states, a trend that accelerated after Reconstruction and again after World War I. Since 1900, the dominant migratory trend has been intrastate, from farm to city. Urbanization has been most noticeable since World War II in the Richmond and Hampton Roads areas. At the same time, the movement of middle-income Virginians to the suburbs and increasing concentrations of blacks in the central cities have been evident in Virginia as in other states. During the 1980s, the urban population grew from 66% to 69.4% of the total population; during the 1990s it reached 77.9%.

Between 1940 and 1970, Virginia enjoyed a net gain from migration of 325,000. In the 1970s, the net gain was 239,000, and during 198590, 377,000 (fourth highest among the states for that period). Between 1990 and 1998, Virginia had net gains of 68,000 in domestic migration and 131,000 in international migration. In 1996, 372,000, or about 6%, of the state's population was foreign-born. In 1998, 15,686 foreign immigrants arrived in Virginia, the ninth-highest total of any state. Of that total, 1,509 came from El Salvador, 921 from the Philippines, and 910 from India. Between 1990 and 1998, Virginia's overall population increased 9.7%. In the period 200005, net international migration was 139,977 and net internal migration was 103,521, for a net gain of 243,498 people.

INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERATION

Regional bodies in which Virginia participates include the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission, Southern Growth Policies Board, Southern States Energy Board, Southeastern Forest Fire Protection Compact, Ohio River Basin Commission, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Southern Regional Education Board, Appalachian Regional Commission, Potomac River Fisheries Commission (with Maryland) and Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. The Delmarva Advisory Council, representing Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, works with local organizations on the Delmarva Peninsula to develop and implement economic improvement programs. The state also has a number of border compacts, including ones with Maryland, West Virginia, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, and Tennessee. In fiscal year 2005, Virginia received federal grants worth $5.269 billion, an estimated $5.495 billion in fiscal year 2006, and an estimated $5.744 billion in fiscal year 2007.

ECONOMY

Early settlements in Virginia depended on subsistence farming of native crops such as corn and potatoes. Tobacco, the leading export crop during the colonial era, was joined by cotton during the early statehood period. Although cotton was never "king" in Virginia, as it was in many other southern states, the sale of slaves to Deep South plantations was an important source of income for Virginians, especially during the 1830s, when some 118,000 slaves were exported for profit. Eventually, a diversified agriculture developed in the piedmont and the Shenandoah Valley. Manufacturing became significant during the 19th century, with a proliferation of cotton mills, tobacco-processing plants, ironworks, paper mills, and shipyards.

Services, trade, and government are important economic sectors today. Because of Virginia's extensive military installations and the large number of Virginia residents working for the federal government in the Washington DC metropolitan area, the federal government plays a larger role in the state's economy than in any other except Hawaii. The industries that experienced the most growth in the 1990s were printing, transportation equipment, electronic and other electrical equipment. Between 1992 and 2000, job growth in Virginia averaged 2.7% a year, and in northern Virginia, the rate was 4% a year. The state's economy as a whole grew briskly, averaging 7.13% a year from 1998 to 2000. However, the high con-centration of high-technology industries in Virginia, the two largest being computer and data processing services, and electronic equipment, meant that the collapse of the dot.com bubble in the national recession of 2001 would have negative impacts, despite counter-cyclical increases in government spending. The growth rate moderated to 4.7% in 2001, employment contracted., and for 2000/01 tax revenues, growth fell by more than half. By November 2002 employment was still 1.5% below the peak reached in March 2001. Tax revenues in 2001/02 declined 4%, facing the state with a billion dollar deficit after successive years of budget surpluses.

In 2004, Virginia's gross state product (GSP) was $329.332 billion, of which the real estate sector accounted for the largest share at $40.274 billion or 12.2% of GSP, followed by manufacturing (durable and nondurable goods) at $38.345 billion (11.6% of GSP) and professional and technical services at $33.911 billion (10.2% of GSP). In that same year, there were an estimated 567,830 small businesses in Virginia. Of the 172,785 businesses that had employees, an estimated total of 169,053 or 97.8% were small companies. An estimated 24,134 new businesses were established in the state in 2004, up 9.4% from the year before. Business terminations that same year came to 19,919, down 3% from 2003. There were 750 business bankruptcies in 2004, down 21.5% from the previous year. In 2005, the state's personal bankruptcy (Chapter 7 and Chapter 13) filing rate was 583 filings per 100,000 people, ranking Virginia 22nd in the nation.

INCOME

In 2005 Virginia had a gross state product (GSP) of $353 billion which accounted for 2.8% of the nation's gross domestic product and placed the state at number 11 in highest GSP among the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, in 2004 Virginia had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $36,160. This ranked ninth in the United States and was 109% of the national average of $33,050. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of PCPI was 4.5%. Virginia had a total personal income (TPI) of $270,521,697,000, which ranked 10th in the United States and reflected an increase of 7.7% from 2003. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of TPI was 5.8%. Earnings of persons employed in Virginia increased from $196,522,936,000 in 2003 to $213,341,529,000 in 2004, an increase of 8.6%. The 200304 national change was 6.3%.

The US Census Bureau reports that the three-year average median household income for 200204 in 2004 dollars was $53,275 compared to a national average of $44,473. During the same period an estimated 9.8% of the population was below the poverty line as compared to 12.4% nationwide.

LABOR

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), in April 2006 the seasonally adjusted civilian labor force in Virginia 4,013,400, with approximately 134,100 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 3.3%, compared to the national average of 4.7% for the same period. Preliminary data for the same period placed nonfarm employment at 3,724,800. Since the beginning of the BLS data series in 1976, the highest unemployment rate recorded in Virginia was 7.8% in January 1983. The historical low was 2.2% in January 2001. Preliminary nonfarm employment data by occupation for April 2006 showed that approximately 7% of the labor force was employed in construction; 7.9% in manufacturing; 17.8% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 5.2% in financial activities; 8.9% in professional and business services; 10.7% in education and health services; 8.9% in leisure and hospitality services; and 17.9% in government.

Although the state has no equal-employment statute, an equal-pay law does prohibit employers from wage discrimination on the basis of sex, and the Virginia Employment Contracting Act established as state policy the elimination of racial, religious, ethnic, and sexual bias in the employment practices of government agencies and contractors. The labor movement has grown slowly, partly because of past practices of racial segregation that prevented workers from acting in concert.

The BLS reported that in 2005, a total of 165,000 of Virginia's 3,406,000 employed wage and salary workers were formal members of a union. This represented 4.8% of those so employed, down from 5.3% in 2004, and well below the national average of 12%. Overall in 2005, a total of 211,000 workers (6.2%) in Virginia were covered by a union or employee association contract, which included those workers who reported no union affiliation. Virginia is one of 22 states with a right-to-work law.

As of 1 March 2006, Virginia had a state-mandated minimum wage rate of $5.15 per hour. In 2004, women in the state accounted for 47.4% of the employed civilian labor force.

AGRICULTURE

Virginia ranked 31st among the 50 states in 2005 with farm marketings of more than $2.6 billion. The commonwealth is an important producer of tobacco, soybeans, peanuts, cotton, tomatoes, potatoes, and peaches. There were an estimated 47,500 farms in 2004, covering 8.6 million acres (3.5 million hectares).

The Tidewater is an important farming region, as it has been since the early 17th century. Crops grown include corn, wheat, tobacco, cotton, peanuts and truck crops. Truck crops and soybeans are cultivated on the Eastern Shore. The piedmont is known for its apples and other fruits, while the Shenandoah Valley is one of the nation's main apple growing regions. In 2004, Virginia ranked fourth among states in tobacco, seventh in peanuts, and sixth in apples. In 2004, greenhouse/nursery products accounted for 8.7% of farm receipts.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

In 2005, Virginia farms and ranches had 1.6 million cattle and calves, valued at $1.26 billion. During 2004, the state had around 375,000 hogs and pigs, valued at $32.6 million. The state produced 3.5 million lb (1.6 million kg) of sheep and lambs in 2003, and an estimated 226,000 lb of shorn wool in 2004.

Dairy farmers produced 1.73 billion lb (0.79 billion kg) of milk from 113,000 milk cows in 2003. That same year, poultry farmers produced 744 million eggs, worth around $73.2 million; 492.2 million lb (223.7 million kg) of turkey, worth almost $177.2 million; 1.3 billion lb (590 million kg) of broilers, valued at $441.7 million; and 21.7 million lb (9.9 million kg) of chicken sold for over $1.5 million.

FISHING

The relative importance of Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic fisheries to Virginia's economy has lessened considerably in recent decades, although the state continues to place high in national rankings. In 2004, Virginia's commercial fish landings totaled 481.6 million lb (218.9 million kg), ranking the state third in the nation for volume of landings. The catch was worth $160.3 million. Landings at the Reedville port totaled over 400.5 million lb (182 million kg), the second highest volume of all US ports. The port at Hampton Road Area ranked third in the nation in catch value with $100.6 million. The bulk of the catch consists of shellfish such as crabs, scallops, and clams, and finfish such as flounder and menhaden. The sea scallop catch in 2004 was at 19.6 million lb (8.9 million kg), the second largest in the nation (after Massachusetts).

In 2003, there were 28 processing and 57 wholesale plants in the state, with about 1,801 employees. In 2001, the commercial fishing fleet had 261 vessels.

Both saltwater and freshwater fish are avidly sought by sport fishermen. A threat to Virginia fisheries has been the chemical and oil pollution of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. In 2004, the state issued 619,853 fishing licenses. The Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery is located in Charles City.

FORESTRY

As of 2004, Virginia had 15,844,000 acres (6,412,000 hectares) of forestland, representing more than 63% of the state's land area and 2.1% of all US forests. Virtually every county has some commercial forestland and supports a wood products industry. In 2004, 1,474 million board feet of lumber were produced.

Reforestation programs initiated by the Division of Forestry in 1971 have paid landowners to plant pine seedlings, and state-funded tree nurseries produce 60-70 million seedlings annually. The Division of Forestry's tree seed orchards have developed improved strains of loblolly, shortleaf, white, and Virginia pine for planting in cutover timberland.

For recreational purposes, there were 2.7 million acres (1.1 million hectares) of forested public lands in 2004, including Shenandoah National Park, Washington and Jefferson National Forests, 24 state parks, and eight state forests.

MINING

According to preliminary data from the US Geological Survey (USGS), the estimated value of nonfuel mineral production by Virginia in 2003 was $727 million, an increase from 2002 of about 5%. The USGS data ranked Virginia as 19th among the 50 states by the total value of its nonfuel mineral production, accounting for almost 2% of total US output.

According to the preliminary data for 2003, crushed stone was the state's top raw nonfuel mineral, by value, accounting for around 59% of Virginia's total nonfuel mineral output, and was followed by cement (portland and masonry), construction sand and gravel, and lime. Collectively, these four commodities accounted for around 86% of all nonfuel mineral output, by value. Virginia in 2003 was the only state to mine kyanite, while it ranked (by value) second in the production of feldspar, zirconium concentrates, and titanium. Virginia was also second (out of two states) in the production of vermiculite and was fourth in the output of iron oxide pigments.

The preliminary data for 2003 showed crushed stone output at 63 million metric tons, with a value of $428 million, with construction sand and gravel production that same year as totaling 11.1 million metric tons, with a value of $63.8 million. Kyanite production in 2003 was estimated at 90,000 metric tons, with a value of $13.4 million.

Virginia in 2003 also produced dimension stone and common clays.

ENERGY AND POWER

As of 2003, Virginia had 39 electrical power service providers, of which 16 were publicly owned and 13 were cooperatives. Of the remainder, five were investor owned, one was federally operated, one was the owner of an independent generator that sold directly to customers, one was an energy-only supplier and two were delivery-only providers. As of that same year there were 3,301,904 retail customers. Of that total, 2,728,215 received their power from investor-owned service providers. Cooperatives accounted for 411,861 customers, while publicly owned providers had 159,588 customers. There was only one federal customer, one independent generator or "facility" customer, and 2,238 energy-only supplier customers. There was no data on the number of delivery-only customers.

Total net summer generating capability by the state's electrical generating plants in 2003 stood at 21.257 million k W, with total production that same year at 75.309 billion kWh. Of the total amount generated, 82.1% came from electric utilities, with the remainder coming from independent producers and combined heat and power service providers. The largest portion of all electric power generated, 37.093 billion kWh (49.3%), came from coal-fired plants, with nuclear generating plants in second place at 24.816 billion kWh (33%) and petroleum fueled plants in third at 5.780 billion kWh (7.7%). Other renewable power sources, natural gas fueled plants, hydroelectric and pumped storage facilities accounting for the remaining generation.

As of 2006, Virginia had two nuclear power plants: the North Anna plant in Louisa County; and the Surry plant near Williamsburg.

As of 2004, Virginia had proven crude oil reserves of less than 1% of all proven US reserves, while output that same year averaged 52 barrels per day. Including federal offshore domains, the state that year ranked 32nd (31st excluding federal offshore) in production among the 31 producing states. In 2004 Virginia had 10 producing oil wells and accounted for under 1% of all US production. As of 2005, the state's single crude oil refinery at Yorktown had a distillation capacity of 58,600 barrels per day.

The state is supplied with natural gas by three major interstate pipeline companies. Liquefied natural gas plants operate in Chesapeake, Roanoke, and Lynchburg, and a synthetic gas plant is in service at Chesapeake. There is underground natural gas storage facilities in Scott and Washington Counties and in Saltville.

In 2004, Virginia had 3,870 producing natural gas and gas con-densate wells. In that same year, the production of dry or consumer-grade natural gas totaled 152.495 billion cu ft (4.33 billion cu m). As of 31 December 2004, proven reserves of dry natural gas totaled 1,742 billion cu ft (49.47 billion cu m).

Virginia in 2004 had 123 producing coal mines, 46 of which were surface operations and 77 were underground. Coal production that year totaled 31,420,000 short tons, down from 31,596,000 short tons in 2003. Of the total produced in 2004, underground mines accounted for 20,437,000 short tons. All of the coal produced was bituminous. Recoverable coal reserves in 2004 totaled 250 million short tons. One short ton equals 2,000 lb (0.907 metric tons).

INDUSTRY

Beginning with the establishment of a glass factory at Jamestown in 1608, manufacturing grew slowly during the colonial era to include flour mills and, by 1715, an iron foundry. During the 19th century, the shipbuilding industry flourished, and many cotton mills, tanneries, and ironworks were built. Light industries producing a wide variety of consumer goods developed later.

Richmond is a principal industrial area for tobacco processing, paper and printing, clothing, and food products. Nearby Hopewell is a locus of the chemical industry. Newport News, Hampton, and Norfolk are centers for shipbuilding and the manufacture of other transportation equipment. In the western part of the state, Lynchburg is a center for electrical machinery, metals, clothing, and printing, and Roanoke for food, clothing, and textiles. In the south, Martinsville has a concentration of furniture and textile-manufacturing plants, and textiles are also dominant in Danville.

According to the US Census Bureau's Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) for 2004, Virginia's manufacturing sector covered some 19 product subsectors. The shipment value of all products manufactured in the state that same year was $87.842 billion. Of that total, beverage and tobacco product manufacturing accounted for the largest share at $12.856 billion. It was followed by transportation equipment manufacturing at $12.211 billion; food manufacturing at $10.007 billion; chemical manufacturing at $7.864 billion; and plastics and rubber products manufacturing at $4.864 billion.

In 2004, a total of 284,076 people in Virginia were employed in the state's manufacturing sector, according to the ASM. Of that total, 206,060 were actual production workers. In terms of total employment, the transportation equipment manufacturing industry accounted for the largest portion of all manufacturing employees, with 38,533 (27,606 actual production workers). It was followed by food manufacturing, with 30,982 (23,946 actual production workers); plastics and rubber products manufacturing, with 20,032 (15,772 actual production workers); wood product manufacturing, with 18,753 (14,802 actual production workers); and furniture and related product manufacturing, with 17,633 (14,738 actual production workers).

ASM data for 2004 showed that Virginia's manufacturing sector paid $11.915 billion in wages. Of that amount, the transportation equipment manufacturing sector accounted for the largest share at $1.836 billion. It was followed by computer and electronic product manufacturing at $1.222 million; food manufacturing at $936.758 million; chemical manufacturing at $920.204 million; and plastics and rubber products manufacturing at $804.629 million.

COMMERCE

According to the 2002 Census of Wholesale Trade, Virginia's wholesale trade sector had sales that year totaling $69.2 billion from 7,712 establishments. Wholesalers of durable goods accounted for 4,990 establishments, followed by nondurable goods wholesalers at 2,182 and electronic markets, agents, and brokers accounting for 540 establishments. Sales by durable goods wholesalers in 2002 totaled $33.8 billion, while wholesalers of nondurable goods saw sales of $27.06 billion. Electronic markets, agents, and brokers in the wholesale trade industry had sales of $8.3 billion.

In the 2002 Census of Retail Trade, Virginia was listed as having 28,914 retail establishments with sales of $80.5 billion. The leading types of retail businesses by number of establishments were: clothing and clothing accessories stores (3,924); gasoline stations (3,623); food and beverage stores (3,383); and miscellaneous store retailers (3,313). In terms of sales, motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers accounted for the largest share of retail sales at $20.1 billion, followed by general merchandise stores at $12.5 billion; food and beverage stores at $11.8 billion; and gasoline stations at $7.8 billion. A total of 401,921 people were employed by the retail sector in Virginia that year.

Virginia is a major container shipping center, with almost all shipments handled through the Hampton Roads estuary. Coal is the leading exported commodity and residual fuel oil the principal import. Exports of goods originating within Virginia totaled $12.2 billion in 2005.

CONSUMER PROTECTION

Consumer protection issues are generally the responsibility of the state's Office of Consumer Affairs, which is under the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, although the Office of the Attorney General does have limited authority to act on consumer protection issues. The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs regulates food processors and handlers, product labeling, the use of pesticides, and product safety, and through its Office of Consumer Affairs is also responsible for the enforcement of consumer protection laws as well as acting as the central clearing-house for consumer complaints in Virginia.

When dealing with consumer protection issues, the state's Attorney General's Office can initiate civil proceedings and to a limited extent, criminal proceedings. The office can represent the state before state and federal regulatory agencies, but can only offer legal opinions regarding the administration of consumer protection and education programs and in the handling of formal consumer complaints. In consumer matters the Attorney General's Office has limited subpoena powers. In antitrust actions, the Attorney General's Office can act on behalf of those consumers who are incapable of acting on their own; initiate damage actions on behalf of the state in state courts; initiate criminal proceedings; and represent counties, cities and other governmental entities in recovering civil damages under state or federal law.

The offices of the state's Office of Consumer Affairs, and the Antitrust and Consumer Litigation Section of the Attorney General's Office are located in Richmond. County government consumer affairs offices are located in the cities of Arlington and Fairfax. City government consumer protection offices are located in Alexandria and Virginia Beach.

BANKING

As of June 2005, Virginia had 140 insured banks, savings and loans, and saving banks, in addition to 61 state-chartered and 161 federally chartered credit unions (CUs). Excluding the CUs, the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria market area, which includes portions of Maryland, West Virginia and the District of Columbia, accounted for the largest portion of the state's financial institutions and deposits in 2004, with 103 institutions and $130.985 billion in deposits, followed by the Richmond market area with 36 institutions and $33.475 billion in deposits. As of June 2005, CUs accounted for 16.1% of all assets held by all financial institutions in the state, or some $48.182 billion. Banks, savings and loans, and savings banks collectively accounted for the remaining 83.9% or $250.480 billion in assets held.

The median net interest margin (the difference between the lower rates offered to savers and the higher rates charged on loans) as of fourth quarter 2005 stood at 4.25%, up from 3.94% in 2004 and 3.95% in 2003. The median percentage of past-due/nonaccrual loans to total loans in fourth quarter 2005 stood at 0.99%, down from 1% in 2004 and 1.52% in 2003.

Regulation of Virginia's state-chartered banks and other state-chartered financial institutions is the responsibility of the State Corporation Commission's Bureau of Financial Institutions.

INSURANCE

Virginians held over 4.5 million individual life insurance policies worth over $338.8 billion in 2004; total value for all categories of life insurance (individual, group, and credit) was over $597 billion. The average coverage amount is $73,800 per policy holder. Death benefits paid that year totaled $1.6 billion.

As of 2003, there were 19 property and casualty and 14 life and health insurance companies domiciled in the state. In 2004, direct premiums for property and casualty insurance totaled over $9.8 billion. That year, there were 84,492 flood insurance policies in force in the state, with a total value of $14.2 billion. About $3.6 billion of coverage was held through FAIR plans, which are designed to offer coverage for some natural circumstances, such as wind and hail, in high risk areas.

In 2004, 59% of state residents held employment-based health insurance policies, 7% held individual policies, and 19% were covered under Medicare and Medicaid; 14% of residents were uninsured. In 2003, employee contributions for employment-based health coverage averaged at 19% for single coverage. The employee contribution rate of 30% for family coverage is one of the highest averages among the fifty states. The state does not offer a health benefits expansion program in connection with the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA, 1986), a health insurance program for those who lose employment-based coverage due to termination or reduction of work hours.

In 2003, there were over 5.6 million auto insurance policies in effect for private passenger cars. Required minimum coverage includes bodily injury liability of up to $25,000 per individual and $50,000 for all persons injured in an accident, as well as property damage liability of $20,000. Uninsured motorist coverage is also required. In 2003, the average expenditure per vehicle for insurance coverage was $657.37.

SECURITIES

There are no securities exchanges in Virginia. In 2005, there were 3,130 personal financial advisers employed in the state and 5,060 securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents. In 2004, there were over 215 publicly traded companies within the state, with over 83 NASDAQ companies, 47 NYSE listings, and 10 AMEX listings. In 2006, the state 18 Fortune 500 companies; Sprint Nextel (based in Reston) ranked first in the state and 59th in the nation with revenues of over $34.6 billion, followed by General Dynamics (Falls Church), Dominion Resources (Richmond), Capital One Financial (McLean), and Smithfield Foods (Smith-field). All of these top five companies are listed on the NYSE.

PUBLIC FINANCE

Virginia's resources are divided equally into two portions: the general fund (which comes from general state taxes), and the non-general fund (which is used for set purposes). Total general funds for fiscal year 2002 were over $12 billion, 64% from individual income taxes, 20% from sales taxes, and 4% from corporate taxes. The governor's fiscal year 200002 budget emphasized a property tax phase-out.

Fiscal year 2006 general funds were estimated at $15.8 billion for resources and $15.2 billion for expenditures. In fiscal year 2004, federal government grants to Virginia were $7.9 billion.

TAXATION

In 2005, Virginia collected $15,919 million in tax revenues or $2,104 per capita, which placed it 26th among the 50 states in per capita tax burden. The national average was $2,192 per capita. Property taxes accounted for 0.1% of the total, sales taxes 19.4%, selective sales taxes 15.0%, individual income taxes 52.5%, corporate income taxes 3.8%, and other taxes 9.2%.

As of 1 January 2006, Virginia had four individual income tax brackets ranging from 2.0% to 5.75%. The state taxes corporations at a flat rate of 6.0%.

In 2004, state and local property taxes amounted to $7.8 billion or $1,031 per capita. The per capita amount ranks the state 21st nationally. Local governments collected $7,694,442,000 of the total and the state government $20,778,000.

Virginia taxes retail sales at a rate of 4%. In addition to the state tax, local taxes on retail sales can reach as much as 1%, making for a potential total tax on retail sales of 5%. Food purchased for consumption off-premises is taxable, but at a lower rate. The tax on cigarettes is 30 cents per pack, which ranks 45th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Virginia taxes gasoline at 17.5 cents per gallon. This is in addition to the 18.4 cents per gallon federal tax on gasoline.

According to the Tax Foundation, for every federal tax dollar sent to Washington in 2004, Virginia citizens received $1.66 in federal spending, which ranks the state seventh nationally.

ECONOMIC POLICY

The state government actively promotes a pro-business climate. Conservative traditions, low tax rates, low wage rates, a weak labor movement, and excellent access to eastern and overseas markets are the general incentives for companies to relocate into Virginia. Five duty-free foreign trade zones have been established in Virginia.

The Virginia Economic Development Partnership extends low-interest loans to creditworthy companies to purchase land, buildings, and machinery if conventional financing is not available. The state also issues revenue bonds to finance industrial projectsa

VirginiaState Government Finances
(Dollar amounts in thousands. Per capita amounts in dollars.)
AMOUNT PER CAPITA
Abbreviations and symbols:zero or rounds to zero; (NA) not available; (X) not applicable.
source: U.S. Census Bureau, Governments Division, 2004 Survey of State Government Finances, January 2006.
Total Revenue 35,739,829 4,777.41
  General revenue 27,971,743 3,739.04
    Intergovernmental revenue 6,237,933 833.84
    Taxes 14,233,065 1,902.56
      General sales 2,977,401 398.00
      Selective sales 2,234,662 298.71
      License taxes 613,910 82.06
      Individual income tax 7,422,071 992.12
      Corporate income tax 422,119 56.43
      Other taxes 562,902 75.24
    Current charges 4,472,170 597.80
    Miscellaneous general revenue 3,028,575 404.84
  Utility revenue - -
  Liquor store revenue 407,574 54.48
  Insurance trust revenue 7,360,512 983.89
Total expenditure 30,370,027 4,059.62
  Intergovernmental expenditure 8,819,067 1,178.86
  Direct expenditure 21,550,960 2,880.76
    Current operation 15,602,380 2,085.60
    Capital outlay 1,772,815 236.98
    Insurance benefits and repayments 2,383,042 318.55
    Assistance and subsidies 1,070,788 143.13
    Interest on debt 721,935 96.50
Exhibit: Salaries and wages 6,831,680 913.20
Total expenditure 30,370,027 4,059.62
  General expenditure 27,618,308 3,691.79
    Intergovernmental expenditure 8,819,067 1,178.86
    Direct expenditure 18,799,241 2,512.93
  General expenditures, by function:
    Education 10,308,063 1,377.90
    Public welfare 5,618,854 751.08
    Hospitals 1,966,021 262.80
    Health 724,350 96.83
    Highways 2,477,512 331.17
    Police protection 549,489 73.45
    Correction 1,215,898 162.53
    Natural resources 181,365 24.24
    Parks and recreation 77,446 10.35
    Government administration 1,005,575 134.42
    Interest on general debt 721,935 96.50
    Other and unallocable 2,771,800 370.51
  Utility expenditure 18,759 2.51
  Liquor store expenditure 349,918 46.77
  Insurance trust expenditure 2,383,042 318.55
Debt at end of fiscal year 15,314,018 2,047.05
Cash and security holdings 57,642,635 7,705.20

popular method of financing because the return to investors is tax-free. The bonds are issued for small as well as large companies and may be used to finance the installation of pollution control equipment. Localities allow total or partial tax exemptions for such equipment and for certified solar energy devices. The Virginia Small Business Financing Authority's loan guarantee program helps small companies obtain working capital by guaranteeing up to $150,000 of a bank loan.

Counties, cities, and incorporated towns may form local industrial development authorities to finance industrial projects and various other facilities, and may issue their own revenue bonds to cover the cost of land, buildings, machinery, and equipment. The authority's lease of the property normally includes an option to buy at a nominal price on the expiration of the lease. In addition, some 110 local development corporations have been organized. The Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development offers grants for projects which will generate employment in economically depressed areas, and the Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority extends loans to new or growing companies in southwestern Virginia. For minority-owned entre-preneurships, Virginia maintains the Office of Minority Business Enterprise to give advice on special problems. With Delaware, Maryland, and Washington, DC, Virginia has been recognized as part of an international life sciences hub, dubbed the BioCapital hub. Virginia companies and agencies have participated in bioscience "hotbed" campaigns, concerted efforts by groups made up of government development agencies, pharmaceutical and bioscience companies, research institutes, universities, and nonprofits to attract capital, personnel and resources to develop a life sciences cluster.

In 2006, the US Chamber of Commerce ranked all 50 states on legal fairness towards business. The chamber found Virginia to be one of five states with the best legal environment for business. The other four were Iowa, Nebraska, Connecticut, and Delaware.

HEALTH

The infant mortality rate in October 2005 was estimated at 7.4 per 1,000 live births. The birth rate in 2003 was 13.7 per 1,000 population. The abortion rate stood at 18.1 per 1,000 women in 2000. In 2003, about 85.3% of pregnant woman received prenatal care beginning in the first trimester. In 2004, approximately 81% of children received routine immunizations before the age of three.

The crude death rate in 2003 was 7.9 deaths per 1,000 population. As of 2002, the death rates for major causes of death (per 100,000 resident population) were: heart disease, 205; cancer, 186.5; cerebrovascular diseases, 54.3; chronic lower respiratory diseases, 37.7; and diabetes, 21.4. The mortality rate from HIV infection was 3.6 per 100,000 population. In 2004, the reported AIDS case rate was at about 10.7 per 100,000 population. In 2002, about 56.4% of the population was considered overweight or obese. As of 2004, about 20.8% of state residents were smokers.

In 2003, Virginia had 84 community hospitals with about 17,200 beds. There were about 758,000 patient admissions that year and 11.2 million outpatient visits. The average daily inpatient census was about 12,000 patients. The average cost per day for hospital care was $1,277. Also in 2003, there were about 278 certified nursing facilities in the state with 31,472 beds and an overall occupancy rate of about 87.7%. In 2004, it was estimated that about 73.5% of all state residents had received some type of dental care within the year. Virginia had 264 physicians per 100,000 resident population in 2004 and 712 nurses per 100,000 in 2005. In 2004, there were a total of 4,395 dentists in the state.

About 10% of state residents were enrolled in Medicaid programs in 2003; 13% were enrolled in Medicare programs in 2004. Approximately 14% of the state population was uninsured in 2004. In 2003, state health care expenditures totaled $5.4million.

SOCIAL WELFARE

In 2004, about 126,000 people received unemployment benefits, with the average weekly unemployment benefit at $240. In fiscal year 2005, the estimated average monthly participation in the food stamp program included about 488,481 persons (215,817 house-holds); the average monthly benefit was about $85.25 per person. That year, the total of benefits paid through the state for the food stamp program was about $499.7 million.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the system of federal welfare assistance that officially replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) in 1997, was reauthorized through the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. TANF is funded through federal block grants that are divided among the states based on an equation involving the number of recipients in each state. Virginia's TANF program is called VIEW (Virginia Initiative for Employment, Not Welfare). In 2004, the state program had 27,000 recipients; state and federal expenditures on this TANF program totaled $129 million in fiscal year 2003.

In December 2004, Social Security benefits were paid to 1,114,210 Virginians. This number included 693,350 retired workers, 111,370 widows and widowers, 155,830 disabled workers, 58,240 spouses, and 95,420 children. Social Security beneficiaries represented 14.9% of the total state population and 91.1% of the state's population age 65 and older. Retired workers received an average monthly payment of $940; widows and widowers, $860; disabled workers, $898; and spouses, $474. Payments for children of retired workers averaged $492 per month; children of deceased workers, $645; and children of disabled workers, $273. Federal Supplemental Security Income payments in December 2004 went to 134,531 Virginia residents, averaging $375 a month. An additional $1.7 million of state-administered supplemental payments were distributed to 6,301 residents.

HOUSING

In 2004, Virginia had an estimated 3,116,827 housing units, 2,846,417 of them occupied; 69.2% were owner-occupied. About 62.7% of all units were single-family, detached homes. Electricity and utility gas were the most common energy sources for heating. It was estimated that 118,489 units lacked telephone service, 8,701 lacked complete plumbing facilities, and 8.175 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household had 2.54 members.

In 2004, 63,200 new privately owned housing units were authorized for construction. The median home value was $179,191. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $1,323. Renters paid a median of $757 per month. In 2006, the state received over $19.5 million in community development block grants from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

EDUCATION

Although Virginia was the first English colony to found a free school (1634), the state's public school system developed very slowly. Thomas Jefferson proposed a system of free public schools as early as 1779, but it was not until 1851 that such a system was establishedfor whites only. Free schools for blacks were founded after the Civil War, but they were poorly funded. Opposition by white Virginians to the US Supreme Court's desegregation order in 1954 was marked in certain communities by public school closings and the establishment of all-white private schools. In Prince Edward County, the most extreme case, the school board abandoned public education and left black children without schools from 1959 to 1963. By the 1970s, however, school integration was an accomplished fact throughout the commonwealth.

In 2004, 88.4% of all state residents 25 years of age or older were high school graduates, and 33.1% had four or more years of college.

The total enrollment for fall 2002 in Virginia's public schools stood at 1,177,000. Of these, 832,000 attended schools from kindergarten through grade eight, and 346,000 attended high school. Approximately 61.3% of the students were white, 26.8% were black, 6.6% were Hispanic, 4.7% were Asian/Pacific Islander, and 0.5% were American Indian/Alaskan Native. Total enrollment was estimated at 1,186,000 in fall 2003 and expected to be 1,202,000 by fall 2014, an increase of 2.1% during the period 200214. Expenditures for public education in 2003/04 were estimated at $11.25 billion. There were 104,304 students enrolled in 604 private schools in fall 2003. Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has tested public school students nationwide. The resulting report, The Nation's Report Card, stated that in 2005 eighth graders in Virginia scored 284 out of 500 in mathematics compared with the national average of 278.

As of fall 2002, there were 404,966 students enrolled in college or graduate school; minority students comprised 27.6% of total postsecondary enrollment. In 2005 Virginia had 104 degree-granting institutions including, 15 public four-year schools, 24 public two-year schools, and 32 nonprofit, private four-year schools. Virginia has had a distinguished record in higher education since the College of William and Mary was founded at Williamsburg (then called Middle Plantation) in 1693, especially after Thomas Jefferson established the University of Virginia at Charlottesville in 1819. In addition to the University of Virginia and the College of William and Mary, public state-supported institutions include Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg; Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond; Virginia Military Institute, Lexington; Old Dominion University, Norfolk; and George Mason University, Fairfax. Well-known private institutions include the Hampton Institute, Hampton; Randolph-Macon College, Ashland; University of Richmond; Sweet Briar College, Sweet Briar; and Washington and Lee University, Lexington. Tuition assistance grants and scholarships are provided through the State Council of Higher Education, while the Virginia Student Assistance Authority provides guaranteed student loans.

ARTS

The Virginia Commission for the Arts was founded in 1968 and is comprised of 13 commissioners appointed by the governor for five-year terms. In 2005, the Virginia Commission for the Arts and other Virginia arts organizations received 32 grants totaling $1,197,200 from the National Endowment for the Arts. The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (VFH) was established in 1974; as of 2005 VFH had sponsored over 40,000 humanities programs. In 2005, the National Endowment for the Humanities contributed $4,267,066 for 46 state programs.

Richmond, Norfolk, and the northern Virginia metropolitan area are the principal centers for the creative and the performing arts in Virginia, although the arts flourish throughout the state. Richmond's Landmark Theater (formerly known as The Mosque) has been the scene of concerts by internationally famous orches-tras and soloists for generations. As of 2005, Richmond's Landmark Theater had the largest proscenium stage on the East Coast. The Barksdale Theatre and its repertory company presents a variety of performances at both Willow Lawn and Hanover Tavern. The 2005/06 season performances included The Syringa Tree, The Full Monty, and Barefoot in the Park.

In Norfolk, the performing arts are strikingly housed in Scope, a large auditorium designed by Pier Luigi Nervi; Chrysler Hall, an elegant structure with gleaming crystal; and the Wells Theatre, an ornate building that has hosted such diverse performers as John Philip Sousa, Will Rogers, and Fred Astaire. The internationally recognized Virginia Opera Association is housed in the Harrison Opera House. As of 2004, the Virginia Opera's Education and Outreach program reached more than 200,000 students and community members annually.

The Wolf Trap Foundation, in northern Virginia, provides theatrical, operatic, and musical performances featuring internationally celebrated performers. The College of William and Mary's Phi Beta Kappa Hall in Williamsburg is the site of the Virginia Shakespeare Festival, an annual summer event inaugurated in 1979. Abingdon is the home of the Barter Theatre (1933), the first state-supported theatre in the United States, whose alumni include Ernest Borgnine and Gregory Peck. This repertory company has performed widely in the United States and at selected sites abroad. The 2006 season included performances of Romeo and Juliet, Thoroughly Modern Millie, Robin Hood, and The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.

There are orchestras in Alexandria, Arlington, Fairfax, Lynch-burg, Petersburg, and Roanoke. Richmond is home to the Richmond Ballet, Richmond Choral Society, Richmond Jazz Society, Richmond Philharmonic, and the Richmond Symphony. The Virginia Symphony, founded in 1920, has been recognized as one of the nation's leading regional symphony orchestras. The symphony provides an education and outreach program; as of 2005 it offered programs such as "The Peanut Butter and Jam Family Series," "Young People's Concerts," and "Beethoven Play-Along."

The annual Virginia Arts Festival has drawn national attention since its inception in 1997. In 2004, the festival presented 134 performances of music, theater, and dance in 32 days and more than 22,000 students and 1,546 artists participated. The annual Shenandoah Valley Music Festival, established in 1963, is held in Orkney Springs and features arts and crafts presentations as well as musical performances.

In 2004 former US Poet Laureate (19931995), Rita Dove, was named Poet Laureate of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Her books of poetry include American Smooth (2004), On the Bus with Rosa Parks (1999), Mother Love (1995), Pulitzer Prize-winning Thomas and Beulah (1986), and The Yellow House on the Corner (1980). She has also published a book of short stories, Fifth Sunday (1985) and a novel, Through the Ivory Gate (1992).

LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS

For the fiscal year ending in June 2001, Virginia had 90 public library systems, with a total of 338 libraries, of which 259 were branches. In that same year, they had a combined 18,659,000 volumes of books and serial publications one their shelves, and had a combined circulation of 63,075,000. The system also had 810,000 audio and 448,000 video items, 13,000 electronic format items (CD-ROMs, magnetic tapes, and disks), and 35 bookmobiles. The Virginia State Library in Richmond and the libraries of the University of Virginia (Charlottesville) and the College of William and Mary (Williamsburg) have the personal papers of such notables as Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Robert E. Lee, William H. McGuffey, and William Faulkner. The University of Virginia also has an impressive collection of medieval illuminated manuscripts, and the library of colonial Williamsburg has extensive microfilms of British records. In fiscal year 2001, operating income for the state's public library system totaled $199,658,000 and included $1,384,000 in federal funds and $21,181,000 in state funding.

There were 260 museums in 199697. In Richmond, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the first state museum of art in the United States, has a collection that ranges from ancient Egyptian artifacts to mobile jewelry by Salvador Dali. The Science Museum of Virginia has a 280-seat planetarium that features a simulated excursion to outer space. Other museums in Richmond are Wilton, the Randolphs' handsome 18th-century mansion, and the Maymont and Wickham-Valentine houses, elaborate 19th-century residences; Agecroft Hall and Virginia House, Tudor manor houses that were moved from England, are also open to the public. Norfolk has the Chrysler Museum, with its famous glassware collection; Myers House, an early Federal period home with handsome art and furnishings; and the Hermitage Foundation Museum, noted for its Oriental art. The Mariners Museum in Newport News has a superb maritime collection, and the much smaller but quite select exhibits of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum are also notable. Perhaps the most extensive "museum" in the United States is Williamsburg's mile-long Duke of Gloucester Street, with such remarkable restorations as the Christopher Wren Building of the College of William and Mary, Bruton Parish Church, the Governor's Palace, and the colonial capital.

More historic sites are maintained as museums in Virginia than in any other state. These include Washington's home at Mt. Vernon (Fairfax County), Jefferson's residence at Monticello (Charlottesville), and James River plantation houses such as Berkeley, Shirley, Westover, Sherwood Forest, and Carter's Grove. The National Park Service operates a visitors' center at Jamestown.

COMMUNICATIONS

The state's communications network has expanded steadily since the first postal routes were established in 1738. Airmail service from Richmond to New York and Atlanta began in 1928.

In 2004, 94.0% of Virginia's occupied housing units had telephones. Additionally, by June of that same year there were 4,392,319 mobile wireless telephone subscribers. In 2003, 66.8% of Virginia households had a computer and 60.3% had Internet access. By June 2005, there were 1,134,059 high-speed lines in Virginia, 1,022,318 residential and 111,741 for business.

In 2005, broadcasters operated 23 major AM radio stations and 82 major FM stations. In the same year, Virginia had 26 major television stations. The Norfolk-Portsmouth-Newport News area had 629,100 television households, 76% of which ordered cable in 1999. Approximately 187,445 Internet domain names were registered with the state in the year 2000.

PRESS

Although the Crown forbade the establishment of a printing press in Virginia Colony, William Parks was publishing the Virginia Gazette at Williamsburg in 1736. Three newspapers were published regularly during the Revolutionary period, and in 1780 the General Assembly declared that the press was "indispensable for the right information of the people and for the public service." The oldest continuously published Virginia daily, tracing its origins to 1784, is the Alexandria Gazette. The first Negro newspaper, The True Southerner, was started by a white man in 1865; several weeklies published and edited by blacks began soon after. By 1900 there were 180 newspapers in the state, but the number has declined drastically since then because of fierce competition, mergers, and rising costs.

USA Today, the nation's largest daily newspaper in 2004 with a circulation of 2,220,863, is based in Arlington, Virginia. In 2002, the Arlington Journal and the Fairfax Journal merged to form the Northern Virginia Journal. In 2005, Virginia had 21 morning dailies, 4 evening, and 17 Sunday papers.

Leading dailies and their approximate circulation rates in 2005 were:

AREA NAME DAILY SUNDAY
*Absorbed Richmond's News Leader in 1992.
Alexandria Northern Virginia Journal (m,S) 62,910 386,000
Arlington USA Today (m) 2,665,815
Newport News Daily Press (m,S) 91,307 112,955
Norfolk Virginian-Pilot (m,S) 200,055 234,508
Richmond Times-Dispatch (m,S)* 184,950 225,293
Roanoke Times (m,S) 96,687 108,564

The newspaper group, Gannett Co, Inc, is based in Virginia. This group owns about 90 daily newspapers nationwide, including USA Today, as well as over 1,000 non-daily papers and shoppers bulletins. Gannett's UK subsidiary, Newsquest plc, publishes 17 daily newspapers and more than 300 non-daily publications.

ORGANIZATIONS

In 2006, there were over 8,990 nonprofit organizations registered within the state, of which about 6.072 were registered as charitable, educational, or religious organizations.

Service and educational groups headquartered in the state include the United Way of America, American Astronautical Society, American Society for Horticultural Science, and American Geological Institute, all located in Alexandria; and the National Honor Society, Music Educators National Conference, and National Art Education Association, located in Reston. Art and cultural organizations include Army Historical Foundation, the Association for the protection of Virginia Antiquities, the Chesapeake and Ohio Historical Society, the Folk Art Society of America, and the Virginia Historical Society.

Veterans' organizations include the Veterans of World War I of the USA and the Retired Officers Association, Alexandria, and the Military Order of the Purple Heart, Springfield. The United Daughters of the Confederacy has national offices in Richmond. Among the business and professional groups based in Virginia are the American Academy of Audiology, the American Physical Therapy Association, and the American Chiropractic Association.

Sports societies headquartered in the state include the American Canoe Association, the United States Parachute Association, and the Boat Owners Association of the United States. The headquarters of the National Rifle Association are in Fairfax. Environmental and conservation associations include, Nature Conservancy, the American Bird Conservancy, and the American Seed Tree Association.

Other groups operating out of Virginia include the National Sojourners, National Alliance of Senior Citizens, and the Association of Former Intelligence Officers.

TOURISM, TRAVEL, AND RECREATION

In 2004, travelers spent over $15 billion in Virginia on day trips and overnight stays. The tourism and travel industry is the state's third-largest employer, supporting over 203,000 jobs. Attractions in the coastal region alone include the Jamestown (the first permanent English settlement in America) and Yorktown historic sites (Jamestown will celebrate its 400 anniversary in 200607), the Williamsburg restoration, and the homes of George Washington and Robert E. Lee. Also featured are the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center, Assateague Island National Seashore, and the resort pleasures of Virginia Beach.

The interior offers numerous Civil War Sites, including Appomattox; Thomas Jefferson's Monticello as well as The University of Virginia, founded by Jefferson; Booker T. Washington's birthplace near Smith Mountain Lake; and the historic cities of Richmond, Petersburg, and Fredericksburg. Visitors can also tour nearby Civil War battlefields and cemeteries. In the west, the Blue Ridge Parkway and Shenandoah National Park, traversed by the breathtaking Skyline Drive, are favorite tourist destinations, as are Cumberland Gap and, in the Lexington area, the Natural Bridge, the home of Confederate General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, the George C. Marshall Library and Museum, and the Virginia Military Institute. A number of historic sites in Arlington and Alexandria attract many visitors to the Washington, D.C, area. The colonial city of Williamsburg attracts visitors to its historic pre-Revolutionary sites. Nearby are the James River Plantation homes.

The state's many recreation areas include state parks, national forests, a major national park, scenic parkways, and thousands of miles of hiking trails and shoreline. Some of the most-visited sites are Mt. Rogers National Recreational Area, Prince William Forest Park, Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge (where wild ponies are rounded up each year), and the Kerr Reservoir. Part of the famous Appalachian Trail winds through Virginia's Blue Ridge and Appalachian mountains. Virginia has more than 1,500 mi (2,400 km) of well-stocked trout streams.

SPORTS

Although Virginia has no major professional sports teams, it does support two Triple-A baseball teams: the Richmond Braves and Norfolk Tides. Other minor league baseball teams play in Bristol, Danville, Lynchburg, Pulaski, Salem, Martinsville, and Wood-bridge. There is also minor league hockey in Richmond and Norfolk.

In collegiate sports, the University of Virginia belongs to the Atlantic Coast Conference, and the Virginia Military Institute competes in the Southern Conference. Virginia won college basketball's National Invitational Tournament (NIT) in 1980 and 1992; Virginia Tech won the NIT in 1973 and has appeared in thirteen consecutive postseason college football bowl games.

Stock car racing is also popular in the state. The Richmond International Raceway and Martinsville Speedway host four NASCAR Nextel Cup races each year.

Participant sports popular with Virginians include tennis, golf, swimming, skiing, boating, and water skiing. The state has at least 180 public and private golf courses.

Among the many notable persons that call Virginia their home, several are legendary athletestennis great Arthur Ashe, football's Fran Tarkenton, and golf's Sam Snead all were born and raised in the state.

FAMOUS VIRGINIANS

Virginia is the birthplace of eight US presidents and many famous statesmen, noted scientists, influential educators, distinguished writers, and popular entertainers.

The first president of the United States, George Washington (173299), also led his country's armies in the Revolutionary War and presided over the convention that framed its Constitution. Washingtonwho was unanimously elected president in 1789 and served two four-year terms, declining a thirdwas not, as has sometimes been assumed, a newcomer to politics: his political career began at the age of 27 with his election to the House of Burgesses.

Thomas Jefferson (17431826), the nation's third president, offered this as his epitaph: "author of the Declaration of Independence and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, and father of the University of Virginia." After serving as secretary of state under Washington and vice president under John Adams, he was elected president of the United States in 1800 and reelected in 1804. Honored now as a statesman and political thinker, Jefferson was also a musician and one of the foremost architects of his time, and he has been called the first American archaeologist.

Jefferson's successor, James Madison (17511836), actually made his most important contributions before becoming chief executive. As a skillful and persistent negotiator throughout the Constitutional Convention of 1787, he earned the designation "father of the Constitution"; then, as coauthor of the Federalist papers, he helped produce a classic of American political philosophy. He was more responsible than any other statesman for Virginia's crucial ratification vote. Secretary of State during Jefferson's two terms, Madison occupied the presidency from 1809 to 1817.

Madison was succeeded as president in 1817 by James Monroe (17581831), who was reelected to a second term starting in 1821. Monroewho had served as governor, US senator, minister to France, and secretary of stateis best known for the Monroe Doctrine, which has been US policy since his administration. William Henry Harrison (17731841) became the ninth president in 1841 but died of pneumonia one month after his inauguration; he had been a governor of Indiana Territory, a major general in the War of 1812, and a US representative and senator from Indiana. Harrison was succeeded by Vice President John Tyler (17901862), a native and resident of Virginia, who established the precedent that, upon the death of the president, the vice president inherits the title as well as the duties of the office.

Another native of Virginia, Zachary Taylor (17841850), renowned chiefly as a military leader, became the 12th US president in 1849 but died midway through his term. The eighth Virginia-born president, (Thomas) Woodrow Wilson (18561924), became the 28th president of the United States in 1913 after serving as governor of New Jersey.

John Marshall (17551835) was the third confirmed chief justice of the United States and is generally regarded by historians as the first great American jurist, partly because of his establishment of the principle of judicial review. Five other VirginiansJohn Blair (17321800), Bushrod Washington (17621829), Philip P. Barbour (17831841), Peter V. Daniel (17841860), and Lewis F. Powell Jr. (190798)have served as associate justices.

George Washington's cabinet included two Virginians, Secretary of State Jefferson and Attorney General Edmund Randolph (17531813), who, as governor of Virginia, had introduced the Virginia Plandrafted by Madison and calling for a House of Representatives elected by the people and a Senate elected by the Houseat the Constitutional Convention of 1787. Among other distinguished Virginians who have served in the cabinet are James Barbour (17751842), secretary of war; John Y. Mason (17991859), secretary of the Navy and attorney general; Carter Glass (18581946), secretary of the treasury, author of the Federal Reserve System, and US senator for 26 years; and Claude Augustus Swanson (18621939), secretary of the Navy and earlier, state governor and US senator.

Other prominent US senators from Virginia include Richard Henry Lee (173294), former president of the Continental Congress; James M. Mason (b.District of Columbia, 17981871), who later was commissioner of the Confederacy to the United Kingdom and France; John W. Daniel (18421910), a legal scholar and powerful Democratic Party leader; Thomas S. Martin (18471919), US Senate majority leader; Harry F. Byrd (18871966), governor of Virginia from 1926 to 1930 and US senator from 1933 to 1965; and Harry F. Byrd Jr. (b.1914), senator from 1965 to 1982. In 1985, Virginia was represented in the Senate by Republican John W. Warner (b.District of Columbia, 1927), former secretary of the Navy, and Republican Paul S. Trible Jr. (b.Maryland, 1946), a US representative from 1976 to 1982.

Some native-born Virginians have become famous as leaders in other nations. Joseph Jenkins Roberts (180976) was the first president of the Republic of Liberia, and Nancy Langhorne Astor (18791964) was the first woman to serve in the British House of Commons.

Virginia's important colonial governors included Captain John Smith (b.England, 1580?1631), Sir George Yeardley (b.England, 1587?1627), Sir William Berkeley (b.England, 160677), Alexander Spotswood (b.Tangier, 16761740), Sir William Gooch (b.England, 16811751), and Robert Dinwiddie (b.Scotland, 16931770).

Virginia signers of the Declaration of Independence, besides Jefferson and Richard Henry Lee, were Carter Braxton (173697); Benjamin Harrison (1726?1791), father of President William Henry Harrison; Francis Lightfoot Lee (173497); Thomas Nelson Jr. (173889); and George Wythe (17261806). Wythe is also famous as the first US law professor and the teacher, in their student days, of Presidents Jefferson, Monroe, and Tyler, and Chief Justice Marshall. Virginia furnished both the first president of the Continental Congress, Peyton Randolph (172175), and the last, Cyrus Griffin (17481810).

Other notable Virginia governors include Patrick Henry (173699), the first governor of the commonwealth, though best remembered as a Revolutionary orator; Westmoreland Davis (18591942); Andrew Jackson Montague (18621937); and Mills E. Goodwin Jr. (b.1914). A major historical figure who defies classification is Robert "King" Carter (16631732), greatest of the Vir-ginia land barons, who also served as acting governor of Virginia and rector of the College of William and Mary.

Chief among Virginia's great military and naval leaders besides Washington and Taylor are John Paul Jones (b.Scotland, 174792); George Rogers Clark (17521818); Winfield Scott (17861866); Robert E. Lee (180770), the Confederate commander who earlier served in the Mexican War and as superintendent of West Point; Joseph E. Johnston (180791); George H. Thomas (181670); Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson (182463); James Ewell Brown "Jeb" Stuart (183364); and George C. Marshall (b.Pennsylvania, 18801959). Virginians' names are also written high in the history of exploration. Daniel Boone (b.Pennsylvania, 17341820), who pioneered in Kentucky and Missouri, was once a member of the Virginia General Assembly. Meriwether Lewis (17741809) and William Clark (17701838), both native Virginians, led the most famous expedition in US history, from St. Louis to the Pacific coast (18046). Richard E. Byrd (18881957) was both an explorer of Antarctica and a pioneer aviator.

Woodrow Wilson and George C. Marshall both received the Nobel Peace Prize, in 1919 and 1953, respectively. Distinguished Virginia-born scientists and inventors include Matthew Fontaine Maury (180673), founder of the science of oceanography; Cyrus H. McCormick (180984), who perfected the mechanical reaper; and Dr. Walter Reed (18511902) who proved that yellow fever was transmitted by a mosquito. Among educators associated with the state are William H. McGuffey (b.Pennsylvania, 18001873), a University of Virginia professor who designed and edited the most famous series of school readers in American history; and Booker T. Washington (18561915), the nation's foremost black educator.

William Byrd II (16741744) is widely acknowledged to have been the most graceful writer in English America in his day, and Jefferson was a leading prose stylist of the Revolutionary period. Edgar Allen Poe (b.Massachusetts, 180949), who was taken to Richmond at the age of three and later educated at the University of Virginia, was the father of the detective story and one of America's great poets and short-story writers. Virginia is the setting of historical romances by three natives: John Esten Cooke (183086), Thomas Nelson Page (18531922), and Mary Johnston (18701936). Notable 20th-century novelists born in Virginia include Willa Cather (18731947), Ellen Glasgow (18741945), and James Branch Cabell (18791958). Willard Huntington Wright (18881939), better known as S. S. Van Dine, wrote many detective thrillers. Twice winner of the Pulitzer Prize for biography and often regarded as the greatest American master of that genre was Douglas Southall Freeman (18861953). Other important historians were Lyon Gardiner Tyler (18531935), son of President Tyler and also an eminent educator; Philip A. Bruce (18561933); William Cabell Bruce (18601946); Virginius Dabney (190195); and Alf J. Mapp Jr. (b.1925). Some contemporary Virginia authors are poet Guy Carleton Drewry (190191); television writer-producer Earl Hamner (b.1923); novelist William Styron (b.1925); and journalists Virginia Moore (19031993) and Tom Wolfe (Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr., b. 1931).

Celebrated Virginia artists include sculptors Edward V. Valentine (18381930) and Moses Ezekiel (18441917), and painters George Caleb Bingham (181179) and Jerome Myers (18671940). A protégé of Jefferson's, Robert Mills (b.South Carolina, 17811855), designed the Washington Monument.

The roster of Virginians prominent in the entertainment world includes Bill "Bojangles" Robinson (18781949), Francis X. Bushman (18831966), Freeman Gosden (18991982), Randolph Scott (19031987), Joseph Cotten (190594), Margaret Sullavan (191160), John Payne (19121989), George C. Scott (192799), Shirley MacLaine (b.1934), and Warren Beatty (b.1938).

Outstanding musical performers include John Powell (18821963), whose fame as a pianist once equaled his prominence as a composer. Virginia's most eminent contemporary composer is Thea Musgrave (b.Scotland, 1928). Popular musical stars include Kathryn Elizabeth "Kate" Smith (19071986), Pearl Bailey (19181990), Ella Fitzgerald (19181996), June Carter (19292003), Roy Clark (b.1933), and Wayne Newton (b.1942).

The Old Dominion's sports champions include golfers Bobby Cruickshank (18961975), Sam Snead (19122002), and Chandler Harper (19142004); tennis star Arthur Ashe (19431993); football players Clarence "Ace" Parker (b.1912), Bill Dudley (b.1921), and Francis "Fran" Tarkenton (b.1940); and baseball pitcher Eppa Rixey (18911963). At age 15, Olympic swimming champion Melissa Belote (b.1957) won three gold medals. Helen Chenery "Penny" Tweedy (b.1922) is a famous breeder and racer of horses from whose stables have come Secretariat and other champions. Equestrienne Jean McLean Davis (b.1929) won 65 world championships.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Council of State Governments. The Book of the States, 2006 Edition. Lexington, Ky.: Council of State Governments, 2006.

Dabney, Virginius. Richmond: The Story of a City. Rev. and enl. ed. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1990.

Diversity and Accommodation: Essays on the Cultural Composition of the Virginia Frontier. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1997. (orig. 1964).

Ferris, William (ed.). The South. Vol. 7 in The Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Regional Cultures. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2004.

Goodwin, Bill. Virginia. London: Frommers/Transworld, 2000.

Holzer, Harold, and Tim Mulligan (eds.). The Battle of Hampton Roads: New Perspectives on the USS Monitor and CSS Virginia. New York: Fordham University Press, 2005.

Horn, James P. P. A Land as God Made It: Jamestown and the Birth of America. New York: Basic Books, 2005.

Mapp, Alf J. Jr. Frock Coats and Epaulets: The Men Who Led the Confederacy. Lanham, Md.: Madison Books, 1996.

Pratt, Robert A. The Color of their Skin: Education and Race in Richmond, Virginia, 195489. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1992.

Ragsdale, Bruce A. A Planters' Republic: The Search for Economic Independence in Revolutionary Virginia. Madison, Wis.: Madison House, 1996.

Rosen, Daniel. New Beginnings: Jamestown and the Virginia Colony, 16071699. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic, 2005.

Saffell, William Thomas Roberts. Records of the Revolutionary War: Containing the Military and Financial Correspondence of Distinguished Officers. Bowie, Md.: Heritage Books, 1999.

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Virginia

Albemarle Old Courthouse
Alexandria
Belvoir Ruins
Berkeley Plantation
Boswell's Tavern
Carter's Grove Plantation
Castle Hill
Chiswell Lead Mines
Christ Church
Colonial Heights
Cuckoo Tavern Site
Culpeper
Elk Hill
Ferry Farm Site
Fort Chiswell
Francisco's Fight (Ward's Tavern) Site
Fredericksburg
Great Bridge
Green Spring Battlefield
Greenway Court
Gunston Hall
Gwynn Island and Cricket Hill
Hanover Courthouse and Tavern
Hite's Fort and Springdale
Jamestown Site
Lewis (Andrew) Grave
Mechunk Creek
Michie Tavern
Monticello
Mount Vernon
Norfolk
Pamunkey Indian Museum
Petersburg
Pohick Church
Point of Fork
Poplar Forest
Portsmouth
Raccoon Ford
Red Hill
Richmond
Saratoga (Daniel Morgan's Home)
Scotchtown
Shadwell
Shirley Plantation
Soldier's Rest (Daniel Morgan's Home)
Spencer's Tavern
Stratford Hall Plantation
Suffolk
Tuckahoe Plantation
War Memorial Museum of Virginia
Washington's Birthplace (Pope's Creek)
Westover
Williamsburg
Winchester
Yorktown

An excellent system of historical markers on Virginia's principal highways was conceived in 1927. Today there are more than 2,000 tall, silver markers pertaining to a wide range of topics that help tell the state's history. The Department of Historic Resources (once the Historic Landmarks Commission) provides an impressive list of books dealing with Virginia's history, some of which it publishes and others that are distributed by various publishing companies. All of the books, including the newest editions of A Guidebook to Virginia's Historical Markers (1994) and The Virginia Landmarks Register (2000), are available for purchase from its website, www.dhr.virginia.gov or by calling University of Virginia Press at (800) 831-3406. A visitor to the state's Department of Historic Resources website will also find a wealth of information on historic preservation and state landmarks.

The Virginia State Tourism Corporation is located at 901 East Byrd Street, Richmond, Va. 23219. They distribute an assortment of travel guides and maps, some of which pertain directly to colonial landmarks. However, similar to the states to Virginia's south, the Civil War receives more focus than the American Revolution. Website: www.virginia.org; phone: (800) 847-4882.

The Virginia Historical Society (1831) has a museum illustrating the early history of the state and a library open to approved users without charge. It is located at 428 North Boulevard, Richmond, Va. 23220 (mailing address: P.O. Box 7311, Richmond, Va. 23221). Website: www.vahistorical.org; main phone: (804) 358-4901; museum phone: (804) 342-9671.

Albemarle Old Courthouse

Albemarle Old Courthouse, James River, Albemarle County. The first seat of Albemarle County was at the sharp hook in the James River near the present town of Scottsville. In 1761 the county seat was moved to Charlottesville. Albemarle Old Courthouse nevertheless remained an important landmark during the Revolution, being an important depot for Patriot supplies until their evacuation to Charlottesville and Staunton was forced by Cornwallis's raid in June 1781. See point of fork and mechunk creek.

Alexandria

Alexandria. Captain John Smith passed the site of Alexandria during his explorations of 1608. Land was first patented here in 1657, a grant was made in 1669, and the next year John Alexander bought and surveyed 6,000 acres that included the area where the city would later be built. Alexander's tract was just north of the one later called Mount Vernon. A few white settlers started appearing around 1670, and by 1695 there was something resembling a village near the mouth of Great Hunting Creek. A warehouse was built there in 1731, and a public ferry established. The settlement was called Belhaven.

Not surprisingly, the local Indians resisted this invasion. John Washington, George's great-grandfather, led the Virginia contingent that joined up with Marylanders to battle the Susquehannocks for control of this region, and many of the local settlers joined in Bacon's Rebellion, which aimed to exterminate the Indians. The end of Queen Anne's War in 1713 marked the start of an era of prosperity for the white elite, founded on tobacco, and the port of Alexandria eventually became second only to Boston in colonial America in the value of exports. As settlement moved west into the Shenandoah, export of flour to England and the West Indies became nearly as important as tobacco. Ships coming for these products brought cargoes of manufactured goods and luxuries from England and the Caribbean.

Meanwhile, the town of Alexandria had been established. In 1748 the seventeen-year-old George Washington, then living at Mount Vernon, assisted the county surveyor in laying out the town of 84 half-acre lots. Some of these were bought by his half-brothers, Lawrence and Augustine. Alexandria became the seat of Fairfax County in 1752 and was incorporated in 1779. To create the District of Columbia, in 1789 Virginia contributed Alexandria and the portion of Fairfax County that now is Arlington County. The towering Washington Masonic Memorial (see below) is on a site proposed for the national capitol. In 1846 Alexandria petitioned Congress successfully for return to Virginia. Meanwhile, the city's commercial importance had been eclipsed by Washington, and it has retained a quaint, old-fashioned character.

In a historic district of nearly 100 blocks, many buildings of the colonial period survive. These are appealing from an architectural and cultural standpoint, but they also furnish the "third dimension" for a significant portion of American history.

Alexandria Black History Resource Center, 902 Wythe Street. Covers the history of African Americans in Alexandria from the mid-eighteenth century to today. Open Tuesday through Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone: (703) 838-4356.

Gadsby's Tavern, 132 Royal Street. Alexandria was important as the only major settlement on the main colonial highway between Baltimore and Fredericksburg, this segment being a part of the route between the northern and southern colonies. Colonial taverns played a vital role as focal points for news and political activity, and Gadsby's was more important than most because it was fed foreign news and political opinion by customers coming into the port as well as by those who traveled the highway. The older portion of the brick building you see in modern Alexandria was built around 1792 and long known as City Tavern. In November 1799 Washington reviewed the local militia from the tavern steps, ending his military activities where they had started forty-five years earlier. A gigantic reception was held here for Lafayette in 1824. John Gadsby became host of the tavern in 1796. Today, the Gadsby's Tavern Restaurant is privately owned, while the Gadsby's Tavern Museum is operated by the city. Phone: (703) 838-4242.

Carlyle House. Entrance at 121 North Fairfax Street. Phone: (703) 549-2997. Here Braddock planned his ill-fated expedition of 1755, met with governors of four colonies to discuss the strategy for driving the French from the Forks of the Ohio, and commissioned Washington as his aide-de-camp. The house was built in 1752 by John Carlyle, one of Alexandria's many Scottish merchants. This site is called Carlyle House Historic Park and serves as a museum that organizes guided tours and many historical special events. There is also a museum gift shop.

Ramsay House, King and Fairfax Streets. Home of Alexandria's first and only lord mayor, William Ramsay, this rather odd building was long thought to date from the period 1749 to 1751. In the process of reconstruction after the house had been almost totally destroyed by fire in 1942, evidence was uncovered to indicate that it had been put up around 1725. The experienced historical architect in charge of reconstruction also came to the conclusion that the house had been moved from a former location closer to the mouth of Hunting Creek (Jones Point). Another theory is that it was built at Dumfries, some 25 miles down the Potomac from Alexandria, and moved by barge. Quite apart from the fact that William Ramsay would have been less than ten years old in 1725, there is strong evidence that these recent revelations are misguided, that instead the house was not started before 1749, and that it has always stood at its present location. As for the claim of being Alexandria's oldest house, it must be reiterated that the structure is a reconstruction, not a restoration.

The Information Center for Old Town Alexandria is in the Ramsay House, whose mail address is 221 King Street, Alexandria, Va. 22314. Here the out-of-town visitor can pick up brochures that detail a walking tour and other information on the area. It is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: (703) 838-4200.

Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Shop, 107 South Fairfax Street. One of the country's oldest drugstores, in continuous operation during the years 1792 to 1933, it has prescription files which record sales to the Washington, Lee, Custis, and Fairfax families, and to Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, and Daniel Webster. It is now a private museum. Phone: (703) 836-3713.

Craik House (private), 210 Duke Street. Built about 1790, this was the home and office of Dr. James Craik (1730–1814), chief physician and surgeon of the Continental army. (It should be noted that this title did not signify the top position in the medical department, as might be assumed. At 212 South Fairfax Street is the house of another man with the similarly misleading title of physician general of the Continental army, Dr. William Brown. The actual top doctor of the American army during the Revolution held a variety of titles incorporating the operative word "director.") James Craik was the son of a Scottish squire whose gardener was the father of John Paul Jones. After studying medicine at Edinburgh, Craik practiced successively in the West Indies, Norfolk, Virginia, and Winchester, Virginia, where he was physician of the fort. Having become surgeon of a Virginia regiment, he was with Washington at Great Meadows, tended the mortally wounded Braddock, and became Washington's chief medical officer when the latter was named head of the state's military forces in August 1755. Thereafter he was closely associated with Washington, tending him in his final illness (1799) and leaving an account of this event, which he hastened.

Coryell House (private), 208 Duke Street. A "flounder" house, long and narrow with a lean-to roof and without windows on the taller side, this is a specimen of an architectural tax-evasion device probably brought to Alexandria by Philadelphia Quakers. The owner of such a house could claim that it was unfinished, thereby dodging the tax due on completed houses. Although "flounder" is the local term in Alexandria, many houses of this type can be seen in the older sections of Philadelphia. The unpainted frame Coryell House, which leans against the brick house of Dr. Craik and was built about the same year, was the home of George Coryell, who in 1776 had assisted his father, Cornelius, in ferrying Washington across the Delaware to attack the Hessians in Trenton.

Christ Church, Cameron and North Washington Streets. Washington was a vestryman here for three months in 1765, and his box pew is marked. Construction on the existing structure started two years later, and features such as the tower and cupola were added in 1818. Pohick Church was the one regularly attended by Washington. The church is open to the public. Phone: (703) 549-1450.

Friendship Fire Engine House, 107 South Alfred Street. A small brick building dating from about 1775, this housed the fire company to which Washington gave a fire engine brought from Philadelphia in 1774, the year the company was formally organized. This is the first volunteer fire department in Alexandria. Tours and educational programs are scheduled here. Among the early fire-fighting equipment on display is a model of this man-powered machine. Museum phone: (703) 838-3891.

Washington Masonic National Memorial, King Street and Russell Road. Dominating the landscape and visible for many miles in all directions, this monstrous edifice (333 feet high) on Shooter's Hill houses relics and important portraits in the possession of the Alexandria-Washington Lodge of Masons. Open daily. Phone: (703) 683-2007.

Tourist information is available from the Ramsay House (see above).

Belvoir Ruins

Belvoir Ruins, Fort Belvoir Military Reservation, 9 miles south of Alexandria and near Mount Vernon, U.S. 1. The manor house of William Fairfax figured prominently in the early life of George Washington (see mount vernon). Construction was started in 1741 of a nine-room brick house 36 by 60 feet in size, with a full basement, a large central hall and four rooms on the ground floor, and five large bedrooms upstairs. When completed in 1743, Belvoir included brick "dependencies"—offices, stables, and a coach house. The eccentric Thomas, Sixth Lord Fairfax (1693–1781), who had inherited proprietary rights to 5 million acres in Virginia, lived at Belvoir for several years before establishing his home near Winchester. William's son, George William Fairfax (1724–1787), a close friend of George Washington, inherited Belvoir in 1757. He was a Loyalist, and at the outbreak of the Revolution he returned to England. The mansion was gutted by fire in 1783. Despite repeated urgings by Washington to come back and rebuild Belvoir, the Fairfaxes remained in England. Belvoir was completely demolished by the British in 1814.

Berkeley Plantation

Berkeley Plantation, James River, 7 miles west of Charles City and just off Va. 5. Quite aside from the architectural charms of the brick mansion and its two large dependencies, Berkeley has a long list of historical distinctions. It was the site of the first Thanksgiving service in America, held more than a year before the more famous one in New England. It was the ancestral home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence and two presidents, and it was visited by every president from Washington to James Buchanan—fifteen presidents during the period 1789 to 1861. During the Civil War it served in 1862 as McClellan's headquarters, and it was here that the famous American bugle call, "Taps," originated.

The estate, eventually known as Harrison's Landing, was part of the grant made in 1619 to Sir George Yeardley, Richard Berkeley, and others; settlers landed there on 4 December 1619 with instructions from the proprietors that "the day of our ships arrival … shall be yearly and perpetually kept as a day of Thankgsiving."

Abandoned after the Indian massacre of 1622, the place was repatented in 1636 and acquired by John Bland. The latter's son, Giles, was executed for his part in Bacon's Rebellion (1676). The estate was confiscated by the governor and later sold to Benjamin Harrison III (1673–1710), who was the colony's attorney general, treasurer, and speaker of the House of Burgesses. (This Harrison was the third of his name in Virginia; hence the designation III, which is a genealogical convenience only—the men did not so sign their names.) The eldest son, Benjamin IV, started building the present mansion in 1726. Benjamin V (1726–1791), who inherited the place in 1745 when his father and two sisters were killed by lightning, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and three-time governor of Virginia. Benjamin VI installed the handsome interior woodwork; his brother, William Henry, and the latter's grandson, Benjamin, became presidents of the United States.

The mansion, whose restoration was started in 1937, is a plain two-story brick building of early Georgian style with two tall chimneys. Flanked by dependencies, it was altered around 1800 to two stories. The site is open to the public daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: (804) 829-6018.

Boswell's Tavern

Boswell's Tavern, South Anna River, Louisa County. At the present village of this name (intersection of U.S. 15 and Va. 22) a tavern was kept by a large Scot named Boswell. Here Lafayette stayed on 11 June 1781 while en route from Raccoon Ford to Mechunk Creek. The locality is referred to also in Revolutionary War history as Mumford's (Bridge). Now a private residence, Boswell's is one of the most complete colonial taverns surviving in Virginia: a story-and-a-half frame building with large end chimneys.

Carter's Grove Plantation

Carter's Grove Plantation, six miles southeast of Williamsburg on U.S. 60. From the standpoint of the original craftsmanship and the expert restoration, this is a superb example of colonial Virginia architecture. Carter's Grove is unquestionably one of the most beautiful places in America. Historically, it is of minor interest: the ubiquitous saber marks of Banastre Tarleton on the balustrade; the "Refusal Room" in which Washington and Jefferson are said to have been turned down by ladies they wanted to marry. The eighteenth-century slave quarters have been reconstructed and located on the site as the Winthrop Rockefeller Archeology Museum. Carter Grove is managed by Colonial Williamsburg. Website: www.history.org; phone: (757) 229-1000. See christ church for biographical data on the Carter family.

Castle Hill

Castle Hill, Cobham, Albemarle County, 9 miles northeast of Charlottesville on Va. 231. Its earlier section built in 1764 by Dr. Thomas Walker (1715–1794), whose achievements included discovery of Cumberland Gap, Castle Hill has a "modern," two-story addition dating from 1824. It was the site of a delaying action that probably kept Thomas Jefferson from being captured by Tarleton. Captain John Jouett of the Virginia militia had gotten ahead of Tarleton's raiders and ridden through the night of 3 to 4 June 1781 toward Monticello and Charlottesville to warn Jefferson and the state legislators. Given a fresh mount at Castle Hill, he hastened on. When Tarleton reached Castle Hill, where he captured a number of prominent Patriots, he could not resist the offer of a sumptuous breakfast. His delay of an hour to rest his tired troopers (who had left Louisa Courthouse at 2 a.m.) gave Jefferson time to escape from Monticello a mere ten minutes ahead of the British. It is a private residence.

Chiswell Lead Mines

Chiswell Lead Mines, Austinville, Wythe County. Colonel John Chiswell discovered lead deposits here in 1756 (allegedly while hiding in a cave to escape pursuit by Indians), and numerous small industrial developments at this place were important during the Revolution. These included furnaces and forges in addition to lead and zinc mines. The settlement that grew up in the neighborhood became the capital of far-flung Fincastle County, which from 1772 to 1776 comprised southwestern Virginia and Kentucky. At Chiswell Lead Mines (as the settlement originally was called) the famous Fincastle Resolves were adopted.

In July 1775 the Fincastle Committee of Safety was directed by the Virginia Assembly to contract with the mines for lead and to take over the mines if not satisfied with production. Loyalists naturally attempted to put the mines out of business, and several skirmishes were fought in the region. In 1780 Colonel Charles Lynch, then superintendent of the mines, used extralegal methods in suppressing Loyalist efforts to stop production, thereby perhaps contributing his name as a new term to the vocabulary; there are many possible origins for the phrase "lynch law." (It is to be noted that "lynch law" acquired its more sinister connotations later. Lynch's court did not hand down sentences more severe than whipping.)

Colonel Chiswell died suddenly in his Williamsburg home after being charged with the murder of Robert Routledge at Effingham Tavern in 1766. Chiswell had been regaling guests with fabulous accounts of his lead mines when Routledge impugned his veracity and was run through by Chiswell's sword. Although a physician testified that the famous prospector, miner, and promoter died of natural causes, it was universally believed that he committed suicide to escape trial.

In the out-of-the-way and forlorn little town of Austinville on the bank of New River is a monument marking the site of the Chiswell lead mines. Approaching the town from U.S. 52 on County Road 619 over a narrow, winding road, you drop into bottomland and enter the portion of Austinville on the northern bank of the river. Do not cross the bridge and railroad tracks to the main section of town, but continue west from the bridge half a mile and the monument will be to the south, opposite a cemetery.

The Chiswell lead mines (Austinville) site is not to be confused with Fort Chiswell, 6 miles to the north. Although built after the Revolution, about 1820, the Old Shot Tower is worth visiting when you leave Austinville. It is visible from the historical marker on U.S. 52 about 8 miles southeast of Fort Chiswell and about 5 miles from Austinville via County Road 619 and U.S. 52. (I-77 will pass within a few hundred yards.)

Christ Church

Christ Church, 3 miles south of Kilmarnock on Route 646 just off Route 200. On the site of a church dating from 1669 to 1675, this Greek-cruciform brick building was erected in 1732 by "King" Carter. Although the latter's magnificent home on the Rappahannock has not survived, the church of the Carters remains almost as it was when completed 273 years ago. From an architectural standpoint it is remarkable not only for a combination of typical early Georgian features, with several that are unique, but also for the integrity of its interior furnishings.

John Carter settled at Corotoman about 1650 and laid the foundations of a family that, primarily through the female line, would produce eight governors of Virginia, three signers of the Declaration of Independence, two famous fighting generals (Robert E. Lee and his father, "Light Horse Harry" Lee) and a chief justice. John's second son, Robert (1663–1732), pyramided the estate inherited from his father in 1669 and older brother (1690) into holdings that earned him the sobriquet of "King." Most of his wealth came from two periods during which he was agent for the Fairfaxes, who held the royal patent for 5 million acres (see greenway court). He left his descendants about 300,000 acres, 1,000 slaves, £10,000 in cash, and the family seat of Corotoman. As an indication of the value of money left by Carter, his grandson built Carter's Grove Plantation for a total of £500, of which £150 was the contractor's fee. Whereas English visitors and French aristocrats could comment that even the famous Mount Vernon was a simple place in comparison with the stately houses of Europe, Corotoman "rivaled the splendor of many an English noble's estate" (Louis B. Wright, The First Gentlemen of Virginia, p. 248).

Tombs of the early Carters are at Christ Church. The church grounds are open daily and the Carter Reception Center Museum is open daily from April through November. Tours are by appointment. Phone: (804) 438-6855.

Colonial Heights

Colonial Heights, Appomattox River opposite Petersburg. George Archer acquired property here in 1665, and it was to Archer's Hill that Patriot forces withdrew in good order after unsuccessfully opposing the British capture of Petersburg on 25 April 1781. Lafayette marched south from Richmond and on 10 May started a cannonade of Petersburg from behind the boxwood hedge on the lawn of Oak Hill. The house, known also as Archer's Hill, and the hedge are still standing on Carroll Avenue of modern Colonial Heights (see below).

Violet Bank (named for a bank of violets, not a financial operation) was Lafayette's headquarters. The first mansion was built in 1770 and burned in 1810. The surviving structure, dating from 1814, was General Robert E. Lee's headquarters during the siege of Petersburg in 1864. Presently it is owned by the city and serves as a Civil War museum. Still standing in front of Violet Bank is the gigantic Cucumber Tree (a species of magnolia), said to have been brought back by one of Governor Alexander Spotswood's "Knights of the Golden Horseshoe" from their exploration of the Shenandoah Valley in 1716. This is just one of the numerous stories surrounding the tree's origin. (Others, including the gigantic hero Peter Francisco, have been credited with planting the tree.)

The sites are indicated by highway markers on U.S. 1 and 301 in Colonial Heights a short distance north of the bridge from Petersburg. The city of Colonial Heights maintains an informative website on its colonial history, www.colonial-heights.com.

Cuckoo Tavern Site

Cuckoo Tavern Site, Louisa County. In the triangle where U.S. 33 and 522 intersect (which shows on the highway map as the village of Cuckoo) is a marker indicating the site of the tavern from which the proprietor's son, Jack Jouett, rode over the Old Mountain Road through Castle Hill to warn Thomas Jefferson at Monticello that Tarleton was coming.

Culpeper

Culpeper, seat of Culpeper County. On U.S. 522, half a mile west of the traffic light in the center of modern Culpeper and opposite a very large cemetery, is a highway marker saying that the Culpeper Minutemen were organized on the hill to the south in 1775. Following Glazier Street south from the vicinity of this sign on U.S. 522 (Sperryville Pike), you will find a region of unpretentious modern homes and several small hills, but no particular landmarks or signs identifying "the hill." A 10-foot stone obelisk inscribed "Virginia's First Minutemen—Great Bridge Their First Battle" (erected by the DAR in 1938) is in Culpeper on U.S. 522, 0.8 mile south of the traffic light mentioned above.

John Marshall, later chief justice of the Supreme Court, marched as a lieutenant in his father's company from Fauquier County to join the Culpeper Minutemen, which included volunteers from Orange County as well (see great bridge). The old courthouse that gave this place its name has been succeeded by one built in 1870.

Cumberland Gap

Cumberland Gap. See under kentucky.

Elk Hill

Elk Hill, James River. Thomas Jefferson's estate here was occupied by Cornwallis during the period 7 to 15 June 1781 and was virtually destroyed by the British raiders. It was again sacked by an invading army in 1865. The gray-stucco brick house has survived on its high hill among ancient elms and box bushes. Privately owned and hard to find, it is reached by taking Va. 6 west from Georges Tavern for 1 mile, at which point a highway marker indicates that the site is 2 miles south; the entrance to the estate is actually 1.6 miles south on County Road 608.

Ferry Farm Site

Ferry Farm Site, opposite Fredericksburg, on State Route 3 in Stafford County near the Rappahannock River. George Washington spent much of his boyhood, from late 1738 to 1747, at this place. It was his share of the estates of his father, who died here in 1743. His mother lived at Ferry Farm until she moved across the river in 1772 to Fredericksburg. If the young Washington ever cut down a paternal cherry tree (which he didn't) or threw a Spanish dollar across the river (highly improbable), Ferry Farm would have been the scene.

In 1996 the George Washington's Fredericksburg Foundation purchased the Ferry Farm and preserved it for generations to come. Visitors should start their tour of George Washington's boyhood home at the visitors center, where a map for a self-guided tour of the grounds is available. The visitors center features a museum gallery, "George Washington—Boy before Legend." Open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: (540) 370-0732.

Fort Chiswell

Fort Chiswell, Wythe County. A pyramid of boulders in the present village of Fort Chiswell north of the junction of interstates I-81 and I-77 about 6 miles east of Wytheville is all that remains to mark the site of the fort built by William Byrd III in the fall of 1760. Byrd named the frontier post for his friend Colonel John Chiswell, who had recently started developing the nearby Chiswell Lead Mines. It may have been at Fort Chiswell that Dan Morgan, then a twenty-year-old wagoner and veteran of Braddock's Defeat, was sentenced to receive five hundred lashes for hitting back at a British officer who slapped him with the flat of a sword. Wherever this actually happened, in later years the famous leader of riflemen used to bare his back to his followers, showing them why he so hated the British and bragging that he owed them one more stripe because they miscounted.

Francisco's Fight (Ward's Tavern) Site

Francisco's Fight (Ward's Tavern) Site, Nottoway County. Although the site of this heroic episode is not plotted on the official highway map of Virginia, it does appear—a little flag with the legend "Spot Signalized by Francisco's Gallantry"—in, of all places, plate CXXXVII of the Atlas to Accompany the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861–1865. On modern highway maps there is no such nod to history, only the symbol for an airport. A state highway marker on U.S. 360, 6 miles northeast of Burkeville and approximately 3 miles due west of the site, reads: "FRANCISCO'S FIGHT. A few miles east [at Ward's Tavern] Peter Francisco … defeated, singlehanded, nine of Tarleton's British dragoons, July, 1781. Francisco weighed 260 pounds and was considered the strongest man in Virginia…." Some historians credit the claim that he killed eleven dragoons on this occasion.

Peter Francisco (c. 1760–1836) appeared mysteriously in Virginia as an abandoned baby, possibly of Portuguese origin. He was raised by an uncle of Patrick Henry's, grew to a 6′6″ giant, and joined a regiment of Virginia Continentals at the age of fifteen. Seriously wounded on several occasions, he distinguished himself on many famous battlefields (Brandywine, Germantown, Fort Mifflin, Monmouth, Stony Point, Paulus Hook, Camden, and Guilford) and was truly a legend in his own time. After the war he prospered as a businessman and undertook a highly successful program of self-education.

On 15 March many states celebrate Peter Francisco Day. The United States Postal Service produced a stamp (18-cent) in his honor in 1975. He is buried in Richmond in Shockoe Hill Cemetery.

Fredericksburg

Fredericksburg. Important as a tidewater port and trading center in colonial days, Fredericksburg was settled in 1671, legally founded in 1727 and named for the father of George III, and incorporated in 1781. The town figured prominently in Washington's life; he lived for a while at Ferry Farm, a family estate across the Rappahannock from Fredericksburg, attended school in town for four months, frequented the Masonic Lodge and the Rising Sun Tavern, and visited the homes of his mother and sister. Other prominent Virginians and associates of Washington are identified with the town, which furnished leaders for the Revolution, maintained a "gunnery" and a military hospital, and was the site of a German prison camp. Most of the sites identified with these activities have been preserved and can be visited. Some points of interest are described below.

Masonic Lodge, 803 Princess Anne Street at Hanover Street. Portions of the old lodge building are preserved in this newer one, which was erected in 1815. Washington was initiated into Lodge No. 4 in Fredericksburg (1752), and the Masonic Bible on which he took his oath as president is displayed here along with the minute book recording the three degrees conferred. The lodge also has a Gilbert Stuart portrait of Washington. (It has been said that every major general of the American army during the Revolution was a Master Mason except one: Benedict Arnold.) Phone: (540) 373-5885.

Masonic Cemetery, Charles at George Street. One of the oldest Masonic burial grounds in America (1784), this half-acre includes an impressive collection of ancient tombstones, including that of Basil Gordon (1768–1817), one of the country's first millionaires. In one corner of the cemetery is the grave of Lewis Littlepage (1762–1802), whose career included military service with his townsman John Paul Jones on the Russian side against the Turks, and with Kosciuszko on the Polish side against the Russians (1794).

James Monroe Law Office, Museum, and Memorial Library, 908 Charles Street between William and George Streets. Phone: (504) 654-1043. Dating from 1758, this brick building has been little altered since Monroe practiced in it from 1786 to 1790. Monroe left the College of William and Mary to join the Continental army and became a second lieutenant in Hugh Mercer's regiment in September 1775. After a little more than three years' service, seeing action in most of the principal engagements in the North and reaching the grade of major, he resigned his commission. During the period 1780 to 1783 he studied law under Thomas Jefferson and started his career in politics. The law office contains the furniture Monroe bought while minister to France (1794–1796) and used in the White House when he was president (1816–1825). Also on display is the desk on which Monroe wrote the message to Congress of 2 December 1823 setting forth the principles embodied in the Monroe Doctrine. Monroe's Revolutionary War weapons are on display with many other subjects associated with his life and his wife's. A thirty-minute guided tour is provided, and visitors are invited to linger over the self-guided galleries. In 1998 the James Monroe Presidential Center was created as an alliance institution with the museum. In the garden behind the museum is an impressive sculpture of Madison.

Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop, 1020 Caroline Street at Amelia. Phone: (540) 373-1776. Shelves, drawers, and pigeonholes of an old apothecary shop were uncovered when lath and plaster were removed in this small, clap-boarded building. The handwriting on some of the drawer labels is thought to be that of Hugh Mercer, so this is believed to be the shop he is known to have operated in Fredericksburg. Mercer (c. 1725–1777) had been a doctor in the army of Bonnie Prince Charlie and had come to America after the defeat at Culloden. (See moores creek bridge national military park, north carolina for the story of his fellow refugees of "the Forty-Five.") He settled in Pennsylvania around 1748 and practiced medicine in the vicinity of modern Mercersburg, and during the Seven Years' War he rose from captain to colonel in four years of active campaigning (1755–1759). During these years on the frontier he came to know George Washington, who may have been instrumental in bringing about Mercer's change of residence to Fredericksburg. As a doctor and apothecary, Mercer kept up his friendship with Washington and became well established in the community. He had reached the relatively mellow age of fifty when the Revolutionary War started, but he was beaten by only a slim margin in the competition for command of the First Virginia Regiment. This coveted post went to a politician of some reputation in Virginia named Patrick Henry. About six months later, however, Mercer was commissioned a colonel, and four months after this he became a brigadier general. After commanding the Third Virginia Regiment and the "Flying Camp," Mercer led a column in the decisive battle at Trenton and was mortally wounded at Princeton. His monument, at Washington Avenue and Faquier Street, was erected by Congress in 1906 and features a bronze figure of the heroic Scot. The Hugh Mercer Apothecary is open to the public daily, and group tours are available by appointment. The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities (APVA) owns and maintains this site.

Rising Sun Tavern, 1304 Caroline Street between Faquier and Hawke Streets (another APVA property). Phone: (540) 373-1776. Like all colonial taverns, the Rising Sun was a focus of political activity. But because of its famous host, George Weedon, who was to become a general known to his troops as "Joe Gourd" (because he used a gourd to serve punch at his tavern), this particular tavern was especially well-known to travelers. One of these, an Englishman, commented five years before the Revolution started that Weedon was "very active in blowing the seeds of sedition." Washington and Lafayette celebrated here with their officers after the victory at Yorktown. Weedon fought in the Seven Years' War before settling in Fredericksburg and becoming host of the tavern believed to have been built about 1760 by Washington's brother Charles. As the lieutenant colonel of the Third Virginia Regiment he was second in command to his brother-in-law Hugh Mercer (see preceding paragraph), and he led a force of about six hundred men in Washington's campaigns in New York and New Jersey before becoming acting adjutant general to Washington and being promoted to brigadier general (February 1777). Weedon quit the army in 1778 in a common dispute over seniority but returned for the Virginia campaign in 1781 as commander of Virginia militia. He died in 1793 at the age of fifty-nine. This site is open to the public daily, with special summer hours.

Mary Washington's Town House, 1200 Charles Street, Lewis Street at Charles. Open to the public (APVA property). Three blocks from her daughter Betty's mansion (see Kenmore, below), George Washington's not-too-doting mother lived in this simple frame house during the years 1772 to 1789. Having moved here at his urging, presumably because he felt the management of Ferry Farm was too much for her and that she would not be happy at Mount Vernon, Mary Washington caused her son much embarrassment by complaining that she had "never lived so poore." She regularly visited her daughter at Kenmore (then a large plantation called Millbank), and although she apparently never went to Mount Vernon, she was frequently visited in Fredericksburg by her son George. The two-story middle portion of the house was built by Washington in 1772, the year his mother moved in from Ferry Farm. The interior has been restored and furnished as it might have been when occupied by Mary Washington. In the yard are box bushes she planted two centuries ago and her personal sundial still stands in the garden and keeps perfect time.

Kenmore, 1201 Washington Avenue between Lewis and Fauquier Streets. Phone: (540) 373-3381. George Washington's only sister to survive infancy, Betty, married Fielding Lewis, who started building this brick mansion in 1752 for his nineteen-year-old bride. (Oil portraits of both hang in the mansion.) Although not completed until fifteen years later, it was occupied long before then and was a center of social and political life. Originally called Millbank, the house was erected with its "dependencies" on a plantation of nearly 1,300 acres surveyed by young George Washington. (Note for suburban homeowners: there are 640 acres in a square mile.) Fielding Lewis was a Patriot who put his money where others put only their mouths: he furnished the funds for three regiments and a ship during the Revolution, and as chief commissioner for the "gunnery" (see next paragraph) used his own money to keep up manufacturing when public funds were exhausted. He died in 1782, leaving a debt of £7,000 and a mortgage on Millbank. His widow sold the house in 1796. A few years later it was bought by the Gordon family, who changed its name to Kenmore. In 1922 an association was formed to save the mansion and the remaining three acres of land from approaching oblivion. The house is an architectural jewel and is filled with furniture and relics of the Washington and Lewis families. Among these is the only weapon from the Fielding Lewis gunnery known to survive. The plantation house's dependencies have been reconstructed on the original foundations, and the grounds have been restored. Further renovations and restorations were going on at Kenmore in 2005, but the site remains open daily for tours. Period furniture, portraits, historical documents, and lush gardens are some of what is displayed here.

Gunnery Springs, off Gunnery Lane in back of Old Walker Grant School, an extension of Ferdinand Street. On the south end of Old Fredericksburg and in what was an open field at the base of a steep hill are the springs where small arms and ammunition were to be manufactured during the Revolution, though very few guns were made. Colonel Fielding Lewis and Major Charles Dick were appointed commissioners by the Virginia Convention of 1775 to establish and operate the factory and were given £2,500 of state funds for this purpose. When this money was exhausted, Lewis raised capital by pledging his own property, and for his patriotic pains his family lost title to it (see preceding paragraph). The site is marked by the local DAR and by a masonry covering over the slow trickling springs.

John Paul Jones House (private), Caroline Street at Lafayette Boulevard. The elder brother of the naval hero was a tailor named William Paul who emigrated from Scotland in 1758 and established a business in Fredericksburg. He was visited here about a year later by his brother John, who was a twelve-year-old apprentice to a shipowner of Whitehaven, England. (This was the first place Jones later raided during the Revolution when he got into foreign waters, "the only American operation of war on English soil.") Although brother William's house has been called the only place in America the naval-hero-to-be could call home, it is improbable that he spent much time here. It is likely that he fled to this house in 1773 from the West Indies after killing the ringleader of his mutinous crew, but it was after this incident that he changed his name by adding the final "Jones," and it would not make sense for him to then reestablish family ties that would help authorities in the West Indies bring him to trial there. But in the years of obscurity before John Paul Jones emerged to become a famous naval commander, he probably stayed closer to the homes of his North Carolina benefactors, Allen and Willie (pronounced "Wylie") Jones. That he spent time in this Fredericksburg house is, however, unquestionable.

Slave Auction Block, corner of William and Charles Streets. Slaves were sold and rented from this spot in the century before the Civil War.

Great Bridge

Great Bridge, Intracoastal Canal, city of Chesapeake, Norfolk County. Governor Dunmore had fled from Williamsburg in June 1775, and on 7 November he started assembling an army of Loyalists and freed slaves (thus his nickname "Dunmore the Liberator") around a small core of regulars. When a Patriot column advanced on Norfolk, Dunmore picked Great Bridge as the place to stop it. A long causeway and a 120-foot bridge spanned a tidal swamp at this point. The British had an ideal defensive position, but on 9 December Dunmore made the error of attacking. (The legend is that a servant of John Marshall's father entered the enemy camp pretending to be a deserter and reported that only a few riflemen were defending the south end of the causeway.)

The British suffered a bloody repulse in a brief action that cost the Patriots only one casualty. Dunmore crowded his Loyalist refugees and troops aboard ships and fled to Gwynn Island.

The topography around the present community of Great Bridge has been altered beyond recognition since the Revolution. It is not an attractive area, although the historic spot is worth the detour if you are driving between the Norfolk area and colonial sites in the Albemarle region of North Carolina. Highway markers at Great Bridge (intersection of Va. 165 and 168) indicate the general location of the British and American works at the northern and southern ends of the causeway that no longer exists.

Green Spring Battlefield

Green Spring Battlefield, between Williamsburg and Jamestown, near the junction of Va. 5 and County Road 614. After withdrawing down the peninsula to Williamsburg, followed cautiously by Lafayette, Cornwallis moved to cross the James and establish a base around Portsmouth. Lafayette was alert to the possibility of catching the British in a vulnerable position astride the river, but the experienced Cornwallis was thinking ahead of his young adversary. When General Anthony Wayne pressed forward with an advance guard of about five hundred men (later reinforced), thinking he would have to deal only with a British rear guard around Green Spring, he suddenly found himself under counterattack. Cornwallis had his main force of some seven thousand troops immediately available. Lafayette had been concerned about this possibility and made a reconnaissance that confirmed his suspicions, but he could not get to Wayne in time to keep that fiery warrior from becoming heavily engaged. Cornwallis, on the other hand, made the mistake of hoping he could draw the major portion of Lafayette's force into battle before delivering a decisive counterblow.

Wayne retrieved the situation masterfully, surprising the British by continuing to attack, and then extricating the bulk of his command before the enemy could recover. Patriot losses were high—some 140 killed, wounded, and captured out of 900 engaged—but disaster was averted. Cornwallis had delayed his attack so long that he had only an hour of daylight remaining; thus, he could not exploit his advantage by undertaking a pursuit.

The action was fought around the estate that Governor Sir William Berkeley had established more than a century earlier. The great mansion of Green Spring had been used by the insurgents in Bacon's Rebellion (1676). The architect Benjamin Latrobe made a sketch of the house before demolishing it in 1796 to construct a new one of his design. All that remains standing aboveground today are the ruined walls of what may be the seventeenth-century jail and an unattractive brick structure over the bubbling spring for which the place was named. The site was thoroughly excavated in 1954 to 1955 by the National Park Service, results recorded in detail, and the extensive ruins recovered with sod. In 1967 Green Spring's house site and surrounding land was acquired by the federal government and made part of Colonial National Historical Park. Included is Berkeley's seventeenth-century plantation home and the Cape Henry Memorial, put up to honor the arrival of the first settlers to Jamestown in 1607. This memorial consists of a white concrete cross to commemorate the wooden one that the settlers placed after landing. It was erected in 1935 by the DAR. Information is available by calling the Colonial National Historical Park at (757) 898-2410.

The battlefield of 1781 has been little affected by time; the action may be traced on the ground, but there are no markers.

Greenway Court

Greenway Court (Private), one mile south of White Post, near Va. 277. Frontier home for thirty years (1752–1781) of the only British peer resident in America, Thomas, Sixth Lord Fairfax of Cameron, this place was never built in the style one might expect from the man who was proprietor of more than 5 million acres in Virginia. The manor house was never constructed. The lord of Greenway was content to live in crude simplicity in what had been planned as the hunting lodge. This has been replaced by a two-story brick farmhouse dating from 1828. The Fairfax land office has survived, a 28-by-18-foot structure of thick limestone walls and narrow windows built probably in 1762 and restored in 1930.

In 1649 Charles II had made a grant of more than 5 million acres of Virginia lands to establish a refuge for Cavaliers who had forfeited their estates to support his father. Thomas Fairfax inherited this property through his mother, the heiress of Lord Thomas Culpeper. The grant comprised the Northern Neck, between the Potomac and Rappahannock, and extended westward to include the northern portion of the Shenandoah Valley, between the North Branch of the Potomac and the Rapidan. Largely because Culpeper agents had antagonized Virginians, there was a long-lived effort to reduce the size of the lands claimed under the grant from Charles II, particularly when westward expansion made the frontier property more valuable. But in 1745 the Privy Council upheld the Fairfax claims to all the land in northwest Virginia, and two years later Thomas came to America to live.

A dumpy little man of democratic outlook, he lived during the Revolutionary period with all the privileges of a Virginia citizen and without molestation. While staying briefly at Belvoir, the home of his cousin and agent, he became a patron of young George Washington of nearby Mount Vernon and charged him with surveying Fairfax lands in the Shenandoah Valley. He was a confirmed woman hater, having been jilted for a duke, and it is said that no woman was ever permitted at Greenway Court. His passions were fox hunting and real estate.

Lord Fairfax died at Greenway Court in his eighty-ninth year. He was buried under the altar of the parish church in Winchester, and his remains were moved later to Christ Church. The exact location of the second grave was found in 1926, and the bones reburied beneath the floor of the church.

Gunston Hall

Gunston Hall, near Lorton, about 20 miles south of Washington, D.C., off Interstate 90 and Route 1. A particularly attractive little Georgian house, this was the home of a Virginia statesman who played an important offstage role in the founding of America. The fourth of his name in Virginia, George Mason (1725–1792) was a lifetime associate of Washington, and had a relationship with George Rogers Clark (1752–1818) that was as father to son. He is remembered for drafting the Virginia Resolves (1769), the Fairfax Resolves (1774), the Virginia Bill of Rights, and the Virginia Constitution. His statement of the constitutional position of the American colonists in the Fairfax Resolves was adopted by the Continental Congress. His Virginia Bill of Rights was drawn on by Jefferson in drafting the first part of the Declaration of Independence, was copied by many states, formed the basis for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, and even had an influence in the French Revolution. Gunston Hall was built in 1755 to 1758. The architect was a skilled draftsman from Oxford under indenture to Mason's brother.

Gunston Hall was eventually bought by the state and today is a 550-acre historic landmark open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Visitors can visit Mason's home and/or walk the grounds to learn about eighteenth-century plantation life. Website: www.gunstonhall.org.

Gwynn Island and Cricket Hill

Gwynn Island and Cricket Hill, Chesapeake Bay, Mathews County. On 2,000-acre Gwynn Island the last royal governor of Virginia made his last stand before being driven off by artillery fire from Cricket Hill, on the mainland about 500 yards away. From Va. 14 a little more than 2 miles north of Mathews, follow Va. 198 North 1 mile to Va. 223 and go right for 2.3 miles to Fort Cricket Hill. Secondary Highway 633 leads on to Gwynn Island.

In 1991 the community established the Gwynn Island Museum. Much of the two-floor museum is dedicated to the Civil War, but there is a very interesting exhibit concerning the Battle of Cricket Hill and colonial artifacts. Phone: (804) 725-7949.

Hanover Courthouse and Tavern

Hanover Courthouse and Tavern, 18 miles north of Richmond on U.S. 301. Here in 1763 Patrick Henry argued for the defense in the Parson's Cause, winning the fame as a lawyer and advocate of local government that launched his political career. In a radical and well-reasoned speech he challenged the long-established prerogative of the British government to veto ("disallow") acts of local American legislatures. Although the judges had to rule that the local Anglican clergy had been damaged by the Two Penny Acts of the Virginia Assembly, when Parson James Maury subsequently sued for damages he was awarded only 1 d. (one British penny).

Still used as the county courthouse, the single-story, T-shaped brick structure with its arcaded piazza is set serenely in a rectangle of grass and trees. Quite apart from its great historic associations (it was a scene of action during the Civil War), Hanover Courthouse is a sight of exceptional charm.

Across the road is Hanover Tavern, a rambling, two-story frame building that was used by the Barksdale Theater from 1953 to 1996. Started in 1723 and built over a high basement, it was acquired in 1760 by the father-in-law of Patrick Henry. Having turned to the law in 1760, Patrick Henry lived at the tavern for some time during the next few years. Cornwallis stayed there briefly during the summer of 1781, when he was playing hounds and hare with Lafayette. The tavern recently underwent renovation by an organization called the Hanover Tavern Foundation, and plans are to use it as a place of education and entertainment.

Hite's Fort and Springdale

Hite's Fort and Springdale (not open), about 2 miles north of Stephens City on U.S. 11. The two-story house of gray stone is Springdale, built in 1753 by John Hite. Just to the south are the broken stone walls that probably are the ruins of Hite's Fort, the house built around 1734 by John's father. The latter was an Alsatian whose first name probably was spelled Jost; it is rendered as Joist by local authorities, but this sounds more Virginian than Alsatian. Hite settled in Pennsylvania in 1710 and in 1731 obtained contracts for about 140,000 acres in the Shenandoah Valley. The next year he settled sixteen families on Opequon Creek, starting the German immigration into the valley.

Jamestown Site

Jamestown Site, James River near Williamsburg. By the time of the Revolution, the site of the first permanent settlement in English America had become farmland that was on its way to being reclaimed by the wilderness. The place was nevertheless important strategically. A major engagement occurred around the nearby ruins of Green Spring (see green spring battlefield), and the French expedition from the West Indies debarked at Jamestown for the Yorktown campaign.

Since 1934 some 1,500 acres around Jamestown have been developed as part of Colonial National Historical Park. Phone: (757) 229-1733. The visitors center offers a seventeen-minute audiovisual program, and foundations of the settlement are exposed. The picturesque Old Church Tower of 1639 is standing. The nearby Jamestown Festival Park has a fine museum, a reconstruction of the Powhatan village, Jamestown's palisaded fort, and full-scale sailing models of the three tiny ships that brought the first 104 settlers to Virginia. The first slaves in the British colonies were sold here on 20 August 1619 (though there is some evidence that a few slaves were brought here even earlier). The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities began excavating the site in 1994, uncovering thousands of artifacts dating back to the first half of the seventeenth century. One big discovery was that James Fort was not washed into the James River as previously believed; rather, the APVA has unearthed over 250 feet of foundation for two distinct walls of the fort's triangular shape.

Lewis (Andrew) Grave

Lewis (Andrew) Grave, Salem. A frontier leader before the Revolution, Andrew Lewis served with Washington at Fort Necessity, with Braddock in the expedition of 1755, and with Forbes three years later against Fort Duquesne. (Under Pennsylvania, see fort necessity and forks of the ohio). He was captured in the latter operation and taken to Montreal. After being released he took part in important Indian negotiations, including the one ending with the Treaty of Fort Stanwix, New York. In Dunmore's War he won the decisive Battle of Point Pleasant (see point pleasant battlefield under West Virginia). At the outbreak of the Revolution the Continental Congress was slow in commissioning Lewis a brigadier general (not until 1 March 1776), and he was not considered qualified for further promotion even after successfully commanding the action against Gwynn Island (see gwynn island and cricket hill) that drove the royal governor, Dunmore, from Virginia. Lewis resigned in April 1777 from the Continental army but continued to serve in the militia and on the governor's executive council until his death in 1781 at the age of sixty-two. The once famous pioneer, statesman, and military leader is buried on part of his 625-acre estate near Main Street (U.S. 460) and Park Avenue.

Mechunk Creek

Mechunk Creek, Albemarle County. Six miles east of Shadwell a highway marker on Va. Route 22 about a half-mile from the county line says that Lafayette's defenses were established 2 miles south. Here on the morning of 12 June 1781 the young French general started digging in between the British army under Lord Cornwallis (around Elk Hill) and the Shenandoah Valley. Stores had been evacuated from Albemarle Old Courthouse, and after Tarleton's raid on Charlottesville the Patriots had every reason to expect that Cornwallis would follow with his main force. To accomplish the dangerous mission of reaching this position along the Mechunk without being exposed to attack by Cornwallis on the Patriots' eastern flank, Lafayette had secretly reopened a long abandoned road from Boswell's Tavern. A marker at the latter place now explains that "The road has ever since been known as 'The Marquis Road.'" When Cornwallis started retreating from Elk Hill on 15 June, Lafayette left his position on Mechunk Creek and followed the British cautiously on a parallel course down the South Anna, gathering strength as he went. He then got on the tail of Cornwallis's column as the British retreated down the peninsula toward Jamestown.

Michie Tavern

Michie Tavern, 683 Thomas Jefferson Parkway, Charlottesville. Phone: (434) 977-1234. In 1927 this large colonial structure was moved from its "inaccessible" location northwest of Charlottesville to the beaten tourist track less than half a mile from the gate to Monticello. Although cheapened by development as a tourist attraction and its architectural integrity degraded, Michie (pronounced "Micky") Tavern has legitimate historical significance. The oldest portion dates from before 1740 and has fine interior woodwork. In 1746 the house was sold by Patrick Henry's father to John Michie, who enlarged it about seven years later and whose descendants owned it until 1910. The Michie family operated a tavern catering to guests whose names are today famous: Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, and Lafayette. Many of the furnishings are original. Today it continues to serve guests whose needs are attended by a staff attired in period clothing. There is also a variety of shops available.

Monticello

Monticello, about 32 miles southeast of Charlottesville. The hilltop home of Thomas Jefferson is a monument, self-built, to a giant of American history who also happened to be the country's first original architect. After the marquis de Chastellux visited Monticello in 1782 he wrote: "We may safely aver that Mr. Jefferson is the first American who has consulted the fine arts to know how he should shelter himself from the weather."

Jefferson also had a scientific bent, and Monticello is full of inventions and gimmicks to delight the heart of the most blasé modern houseowner: the dumbwaiter, the bed with no wrong side to get out of, the hall clock with cannonball weights to mark the days, the revolving chair that becomes a chaise lounge. Monticello, which means "little mountain," is approached by a winding road from either side, with distant vistas unscarred by modern earthmovers. The familiar view on the American nickel is from an angle that does not convey the picture of a mansion on a high hill.

It was up one of the winding roads to Monticello that a British raiding party rode on 4 June 1781 to seize the author of the Declaration of Independence. They were just ten minutes late, thanks to the delay at nearby Castle Hill. It is a tribute to the military discipline of their leader, Tarleton, that they did little damage to the abandoned house, limiting themselves to a binge in Jefferson's wine cellar.

America's first Thomas Jefferson was living in Henrico County (which would include Richmond) in 1677. Three generations later the subject of this sketch was born near the site of Monticello at Shadwell, a frontier farm his father, Peter, had bought from William Randolph of Tuckahoe Plantation. The price of the 400-acre parcel shows in the deed as "Henry Weatherburn's biggest bowl of Arrack punch to him delivered." (See Wetherburn Tavern, williamsburg.) What does not show in the deed is that Peter Jefferson (1705–1757) had married the nineteen-year-old Jane Randolph, a first cousin of William and the eldest surviving child of Isham Randolph of Dungeness.

The Randolphs were probably Virginia's most distinguished family, and this connection gave Thomas Jefferson the social and cultural background that contributed so much to his later achievements. From his father, a frontiersman who made the first accurate map of Virginia and went on to become a burgess and county lieutenant, he inherited 2,750 acres, an established position in the community, a love of the frontier, and a fondness for science.

Jefferson started building Monticello, whose site he had picked as a boy, in 1770, having lived at Shadwell since 1752. He moved into the first completed pavilion at Monticello in 1771, a year after Shadwell burned. On 1 January 1772 he married the twenty-four-year-old widow of Bathurst Skelton at her home 15 miles southeast of Richmond and took her to Monticello, reaching his pavilion on horseback in a snowstorm.

When his wife died after almost eleven years of devoted marriage (September 1782), Jefferson returned to public life. He was in Europe for many years, and this experience broadened his outlook so that when he enlarged Monticello during the period 1796 to 1809 he was able to make it a remarkable example of classical design adapted to its environment and function (WPA Guide, p. 624)

The last seventeen years of Jefferson's life were spent without venturing more than a few miles from Monticello. During this period he finally succeeded in getting the University of Virginia established, and he was its architect in the literal as well as the figurative sense. Despite careful management, Jefferson spent large sums of money on luxuries and was plagued with financial difficulties throughout most of his life. Like many Americans, he was badly hurt by the Embargo of 1807, that daring measure by which he hoped to avoid war with Britain and France. In 1815 he sold his ten-thousand-volume library to the government at a low price and was temporarily relieved of his financial distress. (The books became the nucleus of the Library of Congress.) But four years later he suffered a fatal financial blow when a friend failed to cover a note Jefferson had endorsed. He was trying to find a buyer for his lands—some 10,000 acres—when public sympathy was aroused and voluntary contributions protected Monticello during the last year of his life. Jefferson believed to the end that he would be able to pay off his debts, but his heirs were not able to hold the place long.

There is reason to believe that Jefferson's commitment to slavery actually undermined his financial position, though scholars continue to debate such points. His heirs held a public sale of furnishings in early 1827, and the last member of the family moved out in 1829. Two years later the estate, reduced to 552 acres, was bought for about $7,000 by a Charlottesville apothecary, James T. Barclay, who undertook to use its mulberry trees to establish a silkworm culture. The project failed within two years, with much damage being done to Jefferson's gardens in the meantime and the rest of the property being ravaged by vandals and curiosity seekers.

In 1836 the estate was bought, sight unseen, by Uriah Phillips Levy (1792–1862). His family held Monticello for eighty-nine years, never using it as a full-time residence but maintaining it extremely well. In 1923 the newly organized Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation bought Monticello for $500,000 and undertook the difficult task of raising funds to make it a national shrine. A major difficulty was that Americans had almost forgotten Thomas Jefferson. Not until 1930 did the Foundation have sufficient funds to guarantee the survival of Monticello. Major work was done on the house in 1954, and the beautifully maintained estate of nearly 2,000 acres is now a major tourist attraction open to the public year-round.

Leaving the mansion by road, a visitor passes the little family burial ground, still used by Jefferson's descendants, where a simple obelisk of Jefferson's design bears the epitaph he himself wrote: "Here was buried Thomas Jefferson / Author of the Declaration of American Independence / Of the Statute of Virginia for religious freedom / And Father of the University of Virginia."

In recent years Monticello has moved to come to terms with Jefferson's attitudes toward slavery and to one slave in particular, Sally Heming. The story of Jefferson's affair with Heming, who was his wife's half-sister, encapsulates so much of the sordid nature of America's racial relations. No visit to Monticello is complete without asking a tour guide for a consideration of this story, which was denied and avoided for nearly two centuries. The plantation's slave quarters no longer exist, and there are no plans to restore them. More information is available through the Thomas Jefferson Foundation. Monticello is open daily, 1 March to 31 October, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and 1 November to the end of February, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Website: www.monticello.org; phone: (434) 984-9800.

Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon, Potomac River, 7 miles south of Alexandria. The home of George Washington, and part of a family grant dating from 1669, Mount Vernon is second only to the White House as a famous American residence. The 500-acre estate has been restored in accordance with plans drafted by Washington before the Revolution. In addition to the famous mansion, which is furnished with original items retrieved from widely scattered sources, a visitor will see the numerous outbuildings that supported life on a colonial plantation, including, of course, the slave quarters. George and Martha Washington are buried near the main house.

In 1669 George Washington's great-grandfather and Nicholas Spencer applied for a 5,000-acre grant some 40 miles up the Potomac (as the crow flies) from the former's first holdings on Pope's Creek (see washington's birthplace). John Washington's half of this grant, called (Little) Hunting Creek, was left to his son Lawrence, who left it to his daughter. She sold it in 1726 to her brother Augustine, father of George Washington, who was three years old when his family moved from Pope's Creek to the site of the Mount Vernon mansion. Augustine had built a house here on the site of an older one, and the Washingtons lived in it until George was six years old.

The year 1743 was a landmark in the fortunes of the Washington family. Augustine died, Washington's elder half-brother Lawrence inherited Mount Vernon (as he was to call it), built a simple house on the foundations of the one put up by his father and destroyed by fire, and moved in with a bride. He had lifted the Washingtons from the middle ranks of Tidewater society by marrying Anne Fairfax, daughter of Lord Fairfax's kinsman and agent. The Fairfax mansion, Belvoir, was within distant eyesight of Mount Vernon, and it became a second home to young George. Although Belvoir lacked the magnificence of the country seats of the aristocracy back in England, Lord Fairfax had inherited a grant of more than 5 million acres between the Potomac and the Rappahannock, and Belvoir was the seat of power for administration of this land empire.

George was sixteen years old when he came to live permanently at Mount Vernon with Lawrence and Anne, and he was looked on by the Fairfaxes of Belvoir as a member of the family.

Lawrence had shown signs about this time of having consumption, and he died three years later of this disease, in 1752. His will made George executor and residuary heir should his infant daughter, Sarah, die without issue, and subject to dower rights for Anne. The latter remarried within a few months of becoming a widow, moved away with Sarah, and left George as virtual master of Mount Vernon. Two years later he bought Anne's dower rights. Sarah Washington died in 1761, and George fell heir to the house and land that had for all practical purposes been his since his half-brother's death nine years earlier.

Meanwhile, he had married in 1759 and before bringing his bride to Mount Vernon had started the changes that would gradually transform the house from a one-and-a-half-story structure to the odd but attractive architectural creation it finally became. During the summer of 1758 he had the roof raised to provide for a second story and made other modifications. Later he would extend the ends of the house (1774 and 1776), build the colonnaded porch on the river side (1780s), add the pediment and cupola after the Revolution, and throughout this period make numerous other architectural modifications.

During his lifetime Washington increased the acreage of Mount Vernon to more than 8,000. In 1786 there were about 240 people on the place; at its peak, the Mount Vernon plantation was home to 317 slaves. But although he tried hard, Washington never could make the place pay. The soil was not good enough for high-quality tobacco; wheat, flax, and hemp production were unsuccessful; and many economic historians now argue that slavery was a counterproductive economic system. Although the river was teeming with shad and herring, Washington could not make a profit from them. But he had the one thing needed in his day (and in this) to maintain a country home that could not support itself: a rich wife.

Martha Washington was an extremely wealthy woman. About a year older than George, she had been left a widow at the age of twenty-six, with two surviving children from her marriage with Daniel Parke Custis and an estate tentatively appraised at well over $100,000. It was in all ways a happy marriage, although the Washingtons had no children of their own.

Martha Washington, hardly 5 feet tall beside her 6-foot, 2-inch husband, was a born hostess. Although she brought no luxuries with her except the Custis coach, her money enabled the Washingtons to import furniture, furnishings, and all manner of good things from England, and Mount Vernon became famous for its hospitality. With more than a dozen house slaves, the manor house had hundreds of visitors a year. Intimate friends and total strangers came for a meal or for a week (there being no public accommodations closer than Alexandria), and the Washingtons complained to each other of boredom when bad weather kept guests away.

Mount Vernon now draws more than a million visitors a year.

Unlike many slave owners, Washington provided medical care to his slaves, recognized their marriages, refused to break up families, and arranged for their eventual freedom upon his death. Washington sought to train numerous slaves in a variety of artisan skills and put a few in positions of responsibility. Just 50 yards from his tomb is the old slave burial ground.

Washington died at Mount Vernon on 14 December 1799. Martha followed about eighteen months later, the mansion and 4,000 acres then passing to Bushrod Washington, the son of George's brother John Augustine Washington. Bushrod was an associate justice of the Supreme Court whose duties kept him away from Mount Vernon. The estate passed to his nephew John Augustine Washington in 1829, to the latter's wife three years later, then in 1850 by conveyance to their son, John Augustine Washington, Jr. The latter tried unsuccessfully to interest the state and federal government in acquiring what was left of the Mount Vernon estate, and Ann Pamela Cunningham of South Carolina then marched forth to organize the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association. In a remarkable pioneering effort in the field of historic preservation, the Ladies' Association raised funds in a nationwide campaign, and in 1858 acquired a 200-acre tract that included the mansion. This initial acquisition has since been expanded to just under 500 acres, about the area of Washington's Mansion House Farm. Second in importance only to preservation of the property has been the remarkable effort to find and return the mansion's contents that were widely scattered after Washington's death. Mount Vernon's principal sources of income are admission fees, retail and dining sales, and donations from private organizations and corporations. Over 450 individuals are employed at Mount Vernon, and another estimated 400 volunteers round out the workforce needed to maintain the site. The Mount Vernon Ladies' Association is proud that no tax dollars are used to support this beloved site, and that it boasts over a million visitors a year. Hours vary seasonally, though they are open daily; check their website for specifics and directions: http://www.mountvernon.org. Phone: (707) 780-2000.

Norfolk

Norfolk. At the start of the Revolution this city, laid out in 1682, was the largest in Virginia. Its population was about six thousand. The ruling element was made up of English and Scottish merchants who tended toward Loyalism, being much more interested in continuing their profitable trade with Britain than in revolution. Royal Governor Dunmore came here when driven from Williamsburg in 1775, a major reason being that he could be supported by the Royal Navy while organizing Loyalist militia. After his defeat at Great Bridge, Dunmore and the Loyalists crowded aboard ships off Norfolk. In exasperation over the Patriots' refusal to let him send foraging parties ashore, and seeing no prospect of reaching any terms with the rebels, Dunmore announced he was going to bombard the town. Less than twenty-four hours later, starting at 4 a.m. on New Year's Day 1776, naval guns opened fire and landing parties burned warehouses near the waterfront. The ill-disciplined Patriot militia, who had done much to provoke Dunmore into this act of retribution, started setting fires in the homes of prominent Loyalists, and a wind helped spread the flames. Militia officers finally got control of their troops and stopped the senseless destruction of valuable property, but then decided to destroy what remained of the town to deny its use to the British. (The militia withdrew from Norfolk a few weeks later.) Dunmore moved back among the ashes, built barracks to ease the crowding aboard ship, but then abandoned this beachhead because he was unable to provision it from the surrounding countryside. After the Revolution, Norfolk was rebuilt, but a disastrous fire swept the town in 1799 and the War of 1812 was a further setback to the reviving commercial prosperity. A yellow-fever epidemic in 1855, followed closely by the Civil War, were the next disasters, but Norfolk slowly recovered and is now a thriving maritime city, thanks largely to the U.S. Navy

Distinctive blue "Norfolk Tour" signs lead visitors from the numerous highways into the urban sprawl of the modern city. There is tourist material available at the information center at Gardens-by-the-Sea on Azalea Garden Road. The website www.historicnorfolk.org is another good source.

St. Paul's Church, 201 St. Paul's Boulevard, the only structure to survive the destruction of early 1776, is in the original 50-acre tract of the colonial settlement. One of the country's oldest churches still in use, the present edifice was built in 1739 on the site of a chapel that had been there almost a century. The last renovation (1913) restored St. Paul's to its colonial style. In the south wall is a cannonball with a stone tablet saying it was fired by Lord Dunmore on 1 January 1776. Ancient oaks shade the churchyard, where the oldest headstone dates from 1673. Phone: (757) 627-4353.

The Moses Myers House (c. 1792), East Freemason Street at Bank Street, one of the first brick houses built after the destruction of Norfolk in 1776, is nearby. It is one of the South's most elegant townhouses, open as a museum and containing authentic furnishings of the prosperous merchant's period. Phone: (757) 333-6283.

The Willoughby-Baylor House (1794), 601 East Freemason Street, is another survivor, restored starting in 1963, and adjacent to the Myers House. It also is a house museum with eighteenth-century furnishings. The museum was closed for most of 2005 as it underwent renovation.

The Adam Thoroughgood House, believed to date from 1636, is the oldest brick home in America. Thoroughgood came to America in 1621 as an indentured servant and later brought in a group of settlers that included Augustine Warner, an ancestor of George Washington. The charming house is preserved in an attractive setting of gardens and old trees about 8 miles from the historic district of Old Norfolk (Northhampton Boulevard) at 1636 Parish Road in Virginia Beach. Phone: (757) 431-4000.

Pamunkey Indian Museum

Pamunkey Indian Museum, King William County. The Pamunkey were the largest group within the Powhatan confederation at the time of the English invasion. They lived primarily along the banks of the York River. Pocahontas's uncle led the Pamunkey and their allies in the final attempt to force back the English in 1644. In 1781 the surviving Pamunkey were collected onto a reservation near Lanesville. The Pamunkey Museum, located on this reservation, is devoted to their history and culture. The museum is near the intersection of Routes 30 and 633, and open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. Phone: (804) 843-4792.

Petersburg

Petersburg, Appomattox River. Modern Petersburg was created after the Revolution (1784) by the combination of four settlements. Colonial Petersburg, in the northwestern portion of today's city, is neglected in Chamber of Commerce map-guides encouraging the tourist to "Visit Historic Petersburg." But The Virginia Guide of 1940 locates three Revolutionary sites in this older section of today's Petersburg that historians consider important.

The first is a brick residence called Mountain View, on McKenzie Street opposite the north end of South Street. This may be the site of Fort Henry, whose construction at the head of navigation of the Appomattox was directed by the General Assembly in 1645, and around which Abraham Wood developed a trading post. Wood's son-in-law, Peter Jones, later took over this enterprise, after which the locality became known as Peter's Point. A stone building some distance to the east and included in current tourist literature as Peter Jones's Trading Station is alleged to have been "the center of his flourishing Indian trade."

Of better-established historical authenticity, and west of the alleged site of Fort Henry, is Battersea. Built before the Revolution by John Banister, friend of Thomas Jefferson, ardent Patriot, and first mayor of modern Petersburg (1784), this has been called one of Virginia's finest Palladian houses. Visiting it in 1781, the marquis de Chastellux commented that "the house is decorated in the Italian rather than the British or American style, having three porticoes at the three principal entrances, each of them supported by four columns." (Palladian architecture is named after Andrea Palladio, a sixteenth-century architect who was very Italian.) The British treated Banister's mansion badly in 1781, and until recent years it was in shabby condition. Now a well-maintained private residence at the north end of Battersea Lane, it may be seen from the street. (A highway marker is on U.S. 1 and 460 in the western end of Petersburg at Battersea Lane, four blocks south of the site.) In 1992 the city of Petersburg began hosting a reenactment of the battle of 25 April 1781. The reenactment is at Battersea Plantation, located at the west end of Washington Street, less than 2 miles off the Washington Street Exit on Interstate-95.

On North West Street, near the railroad tracks and roughly midway between Battersea and Mountain View, is a group of red-brick buildings, including Pride's Tavern. Pride's Race Track was nearby, and his tavern was one of the many for which Colonial Petersburg was famous. The Golden Ball Tavern, built about 1750, remained standing until razed in 1944. An unpainted frame building with brick ends and dormers along its gabled roof, it was a lunchroom when described in The Virginia Guide of 1940. The site is the southeast corner of Grove Avenue and North Market Street, a short distance south of Peter Jones's Trading Station. Niblo's Tavern, where Lafayette was entertained in 1824, stood at the northeast corner of modern Second and Boilingbrook Streets.

The site of Bollingbrook, the colonial mansion built by Robert Bolling on East Hill after 1725 and the last portion surviving until razed in 1915, is a knoll between North Jefferson Street and the railroad tracks. (It may be located on the city map as being in the block formed by Franklin, Jefferson, Bank, and Madison Streets, about 700 feet due east of the Center Hill Mansion Museum and roughly the same distance north-northeast of the Information Center.) Here the British had their headquarters in 1781 (see below). Lossing visited and sketched Bollingbrook a few years before the larger part burned in 1855, commenting that the Widow Bolling, "one of the largest land-holders in Virginia … owned the tobacco warehouses at Petersburg, and nearly one half of the town" (Pictorial Field Book of the Revolution, II, pp. 544n. and 545).

Blandford Church and the adjacent Blandford Cemetery, located at 111 Rochelle Lane and marked in 1914 by a DAR monument, is where Major General William Phillips is buried. The church cemetery contains headstones dated to 1702. The church and cemetery is open daily to the public and guided tours are available. Phone: (804) 733-2396.

Petersburg on the eve of the Revolution was what the French call a "ville étape," a term with no English counterpart but meaning a place with exceptional facilities for catering to travelers. In addition to the fine homes, many taverns, and race track, there was a theater. But the place was more important as a center in the all-important tobacco business; here at the head of navigation were the warehouses of the trade, and this is what drew the British raiders in 1781.

In May of that year the British artillery general William Phillips advanced from City Point on Petersburg with two thousand crack regulars he had just brought south from New York and the one-thousand-man force that the traitor Benedict Arnold had brought down a few months earlier. General von Steuben, Prussian trainer of Washington's army at Valley Forge, had been in Virginia a very short time with the mission of doing what he could to help mobilize the military resources of the region.

The important depot of military supplies and tobacco at Petersburg was guarded by about one thousand militia under the command of von Steuben's deputy, Brigadier General John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg. The Patriots had organized a good position near the village of Blandford, on the eastern edge of modern Petersburg. In an action that lasted several hours, Muhlenberg's militia delayed a numerically superior force of particularly high-quality British regulars, dropping back in an orderly fashion to the high ground around Blandford Church before withdrawing under cover of its artillery to what is now Colonial Heights, across the river from Petersburg.

Phillips then occupied Petersburg and had the local people remove some four thousand hogsheads of tobacco from the warehouses for burning. The British destroyed several small vessels and one warehouse but did little other damage. Phillips then was stricken with typhoid fever, and as he lay dying in the Bollingbrook House (mentioned earlier), the Patriot force under Lafayette started shelling Petersburg from Colonial Heights. The hero of the Royal Artillery, who had first become famous at Minden in 1759 before distinguishing himself in New York at Ticonderoga and Saratoga, is said to have complained that the Americans wouldn't even let him die in peace. He was buried in Blandford Church Cemetery on 13 May 1781. For what the distinction is worth, Phillips is the highest-ranking British officer of the Revolution buried in America.

Several other Revolutionary War legends and historic claims are associated with Petersburg. One is that when the traitor Benedict Arnold asked a Patriot prisoner what the Americans would do if they captured him, the soldier said they would bury with military honors the leg wounded at Quebec and Saratoga, "and hang the remainder of you upon a gibbet," or words to this effect. (There are several variations of this dubious story, and several localities challenge Petersburg's claim to being the scene of the dialogue.)

Lord Cornwallis reached Petersburg from North Carolina a week after Phillips's death, took over from Benedict Arnold, who had been temporarily in command, and four days later (24 May 1781) headed for Westover and his frustrating attempt to trap and wipe out Lafayette's force. (See raccoon ford and its cross-references.)

A visitors center is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and located at 425 Cockade Alley. Phone: (800) 368-3595. In addition to that, a second visitors center, to accommodate motorists, is located just off Interstate-95 at the Carson Rest Area. Phone: (434) 246-2145. The city website, www.petersburg-va.org, is another helpful source.

Pohick Church

Pohick Church, 9301 Richmond Highway, on U.S. 1, 10 miles south of Alexandria. Washington, George Mason, and George William Fairfax were on the building committee, and Mason was contractor after the original "undertaker" died. Construction started in 1769, and the first services were held in 1774. Washington kept two adjacent pews for family and guests and attended services here until the Revolutionary War started. The church was badly damaged during the Civil War, but the walls are original and the interior is a close reproduction. Three services are held on Sunday to accommodate a large modern congregation. Tours are available daily, but not offered on Sunday until after 12:30 p.m. so as not to interrupt the regular church services. Phone: (703) 339-6572.

Point of Fork

Point of Fork, James River, Fluvanna County. An important arsenal and supply depot, Point of Fork was selected by General von Steuben as the principal base for training recruits for Greene's Southern army. When the powerful column of raiders under Cornwallis approached in the summer of 1781, von Steuben evacuated some of the supplies, but then abandoned a large quantity on the approach of a force under Colonel John Graves Simcoe. Burned by the British, the arsenal was rebuilt and stored weapons for the militia until the new arsenal was built in Richmond in 1801. It is now a significant archaeological site a little less than a mile west of Columbia on Va. 6. A highway marker commemorating the site is on Route 6 near Columbia.

Pope's Creek

Pope's Creek. Seewashington's birthplace.

Poplar Forest

Poplar Forest, Bedford County. In 1806 Jefferson started work on this remarkable octagonal house, which he finished in 1819. He inherited this 4,000-acre plantation from his wife, Martha Wayles Skelton, and generally spent parts of each summer here, originally in a cottage, and then later in the current house. Like Jefferson's other houses, Poplar Forest is extremely well sited on beautiful grounds. Take Route 29 south to 501 North, avoiding the business routes, taking Exit 11, Graves Mill Road (Route 1425). Keep turning left onto Routes 221, 811, and 661. The entrance is on the right of 661. The house is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day but Tuesday, April through November. Phone: (434) 525-1806.

Portsmouth

Portsmouth, Hampton Roads. The only vestige of an early townscape in historic Hampton Roads is in the Olde Town Portsmouth, a place that has been called "a significant assemblage of late-eighteenth- and nineteenth-century urban architecture" (Virginia Landmarks Commission). After the destruction of nearby Norfolk, Portsmouth and Suffolk were crowded with refugees. Fort Nelson, on Windmill Point, was abandoned when British raiders under Admiral Sir George Collier and General Edward Mathew arrived from New York in May 1779, doing tremendous damage in the area. Portsmouth was subsequently a base for the British expeditions under Alexander Leslie (headed for the Carolinas to reinforce Cornwallis), Benedict Arnold, and William Phillips (see petersburg). Cornwallis reached Portsmouth in July 1781 before moving to his fate at Yorktown.

Highway markers in Portsmouth refer to these events, and several colonial and Revolutionary War landmarks exist in addition to the structures mentioned above. The site of Fort Nelson is marked by a monument on the grounds of the United States Naval Hospital, on the peninsula at the north end of Green Street. (The hospital dates from 1827.) Trinity Church (1762) at Court and High Streets is a remodeled brick structure in the city's first public cemetery.

Raccoon Ford

Raccoon Ford, Rapidan River, Orange County. "I am not strong enough even to get beaten," the young marquis de Lafayette wrote Washington the day a large British force under Lord Cornwallis left Petersburg with precisely this objective in mind. As the British advanced from Westover through White Oak Swamp and Hanover Courthouse (see hanover courthouse and tavern) as far north as Cook's Ford on the Pamunkey (about where I-95 now crosses the river), Lafayette led his little command north to safety behind the Rapidan. He crossed Ely's Ford, circled northwest through the muster ground of the Culpeper Minutemen, and then recrossed the Rapidan at Raccoon Ford (on 6 June 1781). He had been joined by General Anthony Wayne, whose column of reinforcements from Washington's main army was a few days' march to the rear, and Lafayette now had the strength to go back and oppose the British raiders (see mechunk creek).

Raccoon Ford today appears on some highway maps. On the northern edge of the Wilderness and a quiet place of considerable natural beauty in picturesque Orange County, the general location of the old ford may be identified by an antique suspension bridge. The most direct route is from U.S. 522 just south of the Rapidan: from the junction here of the secondary road, No. 611, drive east 1.3 miles. The place can be reached also by driving north from Va. 20 at Locust Grove.

Red Hill

Red Hill, also known as the Patrick Henry National Memorial, 1250 Red Hill Road (Route 2), near Brookneal, Charlotte County. Open daily, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone: (434) 376-2044. Patrick Henry's last home and burial place are located in a remnant of his Red Hill Plantation, where he spent the last few years of his life. The law office and cook's cabin are original; the main house, kitchen, smokehouse, and stables are reconstructions on original foundations. Visitors can view a fifteen-minute film on the life of Patrick Henry before browsing the museum and grounds that feature seven period-authentic buildings, including the slave quarters and Henry's law office and library. Patrick Henry and other family members are buried in the cemetery on this site. This is most comprehensive museum in the country regarding information on Patrick Henry.

Richmond

Richmond. At the head of navigation on the James River and ideally situated for a frontier post and trading center, "the Falls of the Potomac" were explored by a party from Jamestown on 27 May 1607. A settlement was started on the site of modern Richmond two years later, but because of hostile Indians it was almost immediately abandoned. Thomas Stegg established a trading post in 1637. He later received a grant around the falls, to which his son added land purchased on both sides of the river. William Byrd I (1652–1704) inherited these holdings through his mother, a sister of Thomas Stegg II.

The Indians continued to resist this penetration of what had been the center of the Powhatan confederation. Nathaniel Bacon, who had settled at Curies Neck, a series of bends in the James about 9 miles southeast of Richmond, became the champion of settlers who took Indian affairs into their own hands when they became convinced that the colonial governor (Berkeley) was indifferent to their problems. Leading a punitive expedition against the surviving natives, he started by killing about 150 Indians on a hill just east of Richmond, an action remembered as the Battle of Bloody Run. Bacon did not distinguish between friendly and hostile, insuring that the Indians themselves abandoned this distinction.

In 1737 the village of Richmond was laid out on the orders of William Byrd II by William Mayo, who surveyed thirty-two "squares" in the area that would become called Church Hill, which has recently been designated a historic district (see st. john's episcopal church below). Named presumably for the site's resemblance to Richmond on the Thames, the town was incorporated in 1742. Growth continued to be slow; the population of only 250 people in 1742 had increased to fewer than two thousand at the time of the Revolution, and half of these were slaves. As settlement moved westward, however, the location of Richmond made it a more logical place than Williamsburg for the capital, particularly because it was less vulnerable to British sea power. Three significant Virginia conventions were held in Richmond in 1775, the public records were moved there in 1777, and after earlier attempts had failed, the place was made the state capital in May 1779.

As fate would have it, this date coincided with the first of a devastating series of British raids that lasted until 1781. Richmond became an important military depot and also a port for the shipment of tobacco, which constituted an important basis of foreign credit. It was not until 1781 that the raiders got as far inland as Richmond, but in January of that year Benedict Arnold occupied the capital for three days, burning tobacco warehouses and other buildings. Governor Thomas Jefferson, who lived there in a rented house, could muster only two hundred men to oppose the eight hundred raiders. Simcoe's Rangers figured prominently as a force in Arnold's expedition.

When the cries of Virginia Patriots who would not themselves turn out to defend their state finally forced Washington to send regulars to defend them, Lafayette led a force of New England and New Jersey light infantry (one regiment commanded by his compatriot and former aide-de-camp, Jean-Joseph Sourbader de Gimat). The Continentals arrived after a series of forced marches just in time to save Richmond from another raid, but too late to help defend Petersburg. (See colonial heights.) Remaining there during the period 29 April to 27 May 1781, Lafayette then retreated north to evade a superior force under Lord Cornwallis, who had come up from the Carolinas to do some serious raiding in Virginia. The British passed through Richmond three weeks later on their withdrawal down the peninsula.

Following are some of Richmond's principal points of interest to students of the Revolution:

St. John's Episcopal Church. The church, at 2401 East Broad and 24th Streets, is the most famous site in Richmond pertaining to the colonial era, drawing about fifty thousand visitors a year to the scene of Patrick Henry's most famous oration. In the third great speech of his life, on 23 March 1775, he said: "I know not what course others may take, but as for me, Give me liberty or give me death!"

Patrick Henry's political career had been launched by his performance in the Parson's Cause (see hanover courthouse and tavern). As a newly elected member of the House of Burgesses, two years later, on 29 May 1765, he had spoken the other lines that played such an important part in rousing Patriot spirits against colonial oppression: "Caesar had his Brutus—Charles the first, his Cromwell—and George the third—may profit by their example…. If this be treason, make the most of it." However, he apologized for these words when challenged by his fellow legislators.

The Richmond church now called St. John's was built during the years 1740 to 1741 on land given by William Byrd II, and for almost seventy-five years it was the only church in town. The original 25-by-40-foot building was enlarged in December 1772 by an addition on the north side, and the interior was rearranged to make this new part the nave. A belfry was added at the same time. The "New Church" or the "Church on Richmond Hill" was being used by the Virginia Assembly in 1775, when Henry made his famous speech, because it was the largest building available for the 120 or so members of the assembly. (Governor Dunmore had dissolved this body, so it could not meet in the capitol in Williamsburg.)

St. John's churchyard has the graves of George Wythe (whose house is covered under williamsburg), and Dr. James McClurg (c. 1746–1823). The latter was a distinguished physician who had served during the Revolution as a surgeon and as director general of military hospitals in Virginia. He was proposed by James Madison to be Livingston's successor as secretary of foreign affairs, but not appointed. In 1787 he was selected as a member of the Virginia delegation to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, where he was influential in promoting the principle that the legislative branch of the government should exercise minimum influence on the executive. He also urged that the president serve for life.

Several city blocks around St. John's known as Church Hill and containing an extraordinary variety of nineteenth-century structures are now a historic district. Extensive restoration was completed in the 1970s. Reenactments of the Second Virginia Convention began in 1976 as part of the bicentennial, and have now become a regular fixture at the church. Today thousands of viewers see the show every year, and for a healthy fee, one can even schedule a private showing of the reenactment. St. John's possesses beautiful gardens, and a museum gift shop is accessible. Phone: 804-649-7938.

Capitol Square. This 12-acre plot set aside for public buildings by the act establishing the state capital in Richmond is now a pretty area of walks and large trees. In one corner is a sculptural group of famous Virginians of the Revolution: Washington, Mason, Henry, Lewis, Marshall, Nelson, and Jefferson.

The State Capitol. The famous statue of Washington by Houdon (in the rotunda) and a copy of his bust of Lafayette, the original of which was a gift to the city of Paris from the state of Virginia, are both here.

John Marshall House. This landmark is at Ninth and East Marshall Streets. Designed and built by Marshall shortly after 1789, this was the home of the famous chief justice of the Supreme Court until his death in 1835. Although his reputation rests on his legal career after the Revolution, John Marshall had just reached manhood when that war started. He was a lieutenant in the Patriot force that defeated the British at Great Bridge in December 1775. After serving with the Culpeper Minutemen, in July 1776 he became a first lieutenant in the Third Virginia Continentals. Marshall was later made deputy judge advocate, and in February 1781 he retired as a captain. He had seen action at the Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth, and Stony Point.

Having been raised on the frontier, he moved to Richmond in 1783 and quickly became successful as a lawyer. In 1801 he became chief justice, serving thirty-four years and establishing the prestige of the Supreme Court. Phone: (804) 648-7998.

The Site of Powhatan's Village. This historic spot is said to be in Chimborazo Park, on East Broad between 32nd and 35th Streets, and the place is indicated by a stone that once marked the chief's grave. Authorities agree that Powhatan's power was originally centered in the region north and east of Richmond, so they undoubtedly would have had one of their villages here at some time. However, their main "capital"—the one visited by John Smith and other Jamestown settlers—was on the north bank of the York River, probably at Purton Bay, near Gloucester. (It is important to note that the first settlers were confused and thought that the chief Wahunsonacock, Pocahontas's father, was named Powhatan.)

Shockoe Hill Cemetery. Peter Francisco, known as the Hercules of the American Revolution, is buried in this cemetery, a 12.5-acre tract of ancient trees and graves of the period 1825 to 1875 located at the north end of Third Street. As a child of about five years, he had been put ashore from a strange ship and abandoned near the present Hopewell, Virginia. Recent research discovered that a Pedro Francisco was born in the Azores in 1760 and disappeared five years later. An uncle of Patrick Henry raised the boy. In 1776 he joined the Tenth Virginia Regiment and during the war he distinguished himself in a number of hard-fought battles, including Brandywine, Germantown, Fort Mifflin, Monmouth, Stony Point, Paulus Hook, Camden, Guilford Courthouse, and Yorktown. He moved to Richmond in 1823 and became sergeant at arms in the House of Delegates. Having survived at least five serious wounds during the war, he died in 1831 of an intestinal ailment. (See francisco's fight in this article, and also guilford courthouse, under North Carolina.)

Virginia Historical Society Headquarters. The Society's collections at 428 North Boulevard include the gigantic broadsword presented to Peter Francisco by Washington. Here you can also see Charles Willson Peale's portrait of Lafayette and Thomas Sully's Pocahontas and many other items and exhibits relevant to the colonial and Revolutionary periods. Phone: (804) 358-4901.

Ampthill (private). This historic residence at the south end of Ampthill Road off Cary Street was moved to this location in 1929 to 1930 from Falling Creek, on the south bank of the James. Built long before 1732 by one of the Henry Carys, and moved to Richmond by a member of the family, it was the home of Colonel Archibald Cary. The latter was chairman of the committee that directed the Virginia delegates to the Continental Congress to move for independence.

Wilton. Located at the south end of Wilton Road off Cary Street Road, this brick mansion of remarkably beautiful proportions was moved to its present site in 1935. It was built around 1750 by William Randolph III on the north bank of the James, 6 miles below Richmond.

Saratoga (Daniel Morgan's Home)

Saratoga (Daniel Morgan's Home), near Boyce, Clarke County. Privately owned, this large, austere, two-story stone house on a rocky elevation is one of the best preserved mansions of the Revolutionary period in the Shenandoah. Morgan built it in 1781 to 1782, probably with German prisoner of war labor. The "Old Wagoner" had resigned for "ill health" on 10 February 1781, having done this once before, on 18 July 1779, before joining General Gates at Hillsborough, North Carolina, and then winning his brilliant victory at Cowpens, South Carolina. Extremely proud of Saratoga, he lived there until about 1798, when lameness forced him to move to one of his smaller farms, Soldier's Rest.

Scotchtown

Scotchtown, in Hanover County, 11 miles northwest of Ashland off Route 54. Probably built around 1719, this unusually large frame house was Patrick Henry's home during the years 1771 to 1777, although as the first Revolutionary governor of Virginia he moved into the governor's mansion in Williamsburg soon after his election at the end of June 1777, and before this had been in Philadelphia as a member of the Continental Congresses. He sold the house, which he had bought for £600, to a wealthy planter. The next owner was the father of the future Dolley Madison, who wrote vividly of Scotchtown in her Memoirs. The house has been restored and has particularly noteworthy paneling. It also has more than its share of legends: Indian raids, duels, a wife chained in a "dungeon," and one of the many stories about Tarleton riding around the second floor on his horse.

Acquired in 1958 by Hanover County, it is now owned by the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities (APVA). The site is a National Historic Landmark and is open from April through October, Thursday through Sunday. Phone: (804) 227-3500.

Shadwell

Shadwell. About 3 miles east of Charlottesville on U.S. 250 and within sight of Monticello is a highway marker near the entrance to the farmland on which Thomas Jefferson was born in 1743. He lived at Shadwell until 1745, when he went to Tuckahoe Plantation, and again during the period 1752 to 1770. In the latter year the house built by Peter Jefferson in about 1737 was destroyed by fire and his son started constructing Monticello.

Although the general location of Shadwell was always known, the foundations were not discovered until 1955. A conjectural reconstruction of the house was built in 1960 as a tourist attraction but removed after the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation acquired the property. A "No Trespassing" sign bars visitors from the site where Jefferson's father had bought 400 acres from his wife's cousin William Randolph in exchange for a bowl of Henry Wetherburn's arrack punch. (See monticello and its cross-reference for particulars.)

Shirley Plantation

Shirley Plantation, James River, 25 miles southeast of Richmond on Va. Route 5. The unique distinction of this estate is that it is still owned and operated by the family that acquired it in 1660. The property has been reduced somewhat from the 170,000-acre complex it comprised in the early 1800s, and the two hundred slaves are no longer employed, but the eleventh generation of the Hills and Carters make do on the 800 acres remaining in their agricultural operation.

Edward Hill II acquired the property in 1660, but it had been settled in 1613 and was producing tobacco for export in 1616. The present house, a large Georgian, three-story brick edifice with two-story white porticos on both main facades, was begun around 1723 by Edward Hill III. His great-granddaughter, Ann Hill Carter, married "Light Horse Harry" Lee and was the mother of Robert E. Lee. Carter portraits and original furnishings are in the mansion, which is still a private home but is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. to visitors. Museum exhibits and educational programs highlight a visit to Shirley Plantation, as does a relaxed stroll on the sprawling grounds. Phone: (804) 829-5121.

Soldier's Rest (Daniel Morgan's Home)

Soldier's Rest (Daniel Morgan's Home), Berryville, Clarke County. About 1762, when Dan Morgan married Abigail Bailey, he started building this T-shaped frame house. He moved to Saratoga when this house was completed in 1782, but returned briefly to Soldier's Rest before the need for regular medical attention made him take up residence in Winchester in 1800. (Here he died in 1802.) A private home, Soldier's Rest is listed by the National Survey in the "Sites Also Noted" category (1964), whereas Saratoga is not mentioned.

Spencer's Tavern

Spencer's Tavern, near Williamsburg, James City County. After Cornwallis had reached Williamsburg in his withdrawal down the peninsula he detached Lieutenant Colonel John Graves Simcoe westward to destroy Patriot supplies on the Chickahominy. Lafayette had halted his cautious pursuit at New Kent Courthouse, but from here he sent his advance elements to cut Simcoe off as he returned. Before dawn on 26 June 1781 the forces of Butler and Simcoe clashed in the vicinity of Spencer's Ordinary (tavern). It was a classic meeting engagement, both commanders committing their units piecemeal as they caught up with their advance echelons. Simcoe was getting the better of it, but broke off the action because he was afraid that Lafayette's main column might be closing up. Each side had about thirty casualties and each commander claimed the victory, but Butler retained possession of the field. The site is about a mile north of Green Spring Battlefield and 4 miles south of a highway marker on U.S. 60 at Lightfoot. It is undeveloped, but with a contemporary sketch of the action you can find the principal landmarks. (The sketch from Simcoe's Military Journal is reproduced by Lossing in Field Book of the American Revolution, II, p. 464.)

Stratford Hall Plantation

Stratford Hall Plantation, Potomac River, 3 miles north of Lerty on Va. 214. In 1716 Thomas Lee (1690–1750) bought 16,000 acres here that were part of lands patented in 1651 by George Washington's great-great grandfather, Nathaniel Pope (see washington's birthplace). In 1722 he married Hannah Ludwell of Green Spring; they had eleven children, of whom four became famous during the Revolution: Richard Henry, Francis Lightfoot, William, and Arthur.

Thomas built the great mansion during the period 1725 to 1730, and under his son Philip Ludwell Lee "Stratford exemplified the pinnacle of colonial cultural, social, and plantation life" (Virginia Guide, 546). Philip's daughter Matilda married her cousin "Light Horse Harry" Lee in 1782, having inherited Stratford in 1775. She died in 1790. Harry Lee became governor of Virginia the next year, and in 1793 brought a new wife to Stratford; their son Robert E. Lee was born there in 1807 and remained until the family moved to Alexandria in 1811. "Light Horse Harry" had been a great cavalry commander, but he and his son Henry, who inherited Stratford from his mother, allowed the family estate to run down. Much to the chagrin of his half-brother, the future Confederate commander, Henry Lee became involved in moral and financial difficulties that forced him to sell Stratford in 1828 for a paltry $11,000.

The Lee Memorial Foundation, organized in 1929, has bought and restored the estate as a model colonial plantation with characteristic industries. The site is billed as "the birthplace of Robert E. Lee." The mansion is a notable example of early Georgian architecture, and has many unique features, including a monumental hall and unusual chimney stacks. The vista onto the river has been cleared of the trees that long obscured it, and the formal gardens have been restored. Stratford Hall Plantation is open daily to the public. Phone: (804) 493-8038.

Suffolk

Suffolk, Nansemond River, Nansemond County. The Widow Constance's tobacco warehouse, established in 1730, was in a settlement pioneered by Edward Waters in 1618, only ten years after Captain John Smith explored the Nansemond River. Some three hundred Puritans, the first to reach Virginia, were expelled from this area by Governor Berkeley. (They established Providence, Maryland.) In the operations that eventually drove Governor Dunmore from Norfolk in early 1776, North Carolina and Virginia troops under General Robert Howe occupied Suffolk, which was crowded with refugees. The place was burned on 13 May 1779 by British raiders who had landed at Portsmouth. Cornwallis camped at Suffolk in mid-July 1781 when he maneuvered his army from Green Spring to Portsmouth in the operations leading to Yorktown.

Suffolk's colonial church of 1753 survived the Revolution but fell into ruin and was demolished by 1802. The site is marked on Western Avenue about 200 feet west of Church Street. The Widow Constance's house has been carefully restored in Suffolk Cemetery, at the east end of Mahan Street.

Tuckahoe Plantation

Tuckahoe Plantation (private), 7 miles west of Richmond, take Interstate 64 to Gaskin Road. Thomas Jefferson spent seven of his first nine years here at the home of his Randolph cousins, receiving the cultural foundations of his later achievements. It is designated a National Landmark. Notable for its H-shaped plan, the house was built between 1712 and 1730. The interior has not been significantly changed. Among the original outbuildings that remain is the little brick schoolhouse attended by Jefferson, and his boyish autograph has survived on its plastered walls. (Jefferson's other homes were Poplar Forest, Shadwell, and Monticello.) Individuals or groups wishing to tour Tuckahoe are advised to make an appointment. Phone: (804) 749-4000.

War Memorial Museum of Virginia

War Memorial Museum of Virginia, Newport News. Covers the military history of Virginia from the colonial period to today, with more than fifty thousand artifacts. Take Exit 263A, Warwick Boulevard, off Route 258. The Museum is at 9285 Warwick Boulevard. Open Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. Phone: (757) 247-8523.

Washington's Birthplace (Pope's Creek)

Washington's Birthplace (Pope's Creek), Potomac River 38 miles east of Fredericksburg. George Washington was born here (1732) in a house completed a few years earlier by his father on property lying between Pope's and Bridges Creeks. This house was destroyed by fire about 1779. A memorial house has been built in the style of the period, and a working plantation of the eighteenth century has been developed by the National Park Service on the land settled by the Washington family. Take Route 204 from Route 3. Open weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: (804) 224-1732.

George Washington's father, Augustine, added to property purchased by Colonel John Washington, George's great-grandfather. The family cemetery, a mile from the memorial house, has the tombs of thirty-one Washingtons, including George's father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. (The route is marked from the house and may now be reached by car.)

The future president lived his first three years at Pope's Creek (as the family place was known). His family then spent about three years on the property that would later be called Mount Vernon, and late in 1738 they moved to Ferry Farm (see ferry farm site), opposite Fredericksburg. After the death of his father, Augustine, in 1743, young George spent time at all three of these family places, and according to some evidence he lived at Pope's Creek part of the period 1744 to 1746.

The original family place had been willed to George's half-brother Augustine. Lawrence, the other half-brother, inherited the place that he would later name Mount Vernon and pass on to George, and George was left Ferry Farm in his father's will.

John Washington was a young Englishman in the transatlantic shipping trade when he reached the little river landing of Mattox, close to the site we are discussing. Here he was befriended by Colonel Nathaniel Pope, who had built the wharf and warehouse at Mattox. John decided to remain in Virginia, staying in the Pope house, and eventually marrying Pope's daughter Anne (around 1658). Colonel Pope gave the young couple 700 acres that included Mattox. In 1664 they moved to a 150-acre tract John had bought on Bridges Creek, their new home being built 50 yards east of the place where the family burial lot was later established.

The Mattox property descended through John's older son, Lawrence, to a grandson, Augustine, who was George's father. In 1717 to 1718 Augustine bought land adjoining the Bridges Creek property that had passed down to his cousins from the second son of the original John Washington.

The U-shaped house in which George was born was completed by his father around 1726. Its foundation survived the fire of 1779, and its outline and basement design have been traced; the site is marked near the memorial house. Until recent years research failed to uncover any information about the design and appearance of the house other than that it resembled the Christian House at Providence Forge. With only these two clues, the memorial mansion was built, and now it serves to portray a typical plantation house of the Northern Neck at the time when George Washington was born. A monument, about one-tenth the size of the Washington Monument but an otherwise somewhat exact replica, was erected here in honor of the birthplace of Washington. The name Wakefield, by which Washington's birthplace has long been known, apparently was not associated with the property until after the Revolution.

Westover

Westover, James River, 7 miles west of Charles City Courthouse off Route 5. Land here was settled in 1619 by Francis, John, and Nathaniel West, who were killed in the Indian massacre of 1622. The first William Byrd (1652–1704) bought 1,200 acres from the family of Theodoric Bland in 1688 for £300 and 10,000 pounds of tobacco. This Byrd built an impressive wooden mansion in 1690 and established the tradition of abundant and cultured living at Westover while pursuing wealth in business and land speculation. His son, William II, who would leave a reputation as a distinguished writer of the colonial period in addition to being a highly successful man in politics and commerce, built the present brick mansion in 1730 to 1734. His only son, William III, dissipated the family fortune and committed suicide in 1777.

The Byrds of the Revolutionary era were sympathetic to the British. Westover was the place where Benedict Arnold landed in January 1781 on his raid to Richmond and where Cornwallis landed four months later to chase Lafayette (see richmond).

The famous Byrd mansion is rarely open to the public, but the garden and grounds are open to visitors daily from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The mansion is open to the public for four days in the last week of April and for one day in September. Westover is one of the finest Georgian houses in America. A number of once prominent men are buried at the site of the first Westover Church, 400 yards from the mansion. (The present Westover Church was built in 1737 on a site several miles away, donated by the Byrd family according to tradition because they got tired of always having the congregation for Sunday dinner.) Phone: (804) 829-2882.

Williamsburg

Williamsburg, on I-64, 50 miles east of Richmond. Colonial Williamsburg is an amazing restoration and reconstruction of the large provincial village that was Virginia's capital during the years 1699 to 1780. Its appeal is on several levels. The first, unfortunately, is that of the amusement park, and Williamsburg's colonial charm can be overwhelmed by hordes of bus-borne children (many of whom would rather be at nearby Busch Gardens) and older citizens unprepared intellectually for the experience. If spared this shattering contrast between contemporary American culture and its idealized origins, one can spend many full days enjoying and learning from Williamsburg's architectural treasures, collections, gardens, exhibitions of colonial craftsmen at work, and from its preservation research—the work of historians, architects, and archaeologists.

The 130-acre Historic Area contains more than eighty original structures, most of them extensively restored. Hundreds of others have been reconstructed after exhaustive archaeological and documentary research. Almost one hundred gardens have been reconstructed with the plans and plants of the eighteenth century. At the time of the Revolution, half of Williamsburg's population was enslaved, and many looked to the royal governor, Lord Dunmore, as a liberator for offering them freedom if they joined the British forces to fight the rebels. Few sites at Williamsburg acknowledge this history, which is difficult to address. In the 1990s a reenactment of a slave auction created a major controversy, and the practice was abandoned. The park has attempted to be sensitive to these concerns and interests by establishing a Department of African American Interpretation and Presentations which offers a number of creative programs to introduce the visitor to numerous aspects of black daily life in the colonial period.

A number of interesting books and other publications pertaining to the eighteenth century, from history to house design, are sold at Williamsburg shops or over the internet via their website, www.history.org. The general phone for information on Williamsburg is (757) 229-1000.

Discordant modern elements have been eliminated almost entirely from Colonial Williamsburg, or, as in the case of telephone and electrical wires, they are hidden.

The most important of the original eighteenth-century buildings in Williamsburg are:

The Public Magazine. Built in 1715 to 1716 for the public arms and ammunition, this building figured in the early phases of the Revolution when Governor Dunmore secretly had the gunpowder removed the night of 20 to 21 April 1775. Patrick Henry marched on Williamsburg with the Hanover County militia and demanded that the public powder be restored. The governor roared at this legalistic insolence, but backed down and reimbursed the province. He explained that he took the powder because a slave uprising was rumored. (He should have known. He was threatening to instigate such a revolt.)

Bruton Parish Church. Built in 1710 to 1715, this was restored early in the twentieth century by the Reverend W. A. R. Goodwin, who later inspired John D. Rockefeller, Jr., to restore all of Williamsburg. Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Monroe, and Tyler attended this church as young men.

The George Wythe House. Built about 1750 by the distinguished amateur architect Richard Taliaferro (pronounced "tah-liver"!), it was left twenty years later to his son-in-law, George Wythe (pronounced "with"). The latter was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, statesman, jurist, law professor, and the close associate of more famous men who were friends in early life or his students in later years. Among the latter were Jefferson, John Marshall, James Monroe, and Henry Clay. Born in 1726, Wythe was poisoned by his nephew in 1806 and is buried outside St. John's Church in Richmond. Ironically, the nephew was acquitted because the only witness, a black servant (Wythe freed all his slaves) was not allowed to testify in a court of law because he was black.

Wetherburn Tavern. Formerly known as the Bland-Wetherburn House, the tavern has only recently been restored and refurnished. Almost 200,000 artifacts were found in the archaeological exploration of the site. The house belonged originally to a branch of the famous Bland family and is believed to be the birthplace of Richard Bland (1710–1776), a distinguished colonial statesman. About 1716 the house was sold to Henry Wetherburn, a former operator of the Raleigh Tavern (across the street). The enterprising Wetherburn was famous for his "Arrack punch," a bowl of which was the price paid by Thomas Jefferson's father to William Randolph of Tuckahoe Plantation for 400 acres of prime land (see under monticello).

Most notable of the reconstructed buildings are the Capitol, the Governor's Palace, and Raleigh Tavern.

Within modern Williamsburg and at the opposite end of Duke of Gloucester Street from the colonial Capitol is the Wren Building of the College of William and Mary. The Wren Building is flanked by the President's House and the Brafferton (see below).

Designed by Sir Christopher Wren, but in the words of a contemporary, "adapted to the Nature of the Country by the Gentlemen there," this is the oldest academic building in the United States. Construction was started in 1695 and finished in 1702. Three years later it burned, and reconstruction was completed in 1732. There were fires again in 1859 and 1862, and alterations were made with each reconstruction. When restoration was about to start in 1927, a last-minute discovery was made at Oxford University of a copper engraving plate showing several Williamsburg buildings, including this one. With this and a plan drawn by Jefferson it was possible to reconstruct the Wren Building fairly accurately.

The President's House has been used by every president of the college. It was built in 1732 to 1733 and has been restored. Cornwallis occupied it briefly in 1781. Facing it is the Brafferton, built in 1723 as the first permanent Indian school in the colonies. The English scientist Robert Boyle died in 1691, leaving instructions that revenue from his English estate, Brafferton, be used for charity. The fund was divided between Harvard and William and Mary for the education of Indians.

Winchester

Winchester, Frederick County seat. From prehistoric times this place has grown as an important hub of activity in the region. Major east-west highways still intersect in the center of the old town, taking heavy traffic through streets where important historic sites are marked, and where many interesting buildings still stand.

Settlement of the Shenandoah Valley, whose throat (if not its mouth) is the site of Winchester, was predominately by Englishmen from Virginia and Germans from Pennsylvania. The region was part of the Fairfax Grant. The sixth Lord Fairfax made his home here in the wilderness at Greenway Court and is buried in Winchester (Christ Episcopal Church, on Washington Street near Boscawen Court).

George Washington worked in the area as a surveyor for Lord Fairfax, a simple little building now called Washington's Office surviving at 32 West Cork Street. In front of it is a small cannon mounted on a masonry base, one of the monuments erected to mark the route of Braddock's March in 1755 to defeat on the Monongahela (Battle of the Wilderness). After this disaster Washington took command of frontier defenses, building works that included Fort Loudoun, whose site is marked in Winchester at Peyton and Loudoun Streets. In the course of his long acquaintance with this region Washington and his family staked out a number of choice land claims, particularly around nearby Charlestown, West Virginia. In 1999, after a tremendous effort on the part of volunteers, Washington's Office reopened as a renovated museum, and now is maintained by the Winchester-Frederick County Historical Society.

Dan Morgan's memory also is alive in the area. At the age of nineteen he accompanied Braddock's expedition as a teamster, rendering good service and becoming acquainted with Washington. It may have been at Fort Chiswell, up the Shenandoah Valley, where Morgan got his famous lashing from the British. In 1762 he settled near Winchester on a small grant, and from here he left at the head of a major contingent of frontiersmen to launch his career as the most famous rifleman of the Revolution. The temperamental Morgan, who also was plagued by recurring bouts of bad health that seemed to coincide with his military career plans, spent much time tending his personal affairs near home. He is believed to have used German prisoner's of war to build Saratoga.

Prospering in many enterprises after the Revolution, eventually acquiring a tremendous amount of land, he lived at Soldier's Rest until about two years before his death in 1802. His last two years were spent in Winchester, where the house survives, privately owned, at 226 West Amherst Street. Morgan's grave is southeast of the ruins of the Old Lutheran Church (1764–1864), near the entrance to Mount Hebron Cemetery, at the east end of Boscawen Street. Near Morgan lie five of the six men known as his "Dutch Mess," who were his bodyguards during the Revolution. (The word "mess" in military parlance means a group of men who eat together regularly.)

The first Pennsylvania German pioneer of the region was Jost Hite, his monument being the ruins of Hite's Fort. Winchester's architecture reflects the German influence as well as the English.

Today's boosters of Winchester are focused on its industrial attractions and the annual Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival. But the modern city and the surrounding region have much to recommend them to visitors interested in the colonial and Revolutionary eras. The best source of information on the area's history is the Winchester-Frederick County Historical Society, located at 1340 South Pleasant Valley Road in Winchester. Phone: (540) 662-6550.

Yorktown

Yorktown, on U.S. 17 and a short distance off Interstate 64, about 13 miles east of Williamsburg, 106 miles south of Fredericksburg, and 32 miles north of Norfolk. Open daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: (757) 898-2410. Only a few months before the decisive Franco-American victory at Yorktown (October 1781), it looked as if the American cause was hopeless. The war had dragged on five years, the British land and sea forces could take and hold vital places at will, and Patriot finances had collapsed. The French alliance was three years old, but it had not brought any results. A French expeditionary force under Rochambeau was sitting in Newport with nothing to do because the French fleet had been unable to achieve the naval supremacy needed for decisive operations.

Then several things happened to brighten the scene. In May 1781 Admiral de Barras reached Newport, Rhode Island, to command the French fleet blockaded there by the Royal Navy. Although he proved to be a problem to Rochambeau and Washington because of his independent and uncooperative outlook, he brought good news: Admiral Comte de Grasse was heading for the West Indies with a powerful fleet, and six hundred recruits were on the way to reinforce the four French regiments in Rhode Island.

Washington and Rochambeau met in Wethersfield, Connecticut to make plans for immediate employment of their forces. Agreeing on a strategic diversion against New York City to draw British forces from Virginia and the Carolinas, they left in abeyance the matter of what might be done if de Grasse appeared. They did agree, however, to send word to de Grasse that he should come north as soon as possible for combined operations.

Thanks largely to a series of British blunders, things worked out better than the Allies could have hoped. Cornwallis decided that Virginia was the decisive theater and that he would abandon his frustrating operations against Nathanael Greene in the Carolinas and march north. The neurotic Sir Henry Clinton, British commander in chief in North America with headquarters in New York City, overreacted to the Franco-American threat against that city and called on Cornwallis for reinforcements. The politically powerful Cornwallis was reporting directly to Lord Germain in London, receiving seriously delayed orders and instructions from New York and London, and interpreting these in accordance with his own strategic lights.

The end result was that after chasing Lafayette's small Continental force around Virginia for about two months, he selected Yorktown as the place to make camp and wait for developments. About a week before Cornwallis completed his concentration at Yorktown and Gloucester Point (across the river), Washington got the news that shaped the final strategy of the war: de Grasse was sailing for the Chesapeake with about thirty warships and three thousand soldiers, and would remain for combined operations until 15 October. Continuing to make feints against New York City, the Franco-American army marched for Virginia.

De Grasse slipped away from the British in the West Indies with an alacrity for which Americans must eternally be grateful, and sailed into Chesapeake Bay unimpeded. Admiral Hood made such good time in pursuit that he lost sight of the French, reaching the Virginia Capes ahead of them. Finding no enemy naval forces in Chesapeake Bay, Hood assumed de Grasse had continued north to New York, Boston, or Newport, and headed that way himself. On 31 August the combined fleets of Hood and Graves left New York for the Virginia Capes to fight the French—wherever they might be—and reinforce Cornwallis at Yorktown. This same day de Barras left Rhode Island with siege artillery and provisions for the allied forces concentrating outside Yorktown. On 5 September de Grasse left the Chesapeake to fight Graves and Hood off the Capes. In a long, running naval engagement on 5 September the French were unable to score a clean victory, but inflicted such damage that the British withdrew to New York for repairs. While this was taking place, de Barras entered the Chesapeake. De Grasse soon followed, and the cork was in the bottle Cornwallis had picked for himself at Yorktown.

When French troops from the West Indies were landed at Jamestown by de Grasse on 5 September, Cornwallis still had a chance to fight his way out. But he let himself fall for what classical military scholars know as "the fatal fascination of a fortress," and continued to fortify his positions at Yorktown and Gloucester Point. The forces of Washington and Rochambeau left Williamsburg early on 28 September and by dark had started closing in on Yorktown.

So long as de Grasse could hold off British naval efforts to relieve the siege, the defeat of Cornwallis was simply a matter of time, although the Allies would have to shed a certain amount of blood and much sweat. Alexander Hamilton's assault of Redoubt No. 10 was a brilliant success, the more satisfactory because the Americans accomplished their task in a manner the French veterans had to admire. The French had simultaneously attacked Redoubt No. 9, and before the operation the French commander had annoyed Lafayette by intimating that his Americans might not be up to their task. The Americans, unimpeded by the formal doctrine of using pioneer troops to clear a path for the assault troops in attacking a fortified position, had merely scrambled through the abatis, ditch, and fraises, and taken their redoubt with relatively light losses, some minutes before the French took theirs. Lafayette sent an officer to ask his compatriots whether they would like any help.

On 17 October Cornwallis asked for terms, and two days later his army marched out to lay down their arms. Cornwallis himself pleaded sick, and had a subordinate represent him.

The battlefield is beautifully preserved, and several of the earthworks, including Redoubt No. 9, have been reconstructed. Two self-guided tour routes are marked, and you can easily spend an hour following these by car. One, about 7-miles long, is called the Battlefield Tour Road, and the other, 2 miles longer, is the Encampment Tour Road. An excellent orientation film is shown free at the visitors center, where a truly admirable little museum is located. Visitors may also pick up maps and brochures, and there is a variety of interpretive programs to explore. In addition to exhibits characteristic of these National Park Service museums there is a full-scale reconstruction of a section of the gun deck and captain's cabin of the British frigate Charon, which was sunk during the siege.

Yorktown itself, first settled about 1631 and established as a town when eighty-five lots were laid out in 1691, remains a quiet, picturesque little place. Several colonial houses remain and others have been reconstructed. The most famous is that of General Thomas Nelson, Jr., a signer of the Declaration of Independence who, as Virginia's war governor after Thomas Jefferson, was commander of Virginia militia during the siege. He is reported to have directed that his own house be shelled because Cornwallis was believed to be using it. There is a cannonball still embedded in one wall. Built before 1745 by "Scotch Tom" Nelson of Penrith, the general's grandfather, it is well preserved (although the roof has been altered). The Nelson House was a private residence until acquired by the National Park Service in 1968 and made part of the Colonial National Historical Park.. The house is open daily mid-June to mid-August, from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and in the spring and fall from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Phone: (757) 898-2409.

The site of another Thomas Nelson home is nearby. He was "Secretary" Nelson, uncle of General Nelson, and secretary of the governor's council for thirty years. His was the finest house in Yorktown, and therefore the first headquarters of Cornwallis, and it was destroyed during the siege.

Grace Church has been active since its construction around 1697, and much of the original marl walls are incorporated in the present structure. Nelson family tombs are in the churchyard.

Other noteworthy buildings are the reconstructed Swan Tavern and its kitchen, stable, smokehouse, and privy; a reconstructed medical shop; the restored Somerwell House (built before 1707); the Thomas Pate House (early eighteenth century); the Customhouse (c. 1720); the Edmund Smith House (c. 1750); and the Thomas Sessions House, which is the oldest of them all, having been built before 1699. Other colonial houses are the Ballard House, the frame structure near the Sessions House called the Dudley Dibbes House, and parts of the small frame Archer House below the bluffs and nearly opposite the site of the town wharf. Remains of the latter can be seen at exceptionally low tide.

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Admissions: (757)363-2121
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.aviationmaintenance.edu/aviation-norfolk.asp
Admissions: Mike Huffman
Type: Two-Year College Application Fee: $25.00 Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Tuition: $10,260 full-time, $220 per credit hour part-time. Calendar System: Quarter

BETA TECH

1610 Forest Ave. - Ste214
Richmond, VA 23229
Tel: (804)673-7110 Type: Two-Year College

BLUE RIDGE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 80
Weyers Cave, VA 24486-0080
Tel: (540)234-9261
Admissions: (540)453-2332
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.brcc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James R. Perkins
Admissions: Mary Wayland
Financial Aid: Robert Clemmer
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2040 full-time, $68 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6420 full-time, $214 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $146 full-time, $4.85 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,513, PT 2,291 Faculty: FT 60, PT 126 Student-Faculty Ratio: 22:1 Library Holdings: 59,735 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 63 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN

BLUEFIELD COLLEGE

3000 College Dr.
Bluefield, VA 24605-1799
Tel: (276)326-3682
Free: 800-872-0175
Admissions: (276)326-4217
Fax: (276)326-4288
Web Site: http://www.bluefield.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Daniel G. MacMillan
Registrar: Catherine L. Matherly
Admissions: Tim Havens
Financial Aid: Debra Checchio
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southern Baptist Scores: 86% SAT V 400+; 81% SAT M 400+; 66% ACT 18-23; 9% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 50 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $18,337 includes full-time tuition ($11,675), mandatory fees ($630), and college room and board ($6032). College room only: $2371. Part-time tuition: $382 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $155 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 692, PT 84 Faculty: FT 30, PT 66 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 73 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 48 Library Holdings: 74,150 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 126 semester hours, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE

402 East College St.
Bridgewater, VA 22812-1599
Tel: (540)828-8000
Free: 800-759-8328
Admissions: (540)828-5375
Fax: (540)828-5481
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bridgewater.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Phillip C. Stone
Registrar: Cynthia K. Howdyshell
Admissions: Linda F. Stout
Financial Aid: J. Vern Fairchilds, Jr.
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Church of the Brethren Scores: 96.32% SAT V 400+; 99.21% SAT M 400+; 59.34% ACT 18-23; 19.78% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 86 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $29,250 includes full-time tuition ($20,190) and college room and board ($9060). College room only: $4595. Part-time tuition: $650 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $30. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,495, PT 11 Faculty: FT 96, PT 30 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 68 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 83 Library Holdings: 138,020 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 123 credits, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M; Lacrosse W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

BRYANT AND STRATTON COLLEGE, RICHMOND

8141 Hull St. Rd.
Richmond, VA 23235-6411
Tel: (804)745-2444
Fax: (804)499-7799
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bryantstratton.edu/
President/CEO: Carl L. Newell
Registrar: Deborah Merritt
Admissions: Troy Lawson
Financial Aid: Lisa Jackson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Bryant and Stratton Business Institute, Inc Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For applicants 19 or older who meet entrance testing requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Tuition: $18,675 full-time, $415 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $25 full-time. Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 137, PT 284 Faculty: FT 10, PT 41 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 3,176 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 68 per credit, Associates

BRYANT AND STRATTON COLLEGE, VIRGINIA BEACH

301 Centre Pointe Dr.
Virginia Beach, VA 23462-4417
Tel: (757)499-7900
Fax: (757)499-7799
Web Site: http://www.bryantstratton.edu/
President/CEO: Tracy Nannery
Registrar: Sheila Koenig
Admissions: Greg Smith
Financial Aid: Anita Wyche
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Bryant and Stratton Business Institute, Inc Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 238, PT 102 Faculty: FT 5, PT 35 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 9,646 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors

CENTRAL VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

3506 Wards Rd.
Lynchburg, VA 24502-2498
Tel: (434)832-7600
Admissions: (434)832-7630
Fax: (434)386-4700
Web Site: http://www.cvcc.vccs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Darrel W. Staat
Registrar: Dr. Richard A. Rainsberger
Admissions: Judy Wilhelm
Financial Aid: Robert L. Clemmer
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For allied health programs: High school diploma required; GED not accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 57, PT 116 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 37,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: JRCERT, NAACLS

CHRISTENDOM COLLEGE

134 Christendom Dr.
Front Royal, VA 22630-5103
Tel: (540)636-2900
Free: 800-877-5456
Fax: (540)636-1655
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.christendom.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Timothy O'Donnell
Registrar: Walter Janaro
Admissions: Tom McFadden
Financial Aid: Alisa Polk
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 76 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action Application Deadline: March 01 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $22,806 includes full-time tuition ($16,290), mandatory fees ($450), and college room and board ($6066). Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 372, PT 7, Grad 56 Faculty: FT 23, PT 16 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 48 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 95 Library Holdings: 64,265 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 84 credit hours, Associates; 126 credit hours, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Volleyball W

CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT UNIVERSITY

1 University Place
Newport News, VA 23606-2998
Tel: (757)594-7000
Free: 800-333-4268
Admissions: (757)594-7015
Fax: (757)594-7333
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cnu.edu/
President/CEO: Sen. Paul S. Trible, Jr.
Registrar: Donna A. Varner
Admissions: Patricia Cavender
Financial Aid: Mary Wiggington
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 59% ACT 18-23; 37% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 62 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: March 01 Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $3442 full-time, $143 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,464 full-time, $436 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $2384 full-time, $99. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $7500. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,204, PT 332, Grad 163 Faculty: FT 218, PT 21 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 39 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 30 Library Holdings: 328,319 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ABET, AACN, CSWE, NASM Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M; Sailing M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

THE COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARY

PO Box 8795
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
Tel: (757)221-4000
Admissions: (757)221-4223
Fax: (757)221-1242
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wm.edu/
President/CEO: Timothy J. Sullivan
Admissions: Henry Broaddus
Financial Aid: Edward P. Irish
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 7% ACT 18-23; 43% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 31 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: January 01 Application Fee: $60.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $60. State resident tuition: $4730 full-time, $180 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $20,000 full-time, $710 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $3048 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Part-time tuition varies according to program. College room and board: $6417. College room only: $3856. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 5,527, PT 67, Grad 1,334 Faculty: FT 596, PT 167 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT II % Receiving Financial Aid: 27 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 75 Library Holdings: 2,043,345 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABA, ACA, APA, AALS, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M & W; Gymnastics M & W; Lacrosse W; Soccer M & W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

DABNEY S. LANCASTER COMMUNITY COLLEGE

100 Dabney Dr., PO Box 1000
Clifton Forge, VA 24422
Tel: (540)863-2800
Admissions: (540)863-2815
Fax: (540)863-2915
Web Site: http://www.dl.vccs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Richard R. Teaff
Registrar: Heather Wood
Admissions: Dr. Mary G. Wilson
Financial Aid: Sandy Haverlack
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For applicants 18 or over who demonstrate ability to benefit from a specific program: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1740 full-time, $72.50 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5648 full-time, $235.35 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $157 full-time, $6.55 per credit part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 21, PT 74 Library Holdings: 37,716 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 68 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M

DANVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

1008 South Main St.
Danville, VA 24541-4088
Tel: (434)797-2222
Free: 800-560-4291
Admissions: (434)797-8490
Fax: (434)797-8541
Web Site: http://www.dcc.vccs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. B. Carlyle Ramsey
Admissions: Peter Castiglione
Financial Aid: Mary Gore
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2150 full-time, $71.65 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6596 full-time, $219.85 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $111 full-time, $3.65 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,366, PT 2,723 Faculty: FT 53, PT 148 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 41,600 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates

DEVRY UNIVERSITY (ARLINGTON)

2450 Crystal Dr.
Arlington, VA 22202
Tel: (703)414-4000; (866)563-3900
Fax: (703)414-4040
Web Site: http://www.devry.edu/
President/CEO: Loretta Franklin
Registrar: Edward Trombley
Financial Aid: Robert McDevitt
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: DeVry University Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. One-time mandatory fee: $40. Tuition: $13,060 full-time, $475 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $270 full-time, $160 per year part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 310, PT 153, Grad 122 Faculty: FT 20, PT 42 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 % Receiving Financial Aid: 68 Library Holdings: 7,800 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 67 credit hours, Associates; 122 credit hours, Bachelors

DEVRY UNIVERSITY (MCLEAN)

1751 Pinnacle Dr., Ste. 250
McLean, VA 22102-3832
Tel: (703)556-9669
Fax: (703)556-9420
Web Site: http://www.devry.edu/
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Costs Per Year: One-time mandatory fee: $40. Tuition: $13,060 full-time, $475 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $60 full-time, $30 per year part-time. Calendar System: Semester Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools

EASTERN MENNONITE UNIVERSITY

1200 Park Rd.
Harrisonburg, VA 22802-2462
Tel: (540)432-4000
Free: 800-368-2665
Admissions: (540)432-4118
Fax: (540)432-4444
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.emu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Loren E, Swartzendruber
Registrar: David A. Detrow
Admissions: Stephanie C. Shafer
Financial Aid: Michele R. Hensley
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Mennonite Scores: 92% SAT V 400+; 94% SAT M 400+; 38% ACT 18-23; 43% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 77 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $27,220 includes full-time tuition ($20,612), mandatory fees ($58), and college room and board ($6550). College room only: $3550. Part-time tuition: $862 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $2 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 970, PT 42, Grad 164 Faculty: FT 116, PT 47 Student-Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 72 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 66 Library Holdings: 163,932 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACA, AClPE, ATS, CSWE, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W

EASTERN SHORE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

29300 Lankford Hwy.
Melfa, VA 23410-3000
Tel: (757)789-1789; 877-871-8455
Admissions: (757)789-1731
Fax: (757)789-1739
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.es.cc.va.us/
President/CEO: Dr. Richard E. Jenkins
Admissions: Faye Wilson
Financial Aid: P. Bryan Smith
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2040 full-time, $68 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6420 full-time, $214 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $110 full-time, $3.65 per credit part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 260, PT 547 Faculty: FT 18, PT 39 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Library Holdings: 20,479 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates

ECPI COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (NEWPORT NEWS)

1001 Omni Blvd., No. 100
Newport News, VA 23606
Tel: (757)838-9191
Fax: (757)827-5351
Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/
President/CEO: John Olsen
Registrar: Cheri Richards
Admissions: Cheryl Lokey
Financial Aid: Janet Doyan
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Trimester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 556 Faculty: FT 66, PT 64 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT I, SAT II Library Holdings: 13,014 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates

ECPI COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (VIRGINIA BEACH)

5555 Greenwich Rd.
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
Tel: (757)671-7171
Free: 800-986-1200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/
President/CEO: Mark B. Dreyfus
Admissions: Ronald Ballance
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed % Accepted: 69 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Tuition: $9750 full-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Trimester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,312, PT 79 Faculty: FT 66, PT 64 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT I, SAT II Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools

ECPI TECHNICAL COLLEGE (GLEN ALLEN)

4305 Cox Rd.
Glen Allen, VA 23060
Tel: (804)934-0100
Free: 800-986-1200
Fax: (804)934-0054
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ecpitech.edu/
President/CEO: Jacob Pope
Admissions: Jacob Pope
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed % Accepted: 82 Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 473 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I and SAT II or ACT, SAT I, SAT II Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

ECPI TECHNICAL COLLEGE (RICHMOND)

800 Moorefield Park Dr.
Richmond, VA 23236
Tel: (804)330-5533
Free: 800-986-1200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ecpitech.edu/
President/CEO: Ada Gerard
Admissions: Ada Gerard
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed % Accepted: 75 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Tuition: $9750 full-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I and SAT II or ACT, SAT I, SAT II Library Holdings: 3,165 Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

ECPI TECHNICAL COLLEGE (ROANOKE)

5234 Airport Rd.
Roanoke, VA 24012
Tel: (540)563-8080
Free: 800-986-1200
Fax: (540)362-5400
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ecpi.net/
President/CEO: Dr. Jerry Causey
Admissions: Elmer Haas
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed % Accepted: 65 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Tuition: $9750 full-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I and SAT II, SAT I, SAT II Library Holdings: 1,703 Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

EMORY & HENRY COLLEGE

PO Box 947
Emory, VA 24327-0947
Tel: (276)944-4121
Free: 800-848-5493
Admissions: (276)944-6133
Fax: (276)944-6934
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ehc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Thomas R. Morris
Registrar: Sherry Lyttle
Admissions: Liz Daniels
Financial Aid: Scarlett Cortner
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 98% SAT M 400+; 54% ACT 18-23; 39% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 76 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $26,570 includes full-time tuition ($19,530) and college room and board ($7040). College room only: $3500. Full-time tuition varies according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $815 per hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 999, PT 28, Grad 74 Faculty: FT 68, PT 27 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 79 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 66 Library Holdings: 337,290 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 116 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: JRCEPAT Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

FERRUM COLLEGE

PO Box 1000
Ferrum, VA 24088-9001
Tel: (540)365-2121
Free: 800-868-9797
Admissions: (540)365-4290
Fax: (540)365-4266
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ferrum.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Jennifer L. Braaten
Registrar: Margaret M. Clark
Admissions: Gilda Q. Woods
Financial Aid: Sheila Nelson-Hensley
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Scores: 80% SAT V 400+; 76% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 72 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $24,320 includes full-time tuition ($17,990), mandatory fees ($30), and college room and board ($6300). Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $360 per hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 962, PT 29 Faculty: FT 62, PT 18 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 76 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 70 Library Holdings: 154,370 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 127 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: CSWE, NRPA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Football M; Golf M; Lacrosse W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY

4400 University Dr.
Fairfax, VA 22030
Tel: (703)993-1000
Admissions: (703)993-2400
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.gmu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Alan G. Merten
Registrar: Susan H. Jones
Admissions: Andrew Flagel
Financial Aid: Jevita de Freitas
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 98% SAT V 400+; 98% SAT M 400+; 60% ACT 18-23; 28% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 69 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: January 15 Application Fee: $60.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $60. State resident tuition: $4356 full-time, $181.50 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,636 full-time, $651.50 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1524 full-time, $63.50 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $6480. College room only: $3700. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 13,578, PT 4,513, Grad 10,895 Faculty: FT 997, PT 958 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 37 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 23 Library Holdings: 1,460,524 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, AACN, ABA, APA, AALS, CSWE, NASM, NASPAA, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Lacrosse W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W; Wrestling M

GERMANNA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

2130 Germanna Hwy.
Locust Grove, VA 22508-2102
Tel: (540)727-3000
Admissions: (540)891-3016
Fax: (540)727-3207
Web Site: http://www.gcc.vccs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Francis S. Turnage
Registrar: Rita Dunston
Admissions: Rita Dunston
Financial Aid: Jim Brunner
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For nursing program: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1632 full-time, $68 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5136 full-time, $214 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $118 full-time, $4.90 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,359, PT 3,440 Faculty: FT 48, PT 224 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Library Holdings: 22,412 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 61 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN

HAMPDEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE

PO Box 667
Hampden-Sydney, VA 23943
Tel: (434)223-6000
Free: 800-755-0733
Admissions: (434)223-6120
Fax: (434)223-6346
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hsc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Walter M. Bortz, III
Registrar: Mark Newcomb
Admissions: Anita H. Garland
Financial Aid: Keith Wellings
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Men Affiliation: Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Scores: 97% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 45% ACT 18-23; 47% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 67 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Early Decision Plan Application Deadline: March 01 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $34,295 includes full-time tuition ($25,166), mandatory fees ($1004), and college room and board ($8125). College room only: $3436. Part-time tuition: $748 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,060 Faculty: FT 91, PT 17 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT II % Receiving Financial Aid: 47 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 93 Library Holdings: 219,221 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M; Crew M; Cross-Country Running M; Fencing M; Football M; Golf M; Lacrosse M; Riflery M; Rugby M; Soccer M; Tennis M; Ultimate Frisbee M

HAMPTON UNIVERSITY

Hampton, VA 23668
Tel: (757)727-5000
Free: 800-624-3328
Admissions: (757)727-5328
Fax: (757)727-5084
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hamptonu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. William R. Harvey
Registrar: Jorsene Cooper
Admissions: Angela Boyd
Financial Aid: Cassondra Costa
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 60% ACT 18-23; 3% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 77 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: March 01 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $20,928 includes full-time tuition ($12,722), mandatory fees ($1460), and college room and board ($6746). College room only: $3580. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $320 per credit. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,913, PT 412, Grad 662 Faculty: FT 323, PT 124 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 67 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 59 Library Holdings: 336,092 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 121 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACEJMC, AACN, ACPhE, APTA, ASLHA, CAA, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Bowling W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Sailing M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

HOLLINS UNIVERSITY

PO Box 9603
Roanoke, VA 24020-1603
Tel: (540)362-6000
Free: 800-456-9595
Admissions: (540)362-6401
Fax: (540)362-6218
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hollins.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Lawrence Wayne Markert
Registrar: Dr. Thomas H. Mesner
Admissions: Rebecca Eckstein
Financial Aid: Rebecca Eckstein
Type: Comprehensive Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 97% SAT M 400+; 37% ACT 18-23; 48% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 86 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $31,105 includes full-time tuition ($22,470), mandatory fees ($475), and college room and board ($8160). College room only: $4880. Part-time tuition: $702 per credit. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 790, PT 58, Grad 275 Faculty: FT 68, PT 41 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 61 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 79 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 credits, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: TEAC Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball W; Equestrian Sports W; Fencing W; Golf W; Lacrosse W; Soccer W; Swimming and Diving W; Tennis W

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (CHANTILLY)

14420 Abermarle Point Place, Ste. 100
Chantilly, VA 20151
Tel: (703)263-2541; 888-895-8324
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/
President/CEO: Peggy T. Payne
Admissions: Peggy T. Payne
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: ITT Educational Services, Inc Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Not available Exams: Other Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (NORFOLK)

863 Glenrock Rd., Ste. 100
Norfolk, VA 23502-3701
Tel: (757)466-1260
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/
President/CEO: Calvin E. Lawrence
Admissions: Cal Lawrence
Financial Aid: Marsha Miller
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: ITT Educational Services, Inc Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Not available Exams: Other Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates; 180 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACICS

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (RICHMOND)

300 Gateway Centre Parkway
Richmond, VA 23235
Tel: (804)330-4992
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/
President/CEO: Jeff Sikora
Admissions: Elaine Bartoli
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: ITT Educational Services, Inc Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Not available Exams: Other Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates; 180 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACICS

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (SPRINGFIELD)

7300 Boston Blvd.
Springfield, VA 22153
Tel: (703)440-9535; (866)817-8324
Fax: (703)440-9561
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/
President/CEO: Charles E. Boyd
Admissions: Doug Howard
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: ITT Educational Services, Inc Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Not available Exams: Other Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

J. SARGEANT REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 85622
Richmond, VA 23285-5622
Tel: (804)371-3000
Admissions: (804)371-3029
Fax: (804)371-3650
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.reynolds.edu
President/CEO: Dr. Gary L. Rhodes
Registrar: Wanda Bolda
Admissions: Karen Pettis-Walden
Financial Aid: Barry Davis
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2282 full-time, $76.05 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6728 full-time, $224.25 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,871, PT 8,807 Faculty: FT 117, PT 450 Student-Faculty Ratio: 22:1 Library Holdings: 80,736 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 61 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ADA, COptA, CARC, NAACLS, NLN

JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY

800 South Main St.
Harrisonburg, VA 22807
Tel: (540)568-6211
Admissions: (540)568-5681
Fax: (540)568-3332
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.jmu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Linwood H. Rose
Registrar: Sherry Hood
Admissions: Michael D. Walsh
Financial Aid: Lisa Tumer
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 68 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: January 15 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $5886 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,322 full-time. College room and board: $6372. College room only: $3278. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 14,885, PT 733, Grad 1,320 Faculty: FT 795, PT 369 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 30 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 39 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, AACN, ACA, ADtA, AOTA, APA, ASLHA, CSWE, FIDER, JRCEPAT, NASAD, NASD, NASM, NAST, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Archery M & W; Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Fencing W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M & W; Gymnastics M & W; Lacrosse W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

JEFFERSON COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES

PO Box 13186
Roanoke, VA 24031-3186
Tel: (540)985-8483; 888-985-8483
Admissions: (540)985-9083
Fax: (540)985-9773
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.jchs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Harry C. Nickens
Registrar: Linda Williams
Admissions: Judith McKeon
Financial Aid: Deborah Johnson
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Early Decision Plan Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 423, PT 274 Faculty: FT 41, PT 46 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT, SAT I % Receiving Financial Aid: 19 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 15 Library Holdings: 10,533 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 70 credit hours, Associates; 124 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACN, AOTA, APTA, CARC, JRCEMT, NLN

JOHN TYLER COMMUNITY COLLEGE

13101 Jefferson Davis Hwy.
Chester, VA 23831-5316
Tel: (804)796-4000
Admissions: (804)796-4150
Fax: (804)796-4163
Web Site: http://www.jtcc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Marshall W. Smith
Registrar: Joy James
Admissions: Joy James
Financial Aid: Laurie Schiavone
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For nursing, funeral services, physical therapist assistant programs: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1708 full-time, $71.15 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5264 full-time, $219.35 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $50 full-time, $25 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,607, PT 4,707 Faculty: FT 65, PT 355 Student-Faculty Ratio: 27:1 Library Holdings: 49,393 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 65 semester hours, Associates ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ABFSE, NLN

LIBERTY UNIVERSITY

1971 University Blvd.
Lynchburg, VA 24502
Tel: (434)582-2000
Free: 800-543-5317
Admissions: (434)592-3015
Fax: (434)582-2304
Web Site: http://www.liberty.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Jerry Falwell
Registrar: Lawrence Shackleton
Admissions: Chris Johnson
Financial Aid: Rhonda Allbeck
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: nondenominational Scores: 89.69% SAT V 400+; 85.49% SAT M 400+; 51.14% ACT 18-23; 26.14% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 67 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: June 30 Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For home schooled students-records of academic work, grades and evaluations: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $20,750 includes full-time tuition ($14,400), mandatory fees ($950), and college room and board ($5400). Part-time tuition: $480 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $425 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 8,427, PT 1,548, Grad 2,121 Faculty: FT 336, PT 165 Student-Faculty Ratio: 27:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 77 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 53 Library Holdings: 199,150 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACN, AAFCS, AClPE, NCATE, NLN, TACCS Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

LONGWOOD UNIVERSITY

201 High St.
Farmville, VA 23909
Tel: (434)395-2000
Free: 800-281-4677
Admissions: (434)395-2060
Fax: (434)395-2332
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.longwood.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Patricia P. Cormier
Registrar: Alecia M. Knox
Admissions: Robert J. Chonko
Financial Aid: Michael W. Barree
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400 + Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $3586 full-time, $150 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,270 full-time, $428 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $3434 full-time. College room and board: $5586. College room only: $3288. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,604, PT 135, Grad 550 Faculty: FT 192, PT 50 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 44 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 67 Library Holdings: 325,290 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, CSWE, JRCEPAT, NASM, NAST, NCATE, NRPA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M & W; Lacrosse W; Rugby M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W; Wrestling M

LORD FAIRFAX COMMUNITY COLLEGE

173 Skirmisher Ln.
Middletown, VA 22645
Tel: (540)868-7000
Free: 800-906-5322
Admissions: (540)868-7105
Fax: (540)868-7100
Web Site: http://www.lfcc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John J. Sygielski
Registrar: Carroll Todd Smith
Admissions: Cynthia Bambara
Financial Aid: Barbara Ratcliff
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1740 full-time, $72.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5748 full-time, $235.35 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $117 full-time, $4.30 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,535, PT 3,957 Faculty: FT 57, PT 252 Library Holdings: 41,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates

LYNCHBURG COLLEGE

1501 Lakeside Dr.
Lynchburg, VA 24501-3199
Tel: (434)544-8100
Free: 800-426-8101
Admissions: (434)544-8300
Fax: (434)544-8653
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.lynchburg.edu/
President/CEO: Kenneth R. Garren
Registrar: Jay K. Webb
Admissions: Sharon Walters-Bower
Financial Aid: Michelle G. Davis
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Scores: 98.3% SAT V 400+; 98.6% SAT M 400+; 68.3% ACT 18-23; 11.7% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 72 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $30,645 includes full-time tuition ($23,700), mandatory fees ($545), and college room and board ($6400). College room only: $3200. Part-time tuition: $335 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,924, PT 125, Grad 379 Faculty: FT 142, PT 95 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 64 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 81 Library Holdings: 287,601 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACN, ACA, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

MARY BALDWIN COLLEGE

201 East Frederick St.
Staunton, VA 24401-3610
Tel: (540)887-7000
Free: 800-468-2262
Admissions: (540)887-7019
Fax: (540)886-6634
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.mbc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Pamela Fox
Registrar: Dr. Lewis D. Askegaard
Admissions: Dr. Brenda Bryant
Financial Aid: Lisa Branson
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 96.3% SAT V 400+; 98% SAT M 400+; 48.6% ACT 18-23; 40% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 75 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $26,465 includes full-time tuition ($20,405), mandatory fees ($200), and college room and board ($5860). College room only: $3738. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $345 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to degree level. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Miscellaneous, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 1,002, PT 533, Grad 205 Faculty: FT 76, PT 58 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 76 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 81 Library Holdings: 140,466 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 132 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball W; Cross-Country Running W; Field Hockey W; Soccer W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving W; Tennis W; Volleyball W

MARYMOUNT UNIVERSITY

2807 North Glebe Rd.
Arlington, VA 22207-4299
Tel: (703)522-5600
Free: 800-548-7638
Admissions: (703)284-1500
Fax: (703)522-0349
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.marymount.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James Bundschuh
Admissions: Chris E. Domes
Financial Aid: Deborah Raines
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic Church Scores: 92% SAT V 400+; 91% SAT M 400+; 57% ACT 18-23; 14% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 86 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $25,934 includes full-time tuition ($17,970), mandatory fees ($144), and college room and board ($7820). Part-time tuition: $582 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $6 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,871, PT 456, Grad 1,357 Faculty: FT 134, PT 218 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 56 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 30 Library Holdings: 187,097 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ACEHSA, AACN, ACA, APTA, ACBSP, FIDER, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Volleyball W

MEDICAL CAREERS INSTITUTE (NEWPORT NEWS)

1001 Omni Blvd., Ste. 200
Newport News, VA 23606
Tel: (757)873-2423
Fax: (757)873-2472
Web Site: http://www.medicalcareersinstitute.com/Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Semester Professional Accreditation: COE

MEDICAL CAREERS INSTITUTE (RICHMOND)

800 Moorefield Park Dr., Ste. 302
Richmond, VA 23236-3659
Tel: (804)521-0400
Fax: (804)521-0406
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.medicalcareersinstitute.com/
Admissions: David K. Mayle
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Semester Professional Accreditation: COE

MEDICAL CAREERS INSTITUTE (VIRGINIA BEACH)

5501 Greenwich Rd.
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
Tel: (757)497-8400
Web Site: http://www.medical.eduType: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Semester Professional Accreditation: COE

MOUNTAIN EMPIRE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Drawer 700
Big Stone Gap, VA 24219-0700
Tel: (540)523-2400
Admissions: (276)523-2400
Web Site: http://www.me.vccs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Terrance Suarez
Registrar: Perry Carroll
Admissions: Perry Carroll
Financial Aid: Perry Carroll
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,195, PT 1,690 Faculty: FT 70, PT 80 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 21,600 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: CARC, NLN

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (BLUEFIELD)

100 Logan St.
PO Box 629
Bluefield, VA 24605-1405
Tel: (276)326-3621
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (276)322-5731
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Frank Longaker
Admissions: Denver Riffe
Financial Aid: Crystal Angles
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 2, PT 19 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (CHARLOTTESVILLE)

1819 Emmet St.
Charlottesville, VA 22901
Tel: (434)295-0136
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (434)986-1344
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Frank Longaker
Admissions: Adrienne D. Granitz
Financial Aid: Andrea Grooms
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 2, PT 12 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (DANVILLE)

734 Main St.
Danville, VA 24541-1819
Tel: (434)793-6822
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (434)793-3634
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Amy Bracey
Admissions: Amy Bracey
Financial Aid: Etta Wilson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 2, PT 17 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Library Holdings: 3,010 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (HARRISONBURG)

51 B Burgess Rd.
Harrisonburg, VA 22801-9709
Tel: (540)432-0943
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (540)986-1344
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Janice Boyd
Registrar: Sumer Thompson
Admissions: Jack Evey
Financial Aid: Lou T. Olmstead
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 2, PT 18 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (LYNCHBURG)

104 Candlewood Ct.
Lynchburg, VA 24502-2653
Tel: (434)239-3500
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (434)986-1344
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Frank Longaker
Admissions: Bill Baker
Financial Aid: Pamela Cotton
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 1, PT 32 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (MARTINSVILLE)

10 Church St., PO Box 232
Martinsville, VA 24114
Tel: (276)632-5621
Free: 800-664-1866
Fax: (276)986-1344
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Frank Longaker
Registrar: Barbara Rakes
Admissions: John Scott
Financial Aid: Pamela Cotton
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 2, PT 13 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (SALEM)

1813 East Main St.
Salem, VA 24153
Tel: (540)986-1800
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (540)986-1344
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Frank E. Longaker
Admissions: Lew Bishop
Financial Aid: Pamela Cotton
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 13, PT 62 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Library Holdings: 25,867 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 quarter hours, Associates; 180 quarter hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NEW RIVER COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 1127
Dublin, VA 24084-1127
Tel: (540)674-3600
Fax: (540)674-3644
Web Site: http://www.nr.cc.va.us/
President/CEO: Dr. Jack M. Lewis
Registrar: Margaret G. Taylor
Admissions: Margaret G. Taylor
Financial Aid: Joseph L. Sheffey
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For applicants under 18: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,008, PT 2,337 Faculty: FT 51, PT 155 Student-Faculty Ratio: 22:1 Library Holdings: 33,993 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates

NORFOLK STATE UNIVERSITY

700 Park Ave.
Norfolk, VA 23504
Tel: (757)823-8600
Admissions: (757)823-8396
Fax: (757)823-9435
Web Site: http://www.nsu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Marie V. McDemmond
Registrar: Gary Fincher
Admissions: Michelle Marable
Financial Aid: Estherine Harding
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: State Council of Higher Education for Virginia % Accepted: 71 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: May 31 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $4670 full-time, $204 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $14,480 full-time, $531 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $125 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $6474. College room only: $4110. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,420, PT 917, Grad 759 Faculty: FT 280, PT 106 Student-Faculty Ratio: 21:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 77 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 32 Library Holdings: 378,323 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates; 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEJMC, ABFSE, APA, CAEPK, CSWE, NAACLS, NAIT, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

NORTHERN VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

4001 Wakefield Chapel Rd.
Annandale, VA 22003-3796
Tel: (703)323-3000
Admissions: (703)323-3195
Web Site: http://www.nv.cc.va.us/
President/CEO: Dr. Robert G. Templin
Admissions: Dr. Max L. Bassett
Financial Aid: Carol A. Mowbray
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For veterinary technology, dental hygiene, other health-related programs: High school diploma required; GED not accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 571, PT 1,035 Library Holdings: 228,009 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ADA, AHIMA, APTA, CARC, JRCEMT, NAACLS, NLN

OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY

5215 Hampton Blvd.
Norfolk, VA 23529
Tel: (757)683-3000
Free: 800-348-7926
Admissions: (757)683-3648
Fax: (757)683-5357
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.odu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Roseann Runte
Registrar: Mary Swartz
Admissions: Alice McAdory
Financial Aid: Betty Diamond
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 99.2% SAT V 400+; 99.1% SAT M 400+; 71% ACT 18-23; 19% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 69 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: March 15 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $5430 full-time, $181 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,394 full-time, $507 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $181 full-time, $39 per term part-time. College room and board: $6292. College room only: $3442. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 10,828, PT 4,447, Grad 5,999 Faculty: FT 617, PT 283 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 57 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 24 Library Holdings: 985,801 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, AACN, AANA, ACA, ADA, APTA, APA, ASC, ASLHA, CEPH, JCAHPO, JRCNMT, NAACLS, NASAD, NASM, NASPAA, NAST, NCATE, NRPA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Crew M & W; Fencing M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M & W; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M & W; Sailing M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball M & W; Wrestling M

PARKS COLLEGE

801 North Quincy St., Ste. 501
Arlington, VA 22203
Tel: (703)248-8887
Fax: (703)351-2202
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.parks-college.com/
Admissions: Lachelle Green
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Quarter Faculty: FT 6, PT 28 Professional Accreditation: ACICS

PATRICK HENRY COLLEGE

One Patrick Henry Circle
Purcellville, VA 20132
Tel: (540)338-1776
Fax: (540)338-8707
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.phc.edu/
President/CEO: Michael P. Farris
Admissions: Rebekah A. Knable
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: nondenominational Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 62% ACT 24-29 Application Deadline: April 01 Costs Per Year: Comprehensive fee: $21,730 includes full-time tuition ($16,000) and college room and board ($5730). Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 325, PT 23 Faculty: FT 17, PT 8 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 94 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Professional Accreditation: AALE, TACCS Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M; Soccer M & W

PATRICK HENRY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 5311
Martinsville, VA 24115-5311
Tel: (276)638-8777
Admissions: (276)656-0315
Fax: (276)656-0247
Web Site: http://www.ph.vccs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Max Wingett
Registrar: Nancy Riddle
Admissions: Dr. Nolan Browning
Financial Aid: Cindy Keller
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1632 full-time, $68 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5136 full-time, $214 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $81 full-time, $3.15 per credit hour part-time, $5 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 39, PT 100 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 26,160 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN

PAUL D. CAMP COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 737, 100 North College Dr.
Franklin, VA 23851-0737
Tel: (757)569-6700
Admissions: (757)569-6725
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.pc.vccs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Douglas W. Boyce
Admissions: Monette Williams
Financial Aid: Teresa King
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Scores: 54% SAT V 400+; 54% SAT M 400 + Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 391, PT 1,245 Faculty: FT 24, PT 50 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 22,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 61 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN

PIEDMONT VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

501 College Dr.
Charlottesville, VA 22902-7589
Tel: (434)977-3900
Admissions: (434)961-5400
Fax: (434)971-8232
Web Site: http://www.pvcc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Frank Friedman
Registrar: Tracey Templeton
Admissions: Mary Walsh
Financial Aid: Carol Lawson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2175 full-time, $72.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7126 full-time, $237.55 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $159 full-time, $5.30 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,079, PT 3,084 Faculty: FT 55, PT 157 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Library Holdings: 72,574 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 67 semester hours, Associates ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: NLN

RADFORD UNIVERSITY

PO Box 6890, RU Station
Radford, VA 24142
Tel: (540)831-5000
Free: 800-890-4265
Admissions: (540)831-5371
Fax: (540)831-5138
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.radford.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Douglas Covington
Registrar: Heidi L. Terry
Admissions: David Kraus
Financial Aid: Barbara A. Porter
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 95% SAT V 400+; 94% SAT M 400+; 66% ACT 18-23; 16% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 81 Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $3235 full-time, $214 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,473 full-time, $515 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1895 full-time, $78.90 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $6120. College room only: $3300. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 8,028, PT 454, Grad 1,070 Faculty: FT 377, PT 193 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 39 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 39 Library Holdings: 395,643 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, AACN, ACA, ADtA, ASLHA, CSWE, NASM, NAST, NCATE, NLN, NRPA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

RANDOLPH-MACON COLLEGE

PO Box 5005
Ashland, VA 23005-5505
Tel: (804)752-7200
Free: 800-888-1762
Admissions: (804)752-7305
Fax: (804)752-4707
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.rmc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Roger H. Martin
Registrar: Dr. Marilyn J. Gibbs
Admissions: John C. Conkright
Financial Aid: Mary Y. Neal
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 79 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: March 01 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $31,250 includes full-time tuition ($23,310), mandatory fees ($635), and college room and board ($7305). College room only: $4000. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $863 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,102, PT 23 Faculty: FT 90, PT 53 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT II % Receiving Financial Aid: 60 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 84 Library Holdings: 182,368 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 110 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

RANDOLPH-MACON WOMAN'S COLLEGE

2500 Rivermont Ave.
Lynchburg, VA 24503-1526
Tel: (434)947-8000
Free: 800-745-7692
Admissions: (434)947-8100
Fax: (434)947-8996
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.rmwc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Kathleen Gill Bowman
Registrar: Barbara Thrasher
Admissions: Pat LeDonne
Financial Aid: Sharon M. Wilkes
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Women Affiliation: Methodist Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 87 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: March 01 Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $31,540 includes full-time tuition ($22,550), mandatory fees ($380), and college room and board ($8610). Part-time tuition: $940 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $45 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 685, PT 27 Faculty: FT 72, PT 18 Student-Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 67 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 89 Library Holdings: 197,332 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball W; Equestrian Sports W; Field Hockey W; Soccer W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving W; Tennis W; Volleyball W

RAPPAHANNOCK COMMUNITY COLLEGE

12745 College Dr.
Glenns, VA 23149-2616
Tel: (804)758-6700
Admissions: (804)758-6742
Fax: (804)758-3852
Web Site: http://www.rcc.vccs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Norman H. Scott
Registrar: Wilnet Willis
Admissions: Wilnet Willis
Financial Aid: Carolyn Ward
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Exams: Other Library Holdings: 46,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates

REGENT UNIVERSITY

1000 Regent University Dr.
Virginia Beach, VA 23464-9800
Tel: (757)226-4000
Free: 800-373-5504
Admissions: (757)226-4826
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.regent.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. M.G. "Pat" Robertson
Registrar: Althea Bishard
Admissions: Jerrod Fishback
Financial Aid: Sherwin Hibbetts
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Application Fee: $40.00 Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. Tuition: $11,850 full-time, $375 per credit hour part-time. Calendar System: Trimester Enrollment: FT 490, PT 444, Grad 2,133 Faculty: FT 10, PT 89 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Professional Accreditation: ABA, ACA, APA, AClPE, ATS

RICHARD BLAND COLLEGE OF THE COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARY

11301 Johnson Rd.
Petersburg, VA 23805-7100
Tel: (804)862-6100
Admissions: (804)862-6225
Fax: (804)862-6189
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.rbc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James B. McNeer
Registrar: Lois Wray
Admissions: Randy Dean
Financial Aid: Tony Jones
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: College of William and Mary Scores: 78.1% SAT V 400+; 77.7% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 88 Application Deadline: August 15 Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. State resident tuition: $2350 full-time, $91 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $9608 full-time, $398 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $170 full-time, $4 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and location. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and location. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 814, PT 623 Faculty: FT 32, PT 34 Student-Faculty Ratio: 23:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 91,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 63 semester hours, Associates ROTC: Army

ROANOKE COLLEGE

221 College Ln.
Salem, VA 24153-3794
Tel: (540)375-2500
Free: 800-388-2276
Admissions: (540)375-2270
Fax: (540)375-2267
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.roanoke.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Sabine U. O'Hara
Registrar: Leah R. Russell
Admissions: Michael C. Maxey
Financial Aid: Thomas S. Blair, Jr.
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 74 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: March 15 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $30,748 includes full-time tuition ($22,848), mandatory fees ($605), and college room and board ($7295). College room only: $3526. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $1084 per course. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,833, PT 103 Faculty: FT 133, PT 41 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 73 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 60 Library Holdings: 134,035 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 33.5 courses, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, JRCEPAT Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M & W; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W

SAINT PAUL'S COLLEGE

115 College Dr.
Lawrenceville, VA 23868-1202
Tel: (434)848-3111
Free: 800-678-7071
Admissions: (434)848-6493
Fax: (434)848-0403
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.saintpauls.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John K. Waddell
Registrar: Reginald B. Tucker
Admissions: Rosemary Lewis
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Episcopal Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 33, PT 4 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 92 Library Holdings: 100,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

SHENANDOAH UNIVERSITY

1460 University Dr.
Winchester, VA 22601-5195
Tel: (540)665-4500
Free: 800-432-2266
Admissions: (540)665-4581
Fax: (540)665-4627
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.su.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James A. Davis
Registrar: William Endorf
Admissions: David Anthony
Financial Aid: Nancy Bragg
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Scores: 90% SAT V 400+; 91% SAT M 400+; 43% ACT 18-23; 26% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 70 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $27,600 includes full-time tuition ($19,900), mandatory fees ($150), and college room and board ($7550). Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $610 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,530, PT 76, Grad 932 Faculty: FT 181, PT 170 Student-Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 61 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 44 Library Holdings: 126,097 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates; 120 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACN, ACNM, ACPhE, AOTA, APTA, CARC, NASM, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

SOUTHERN VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

One College Hill Dr.
Buena Vista, VA 24416
Tel: (540)261-8400
Free: 800-229-8420
Admissions: (540)261-2756
Fax: (540)261-8559
E-mail: [email protected]irginia.edu
Web Site: http://www.southernvirginia.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Rodney K. Smith
Registrar: Joseph Bouchelle
Admissions: Tony Caputo
Financial Aid: Margaret Murphy
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Latter-day Saints Scores: 95.6% SAT V 400+; 95.2% SAT M 400+; 46.9% ACT 18-23; 39.4% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 41 Application Deadline: July 31 Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $20,126 includes full-time tuition ($15,826) and college room and board ($4300). College room only: $2800. Part-time tuition: $525 per hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 648, PT 37 Faculty: FT 42, PT 19 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 67 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 85 Library Holdings: 107,630 Credit Hours For Degree: 93 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AALE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

SOUTHSIDE VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

109 Campus Dr.
Alberta, VA 23821-9719
Tel: (804)949-1000
Admissions: (434)949-1012
Fax: (804)949-7863
Web Site: http://www.sv.vccs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John J. Cavan
Registrar: Dr. Ronald Mattox
Admissions: Dr. Ronald E. Mattox
Financial Aid: Brent Richey
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For applicants 18 or over who demonstrate ability to benefit from occupational program: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2040 full-time, $68 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6420 full-time, $214 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $155 full-time, $5.15 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,359, PT 3,327 Faculty: FT 70, PT 225 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Library Holdings: 27,691 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 65 semester hours, Associates ROTC: Army

SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box SVCC
Richlands, VA 24641-1101
Tel: (276)964-2555
Admissions: (276)964-7300
Fax: (276)964-9307
Web Site: http://www.sw.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Charles R. King
Registrar: Roderick B. Moore
Admissions: Jim Farris
Financial Aid: Roderick B. Moore
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1904 full-time, $68 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5992 full-time, $214 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $130 full-time, $4.65 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,514, PT 2,152 Faculty: FT 71, PT 181 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Library Holdings: 58,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 65 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: CARC, JRCERT, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M; Golf M; Rugby M

STRATFORD UNIVERSITY

7777 Leesburg Pike, Ste. 100 South
Falls Church, VA 22043
Tel: (703)821-8570
Free: 800-444-0804
Fax: (703)556-9892
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.stratford.edu/
Admissions: Saibatu Kamarah
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Early Decision Plan Application Deadline: July 30 Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $15,750 includes full-time tuition ($10,260), mandatory fees ($50), and college room and board ($5440). Part-time tuition: $285 per credit hour. Calendar System: Quarter Enrollment: FT 189, PT 256, Grad 41 Faculty: FT 20, PT 41 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: SAT I Library Holdings: 1,800 Credit Hours For Degree: 90 quarter credits, Associates; 180 quarter credits, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACICS, ACF, COE

SWEET BRIAR COLLEGE

Sweet Briar, VA 24595
Tel: (434)381-6100
Free: 800-381-6142
Admissions: (434)381-6142
Fax: (434)381-6173
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.sbc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Elisabeth S. Muhlenfeld
Registrar: Deborah L. Powell
Admissions: Ken Huus
Financial Aid: Barbara S. Carpenter
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Women Scores: 98% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400+; 36% ACT 18-23; 49% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 79 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $32,820 includes full-time tuition ($23,340) and college room and board ($9480). College room only: $3810. Part-time tuition: $775 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 703, PT 36, Grad 13 Faculty: FT 64, PT 35 Student-Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT II % Receiving Financial Aid: 64 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 90 Library Holdings: 255,175 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Equestrian Sports W; Fencing W; Field Hockey W; Lacrosse W; Soccer W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving W; Tennis W; Volleyball W

TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

6315 Bren Mar Dr.
Alexandria, VA 22312-6342
Tel: (703)354-1005
Free: 800-48-TESST
Admissions: (703)548-4800
Fax: (703)354-3661
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/
President/CEO: Sheri Delozier
Admissions: Bob Somers
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Quarter Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

THOMAS NELSON COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 9407
Hampton, VA 23670-0407
Tel: (757)825-2700
Admissions: (757)825-2800
Web Site: http://www.tncc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Charles A. Taylor
Admissions: Dr. Vicki Richmond
Financial Aid: Dr. Pamela Turner
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For nursing program: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2175 full-time, $72.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7061 full-time, $235.35 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $116 full-time, $3.15 per credit hour part-time, $10.50 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,658, PT 5,937 Faculty: FT 90, PT 343 Library Holdings: 66,281 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 65 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NAACLS, NLN

TIDEWATER COMMUNITY COLLEGE

121 College Place
Norfolk, VA 23510
Tel: (757)822-1122
Admissions: (757)822-1068
Fax: (757)822-1060
Web Site: http://www.tcc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Deborah M. DiCroce
Admissions: Tyjaun Lee
Financial Aid: Karen Koonce
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For nursing, allied health programs: High school diploma required; GED not accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1944 full-time, $72.50 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5,905 full-time, $246.05 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $8.50 per credit part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 7,850, PT 15,868 Faculty: FT 265, PT 1,057 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Library Holdings: 147,126 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 65 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: AHIMA, AOTA, CARC, JRCERT, JRCEMT, MACTE, NLN

TIDEWATER TECH

2697 Dean Dr., Ste. 100
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
Tel: (757)340-2121
Fax: (757)340-9704
Web Site: http://www.tidetech.com/
President/CEO: Chantrell Guilford
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

UNIVERSITY OF MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY

1901 North Fort Myers Dr.
Arlington, VA 22209
Tel: (703)516-0035
Fax: (703)516-0985
Web Site: http://www.umtweb.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Yanping Chen
Admissions: Dr. C. Eric Kirkland
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Costs Per Year: Tuition: $10,800 full-time, $390 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $90 full-time, $30 per term part-time. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment. Calendar System: Continuous Faculty: FT 0, PT 0 Student-Faculty Ratio: 0:1 Professional Accreditation: DETC

UNIVERSITY OF MARY WASHINGTON

1301 College Ave.
Fredericksburg, VA 22401-5358 Tel: (540)654-1000
Free: 800-468-5614
Admissions: (540)654-2000
Fax: (540)654-1073
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.umw.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. William M. Anderson, Jr.
Registrar: Judy Ginter
Admissions: Dr. Martin Wilder
Financial Aid: Debra J. Harber
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed % Accepted: 64 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $5634 full-time, $199 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $14,776 full-time, $579 per credit part-time. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. College room and board: $6002. College room only: $3484. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,519, PT 566, Grad 649 Faculty: FT 231, PT 107 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT II % Receiving Financial Aid: 40 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 70 Library Holdings: 355,478 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 122 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: NASM Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Field Hockey W; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA

10021 Balls Ford Rd.
Manassas, VA 20109
Tel: (703)392-0771
Fax: (703)392-6368
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.unva.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Fay R. Avery
Registrar: Kyoko Enomoto
Admissions: Robert Frantz
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Application Fee: $60.00 Calendar System: Quarter Professional Accreditation: ACICS

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-NORTHERN VIRGINIA CAMPUS

11730 Plaza American Dr., Ste. 2000
Reston, VA 20190
Tel: (703)435-4402
Free: 800-228-7240
Admissions: (480)557-1712
Web Site: http://www.phoenix.edu/
Admissions: Nina Omelchanko
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $110.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $110. Tuition: $11,805 full-time, $393.50 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time, $70 per course part-time. Scholarships: Available Enrollment: FT 1,020, Grad 357 Faculty: FT 5, PT 149 Student-Faculty Ratio: 7:1 Library Holdings: 444 Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates; 120 credits, Bachelors

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-RICHMOND CAMPUS

6802 Paragon Place, Ste. 420
Richmond, VA 23230
Tel: (804)288-3390
Free: 800-228-7240
Admissions: (480)557-1712
Web Site: http://www.phoenix.edu/
Admissions: Nina Omelchanko
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $110.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $110. Tuition: $11,370 full-time, $379 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time, $70 per course part-time. Scholarships: Available Enrollment: FT 301, Grad 82 Faculty: FT 4, PT 34 Student-Faculty Ratio: 7:1 Library Holdings: 444 Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates; 120 credits, Bachelors

UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND

28 Westhampton Way
University of Richmond, VA 23173
Tel: (804)289-8000
Free: 800-700-1662
Admissions: (804)289-8640
Fax: (804)287-6003
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.richmond.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. William E. Cooper
Registrar: Susan D. Breeden
Admissions: Pamela Spence
Financial Aid: Cynthia A. Deffenbaugh
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 99.9% SAT V 400+; 99.7% SAT M 400+; 14.4% ACT 18-23; 58.1% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 47 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: January 15 Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $42,610 includes full-time tuition ($36,550) and college room and board ($6060). College room only: $2710. Part-time tuition: $1460 per semester hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,881, PT 39, Grad 266 Faculty: FT 262, PT 58 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 34 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 92 Library Holdings: 1,098,581 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates; 122 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABA, AALS, NASM Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports W; Fencing M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M & W; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M & W; Soccer M & W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Ultimate Frisbee M & W; Volleyball M & W; Water Polo M & W; Wrestling M

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

Charlottesville, VA 22903
Tel: (434)924-0311
Admissions: (434)982-3200
Fax: (434)924-3587
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.virginia.edu/
President/CEO: John T. Casteen, III
Registrar: Carol A. J. Stanley
Admissions: John A. Blackburn
Financial Aid: Yvonne B. Hubbard
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 11% ACT 18-23; 51% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 38 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: January 02 Application Fee: $60.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $60. State resident tuition: $5602 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $22,346 full-time. Mandatory fees: $1768 full-time. College room and board: $6389. College room only: $3289. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 13,395, PT 818, Grad 7,858 Faculty: FT 1,193, PT 137 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: Other, SAT I and SAT II or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 24 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 46 Library Holdings: 4,921,442 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, AACN, ABA, ACA, ADtA, ACSP, APA, ASLA, ASLHA, AClPE, AALS, LCMEAMA, NAST, NCATE, NLN, TEAC Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Crew W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M & W; Ice Hockey M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Ultimate Frisbee M & W; Volleyball M & W; Wrestling M

THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA'S COLLEGE AT WISE

1 College Ave.
Wise, VA 24293 Tel: (276)328-0100; 888-282-9324
Admissions: (276)328-0322
Fax: (276)328-0251
Web Site: http://www.uvawise.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Ernest H. Ern
Registrar: Sheila Cox Combs
Admissions: Russell Necessary
Financial Aid: Bill D. Wendle
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of Virginia Scores: 91% SAT V 400+; 87% SAT M 400+; 52% ACT 18-23; 17% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $2984 full-time, $123 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,062 full-time, $539 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $2097 full-time, $38 per semester hour part-time, $14.25 per term part-time. College room and board: $6200. College room only: $3488. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,432, PT 404 Faculty: FT 82, PT 54 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 70 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 30 Library Holdings: 95,861 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY

901 West Franklin St.
Richmond, VA 23284-9005
Tel: (804)828-0100
Free: 800-841-3638
Admissions: (804)828-1222
Fax: (804)828-1899
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vcu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Eugene P. Trani
Registrar: Anjour B. Harris
Admissions: Delores T. Taylor
Financial Aid: Susan Kadir
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 97% SAT V 400+; 98% SAT M 400+; 59% ACT 18-23; 22% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 68 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $5385 full-time, $165.40 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $17,440 full-time, $668 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $52.05 per credit part-time. College room and board: $7042. College room only: $4102. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 16,109, PT 4,399, Grad 7,270 Faculty: FT 1,744, PT 1,069 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 47 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 22 Library Holdings: 1,849,037 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEHSA, AANA, ACPhE, ADA, ADtA, ACSP, AOTA, APTA, APA, AClPE, CEPH, CORE, CSWE, FIDER, JRCERT, JRCNMT, LCMEAMA, NAACLS NASAD, NASD, NASM, NASPAA, NAST, NCATE, NLN, NRPA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Crew M; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M & W; Soccer M & W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

VIRGINIA HIGHLANDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 828
Abingdon, VA 24212-0828
Tel: (276)739-2400; 877-207-6115
Admissions: (276)739-2414
Fax: (276)739-2590
Web Site: http://www.vhcc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. F. David Wilkin
Registrar: David N. Matlock
Admissions: David N. Matlock
Financial Aid: David N. Matlock
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For nursing program: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 43, PT 92 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 29,683 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 65 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: JRCERT, NLN

VIRGINIA INTERMONT COLLEGE

1013 Moore St.
Bristol, VA 24201-4298
Tel: (276)669-6101
Free: 800-451-1842
Admissions: (276)466-7856
Fax: (276)669-5763
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vic.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Stephen Greiner
Registrar: Pam Hammond
Admissions: Roger Lowe
Financial Aid: Nancy Roberts
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Baptist Church Scores: 85% SAT V 400+; 83.5% SAT M 400+; 63% ACT 18-23; 17% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 63 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. Comprehensive fee: $22,200 includes full-time tuition ($15,500), mandatory fees ($950), and college room and board ($5750). College room only: $2750. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time and program. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $220 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $50 per credit. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, course level, course load, and program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 986, PT 152 Faculty: FT 45, PT 44 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 75 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 56 Library Holdings: 93,382 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 124 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: CSWE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE

Lexington, VA 24450
Tel: (540)464-7207
Free: 800-767-4207
Admissions: (540)464-7211
Fax: (540)464-7746
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vmi.edu/
President/CEO: Maj. Gen. Josiah Bunting, III
Registrar: Maj. Janet M. Battaglia
Admissions: Col. Vernon L. Beitzel
Financial Aid: Col. Timothy P. Golden
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Scores: 99.4% SAT V 400+; 99.8% SAT M 400+; 38.8% ACT 18-23; 52% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED not accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. One-time mandatory fee: $1678. State resident tuition: $4382 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $18,582 full-time. Mandatory fees: $2606 full-time. College room and board: $5666. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,362 Faculty: FT 110, PT 41 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 41 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 100 Library Holdings: 162,053 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 136 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ABET Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M; Cross-Country Running M & W; Fencing M & W; Football M; Golf M; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M; Racquetball M & W; Riflery M & W; Rugby M & W; Soccer M; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W; Water Polo M & W; Weight Lifting M & W; Wrestling M

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY

Blacksburg, VA 24061
Tel: (540)231-6000
Fax: (540)231-3242
Web Site: http://www.vt.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Charles W. Steger
Registrar: Wanda Dean
Financial Aid: Barry W. Simmons, Sr.
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 28% ACT 18-23; 55% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 70 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: January 15 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $4959 full-time, $206.75 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $16,298 full-time, $679 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1419 full-time, $169 per term part-time. College room and board: $4400. College room only: $2346. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and location. Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 21,087, PT 540, Grad 5,993 Faculty: FT 1,304, PT 228 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 37 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 41 Library Holdings: 2,176,916 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 72 credit hours, Associates; 126 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, AAMFT, AAFCS, ACCE, ACA, ADtA, ACSP, APA, ASLA, AVMA, FIDER, NASAD, NASPAA, NAST, NCATE, SAF Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling M & W; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Fencing M & W; Field Hockey M & W; Football M; Golf M; Gymnastics M & W; Ice Hockey M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M & W; Skiing (Downhill) M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Ultimate Frisbee M & W; Volleyball M & W; Water Polo M & W; Weight Lifting M & W; Wrestling M

VIRGINIA STATE UNIVERSITY

1 Hayden St.
Petersburg, VA 23806-0001
Tel: (804)524-5000
Free: 800-871-7611
Admissions: (804)524-5902
Fax: (804)524-5055
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vsu.edu/
President/CEO: Eddie N. Moore, Jr.
Registrar: Dr. Jerome Goodwin
Admissions: Irene Logan
Financial Aid: Henry DeBose
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: State Council of Higher Education for Virginia % Accepted: 79 Application Deadline: May 01 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $2317 full-time, $161 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $9668 full-time, $402 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $2575 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. College room and board: $6484. College room only: $3760. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,060, PT 272, Grad 723 Faculty: FT 226, PT 101 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 88 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 58 Library Holdings: 284,213 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ABET, ADtA, NASAD, NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

VIRGINIA UNION UNIVERSITY

1500 North Lombardy St.
Richmond, VA 23220-1170
Tel: (804)257-5600
Free: 800-368-3227
Admissions: (804)257-5881
Web Site: http://www.vuu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Belinda C. Anderson
Registrar: Sue Ellen Coleman
Admissions: Gil Powell
Financial Aid: Phenie D. Golatt
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Baptist Scores: 46.93% SAT V 400+; 39.88% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 58 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $18,432 includes full-time tuition ($11,600), mandatory fees ($1170), and college room and board ($5662). College room only: $2662. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. Part-time tuition: $483 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $370 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,309, PT 35, Grad 27 Faculty: FT 84, PT 56 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 82 Library Holdings: 147,611 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AClPE, ACBSP, ATS, CSWE, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M; Softball W; Tennis M; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY OF LYNCHBURG

2058 Garfield Ave.
Lynchburg, VA 24501-6417
Tel: (804)528-5276
Fax: (804)528-4257
Web Site: http://www.vulonline.org/
President/CEO: Ralph Reavis
Registrar: Kathy C. Franklin
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Calendar System: Semester Professional Accreditation: TACCS

VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

1584 Wesleyan Dr.
Norfolk, VA 23502-5599
Tel: (757)455-3200
Free: 800-737-8684
Admissions: (757)455-3208
Fax: (757)461-5238
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vwc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. William T. Greer, Jr.
Registrar: Barbara S. Adams
Admissions: Richard T. Hinshaw
Financial Aid: Eugenia F. Hickman
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Scores: 97.4% SAT V 400+; 95.2% SAT M 400+; 50% ACT 18-23; 19.7% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 81 Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $29,986 includes full-time tuition ($22,976), mandatory fees ($160), and college room and board ($6850). Part-time tuition: $957 per semester hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,121, PT 271 Faculty: FT 80, PT 58 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 63 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 42 Library Holdings: 140,400 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: NRPA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

VIRGINIA WESTERN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 14007
Roanoke, VA 24038
Tel: (540)857-7311
Admissions: (540)857-7231
Fax: (540)857-7204
Web Site: http://www.virginiawestern.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Robert H. Sandel
Registrar: Meg Carter
Admissions: Sharlona Wimmer
Financial Aid: Dr. Larry E. Ewing
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,128, PT 5,996 Faculty: FT 87, PT 319 Student-Faculty Ratio: 25:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 67,129 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ADA, ACBSP, JRCERT, NLN

WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY

Lexington, VA 24450-0303
Tel: (540)458-8400
Admissions: (540)458-8710
Fax: (540)463-8062
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wlu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Thomas G. Burish
Registrar: D. Scott Dittman
Admissions: William M. Hartog
Financial Aid: John H. DeCourcy
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 54% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 29 Admission Plans: Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: January 15 Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $35,860 includes full-time tuition ($27,960), mandatory fees ($675), and college room and board ($7225). College room only: $3425. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility and student level. Part-time tuition: $935 per credit. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Miscellaneous, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 1,766, PT 4, Grad 22 Faculty: FT 215, PT 2 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 33 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 61 Library Holdings: 907,325 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 121 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ACEJMC, ABA, AALS Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Fencing M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M; Ice Hockey M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M; Skiing (Cross-Country) M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Ultimate Frisbee M & W; Volleyball M & W; Wrestling M

WESTWOOD COLLEGE-ANNANDALE CAMPUS

7611 Little River Turnpike, 3rd Floor
Annandale, VA 22003
Tel: (703)642-3770
Free: 800-281-2978
Web Site: http://www.westwood.edu/locations/virginia-colleges/annandale-college.aspType: Two-Year College Sex: Coed

WESTWOOD COLLEGE-ARLINGTON BALLSTON CAMPUS

1901 North Ft. Myer Dr.
Arlington, VA 22209
Tel: 800-281-2978
Admissions: 877-268-5218
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.westwood.edu
Admissions: Tim Williams
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Application Fee: $100.00 Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Tuition: $12,300 full-time, $467 per credit part-time.

WORLD COLLEGE

5193 Shore Dr., Ste. 105
Virginia Beach, VA 23455-2500
Tel: (757)464-4600
Free: 800-696-7532
Web Site: http://www.worldcollege.edu/
President/CEO: John Randall Drinko
Registrar: Michael Smith
Admissions: Scott Katzenmeyer
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Tuition: $3540 per year part-time. Calendar System: Semester Faculty: FT 3, PT 2 Credit Hours For Degree: 139 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: DETC

WYTHEVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

1000 East Main St.
Wytheville, VA 24382-3308
Tel: (276)223-4700
Admissions: (276)223-4755
Fax: (276)223-4860
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wcc.vccs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Ann E. Alexander
Registrar: Sherry K. Dix
Admissions: Sherry K. Dix
Financial Aid: Dr. Gail S. Catron
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Virginia Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For allied health programs: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 46 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Library Holdings: 29,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ADA, APTA, NAACLS, NLN

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VIRGINIA

STATE EDUCATION OFFICE

James A. Gray, Jr., Associate Director
Career and Technical Education Services
PO Box 2120
101 N. 14th St.
Richmond, VA 23218-2120
(804)225-2847

STATE REGULATORY INFORMATION

For specific information, contact the Virginia Career and Technical Education Services, address above.

ABINGDON

Virginia Highlands Community College

PO Box 828, Abingdon, VA 24212. Two-Year College. Founded 1969. Contact: David N. Matlock, Dir. of Admissions, (276)739-2400, (276)739-2490, 877-207-6115, Fax: (276)739-2590, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.vhcc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,200/year in-state, $5,000/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,840. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: CAAHEP; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (1 Yr); Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (2 Yr); Art (2 Yr); Bank Management (2 Yr); Bookkeeping (1 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Computer Technology (2 Yr); Correctional Science (1 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (1 Yr); Electro-Mechanical Technology (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Engineering Technology (2 Yr); General Studies (2 Yr); Health Information Technology (1 Yr); Horticulture (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Legal Assistant (2 Yr); Liberal Arts (2 Yr); Machine Tool & Die (1 Yr); Machinist, General (2 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Medical Office Management (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide (2 Yr); Police Science (2 Yr); Theatre Arts (2 Yr)

ALBERTA

Southside Virginia Community College - Christanna Campus

109 Campus Dr., Alberta, VA 23821. Two-Year College. Founded 1970. Contact: Dr. Ronald Mattox, Dean of Admissions, (434)949-1000, Fax: (804)949-7863, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.sv.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,066/year in-state; $6,490/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,359. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Heating (2 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Correctional Science (2 Yr); Data Processing (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (1 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Human Services (1 Yr); Law Enforcement (1 Yr); Nursing, Vocational (1 Yr); Secretarial, Science (2 Yr)

ALEXANDRIA

Goodwin House Basic Geriatric Nursing Program

4800 Fillmore Ave., Alexandria, VA 22311. Trade and Technical. Contact: Joanne Garcia, Dir. of Nursing, (703)578-1000, (703)824-1236, 888-491-2676, Fax: (703)824-1317, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.goodwinhouse.org. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Curriculum: Geriatric Care; Nurse, Assistant

Skin Care Center

8403-G Richmond Hwy., Alexandria, VA 22309. Other. Contact: Agita Shfazand, Dir., (703)360-6521, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Electrology; Esthetician; Laser Technology; Makeup Facial Treatment; Permanent Makeup; Skin Care

TESST College of Technology - Alexandria

6315 Bren Mar Dr., Alexandria, VA 22312-6342. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Sheryl Delozier, (703)354-1005, 800-488-3778, Fax: (703)354-3661, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tesst.com; Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/contact_us_regular.htm. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 316. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Business Management; Criminal Justice (960 Hr); Electronics Technology (1800 Hr); Information Sciences Technology (1500 Hr); Medical Assistant (720 Hr); Pharmacy Technician (720 Hr)

ANNANDALE

Northern Virginia Community College

4001 Wakefield Chapel Rd., Annandale, VA 22003-3796. Two-Year College. Founded 1964. Contact: Kimberly Ellis, Student Services Center Manager, (703)323-3000, (703)323-3400, Fax: (703)323-3367, Web Site: http://www.nvcc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,400/year in-state, $5,000/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 12,303. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Architectural Technology; Auto Body & Fender Repair; Auto Engine Diagnosis; Auto Mechanics - Automatic Transmission; Auto Mechanics - Tune Up; Automotive Machine Shop; Automotive Technology; Aviation Technology; Business Management; Civil Engineering Technology; Commercial Art; Computer Information Science; Construction Management; Construction Technology; Correctional Science; Dental Hygiene; Dental Laboratory Technology; Dietetic Technology; Dietician Training; Drug Abuse Counseling; Early Childhood Specialist; Electronics Technology; Emergency Medical Technology; Engineering Technology, Mechanical; Fire Science; Geriatric Care; Horticulture; Hotel & Restaurant Management; Human Services; Information Sciences Technology; Interior Design; Legal Assistant; Machine Tool & Die; Marketing; Medical Laboratory Technology; Medical Record Technology; Nursing, R.N.; Office Administration; Office Technology; Park & Recreation; Physical Therapy Aide; Police Science; Real Estate, Basic; Respiratory Therapy; Safety Technology; Security Training; Small Business Management; Travel & Tourism; Veterinary Technology; Welding Technology; X-Ray Technology

Springfield Beauty Academy

4223 Annandale Rd., Annandale, VA 22003. Cosmetology. Founded 1974. Contact: Anthony N. Katsakis, (703)256-5662, (703)256-5663, Fax: (703)256-9164, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $9,000 plus $995 books and supplies for cosmetologist; $1,025 plus $330 books and supplies for manicurist. Enrollment: men 14, women 126. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Manicurist (150 Hr)

ARLINGTON

ACT College

1100 Wilson Blvd., Ste. M780, Arlington, VA 22209-2297. Allied Medical, Two-Year College. Founded 1983. Contact: Bob Boderman, School Dir., (703)527-6660, (866)950-7979, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.actcollege.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $3,650 per quarter. Enrollment: men 18, women 280. Degrees awarded: Diploma, Associate. Accreditation: ABHES. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Dental Assisting (3 Qt); Medical Administrative Assistant (3 Qt); Medical Assistant (3 Qt); Pharmacy Technician (3 Qt)

Art Institute of Washington

1820 North Fort Myer Dr., Ames Building, Arlington, VA 22209-1802. Art, Trade and Technical.(703)358-9550, 877-303-3771, Fax: (703)358-9759, Web Site: http://www.aiw.artinstitutes.edu; Web Site: http://www.artinstitutes.edu/getinfo.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $18,345; $1,971 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 958. Degrees awarded: Associate. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cooking, Commercial (3 Qt); Culinary Arts - Pastry (4 Qt)

Banner College

2300 Wilson Blvd., Ste. 600, Arlington, VA 22201. Trade and Technical, Allied Medical.(703)908-8300, 877-600-8860, Fax: (703)908-8301, Web Site: http://www.bannercollege.edu; Web Site: http://www.bannercollege.edu/request.php?. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $9,010 - $19,409; $243 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 156. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCET. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Computer Information Systems (1200 Hr); Massage Therapy (820 Hr); Medical Assistant (746 Hr); Medical Billing (746 Hr); Surgical Technology (1340 Hr)

Connecticut School of Broadcasting

Crystal City, 2170 Crystal Plaza Arcade, Arlington, VA 22202. Trade and Technical. Founded 1964. Contact: RJ Narsavage, Jr., Dir., 800-887-2346, Web Site: http://www.800tvradio.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Week. Tuition: $9940; $50 in fees. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Broadcasting, Nontechnical (8-16 Wk); Radio & Television (8-16 Wk); Television & Radio Production (8-16 Wk)

Graham Webb Academy

1621 N. Kent St., No. 1617LL, Arlington, VA 22209. Cosmetology. Founded 1987. Contact: Christine Gordon, Pres., (703)243-9322, 800-869-9322, Fax: (703)525-4356, Web Site: http://www.grahamwebbacademyonline.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $13,000. Enrollment: men 40, women 264. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

L B N Institute

3328 S. Wakefield St., No. A, Arlington, VA 22206-1715. Cosmetology. Founded 1992. Contact: Lilian Omar, (703)998-0021, (703)998-0003, Fax: (703)998-0021, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Women. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,150-$4,500. Enrollment: Total 6. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Electrology; Skin Care

Laser Electrolysis Center

943 S. George Mason Dr, Arlington, VA 22204. Trade and Technical. Founded 1980. Contact: Ronda Schueller, Dir., (703)979-2853, Web Site: http://www.laserelectrol.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Hour. Tuition: $2,700; $100 application fee and materials. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Curriculum: Electrology (60 Hr)

Professional Bartending School

2440 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22201. Trade and Technical. Founded 1968. Contact: Tommy Hanavan, (703)841-9700, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bartending-school.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $595. Enrollment: men 375, women 225. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: TEAC. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Bartending (40 Hr)

BEDFORD

Bedford Science and Technology Center

600 Edmund St., Bedford, VA 24523. Trade and Technical. Contact: Dean A. Gehman, Assistant Principal, (540)586-3933, Fax: (540)586-7711, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bedford.k12.va.us/bstc. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Tuition: $600 first session, $1,200 second session for Bedford Countyresidents, tuition higher for non-county residents. Enrollment: Total 15. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Nursing, L.P.N. (18 Mo)

BEN HUR

Lee County Vocational-Technical School

1 Vo Tech Dr., Ben Hur, VA 24218. Trade and Technical. Contact: Alan Ingle, Dir., (276)346-1960. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Curriculum: Agri-Engineering & Mechanics (2 Yr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Building Trades (2 Yr); Carpentry (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (2 Yr); Cosmetology (2 Yr); Data Processing (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (2 Yr); Food Processing Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (2 Yr); Office Machines (2 Yr); Secretarial, Administrative (2 Yr); Sewing, Commercial (2 Yr); Small Engine Repair; Welding Technology (2 Yr)

BIG STONE GAP

Mountain Empire Community College

3441 Mountain Empire Rd., Big Stone Gap, VA 24219. Two-Year College. Founded 1972. Contact: Dr. Sharon Fisher, Dir., (276)523-2400, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.me.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $74/credit hour in-state; $222/credit hour out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 2,875. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: JRCERT; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Automated (1 Yr); Accounting, General (2 Yr); Administrative Assistant (2 Yr); Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (1 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (1 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Computer Operations (1 Yr); Correctional Science (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (1 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (1 Yr); Environmental Technology (2 Yr); Forestry Technology (2 Yr); Industrial Management & Supervision (1 Yr); Industrial Technology (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (1 Yr); Landscaping (1 Yr); Legal Assistant (2 Yr); Maintenance, Machine Tool (1 Yr); Maintenance Technology (1 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Medical Record Technology (1 Yr); Mining Technology (1 Yr); Nurse, Assistant (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Machines (1 Yr); Pharmacy Technician (1 Yr); Photography (1 Yr); Police Science (2 Yr); Real Estate, Basic (1 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (1 Yr); Small Business Management (1 Yr); Stenography, General (1 Yr); Welding Technology (1 Yr)

BLACKSTONE

ETS Training Center

1366 Willis Rd., Blackstone, VA 23824-4313. Trade and Technical. Founded 1986. Contact: Lillie M. Edmonds, (434)292-4134, Fax: (434)292-7648, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://ets1040.com; Web Site: http://ets1040.com/default.cfm?SID=3569&linkinfo=4. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Month. Tuition: $1,400. Enrollment: Total 6. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Computerized

BLUEFIELD

National College of Business and Technology (Bluefield)

100 Logan St, Bluefield, VA 24605. Two-Year College.(276)326-3621, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/bluefield.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Management; Computer Applications; Medical Assistant; Medical Billing; Medical Transcription; Office Technology; Pharmacy Technician

BRISTOL

Virginia Intermont College

1013 Moore St., Bristol, VA 24201. Other. Founded 1884. Contact: Roger Lowe, Dir. of Admissions, (276)669-6101, (276)466-7873, 800-451-1842, Fax: (276)466-7899, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.vic.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $15,200 per year. Enrollment: Total 1,002. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Allied Health Occupations; Art; Business; Business Management; Creative Writing; Dance; Graphic Design; Horse Management; Marketing; Medical Technology; Office Management; Photography; Physical Education; Sports Management; Theatre Arts

BUENA VISTA

Southern Virginia University

1 University Hill Dr., Buena Vista, VA 24416. Other. Founded 1867. Contact: Craig Lund, (540)261-8400, 800-229-8420, 800-229-8420, Fax: (540)261-8559, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.southernvirginia.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $15,350 per year. Enrollment: Total 548. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: AALE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Art (4 Yr); Business (4 Yr); Early Childhood Education; Liberal Arts (4 Yr); Mathematics; Multimedia Design (4 Yr)

CHANTILLY

ITT Technical Institute (Chantilly)

14420 Albemarle Point Place, Ste. 100, Chantilly, VA 20151. Trade and Technical.(703)263-2541, 888-895-8324, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Enrollment: Total 269. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits); Software Development/Engineering (96 Credits); Web Development (96 Credits)

CHARLOTTESVILLE

International Beauty School

2024 Holiday Dr., Charlottesville, VA 22901. Cosmetology. Founded 1968. Contact: Wendy Powers, (434)296-0159, Fax: (434)296-8743, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.internationalbeautyschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $7,700 includes books & equipment. Enrollment: men 1, women 25. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (2000 Hr); Manicurist (400 Hr)

National College of Business and Technology (Charlottesville)

1819 Emmet St., Charlottesville, VA 22901. Two-Year College. Founded 1886. Contact: Adrienne Granitz, (434)295-0136, 800-664-1886, Fax: (434)979-8061, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/charlottesville.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Enrollment: Total 174. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Management; Computer Applications; Hospitality; Medical Assistant; Medical Insurance Specialist; Medical Office Management; Medical Transcription; Microsoft Certified Specialist; Office Administration; Pharmacy Technician; Secretarial, Administrative; Secretarial, Executive; Secretarial, Legal; Secretarial, Medical; Tourism

Piedmont Virginia Community College

501 College Dr., Charlottesville, VA 22902. Two-Year College. Founded 1972. Contact: Joyce Knight, (434)977-3900, Fax: (434)971-8232, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.pvcc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,045/year in-state, $6,469/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,077. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Biomedical Technology (1 & 2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business, General Office (1 & 2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Carpentry (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (1 Yr); Computer Repair (1 Yr); Criminal Justice (1 Yr); Drafting Technology (1 Yr); Education (2 Yr); Electricity, Apprenticeship (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); Fine Arts (2 Yr); General Studies (2 Yr); Graphic Design (1 Yr); Health Care & Management (1 Yr); Horticulture (1 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Liberal Arts (2 Yr); Masonry (2 Yr); Mechanical Technology (1 & 2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Police Science (2 Yr); Science (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (1 Yr)

Virginia School of Massage

2008 Morton Dr., Charlottesville, VA 22903. Trade and Technical, Cosmetology. Founded 1988. Contact: Suzanne Spear, (434)293-4031, 888-599-2001, Fax: (434)293-4190, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.vasom.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $8,100 to $10,485 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 25, women 123. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT; COMTA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Esthetician (600 Hr); Massage Therapy (637-795 Hr)

CHESAPEAKE

Chesapeake Vocational-Technical Center

1617 Cedar Rd., Chesapeake, VA 23322. Trade and Technical, Cosmetology, Nursing. Founded 1967. Contact: Dee Winslow, (757)547-0134, Fax: (804)547-2391. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Year. Enrollment: Total 453. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Auto Body & Fender Repair; Automotive Service; Cabinet & Mill Work; Carpentry; Computer Networking; Computer Servicing Theory & Systems; Cosmetology; Engineering; Health Technology; Internet Technologies; Landscape Architecture; Legal Technology; Manicurist; Masonry; Medical Technology; Nursing, Practical; Radio; Television; Veterinary Technology

Sentara School of Health Professions

1441 Crossways Blvd., Suite 105, Chesapeake, VA 23320. Contact: Shelly Cohen, Director, (757)388-2900, (757)668-2666, 800-SEN-TARA, Web Site: http://www.sentara.com/healthprofessions. Private. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $8,856 in-state; $8,856 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Associate.

Tidewater Community College, Chesapeake Campus

1428 Cedar Rd., Chesapeake, VA 23322-7108. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Linda M. Rice, Provost, (757)822-5100, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tcc.edu. Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,911 in-state; $6,289 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

CHESTER

John Tyler Community College

13101 Jefferson Davis Hwy., Chester, VA 23831-5316. Two-Year College. Founded 1967. Contact: Marshall W. Smith, Pres., (804)796-4000, 800-552-3490, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.jtcc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,056/year in-state; $6,480/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,641. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: ABFSE; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Building Construction Technology; Business Management; Child Care & Guidance (9 Mo); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Computer Operations (9 Mo); Computer Programming (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (9 Mo); Early Childhood Specialist (2 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (9 Mo); Fine Arts (1 Yr); Funeral Service Education; Human Services; Machine Shop (9 Mo); Management; Mechanical Engineering; Mechanical Technology (9 Mo); Microcomputers; Nursing, R.N.; Office Administration (2 Yr); Police Science (2 Yr); Small Business Management; Teacher Assistant; Welding Technology (1 Yr); Word Processing

CLIFTON FORGE

Dabney South Lancaster Community College

1000 Dabney Dr., PO Box 1000, Clifton Forge, VA 24422-1000. Two-Year College. Founded 1964. Contact: Dr. Terry King, Dean, (540)863-2800, 877-73D-SLCC, Fax: (540)863-2915, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.dl.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $72/credit hour in-state; $221/credit hour out-of-state. Enrollment: men 700, women 986. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Banking (9 Mo); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (15 Hr); Clerk, Stenographer (9 Mo); Clerk, Typist (9 Mo); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Computer Science (9 Mo); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Culinary Arts (2 Yr); Education (2 Yr); Electricity, Apprenticeship (9 Mo); Electronics Technology (9 Mo); Forestry Technology (2 Yr); General Studies (2 Yr); Golf Course Management (12 Hr); Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning (15 Hr); Law Enforcement (9 Mo); Massage Therapy (2 Yr); Microcomputers (9 Mo); Nursing, L.P.N. (9 Mo); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Management (9 Mo); Secretarial, General (2 Yr); Welding Technology (9 Mo)

COLONIAL HEIGHTS

Colonial Heights Beauty Academy

3233B Boulevard, Colonial Heights, VA 23834. Cosmetology. Founded 1979. Contact: Tracy Burke, (804)526-6363, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $7,940 for tuition, books and fees. Enrollment: men 3, women 42. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

DANVILLE

Artistic Beauty College

158 Arnett Blvd, Danville, VA 24540-3426. Cosmetology. Founded 1960. Contact: Joyce Murray, (434)793-9860. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $2,175. Enrollment: Total 32. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

Danville Community College

1008 S. Main St., Danville, VA 24541. Two-Year College. Founded 1946. Contact: Evonda Thornton, Ed. Support Specialist, (434)797-2222, (434)797-8420, 800-560-4291, Fax: (434)797-8541, E-mail: [email protected] vccs.edu, Web Site: http://www.dcc.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,021/year in-state; $6,443/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,326. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (2 Yr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (1 Yr); Clerk, Typist (1 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (2 Yr); Electronics, Industrial (1 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Machine Technology; Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Nursing, Vocational (3 Mo); Office Technology (2 Yr); Printing (2 Yr); Social Services Aide (1 Yr)

Danville Regional Medical Center School of Nursing

142 S. Main St., Danville, VA 24541. Nursing. Founded 1898. Contact: Kamela O. Deel, Dir., (434)799-4510, 877-799-WELL, Fax: (434)799-3718, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.danvilleregional.org/nursingschool. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $5,253 in-state; $5,253 out-of-state. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Nursing, R.N. (18 Mo)

General Aviation, Inc.

PO Box 457, Danville, VA 24543. Flight and Ground.(434)793-7033, Fax: (434)793-0228, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.flydanville.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Tuition: $5,000-$7,000 (approx.) for private pilot certificate program. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: FAA. Curriculum: Aircraft Flight Instruction, Basic Ground (40 Hr)

National College of Business and Technology (Danville)

336 Old Riverside Dr., Danville, VA 24541. Two-Year College. Founded 1886. Contact: Cyndee Moore, Dir., (434)793-6822, 800-666-6221, Fax: (434)793-3634, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/danvilleva.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Enrollment: Total 175. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Administration; Business Management; Computer Operations; Data Processing; Medical Assistant; Medical Transcription; Microsoft Certified Specialist; Office Administration; Pharmacy Technician; Secretarial, Administrative; Secretarial, Executive; Surgical Technology; Tourism

Natural Touch School of Massage Therapy (Danville)

291 Park Ave., Danville, VA 24541-4212. Trade and Technical. Founded 1993. Contact: Ramona Richardson, (434)799-0060, 888-284-8555, Fax: (434)799-0438, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.naturaltouchschools.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $5,600 for 500 hour program. Enrollment: Total 90. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Massage Therapy (550 Hr)

DUBLIN

New River Community College

PO Box 1127, Dublin, VA 24084. Two-Year College. Founded 1959. Contact: Dr. Charlie White, VP for Instruction and Student Svcs., (540)674-3600, (540)674-4295, (866)462-6722, Fax: (540)674-3642, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.nr.cc.va.us. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,932/year in-state; $6,356/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,862. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Advanced (4 Sm); Accounting, Junior (3 Sm); Administrative Assistant (4 Sm); Architectural Technology (4 Sm); Automotive Collision Repair (4 Sm); Business Administration (4 Sm); Business Management (4 Sm); Computer Aided Drafting (4 Sm); Computer Applications (4 Sm); Computer Engineering (4 Sm); Computer Graphics (4 Sm); Computer Programming (4 Sm); Construction Technology (4 Sm); Early Childhood Education (4 Sm); Early Childhood Specialist (2 Sm); Electrical Engineering Technology (4 Sm); Electrical Technology (4 Sm); Electronics Technology (4 Sm); Engineering Technology, Computer (4 Sm); Geriatric Care (4 Sm); Graphic Design (4 Sm); Human Services (2 Sm); Industrial Maintenance (2 Sm); Information Sciences Technology (4 Sm); Instrumentation Technology (4 Sm); Internet Technologies (4 Sm); Legal Assistant (4 Sm); Machine Operator, General (4 Sm); Machine Shop (4 Sm); Machine Shop Operator (4 Sm); Machine Technology (4 Sm); Marketing (4 Sm); Medical Office Management (4 Sm); Nursing, Practical (3 Sm); Nursing, R.N. (4 Sm); Paralegal (4 Sm); Police Science (4 Sm); Small Business Management (4 Sm); Welding Technology (3 Sm); Word Processing (2 Sm)

EMPORIA

Greensville Memorial Hospital

214 Weaver Ave., Emporia, VA 23847. Nursing. Founded 1961. Contact: Ann W. Wrenn, Dir., (434)348-2000, Web Site: http://www.greensvillecountyva.gov/Health%20and%20Welfare/greensville_memorial_hospital.htm. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Enrollment: Total 36. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

FAIRFAX

Columbia School of Broadcasting

3947 University Dr., 2nd fl., Fairfax, VA 22030-2506. Correspondence, Trade and Technical. Founded 1964. Contact: William T. Butler, President, 800-362-0660, Fax: (703)591-6147, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.csbamerica.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $4,250 announcing; $1,020 sportscasting; $870 basic radio production; $1,325 TV announcing. Enrollment: men 80, women 120. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Broadcasting Technology (6 Wk); Internet Technologies (7 Wk); Radio Announcing (18 Mo); Television & Radio Production (9 Wk)

CPA School of Washington

3819 Lee St., Fairfax, VA 22030. Business. Founded 1957. Contact: John W. Coughlan, Pres., (703)273-5745, 800-262-9272, Fax: (703)591-1194, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://cpaschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $1,295 CPA coaching; $990 CMA coaching; $990 CFM coaching. Enrollment: men 50, women 50. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Certified Public Review (3 Mo)

Omega Travel School

3102 Omega Office Park, Ste. 101, Fairfax, VA 22031-2400. Trade and Technical. Founded 1988. Contact: Barbara Schraff, (703)359-8830, (703)359-0200, Fax: (703)273-9410, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.owt.net. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $2,100. Enrollment: men 8, women 98. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Travel Agents (190 Hr)

Para-Legal Institute

9508-A Lee Hwy., Fairfax, VA 22031. Trade and Technical, Other, Business. Founded 1974. Contact: Tamara F. Greene, (703)352-9317, Fax: (703)352-7422, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.paralegalinstitute.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $3,800. Enrollment: Total 20. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Paralegal (4-10 Mo)

FALLS CHURCH

Advanced European Facials Institute

124C East Broad St., Falls Church, VA 22046-3106. Other. Founded 1998. Contact: Celina Curie, Dir., (703)237-1313, Fax: (703)237-2966, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.uniquefacials.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $16.50 per hour. Enrollment: Total 12. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Facial Treatment (600 Hr); Skin Care (600 Hr)

Heritage Education

350 S. Washington St., Falls Church, VA 22046-4202. Trade and Technical, Cosmetology. Founded 1954. Contact: Michelle Moostow, Dir., (703)532-5050, 888-334-7339, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.heritage-education.com; Web Site: http://www.heritage-education.com/requestinfo.htm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: Cosmetology $14,150 plus $1,254 books and supplies; Massage Therapy $7,795 plus $335 books and supplies. Enrollment: men 132, women 360. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS; ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Massage Therapy (840 Hr); Medical Assistant; Pharmacy Technician; Surgical Technology

Stratford University

7777 Leesburg Pike, No. 100, Falls Church, VA 22043-2411. Other, Business, Trade and Technical. Founded 1976. Contact: Mary Ann Shurtz, VP, (703)821-8570, 800-444-0804, Fax: (703)556-9892, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.stratford.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $10,510 per year. Enrollment: Total 342. Degrees awarded: Diploma, Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Baking; Business Administration; Business Management; Computer Information Science; Computer Networking; Culinary Arts; Digital Program Design; Entrepreneurship; Hospitality; Hotel & Restaurant Management; Telecommunications Technology

FISHERSVILLE

Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center

PO Box 1500, Fishersville, VA 22939. Trade and Technical. Founded 1947. Contact: Richard Luck, Dir., (540)332-7390, 800-345-9972, Fax: (540)332-7132, Web Site: http://www.wwrc.net. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Clerical (13 Mo); Administrative Assistant (13 Mo); Auto Body & Fender Repair (9 Mo); Auto Mechanics (15 Mo); Auto Mechanics - Automatic Transmission (5 Mo); Auto Mechanics - Brake & Wheel Alignment (6 Mo); Auto Mechanics - Tune Up (8 Mo); Baking (8 Mo); Building Maintenance (5 Mo); Cabinet & Mill Work (10 Mo); Carpentry (7 Mo); Clerical, General (9 Mo); Computer Aided Drafting (15 Mo); Computer Programming (14 Mo); Construction Technology (5 Mo); Cooking, Commercial (8 Mo); Cook, Short Order (6 Mo); Electro-Mechanical Technology (3 Mo); Electronics Technology (12 Mo); Furniture Manufacturing (6 Mo); House & Medical Services Cleaning (7 Mo); Masonry (2 Mo); Mechanical Drafting (15 Mo); Microcomputers (3 Mo); Nurses Aide (8 Mo); Office, General (6 Mo); Power Lineman (6 Mo); Receptionist (9 Mo); Stock Clerk (6 Mo); Warehouse Management (4 Mo); Welding, Combination (11 Mo); Welding, Electric Arc (6 Mo); Welding, Heli Arc (6 Mo)

FRANKLIN

Paul D. Camp Community College

100 N. College Dr., Franklin, VA 23851. Two-Year College. Founded 1971. Contact: Monette Williams, Coordinator, Student Support Svcs., (757)569-6700, (757)569-6707, Fax: (757)569-6795, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.pc.vccs.edu/. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $63 per credit. Enrollment: men 573, women 1,063. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Education (2 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (1 Yr); Electricity, Apprenticeship (1 Yr); Industrial Technology (2 Yr); Law Enforcement (2 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Microcomputers (1 Yr); Police Science (2 Yr); Welding Technology (1 Yr); Word Processing (1 Yr)

Southampton Memorial Hospital School of Practical Nursing

100 Fairview Dr., Franklin, VA 23851. Nursing. Founded 1964. Contact: Ercelle Vann, Program Dir., (757)569-6414, Fax: (757)569-6416. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $1,150 Local; $1,650 Non-Local. Enrollment: Total 15. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (12 Mo)

GALAX

Living Waters Academy

225 S. Main St., Galax, VA 24333. Cosmetology. Contact: Linda Holliday, (276)236-5757. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,728. Enrollment: men 1, women 13. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Manicurist

Wytheville Community College (Galax)

121 West Grayson St., Galax, VA 24333. Nursing, Two-Year College. Founded 1969. Contact: Crystal Goad, Program Dir., (276)238-1177, 800-468-1195, Fax: (276)238-1986, Web Site: http://www2.wcc.vccs.edu/. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $65 semester, per credit hr. Enrollment: Total 100. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

GLEN ALLEN

ECPI Technical College (Glen Allen)

4305 Cox Rd, Glen Allen, VA 23060. Trade and Technical, Business, Allied Medical.(804)934-0100, 888-526-4654, Web Site: http://www.ecpitech.edu/campustec/ricw/; Web Site: http://www.ecpitech.edu/admissionstec/contact/route/routeinquiry.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,559 plus $1,066 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business Administration; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Criminology - Identification Technology; Information Systems; Internet Technologies; Medical Assistant; Office Technology; Web Development

GLENNS

Rappahannock Community College (Glenns Campus)

12745 College Dr., Glenns, VA 23149. Two-Year College. Founded 1971. Contact: Robert Griffin, Dean of Student Affairs, (804)758-6700, (804)758-6742, 800-836-9381, Fax: (804)758-3852, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.rcc.vccs.edu; Wilnet H. Willis, Admissions and Records Officer, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,913/year in-state, $6,315/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 601. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Clerk, Typist (1 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Industrial Maintenance (1 Yr); Law Enforcement (1 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Technology (1 Yr)

GREAT FALLS

Ana Visage, Ltd. Academy

10130-B Colvin Run Rd., Great Falls, VA 22066-1839. Trade and Technical, Cosmetology. Founded 1995. Contact: Nahid Ghassemi, Founder, (703)759-2200, Fax: (703)759-2230, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.anavisageacademy.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $1,000; $3,500; $4,300; $6,300. Enrollment: Total 10. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Electrology (600 Hr); Makeup Facial Treatment (500 Hr); Massage Therapy (500 Hr); Skin Care (600 Hr)

HAMPTON

ECPI College of Technology (Hampton)

1001 Omni Blvd., Hampton, VA 23666. Trade and Technical, Business, Allied Medical. Founded 1966. Contact: John Olson, Provost, (757)838-9191, 888-526-4654, Fax: (757)827-5351, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu; Web Site: http://. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,559 plus $1,066 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (60 Sm); Computer Networking (65 Sm); Computer Programming (65 Sm); Computer Technology (65 Sm); Data Processing (60 Sm); Office Technology; Telecommunications Technology (65 Sm); Web Development (65 Sm); Word Processing

Peninsula School of Practical Nursing

3120 Victoria Blvd., Hampton, VA 23661. Nursing. Founded 1952. Contact: Nina O. Derby, (757)727-7266. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 47. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

Thomas Nelson Community College

99 Thomas Nelson Dr., PO Box 9407, Hampton, VA 23670. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Henrietta Cain, Enrollment Services, (757)825-2700, (757)825-2800, Fax: (757)827-2763, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tncc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,156/year in-state; $6,602/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 2,913. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (1 Yr); Architectural Design Technology (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (1 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Banking & Finance (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Career Development; Clerical, General (1 Yr); Commercial Art (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Computer Programming (2 Yr); Correctional Science (1 Yr); Dietetic Technology (2 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Electricity, Industrial (1 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Engineering (2 Yr); Fine Arts (2 Yr); Fire Science (2 Yr); Food Service & Management (1 Yr); Hotel & Restaurant Management (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Industrial Management & Supervision (1 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Legal Assistant (1 Yr); Machine Tool & Die (2 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Marine Technology (2 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr); Mechanical Technology (2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Assistant (1 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Microcomputers (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Optometric Assistant (2 Yr); Photography (2 Yr); Police Science (2 Yr); Public Administration Technology (2 Yr); Teacher Assistant (1 Yr); Technician, Electronic Service (1 Yr); Word Processing (1 Yr)

Virginia School of Hair Design

101 W. Queens Way, Hampton, VA 23669. Cosmetology. Founded 1958. Contact: Donald Allhouse, Exec.Dir., (804)722-0211, Fax: (804)723-0261, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $655 to $7,060 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 4, women 109. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Barbering (1500 Hr); Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (600 Hr); Esthetician (600 Hr); Manicurist (150 Hr)

HARRISONBURG

Massanutten Technical Center

325 Pleasant Valley Rd., Harrisonburg, VA 22801. Trade and Technical. Founded 1972. Contact: Sandy Rinker, Asst. Dir. for Continuing Ed., (540)879-2833, 800-336-6012, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.rockingham.k12.va.us/mtc/MTC.html. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: Varies; tuition waived for high school students. Enrollment: Total 63. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

National Business College

51 B Burgess Rd., Harrisonburg, VA 22801. Two-Year College, Other, Business. Founded 1886. Contact: Jack Ekey, (540)432-0943, Fax: (540)432-1133, Web Site: http://ncbt.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Enrollment: Total 150. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Administration; Business Management; Clerical, Medical; Computer Operations; Medical Assistant; Medical Transcription; Office Administration; Pharmacy Technician

National College of Business and Technology (Harrisonburg)

51B Burgess Rd, Harrisonburg, VA 22801. Two-Year College.(540)432-0943, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/harrisonburg.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Management; Computer Applications; Medical Assistant; Medical Billing; Medical Transcription; Office Technology; Pharmacy Technician

HERNDON

AKS Massage School, Inc.

462 Herndon Pkwy., Ste. 208, Herndon, VA 20170. Trade and Technical. Founded 1992. Contact: H. Katharine Hunter, Dir., (703)464-0333, (703)464-5999, 877-306-3422, Fax: (703)464-5999, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://aksmassageschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $6,600 for 650-hour program. Enrollment: Total 80. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Massage Therapy (650 Hr)

HIGHLAND SPRINGS

Henrico County-Saint Mary's Hospital School of Practical Nursing

201 E. 9 Mile Rd., Highland Springs, VA 23075. Nursing, Trade and Technical. Founded 1966. Contact: Elaine B. Callahan, Adult Education Administrator, (804)328-4095, Web Site: http://www.henrico.k12.va.us/adulteducation. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 100. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

KEYSVILLE

Southside Virginia Community College - John H. Daniel Campus

200 Daniel Rd., Keysville, VA 23947. Two-Year College. Founded 1971. Contact: Dr. Ronald E. Mattox, Dean of Admissions, (434)736-2000, Fax: (804)736-2082, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.sv.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,066/year in-state; $6,490/year out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma, Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Technology (1 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Computer Aided Drafting (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (1 Yr); Electrical Technology (1 Yr); Engineering Technology (2 Yr); General Studies (2 Yr); Heavy Equipment (1 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Liberal Arts (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Truck Driving (1 Yr)

LAKE RIDGE

Piedmont School of Professional Massage

1690 Old Bridge Rd., Ste. 200, Lake Ridge, VA 22192. Trade and Technical. Founded 1995. Contact: Jim Weiler, Dir./Instructor, (703)499-9909, (703)497-4437, Fax: (703)492-7226, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.piedmontmassage.com/. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $6,000 (Books and supply costs are not included). Enrollment: Total 36. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Massage Therapy (9 Mo)

LEESBURG

C. S. Monroe Technical Center

715 Childrens Center Rd., Leesburg, VA 20175. Trade and Technical. Founded 1977. Contact: Wagener Grier, Dir., (703)771-6560, Fax: (703)771-6563, Web Site: http://www.loudoun.k12.va.us/mtc. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $300/year. Enrollment: men 220, women 190. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

Loudoun Hospital Center

224 Cornwall St. NW, Leesburg, VA 20176. Trade and Technical. Founded 1978. Contact: Margaret Gillis, RN, Dir. of Nursing, (703)771-2841, Fax: (703)771-2800. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $75. Enrollment: Total 50. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Geriatric Care (80 Hr); Health Aide (80 Hr); Nurse, Assistant (80 Hr)

LEXINGTON

Stonewall Jackson Hospital School of Practical Nursing

1 Health Cir., Lexington, VA 24450. Nursing. Founded 1964. Contact: Penny C. Fauber-Moore, Dir., (540)458-3299, (540)458-3300, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.sjhospital.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Free for residents of Rockbridge County, Buena Vista, and Lexington; $3,500 per program (est.) for others. Enrollment: Total 15. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (11 Mo)

LOCUST GROVE

Germanna Community College

2130 Germanna Hwy., Locust Grove, VA 22508. Two-Year College. Founded 1970. Contact: Rita Dunston, Registrar, (540)423-9030, Fax: (540)727-3207, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.germanna.edu/. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $48.65 per credit. Enrollment: men 784, women 1,585. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting & Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Electrical Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Engineering Technology, Electronic (2 Yr); Mechanical Drafting (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Police Science; Secretarial, Science (2 Yr)

LYNCHBURG

Centra Health School of Practical Nursing

1920 Atherholt Rd., Lynchburg, VA 24501. Nursing. Founded 1990. Contact: Woody B. Hanes, (434)947-3070, Web Site: http://www.centrahealth.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $4,067. Enrollment: Total 25. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (12 Mo)

Central Virginia Community College

3506 Wards Rd., Lynchburg, VA 24502-2498. Two-Year College. Founded 1967. Contact: Cathy Beale, Admissions, (434)832-7600, (434)832-7633, 800-562-3060, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.cvcc.vccs.edu; Kitty Daniel, Admissions, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,200/year in-state, $5,500/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,123. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Automation Technology (2 Yr); Banking (2 Yr); Bookkeeping (1 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (1 Yr); Civil Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Commercial Art (2 Yr); Data Processing (2 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (1 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Finance (2 Yr); Human Services (8 Qt); Law Enforcement (2 Yr); Legal Assistant (1 Yr); Machine Shop (1 Yr); Machine Technology (1 Yr); Machine Tool & Die; Management (2 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Medical Record Technology (2 Yr); Merchandising (2 Yr); Microcomputers (2 Yr); Police Science (2 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Secretarial, General (2 Yr); Teacher Assistant (1 Yr); Travel & Transportation Management (1 Yr)

Legends Institute

3225 Old Forest Rd., Ste. 5, Lynchburg, VA 24501. Cosmetology. Founded 2003. Contact: James Looney, (434)385-7722, Fax: (434)385-7902, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.legendsinstitute.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $10,900 plus $1,595 books and supplies. Enrollment: women 31. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

Lynchburg General Hospital School of Nursing

1901 Tate Springs Rd., Lynchburg, VA 24501. Contact: Woody B. Hanes, Dean schools of nursing, (434)947-3070, Web Site: http://www.centrahealth.com. Private. Housing available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $3,150 in-state; $3,150 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 9.

Miller-Motte Technical College

1011 Creekside Ln., Lynchburg, VA 24502. Business. Founded 1929. Contact: Betty J. Dierstein, (434)239-5222, 877-333-6622, Fax: (804)528-5341, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.miller-motte.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,375 per academic year. Enrollment: Total 150. Degrees awarded: Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS; CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Data Entry (9 Mo); Medical Assistant (15 Mo); Microcomputers (15 Mo); Secretarial, General (12 Mo)

National College of Business and Technology (Lynchburg)

104 Candlewood Court, Lynchburg, VA 24502-2653. Two-Year College. Founded 1886. Contact: Bill Baker, Dir., (804)239-3500, 800-666-6221, Fax: (804)239-3948, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/lynchburg.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Enrollment: Total 175. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (18 Mo); Business Administration (18 Mo); Business Management (2 Yr); Computer Operations (2 Yr); Medical Assistant (2 Yr); Office Administration (2 Yr); Secretarial, Administrative (18 Mo); Secretarial, Executive (2 Yr); Secretarial, Medical (2 Yr)

Virginia Baptist Hospital Geriatric Training Program

3300 Rivermont Ave., Lynchburg, VA 24503. Trade and Technical. Contact: Rozenia Clavon, Program Coordinator, (804)947-4561, (434)947-4667, Fax: (804)947-4056, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.centrahealth.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Enrollment: Total 15. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nurses Aide (128 Hr)

Westminster-Canterbury of Lynchburg

501 V. E. S. Rd., Lynchburg, VA 24503. Trade and Technical. Contact: Vikki Keller, (434)386-3500, 800-962-3520, Fax: (434)386-3535, Web Site: http://www.wclynchburg.org. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $300. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Geriatric Care; Nurse, Assistant

MANASSAS

Annaburg Manor Vocational School for Geriatric Nursing Assistants

9201 Maple St., Manassas, VA 20110. Allied Medical. Contact: Lois Ijams, RN, Director, (703)335-8300. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Day. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Placement service available. Curriculum: Geriatric Care; Health Aide; Nurse, Assistant

Aviation Institute of Maintenance

9821 Godwin Dr., Manassas, VA 20110. Trade and Technical. Contact: (703)257-5515, (757)233-6542, 888-FIX-JETS, Fax: (703)257-5523, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.aviationmaintenance.edu; Web Site: http://aviationmaintenance.edu/aviation-washington-dc.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $31,050 per year. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: FAA; ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Aviation Maintenance Technology (1920-2080H)

ECPI College of Technology (Northern Virginia)

10021 Balls Ford Rd., Manassas, VA 20109. Trade and Technical, Business, Allied Medical.(703)330-5300, 888-526-4654, Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/campus/nva/; Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/admissions/contact/route/routeinquiry.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,559 plus $1,066 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Automated; Biomedical Technology; Business Administration; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Criminology - Identification Technology; Information Systems; Internet Technologies; Office Technology; Secretarial, Medical

Heritage Education

8255 Shoppers Sq., Manassas, VA 20111-2176. Trade and Technical, Cosmetology.(703)361-7775, 888-334-7339, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.heritage-education.com; Web Site: http://www.heritage-education.com/requestinfo.htm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $13,536; $1,414 books and fees. Enrollment: Total 166. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology; Massage Therapy; Medical Assistant; Pharmacy Technician; Surgical Technology

Prince William County Public Schools

8820 Rixlew Ln., Manassas, VA 20109. Nursing. Founded 1969. Contact: Susan Duetsch, (703)791-7200, Web Site: http://www.pwcs.edu/. Public. Coed. Term: Other. Tuition: $1,950. Enrollment: Total 40. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Curriculum: Health Occupations; Nursing, Practical; Nursing, Vocational

MARTINSVILLE

Eastern Trade Center

PO Box 1368, Martinsville, VA 24114-1368. Trade and Technical. Founded 1964. Contact: Danny Ward, (540)638-7908, 800-336-7273. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Week. Tuition: $2,400. Enrollment: men 14, women 6. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Curriculum: Horseshoeing (9 Wk)

National College of Business and Technology (Martinsville)

10 Church St., PO Box 232, Martinsville, VA 24114. Two-Year College. Founded 1886. Contact: John Scott, (276)632-5621, Fax: (276)632-7915, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/martinsville.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Enrollment: Total 258. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting & Business Administration; Accounting, General; Business Administration; Business Management; Computer Applications; Medical Assistant; Medical Billing; Medical Transcription; Microsoft Certified Specialist; Office Administration; Office, General; Pharmacy Technician; Secretarial, General

Patrick Henry Community College

PO Box 5311, Martinsville, VA 24115. Two-Year College. Founded 1962. Contact: Graham Valentine, Coord. of Admissions and Records, (276)638-8777, (276)656-0311, 800-232-7997, Fax: (276)652-0261, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ph.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $68/credit hour in-state; $214/credit hour out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 3,302. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (1 Yr); Business, General Office (1 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (1 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Electricity, Apprenticeship (1 Yr); Electronics, Solid State (2 Yr); Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Furniture Manufacturing (2 Yr); Industrial Maintenance (1 Yr); Industrial Management & Supervision (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Paralegal (2 Yr); Quality Control (1 Yr)

MCLEAN

Columbia Technical Institute School of Technology

PO Box 3032, Tysons Corner, McLean, VA 22103. Trade and Technical. Founded 1910. (703)255-6125. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Other. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 350, women 50. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration; Architectural Technology; Blue Print Reading; Building Construction Technology; Civil Engineering Technology; Commercial Art; Drafting, Aeronautical; Drafting, Architectural; Drafting, Electrical; Drafting, Machine Design; Drafting, Structural; Drafting Technology; Drafting, Topographical; Electrical Technology; Electronics Technology; Mechanical Drafting; Mechanical Technology; Radio & Television Technology; Surveying; Technical Illustration; Television; Television Electronics

MELFA

Eastern Shore Community College

29300 Laukford Hwy., Melfa, VA 23410. Two-Year College. Founded 1964. Contact: Dr. Ronald L. May, (757)787-1789, 877-871-8455, Web Site: http://www.es.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $37.12 in-state;$164.82 out-of-state per credit hr., plus fees. Enrollment: men 227, women 540. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Technology (1 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Computer Information Science (1 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (1 Yr); Electronics Technology (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr)

MIDDLETOWN

Lord Fairfax Community College (Middletown Campus)

173 Skirmisher Ln., Middletown, VA 22645. Two-Year College. Founded 1970. Contact: Tina M. Anderson, Education Support Specialist, (540)868-7000, 800-906-5322, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.lfcc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,400/year in-state, $4,900/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,407. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (4 Sm); Administrative Assistant (4 Sm); Agribusiness (4 Sm); Business Administration (4 Sm); Civil Engineering Technology (4 Sm); Clerical, General (2 Sm); Computer Aided Drafting (4 Sm); Computer Information Science (4 Sm); Computer Technology (4 Sm); Dental Hygiene (5 Sm); Drafting Technology (3 Sm); Electronics Technology (4 Sm); Environmental Technology (4 Sm); Executive Assistant (4 Sm); Graphic Design (2 Sm); Horticulture (4 Sm); Information Systems (4 Sm); Management (4 Sm); Marketing (4 Sm); Mechanical Engineering (4 Sm); Microcomputers (4 Sm); Natural Resources Technology (4 Sm); Nursing, Practical (3 Sm); Nursing, R.N. (5 Sm); Pharmacy Technician (4 Sm); Plastics (4 Sm); Word Processing (4 Sm)

MIDLOTHIAN

Empire Beauty School (Midlothian)

10807 Hull Street Rd, Midlothian, VA 23112. Cosmetology.800-223-3271, Web Site: http://www.empire.edu. Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Tuition: $17,595. Enrollment: Total 99. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available.

NASSAWADOX

Shore Memorial Hospital School of Practical Nursing

10098 Rogers Dr., Nassawadox, VA 23413. Nursing. Founded 1956. Contact: Sharon Angle, Dir., (757)442-8771, Web Site: http://www.shorehealthservices.org. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $1,800/year in-state, $3,600/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 22. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (12 Mo)

NEWPORT NEWS

Anthony's Barber - Styling College

121 Campbell Ln., Newport News, VA 23602. Barber. Founded 1946. Contact: I.Y. Anthony, (804)244-2311, Fax: (804)244-6649. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $4,000. Enrollment: men 48, women 10. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NABS; ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Barbering (12 Mo); Hair Styling (18 Mo); Hair Styling, Advanced (24 Mo)

Apprentice School, Newport News

4101 Washington Ave., Newport News, VA 23607-2734. Trade and Technical. Founded 1919. Contact: James H. Hughes, (757)380-2682, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://apprenticeschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Trisemester. Tuition: None required. Enrollment: men 520, women 80. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Heating (4 Yr); Electricity - Master Electrician (4 Yr); Machinist, Advanced (4 Yr); Machinist, General (4 Yr); Metallurgical Technology (4 Yr); Metal Trades Technology (4 Yr); Millwright (4 Yr); Moldmaking (4 Yr); Nondestructive Testing Technology (4 Yr); Painting, Decorating & Paper Hanging (4 Yr); Pipefitting (4 Yr); Sheet Metal (4 Yr); Ship Construction & Repairing (4 Yr); Welding Technology (4 Yr)

ECPI College of Technology (Newport News)

1001 Omni Blvd., Newport News, VA 23606. Trade and Technical, Business, Allied Medical.(757)838-9191, 888-526-4654, Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/campus/new/; Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/admissions/contact/route/routeinquiry.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,559 plus $1,066 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Automated; Biomedical Technology; Business Administration; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Criminology - Identification Technology; Information Systems; Internet Technologies; Office Technology; Secretarial, Medical

Kee Business College

803 Diligence Dr., Newport News, VA 23606. Business. Founded 1941. Contact: Lisa Scott, (757)873-1111, 888-741-4270, Fax: (757)873-0728, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.keecollege.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Tuition: Varies. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Administration (12 Mo); Data Entry; Data Processing (12 Mo); Medical Assistant (12 Mo); Secretarial, General; Secretarial, Legal; Secretarial, Medical

Medical Careers Institute (Newport News)

1001 Omni Blvd., Ste. 200, Newport News, VA 23606. Allied Medical. Founded 1978. Contact: Laura Egatz, (757)873-2423, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://medical.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $11,850-$19,800. Enrollment: Total 350. Degrees awarded: Diploma, Associate. Accreditation: CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Dental Assisting (10 Mo); Massage Therapy (11-14 Mo); Medical Assistant (10-14 Mo); Medical Office Management (10 Mo); Medical Technology (18 Mo); Nursing, Practical (12 Mo); Nursing, R.N. (15 Mo)

NNPS RRMC School of Radiologic Technology

316 Main St., Newport News, VA 23601. Allied Medical, Trade and Technical. Contact: Tracee Carmean, VP, (757)240-2200, Web Site: http://www.riversideonline.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $6,150 in-state; $6,150 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 32. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology (2 Yr)

Riverside Regional Medical Center-School of Professional Nursing

316 Main St., Newport News, VA 23601. Nursing. Contact: Lori Whittaker, Admissions Counselor, (757)240-2233, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.riverside-online.com/rspn. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Trisemester. Tuition: $725 including fees for nurses aide; $5,000 for registered nurse. Accreditation: NLNAC. Curriculum: Nurses Aide (4 Wk); Nursing, R.N. (2-3 Yr)

Tidewater Tech

616 Denbigh Blvd., Newport News, VA 23608. Trade and Technical. Contact: Zoe Thompson, Dir., (757)874-2121, 877-604-2121, Fax: (757)874-3857, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tidetech.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 278. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Networking (1040 Hr); Computer Science (1040 Hr); Medical Assistant (1030 Hr); Systems Administrator (1040 Hr)

NORFOLK

C. I. Travel School

870 N. Military Hwy., Ste. 213, Norfolk, VA 23502-3638. Trade and Technical. Founded 1978. Contact: Tom Holmes, (757)892-3824, 888-627-8000, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.citravel.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Term: Other. Tuition: $1,795 for program. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Travel Agents (21 Wk)

Central School of Practical Nursing

1330 N. Military Hwy., Norfolk, VA 23502. Trade and Technical, Other. Founded 1968. Contact: Linda Cockrell, Program Leader/Chair, (757)892-3300, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://ww2.nps.k12.va.us/education/dept. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $4,050 per nine months plus books, uniforms and fees. Enrollment: Total 42. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

ITT Technical Institute (Norfolk)

863 Glenrock Rd., Ste. 100, Norfolk, VA 23502-3701. Trade and Technical. (757)466-1260, 888-253-8324, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Enrollment: Total 662. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits); Software Development/Engineering (96 Credits); Web Development (96 Credits)

Jenkins' Barber College

1016 Wilson Rd., Norfolk, VA 23523. Barber. Founded 1954. Contact: M. B. Riddick, (757)545-9627. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Other. Tuition: $1,478. Enrollment: men 16, women 2. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Curriculum: Barbering

Norfolk Public Schools Skills Center

922 W. 21st St., Norfolk, VA 23517-1516. Other. Contact: Denise G. Wiggins, Senior director, (757)628-3300, Web Site: http://www.nps.k12.va.us/schools/skillscenter/index.html. Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $4,545. Enrollment: Total 131. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NATEF; COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Placement service available. Curriculum: Automotive Collision Repair; Automotive Technology; Building Maintenance; Computer Information Systems; Masonry; Welding, Combination

Norfolk State University

700 Park Ave., Norfolk, VA 23504. Other. Founded 1935. Contact: Michelle D. Marable, Admissions Dir., (757)823-8600, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.nsu.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,180. Enrollment: men 2,918, women 5,090. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: CAAHEP; NASM; NCATE; NLNAC. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Cabinet & Mill Work (2 Yr); Carpentry (2 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (2 Yr); Drafting, Architectural (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Industrial Technology (2 Yr); Machine Shop (2 Yr); Manufacturing Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Upholstering (2 Yr); Welding Technology (2 Yr)

Norfolk Technical-Vocational Center

1330 N. Military Hwy., Norfolk, VA 23502. Trade and Technical. Founded 1968. Contact: William Davis, Jr., Principal, (757)892-3300, Fax: (757)892-3305, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.nps.k12.va.us/schools/ntvc/. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: None required. Enrollment: Total 900. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Advertising (2 Yr); Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (2 Yr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Building Trades (1 Yr); Business Automation (1 Yr); Carpentry (2 Yr); Cashiering (6 Mo); Catering (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (2 Yr); Computer Business Systems Technology (1 Yr); Computer Information Science (1 Yr); Computer Networking (1 Yr); Cosmetology (2 Yr); Dental Assisting (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (2 Yr); Electricity - Master Electrician (2 Yr); Electro-Mechanical Technology (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Fashion Design & Illustration (2 Yr); Food Service & Management (2 Yr); Horticulture (2 Yr); Interior Design (2 Yr); Medical Assistant (1 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Office Technology (1 Yr); Printing (2 Yr); Robotics (3 Yr); Safety Technology (2 Yr); Supermarket Management (6 Mo); Welding Technology (2 Yr)

Tidewater Community College, Portsmouth Campus

300 Granby St., Norfolk, VA 23510. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Judy McMillan, Dean of Student Srvs., (757)822-1110, (757)822-1069, Fax: (757)822-5274, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tcc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,043/year in-state; $6,467/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 7,387. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma, Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (1 Yr); Art, Advertising Commercial; Auto Engine Diagnosis (1 Yr); Automotive Systems; Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Clerical, General (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Correctional Science; Data Processing; Drafting & Design Technology (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (1 Yr); Early Childhood Specialist (2 Yr); Engineering (2 Yr); Fine Arts (2 Yr); Furniture Manufacturing; Graphic Arts (2 Yr); Industrial Management & Supervision (2 Yr); Machine Operator, General (1 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Merchandising (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Purchasing (2 Yr); Real Estate, Basic; Welding Technology (1 Yr)

PETERSBURG

Richard Bland College of The College of William And Mary

11301 Johnson Rd., Petersburg, VA 23805. Two-Year College. Contact: James B. McNeer, President, (804)862-6100, (804)862-6231, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.rbc.edu; Randy L. Dean, Dir. of Admissions, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,036 in-state; $8,779 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 429.

Southside Regional Medical Center

801 S. Adams St., Petersburg, VA 23803. Nursing, Other. Founded 1895. Contact: Tonia Little, Coord. of Student Services, (804)862-5800, Fax: (804)862-5937, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.srmconline.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 50, women 150. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Nursing, R.N.; Radiologic Technology

PORTSMOUTH

Hicks Academy of Beauty Culture

904 Loudoun Ave., Portsmouth, VA 23707-3218. Cosmetology. Founded 1951. Contact: Felicia Fontenot, Admissions Dir., (757)399-2400, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $10,007 plus books for cosmetology program, $3,857 plus books for nail technology; $9,960 plus books for barbering. Enrollment: men 3, women 37. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Barbering (1500 Hr); Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology - Administration, Management & Supervision; Cosmetology Instructor; Makeup Facial Treatment; Manicurist (480 Hr); Shampoo Specialist; Skin Care; Wig Styling

RICHLANDS

Southwest Virginia Community College

369 College Rd., PO Box SVCC, Richlands, VA 24641. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Rod Moore, (276)964-2555, 800-822-7822, Fax: (276)964-7716, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.sw.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $39.63 per credit. Enrollment: men 1,050, women 2,300. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Banking; Bookkeeping; Business Administration; Child Care & Guidance; Clerk, Typist; Data Processing; Drafting & Design Technology; Drafting Technology; Electrical Technology; Electronics Technology; Engineering; Engineering Technology; Food Service & Management; Inhalation Therapy Technology; Law Enforcement; Machine Tool & Die; Management; Mining Machinery Mechanics; Mining Technology; Music; Nursing, R.N.; Police Science; Radiologic Technology; Secretarial, General; Technician, Electronic Service; Welding Technology

RICHMOND

Aero Industries, Inc.

Executive Terminal, 5690 Clarkson Rd., Richmond, VA 23250. Flight and Ground. Founded 1946. Contact: Bruce Hartwick, (804)222-7211, Fax: (804)236-1670. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Accreditation: FAA. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Aircraft Flight Instruction, Advanced Ground; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Airline Transport Pilot; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Basic Ground; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Commercial Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor Additional Rating; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Instrument Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Primary Flying

Beta Tech - Richmond South

7914 Midlothian Trpk, Richmond, VA 23235-5230. Trade and Technical. (804)330-0111, 877-604-2121, Fax: (804)330-3809, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.betatech.edu; Web Site: http://www.betatech.edu/richmond-virginia-south.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $18,000; $1,700 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 240. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Computer Networking; Massage Therapy; Medical Assistant; Medical Office Management; Paralegal

Beta Tech - Richmond West

7001 W. Broad St., Richmond, VA 23294. Trade and Technical, Allied Medical.(804)672-2300, 877-604-2121, Fax: (804)672-3338, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.betatech.edu; Web Site: http://www.betatech.edu/richmond-virginia-west.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $18,425; $1,365 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 107. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Business; Computer Networking; Estimating (6 Da); Medical Assistant; Medical Office Management

Bon Secours Memorial School of Nursing

8550 Magellan Pkwy, Ste. 1100, Richmond, VA 23227-1149. Nursing. Founded 1961. Contact: Maryruth Fox, Dean, (804)627-5300, Fax: (804)627-5300, Web Site: http://www.bonsecours.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $6,402 plus $2,188 books and supplies in-state; $6,402 plus $2,188 books and supplies out-of-state. Enrollment: men 22, women 430. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Nursing, R.N. (3 Yr)

Braxton School of Business

3600 W. Broad St., No. 190, Richmond, VA 23230-4939. Business. Founded 1971. Contact: Jeanette MacFarland, Dir., (804)353-4458, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $7,900 per 9-month programs. Enrollment: men 25, women 75. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Accounting, Automated (9 Mo); Secretarial, Administrative (9 Mo); Secretarial, Legal (9 Mo); Secretarial, Medical (9 Mo)

Bryant and Stratton College (Richmond)

8141 Hull St. Rd., Richmond, VA 23235-6411. Two-Year College. Founded 1854. Contact: Carl Newell, Campus Dir., (804)745-2444, Web Site: http://www.bryantstratton.edu; Jackie S. Brown, Campus Admissions Rep., Web Site: http://bryantstratton.edu/request_info.aspx?i=C&c=7. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $11,820 per year; $1,300 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 470. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (4 Sm); Administrative Assistant (4 Sm); Business (4 Sm); Human Resources Assistant (4 Sm); Information Technology (4 Sm); Medical Assistant (4 Sm); Paralegal (4 Sm)

ECPI Technical College (Richmond)

800 Moorefield Park Dr., Richmond, VA 23236. Trade and Technical, Business, Allied Medical.(804)330-5533, 888-526-4654, Web Site: http://www.ecpitech.edu/campustec/rics/; Web Site: http://www.ecpitech.edu/admissionstec/contact/route/routeinquiry.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,559 plus $1,066 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 879. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business Administration; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Criminology - Identification Technology; Information Systems; Internet Technologies; Office Technology; Web Development

Forest Hill Convalescent Center

4403 Forest Hill Ave., Richmond, VA 23225. Trade and Technical. Contact: Debbie Ford, Director of Education, (804)231-0231, Fax: (804)232-4215. Private. Coed. Curriculum: Geriatric Care; Nurse, Assistant

ITT Technical Institute (Richmond)

300 Gateway Centre Pkwy., Richmond, VA 23235. Trade and Technical. (804)330-4992, 888-330-4888, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Enrollment: Total 371. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits); Software Development/Engineering (96 Credits); Web Development (96 Credits)

J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College

Box 85622, Richmond, VA 23285-5622. Two-Year College. Founded 1972. Contact: Karen Pettis-Walden, Admissions Dir., (804)371-3000, (804)523-5029, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.reynolds.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $70.75 per semester cr, resident=$2,123 for 2 sem; instate $218.20 per sem cr=$6,546 2 sem, non-resident out of state. Enrollment: Total 2,872. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC; SACS; COA; AOTA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Architectural Design Technology; Automotive Technology; Auto Trimmer & Glazier; Building Construction Technology; Business Administration; Carpentry; Civil Engineering Technology; Community Aid; Computer Aided Design; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Computer Science; Criminal Justice; Culinary Arts; Dental Assisting; Dental Laboratory Technology; Diesel Technology; Drug & Alcohol Counseling; Early Childhood Education; Early Childhood Specialist; E-Commerce; Electrical Engineering Technology; Electronics & Computer Technology; Electronics Technology; Emergency Medical Technology; Engineering; Entrepreneurship; Fire Science; Floristry; Food Service & Management; Graphic Design; Heavy Equipment; Horse Management; Horticulture; Hospitality; Hotel & Motel Management; Industrial Design; Industrial Technology; Internet Technologies; Interior Decoration; Landscape Architecture; Landscaping; Language Arts; Legal Technology; Liberal Arts; Management Development; Manufacturing Technology; Marketing Management; Mathematics; Mechanics, Diesel; Medical Laboratory Technology; Medical Office Management; Medical Record Technology; Medical Technology; Medical Transcription; Merchandising, Retail; Microcomputers; Music; Nursing, Practical; Office Administration; Office Technology; Optical Technology; Optometric Assistant; Paralegal; Paramedic; Park & Turf Management; Pharmacy Technician; Photography; Real Estate, Basic; Respiratory Therapy; Sign Language Education; Social Services Aide; Surgical Technology; Surveying; Telecommunications Technology; Transportation Engineering Technology; Web Development; Welding Technology

Kidcare Training Academy

200 N. 22nd St., Richmond, VA 23223-7020. Trade and Technical. Founded 1994. Contact: Karen T. Sweeney, Education and Training Services Dir., (804)644-9590, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.mcgcva.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies by program. Enrollment: Total 20. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Early Childhood Education

Richmond Academy of Massage

2004 Bremo Rd., Ste. 102, Richmond, VA 23226. Allied Medical. Founded 1989. Contact: DC Ashburn, (804)282-5003, 800-306-8827, Fax: (804)288-7356. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $4,500. Enrollment: Total 20. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Massage Therapy (12 Mo)

Westminster Canterbury Richmond

1600 Westbrook Ave., Richmond, VA 23227. Nursing. Contact: Pamela W. Lane, Clinical Instructor, (804)264-6200. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Geriatric Care; Nurses Aide

Westport Convalescent Center

7300 Forest Ave., Richmond, VA 23226. Trade and Technical. Contact: Rosa B. Bear, Director, (804)288-3152, Fax: (804)285-9348. Private. Coed. Curriculum: Geriatric Care; Nurse, Assistant

ROANOKE

Bar Palma Beauty Careers Academy

3535 D Franklin Rd. S.W., Roanoke, VA 24014. Cosmetology. Contact: Barbara L. Hensley, President, (540)343-0153, (540)982-0089. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $9,125 plus $609 books and supplies. Enrollment: men 6, women 77. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: COE. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital, School of Practical Nursing

Belleview at Jefferson, PO Box 13367, Roanoke, VA 24033-3367. Nursing. Founded 1957. Contact: C. Lyon, (540)981-7362, (540)266-6000, 800-422-8482, Fax: (540)981-8585, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.carilion.com/nursing. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Year. Tuition: $1,500 plus books and uniforms. Enrollment: Total 40. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (1 Yr)

Community Hospital of Roanoke Valley, College of Health Sciences

PO Box 13186, Roanoke, VA 24031-3186. Allied Medical. Founded 1982. Contact: Howard Ballentine, (540)985-8483, 888-985-8483, Fax: (540)985-9773, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $3,750 per semester; $250 per credit hour. Enrollment: men 167, women 530. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Athletic Trainer (4 Yr); Biomedical Technology (4 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Occupational Therapy (4 Yr); Occupational Therapy Assistant (2 Yr); Paramedic (2 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide (2 Yr); Physicians Assistant (4 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Science (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (2 Yr)

ECPI Technical College (Roanoke)

5234 Airport Rd. NW, Roanoke, VA 24012. Trade and Technical, Business, Allied Medical.(540)563-8080, 888-526-4654, Web Site: http://www.ecpitech.edu/campustec/roa/; Web Site: http://www.ecpitech.edu/admissionstec/contact/route/routeinquiry.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,559 plus $1,066 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business Administration; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Criminology Identification Technology; Information Systems; Internet Technologies; Medical Assistant; Nursing, Practical; Office Technology; Secretarial, Medical

Virginia Western Community College

PO Box 14007, Roanoke, VA 24038-4007. Two-Year College. Founded 1966. Contact: Robert H. Sandel, President, (540)857-8299, (540)857-7231, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.virginiawestern.edu; Meg Patterson, Admissions Coordinator, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,053 in-state; $6,477 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Financial aid available.

SALEM

National College of Business and Technology (Salem)

1813 E. Main St., Salem, VA 24153. Two-Year College. Founded 1886. (540)986-1800, 800-664-1886, Fax: (540)444-4198, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/roanoke.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Enrollment: Total 2,875. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (60 credits); Business Administration (48 credits); Computer Applications (96 credits); Computer Networking (36 credits); Emergency Medical Technology (48 credits); Information Systems (96 credits); Medical Assistant (96 credits); Medical Transcription (48 credits); Microsoft Certified Specialist; Office, General (96 credits); Office Technology (36 credits); Paralegal (96 credits); Paramedic; Pharmacy Technician (48 credits); Tourism (96 credits)

SPRINGFIELD

ITT Technical Institute (Springfield)

7300 Boston Blvd., Springfield, VA 22153. Trade and Technical.(703)440-9535, (866)817-8324, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Enrollment: Total 626. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits); Software Development/Engineering (96 Credits); Web Development (96 Credits)

STAUNTON

Staunton School of Cosmetology

128 E. Beverly St., Staunton, VA 24401. Cosmetology. Founded 1956. Contact: B. Traylor Bender, (540)885-0808, 800-296-5853. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Year. Tuition: $10,150 plus books and registration. Enrollment: men 1, women 31. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (2000 Hr)

SUFFOLK

Suffolk Beauty Academy

860 Portsmouth Blvd., Suffolk, VA 23434-3020. Cosmetology. Contact: Annie S. Snyder, Owner, (757)934-0656. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $7,010 plus $495 books and supplies. Enrollment: men 3, women 51. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

Suffolk Public Schools/Obici Hospital School of Practical Nursing

2800 Godwin Blvd, Suffolk, VA 23434. Nursing. Founded 1959. Contact: Gwen T. Sweat, Dir., (757)934-4742, (757)934-4466, 800-237-5788, Fax: (757)934-4835, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.obici.com/system/nurse_ed.asp. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,650 per program plus books, supplies and fees. Enrollment: Total 25. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

TAZEWELL

Tazewell County Career and Technical Center

114 Maplewood Ln., Tazewell, VA 24651-1204. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Dr. Barry Yost, Principal, (276)988-2529, Fax: (276)988-5494, Web Site: http://tazewell.k12.va.us/schools/tcctc/. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Semester. Tuition: None required. Enrollment: Total 450. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (1080 Hr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (1080 Hr); Auto Mechanics (1080 Hr); Automotive Service (1080 Hr); Building Maintenance (1080 Hr); Building Trades (1080 Hr); Carpentry (1080 Hr); Cosmetology (1080 Hr); Electrical Technology (1080 Hr); Heavy Equipment (1080 Hr); Machine Shop (1080 Hr); Masonry (1080 Hr); Nursing, Practical (1500 Hr); Sewing, Commercial (1080 Hr); Small Engine Repair (1080 Hr); Welding Technology (1080 Hr)

VIENNA

Washington Business School

1980 Gallows Rd., Vienna, VA 22182. Trade and Technical. Founded 1950. Contact: Katherine C. Embrey, (703)556-8888, Fax: (703)556-0953. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $8,480. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Computer Information Science (12 Mo); Microcomputers (10 Mo); Office Administration (10 Mo); Secretarial, Executive (10 Mo)

VIRGINIA BEACH

Advanced Fuller School of Massage Therapy

195 S. Rosemont Rd., Ste. 105, Virginia Beach, VA 23452. Trade and Technical. Founded 1983. Contact: Nancy Bender, Dir., (757)340-7132, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.advancedfullerschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,800 Level I, $2,100 Level II. Enrollment: men 30, women 50. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Aroma Therapy (250 Hr); Massage Therapy (600 Hr)

Advanced Technology Institute

5700 Southern Blvd., Virginia Beach, VA 23462. Trade and Technical. Founded 1993. Contact: William M. Tomlin, Dir., (757)490-1241, Web Site: http://www.auto.edu/. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 199, women 10. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Heating; Automotive Technology; Heavy Equipment; Tractor Trailer Operators Training

Aviation Institute of Maintenance

1492 Miller Store Rd., Virginia Beach, VA 23455-3324. Trade and Technical. Founded 1991. Contact: (757)363-2121, (757)233-6542, 888-349-5387, Fax: (757)363-2044, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.aviationmaintenance.edu; Web Site: http://aviationmaintenance.edu/aviation-atlanta.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $31,050 per year. Enrollment: men 177, women 24. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: FAA; ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Aviation Maintenance Technology (1920-2080H)

Barmasters of Virginia Beach

1141 Independence Blvd., Virginia Beach, VA 23455. Trade and Technical. Founded 1992. Contact: Dennis R. McCloskey, (757)464-0500, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://virginiabartending.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Week. Tuition: $495. Enrollment: men 101, women 49. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Bartending (40 Hr)

Bryant and Stratton College (Virginia Beach)

301 Centre Pointe Dr., Virginia Beach, VA 23462. Two-Year College. Founded 1966. Contact: Greg Smith, Dir. of Admissions, (757)499-7900, Fax: (757)499-9977, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bryantstratton.edu; Tracy Nannery, Campus Director, Web Site: http://bryantstratton.edu/request_info.aspx?i=C&c=8. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $5,910 for full time day student per semester. Enrollment: men 100, women 355. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Administrative Assistant; Business Management (2 Yr); Computer Technology (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Medical Assistant (2 Yr); Paralegal

Cayce/Reilly School of Massotherapy

215 67th St., Virginia Beach, VA 23451. Trade and Technical. Founded 1987. Contact: Colleen Temple, (757)457-7270, 800-333-4499, Fax: (757)428-0398, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.edgarcayce.org. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $5,000-$6,020. Enrollment: Total 100. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: COMTA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Massage Therapy (600-1000 H)

Computer Dynamics Institute, Inc.

PO Box 951, Virginia Beach, VA 23462. Trade and Technical. Founded 1989. Contact: Wayne Mullis, President, (757)499-4900, Fax: (757)499-2281. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $10,400-$16,000. Enrollment: Total 327. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Networking (14 Mo); Computer Repair (14 Mo); Dental Assisting (1 Yr); Medical Transcription (12 Mo); Nurse, Assistant (15 Wk); Nursing, Practical (15-21 Mo); Secretarial, Medical (12 Mo)

Cooper Career Institute

129 N. Witchduck Rd., Virginia Beach, VA 23462. Business, Trade and Technical. Founded 1987. Contact: Tammy Bennington, (757)519-9500, 888-643-9500, Fax: (757)519-9264, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $5,000-$7,900; $50 application fee; $1,000 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 150. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available.

ECPI College of Technology (Virginia Beach)

5555 Greenwich Rd., Virginia Beach, VA 23462. Trade and Technical, Business, Allied Medical. Founded 1966.(757)490-9090, 888-526-4654, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/campus/vab/; Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/campus/vab/index.cfm?pgNum=3. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,559 plus $1,066 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 4,759. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Automated; Biomedical Technology; Business Administration; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Criminology - Identification Technology; Information Systems; Internet Technologies; Office Technology; Secretarial, Medical

Tidewater Community College, Virginia Beach Campus

1700 College Crescent, Virginia Beach, VA 23453-1918. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Judy McMillan, Dean of Student Srvs., (757)822-7100, Fax: (757)822-7041, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tcc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Advertising; Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Banking & Finance; Bookkeeping; Business Administration; Career Development; Clerical, General; Correctional Science; Culinary Arts; Data Processing; Dietician Training (1 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology; Drafting Technology; Early Childhood Specialist; Electronics Technology; Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); Engineering; Fine Arts; Fire Science; Food Service & Management; Geriatric Care (1 Yr); Health Technology; Hotel & Motel Management; Hotel & Restaurant Management; Industrial Engineering Technology; Industrial Management & Supervision; Law Enforcement; Legal Assistant; Management; Media Technology; Medical Record Technology; Merchandising; Office Technology (2 Yr); Photography; Physical Therapy Aide; Radio & Television (2 Yr); Radio Electronics; Radiologic Technology; Real Estate, Basic; Recreation Leadership; Respiratory Therapy

Virginia Beach Beauty and Barber Academy

4392 Holland Rd., Ste. 109, Virginia Beach, VA 23452-1151. Cosmetology, Barber. Founded 1979. Contact: Jacqueline Rosendahl, (757)463-4730, (757)463-3774, Fax: (757)463-4731, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://vbbba.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $4,500 includes kit and books. Enrollment: men 40, women 25. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Barbering (1500 Hr); Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor

Virginia School of Technology-Virginia Beach

100 Constitution Dr., Ste. 101, Virginia Beach, VA 23462. Contact: Andy Tysinger, Director, (757)499-5447, Web Site: http://vstsuccess.com. Private. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $6,750. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

WARSAW

Rappahannock Community College (Warsaw Campus)

52 Campus Dr., Warsaw, VA 22572. Two-Year College. Founded 1971. Contact: Wilnet H. Willis, Admissions and Records Officer, (804)758-6700, (804)758-6742, 800-836-9381, Fax: (804)333-6836, E-mail: [email protected] vccs.edu, Web Site: http://www.rcc.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $68/credit hour in-state, $214/credit hour out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Automotive Technology; Business Administration; Business Management; Data Processing - Programming Operations; Drafting & Design Technology; Drafting Technology; Electrical Engineering Technology; Electronics Technology; Law Enforcement; Nursing, Practical; Nursing, R.N.; Office Technology

WEYERS CAVE

Blue Ridge Community College

One College Ln., PO Box 80, Weyers Cave, VA 24486. Two-Year College. Founded 1967. Contact: Robin Anderson, Dir. of Inst. Research, (540)234-9261, (540)234-7002, 888-750-2722, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.br.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,056/year in-state; $6,481/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,433. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Animal Science, General (2 Yr); Art (2 Yr); Automotive Service (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Computer Technology (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Mechanical Engineering (2 Yr); Mental Health Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Technological Studies (2 Yr)

WILLIAMSBURG

Lafayette School Health and Medical Sciences (LPN)

Lafayette High School, 4460 Longhill Rd., Williamsburg, VA 23188. Nursing, Other. Founded 1974. Contact: Mrs. Noel Piano, (757)565-4270, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.wjcc.k12.va.us/lhs/curriculum/practicalnursing. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

WINCHESTER

Winchester Medical Center

PO Box 3340, Winchester, VA 22604. Allied Medical. Founded 1901. Contact: Leslie Kelly, Employment Coordinator, (540)536-8000, Fax: (540)536-5320, Web Site: http://valleyhealthlink.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $6,000 for Radiologic Technology Program. Enrollment: Total 38. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: JRCRTE; CAAHEP; JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Electro-Encephalograph Technology (18 Mo); Radiologic Technology (24 Mo)

WYTHEVILLE

Alliance Tractor Trailer Training Center

PO Box 804, Wytheville, VA 24382. Trade and Technical. Founded 1981. Contact: J. Hoback, Dir. of Training, (540)228-6101, 800-334-1203, Web Site: http://www.alliancetractortrailer.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Week. Tuition: Varies. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Truck Driving

Wytheville Community College (Wytheville)

1000 E. Main St., Wytheville, VA 24382. Two-Year College. Founded 1963. Contact: Dr. Phyllis C. Ashworth, (276)223-4700, 800-468-1195, Fax: (276)223-4778, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.wcc.vccs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,024/year in-state; $2,708/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 923. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: ADA; APTA; CAAHEP; NAACLS; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Administrative Assistant (2 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Clerical, Medical (1 Yr); Computer Aided Drafting (2 Yr); Correctional Science (2 Yr); Dental Assisting (1 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Information Systems (2 Yr); Law Enforcement (1 Yr); Machine Operator, General (1 Yr); Machine Technology (2 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Microcomputers (1 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide (2 Yr); Police Science (2 Yr)

views updated

Virginia

ARGOSY UNIVERSITY/WASHINGTON D.C.

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MD

Clinical Psychology, MD

Counseling Psychology, MD

Curriculum and Instruction, MD

Education, MD

Educational Leadership and Administration, MD

Forensic Psychology, M

Psychology, BMD

THE ART INSTITUTE OF WASHINGTON

Advertising, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, AB

Computer Graphics, A

Culinary Arts/Chef Training, A

Design and Visual Communications, B

Digital Communication and Media/Multimedia, B

Interior Design, B

Intermedia/Multimedia, AB

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, B

AVERETT UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Air Transportation, B

Applied Mathematics, B

Art Education, M

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Aviation/Airway Management and Operations, B

Avionics Maintenance Technology/Technician, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Clinical Psychology, B

Cognitive Psychology and Psycholinguistics, B

Computer Science, BM

Corrections and Criminal Justice, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Ecology, B

Education, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, M

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Environmental Biology, B

Environmental Sciences, B

Equestrian/Equine Studies, B

Finance, B

General Studies, A

Health and Physical Education, B

Health and Physical Education/Fitness, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Industrial and Organizational Psychology, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

International Marketing, B

Journalism, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Management Science, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics and Computer Science, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, BM

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physiological Psychology/Psychobiology, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Psychology, B

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, BM

Sociology, B

Special Education and Teaching, M

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Subject Areas, B

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, B

Theater, M

Theatre Literature, History and Criticism, B

AVIATION INSTITUTE OF MAINTENANCE-MANASSAS

Airframe Mechanics and Aircraft Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

AVIATION INSTITUTE OF MAINTENANCE-VIRGINIA BEACH

Airframe Mechanics and Aircraft Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

BLUE RIDGE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Drafting/Design Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Information Technology, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

BLUEFIELD COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Computer Science, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE

American History (United States), B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Computer Science, B

Economics, B

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Sciences, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

French Language and Literature, B

Health and Physical Education, B

History, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Music History, Literature, and Theory, B

Philosophy and Religious Studies, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

BRYANT AND STRATTON COLLEGE, RICHMOND

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, B

Business/Commerce, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Human Resources Management and Services, A

Information Technology, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

BRYANT AND STRATTON COLLEGE, VIRGINIA BEACH

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, AB

Consumer Merchandising/Retailing Management, A

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Tourism and Travel Services Management, A

CENTRAL VIRGINIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Consumer Merchandising/Retailing Management, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Engineering Technology, A

Finance, A

General Studies, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

CHRISTENDOM COLLEGE

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Comparative Literature, B

French Language and Literature, B

History, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Philosophy, B

Political Science and Government, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, M

Theology/Theological Studies, B

CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Applied Physics, M

Art Education, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Comparative Literature, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering, B

Computer Science, BM

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, BM

Elementary Education and Teaching, M

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Sciences, M

Environmental Studies, B

Finance, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, M

French Language and Literature, BM

German Language and Literature, B

History, BM

Horticultural Science, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Law and Legal Studies, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Music, B

Music History, Literature, and Theory, B

Music Teacher Education, M

Music Theory and Composition, B

Philosophy, B

Physics, BM

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, BM

Theater, M

THE COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARY

Accounting, M

African-American/Black Studies, B

American/United States Studies/Civilization, BMDO

Anthropology, BMD

Applied Science and Technology, MD

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biological Anthropology, D

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biopsychology, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MO

Chemistry, BM

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Clinical Psychology, D

Computational Sciences, M

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, MD

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MD

Curriculum and Instruction, MD

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

East Asian Studies, B

Economics, B

Education, MDO

Education/Teaching of the Gifted and Talented, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, MD

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, D

Elementary Education and Teaching, M

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

Ethnic and Cultural Studies, B

European Studies/Civilization, B

Experimental Psychology, M

French Language and Literature, B

Geology/Earth Science, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, BMD

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Latin American Studies, B

Latin Language and Literature, B

Law and Legal Studies, MPO

Linguistics, B

Marine Sciences, MD

Marriage and Family Therapy/Counseling, M

Mathematics, B

Medieval and Renaissance Studies, B

Modern Greek Language and Literature, B

Modern Languages, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Operations Research, M

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, BMD

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BMD

Public Policy Analysis, BMO

Reading Teacher Education, M

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Russian Studies, B

School Psychology, MO

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, M

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling, M

Women's Studies, B

DABNEY S. LANCASTER COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drafting/Design Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Forestry Technology/Technician, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Wood Science and Wood Products/Pulp and Paper Technology, A

DANVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Education, A

Engineering Technology, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

DEVRY UNIVERSITY (ARLINGTON)

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, BM

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, B

Computer Systems Analysis/Analyst, B

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, AB

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, AB

Information Science/Studies, B

DEVRY UNIVERSITY (MCLEAN)

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

EASTERN MENNONITE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, AB

Biochemistry, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer Science, B

Computer Systems Analysis/Analyst, B

Conflict Resolution and Mediation/Peace Studies, MO

Development Economics and International Development, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, M

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Emotional Disturbances, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Mental Retardation, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Environmental Sciences, B

French Language and Literature, B

French Language Teacher Education, B

General Studies, A

German Language and Literature, B

German Language Teacher Education, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

International Agriculture, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, MO

Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution, B

Philosophy and Religious Studies, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, M

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, MPO

Theology/Theological Studies, B

EASTERN SHORE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

ECPI COLLEGE OF T