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Kentucky

Kentucky

Commonwealth of Kentucky

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Possibly derived from the Wyandot Indian word Kah-ten-tah-teh (land of tomorrow).

NICKNAME: The Bluegrass State.

CAPITAL: Frankfort.

ENTERED UNION: 1 June 1792 (15th).

SONG: "My Old Kentucky Home."

MOTTO: United We Stand, Divided We Fall.

FLAG: A simplified version of the state seal on a blue field.

OFFICIAL SEAL: In the center are two men exchanging greetings; above and below them is the state motto. On the periphery are two sprigs of goldenrod and the words "Commonwealth of Kentucky."

BIRD: Cardinal.

FISH: Bass.

FLOWER: Goldenrod.

TREE: Tulip poplar.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year's Day, 1 January, plus one extra day; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Washington's Birthday, 3rd Monday in February; Good Friday, March or April, half-day holiday; Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Veterans' Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving Day, 4th Thursday in November, plus one extra day; Christmas Day, 25 December, plus one extra day.

TIME: 7 AM EST = noon GMT; 6 AM CST = noon GMT.

LOCATION, SIZE, AND EXTENT

Located in the eastern south-central United States, the Commonwealth of Kentucky is the smallest of the eight south-central states and ranks 37th in size among the 50 states.

The total area of Kentucky is 40,409 sq mi (104,659 sq km), of which land makes up 39,669 sq mi (102,743 sq km) and inland water 740 sq mi (1,917 sq km). Kentucky extends about 350 mi (563 km) e-w; its maximum n-s extension is about 175 mi (282 km).

Kentucky is bordered on the n by Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio (with the line roughly following the north bank of the Ohio River); on the ne by West Virginia (with the line formed by the Big Sandy and Tug Fork rivers); on the se by Virginia; on the s by Tennessee; and on the w by Missouri (separated by the Mississippi River). Because of a double bend in the Mississippi River, about 10 sq mi (26 sq km) of sw Kentucky is separated from the rest of the state by a narrow strip of Missouri.

After 15 years of litigation, Kentucky in 1981 accepted a US Supreme Court decision giving Ohio and Indiana control of at least 100 feet (30 meters) of the Ohio River from the northern shore. This in effect returned Kentucky's border to what it was in 1792, when Kentucky entered the Union.

The total boundary length of Kentucky is 1,290 mi (2,076 km). The state's geographic center is in Marion County, 3 mi (5 km) nw of Lebanon.

TOPOGRAPHY

The eastern quarter of the state is dominated by the Cumberland Plateau, on the western border of the Appalachians. At its western edge, the plateau meets the uplands of the Lexington Plain (known as the Bluegrass region) to the north and the hilly Pennyroyal to the south. These two regions, which together make up nearly half the state's area, are separated by a narrow curving plain known as the Knobs because of the shapes of its eroded hills. The most level area of the state consists of the western coalfields bounded by the Pennyroyal to the east and the Ohio River to the north. In the far west are the coastal plains of the Mississippi River; this region is commonly known as the Purchase, having been purchased from the Chickasaw Indians.

The highest point in Kentucky is Black Mountain on the southeastern boundary in Harlan County, at 4,139 ft (2,162 m). The lowest point is 257 ft (78 m), along the Mississippi River in Fulton County. The state's mean altitude is 750 ft (229 m).

The only large lakes in Kentucky are artificial. The biggest is Cumberland Lake (79 sq mi/205 sq km); Kentucky Lake, Lake Barkley, and Dale Hollow Lake straddle the border with Tennessee.

Including the Ohio and Mississippi rivers on its borders and the tributaries of the Ohio, Kentucky claims at least 3,000 mi (4,800 km) of navigable riverssometimes said to have more water than any other state except Alaska. Among the most important of Kentucky's rivers are the Kentucky, 259 mi (417 km); the Cumberland, partly in Tennessee; the Tennessee, also in Tennessee and Alabama; and the Big Sandy, Green, Licking, and Tradewater rivers. All, except for a portion of the Cumberland, flow northwest into the Ohio and thence to the Mississippi. Completion in 1985 of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, linking the Tennessee and Tombigbee rivers in Alabama, gave Kentucky's Appalachian coalfields direct water access to the Gulf of Mexico for the first time.

Drainage through porous limestone rock has honeycombed much of the Pennyroyal with underground passages, the best known of which is Mammoth Cave, now a national park. The Cumberland Falls, 92 ft (28 m) high and 100 ft (30 m) wide, are located in Whitely County.

CLIMATE

Kentucky has a moderate, relatively humid climate, with abundant rainfall.

The southern and lowland regions are slightly warmer than the uplands. In Louisville, the normal monthly average temperature ranges from 33°f (1°c) in January to 78°f (25°c) in July. The record high for the state was 114°f (46°c), registered in Greensburg on 28 July 1930; the record low, 37°f (40°c), in Shelbyville on 19 January 1994.

Average daily relative humidity in Louisville ranges from 58% to 81%. The average annual precipitation at Louisville is about 43.6 in (110 cm); snowfall totals about 16 in (41 cm) a year.

FLORA AND FAUNA

Kentucky's forests are mostly of the oak/hickory variety, with some beech/maple stands. Four species of magnolia are found, and the tulip poplar, eastern hemlock, and eastern white pine are also common; the distinctive "knees" of the cypress may be seen along riverbanks. Kentucky's famed bluegrass is said to be actually blue only in May when dwarf iris and wild columbine are in bloom. Rare plants include the swamp loosestrife and showy gentian. In April 2006, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed eight Kentucky plant species as threatened or endangered, including Braun's rock-cress, Cumberland sandwort, running buffalo clover, and Short's goldenrod.

Game mammals include the raccoon, muskrat, opossum, mink, gray and red foxes, and beaver; the eastern chipmunk and flying squirrel are common small mammals. At least 300 bird species have been recorded, of which 200 are common. Blackbirds are a serious pest, with some roosts numbering 5-6 million; more desirable avian natives include the cardinal (the state bird), robin, and brown thrasher, while eagles are winter visitors. More than 100 types of fish have been identified.

Rare animal species include the swamp rabbit, black bear, raven (Corvus corax), and mud darter. In April 2006, a total of 31 animal species occurring within the state (vertebrates and invertebrates) were on the threatened and endangered species list of the US Fish and Wildlife Service. These included three species of bat (Indiana, Virginia big-eared, and gray), the bald eagle, puma, piping plover, Kentucky cave shrimp, and three species of pearly mussel.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

The National Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet, with broad responsibility, includes the departments of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection, and Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, as well as the Kentucky Nature Preserves Commission. The Environmental Quality Commission, created in 1972 to serve as a watchdog over environmental concerns, is a citizen's group of seven members appointed by the governor.

The most serious environmental concern in Kentucky is repairing and minimizing damage to land and water from strip-mining. Efforts to deal with such damage are relatively recent. The state has had a strip-mining law since 1966, but the first comprehensive attempts at control did not begin until the passage in 1977 of the Federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act.

Also active in environmental matters is the Department of Environmental Protection, consisting of four divisions. The Division of Water administers the state's Safe Drinking Water and Clean Water acts and regulation of sewage disposal. The Division of Waste Management oversees solid waste disposal systems in the state. The Air Pollution Control Division monitors industrial discharges into the air and other forms of air pollution. Most air pollution has declined since the 1970s, with lead air concentrations down by 97% since 1970. A special division is concerned with Maxey Flats, a closed nuclear waste disposal facility in Fleming County, where leakage of radioactive materials was discovered.

There are 15 major dams in Kentucky, and more than 900 other dams. Flooding is a chronic problem in southeastern Kentucky, where strip-mining has exacerbated soil erosion.

In 2003, Kentucky had 149 hazardous waste sites listed in the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) database, 14 of which were on the National Priorities List as of 2006, including Maxey Flats Nuclear Disposal in Hillsboro. In 2005, the EPA spent over $1.8 million through the Superfund program for the cleanup of hazardous waste sites in the state. The same year, federal EPA grants awarded to the state included $16.8 million for the state clean water revolving fund program and $3.4 million for implementation of nonpoint source management programs. In 2003, 90.6 million lb of toxic chemicals were released in the state.

POPULATION

Kentucky ranked 26th in population in the United States with an estimated total of 4,173,405 in 2005, an increase of 3.2% since 2000. Between 1990 and 2000, Kentucky's population grew from 3,685,296 to 4,041,769, an increase of 9.7%. The population was projected to reach 4.35 million by 2015 and 4.48 million by 2025. The population density in 2004 was 104.7 persons per sq mi.

In 2004 the median age was 37.3. Persons under 18 years old accounted for 23.6% of the population while 12.5% was age 65 or older.

During the early decades of settlement, population grew rapidly, from a few hundred in 1780 to 564,317 in 1820, by which time Kentucky was the sixth most populous state. By 1900, however, when the population was 2,147,174, growth had slowed considerably. For most of the 20th century, Kentucky's growth rate was significantly slower than the national average.

As of 2004, Louisville-Jefferson County had an estimated population of about 556,332. Lexington-Fayette had an estimated population of 266,358. The population of the Louisville (Kentucky-Indiana) metropolitan area was estimated at 1,200,847; the Lexington metropolitan area had 424,661.

ETHNIC GROUPS

Though a slave state, Kentucky never depended on a plantation economy. In 1830, almost 25% of the population was black. After the Civil War, a lack of jobs and migration to the industrial cities of the Midwest in the 1890s may have accounted for a dwindling black population. In 2000 the black population of Kentucky was relatively low at 295,994 (7.3%). In 2004, 7.5% of the population was black. Kentucky was a center of the American (or Know-Nothing) Party, a pre-Civil War movement whose majority were staunchly anti-immigration and anti-Catholic. With relatively little opportunity for industrial employment, Kentucky attracted small numbers of foreign immigrants in the 19th and 20th cen-turies. The state had 80,271 foreign-born residents in 2000 (2% of the total population), up from 34,119 in 1990. Among persons reporting a single ancestry in the 2000 census, a total of 391,542 claimed English descent, 514,955 German, 424,133 Irish, and 66,147 French.

In 2000, the Asian population was estimated at 29,744, and the American Indian population was estimated at 8,616. The 2000 census reported 3,818 Koreans, 6,771 Asian Indians (up from 2,367 in 1990), 3,683 Japanese, 3,596 Vietnamese (up from 1,340 in 1990), and 5,397 Chinese (up from 3,137). In 2004, 0.9% of the population was Asian, and American Indians accounted for 0.2% of the population. In 2000, a total of 59,939 (1.5%) state residents were Hispanic or Latino, up from 33,000 (0.8%) in 1990, with 31,385 reporting Mexican ancestry and 6,469 Puerto Rican ancestry. In 2004, 1.9% of the population was of Hispanic or Latino origin. Pacific Islanders numbered 1,460 in 2000. In 2004, 1% of the population reported origin of two or more races.

LANGUAGES

Kentucky was a fought-over hunting ground for Ohio Shawnee, Carolina Cherokee, and Mississippi Chickawaw Indians. Place-names from this heritage include Etowah (Cherokee) and Paducah (Chickasaw).

Speech patterns in the state generally reflect the first settlers' Virginia and Kentucky backgrounds. South Midland features are best preserved in the mountains, but some common to Midland and Southern are widespread.

Other regional features are typically both South Midland and Southern. After a vowel, the /r/ may be weak or missing. Coop has the vowel of put, but root rhymes with boot. In southern Kentucky, earthworms are redworms, a burlap bag a tow sack or the Southern grass sack, and green beans snap beans. A young man may carry, not escort, his girlfriend to a party. Subregional terms appear in abundance. In the east, kindling is pine, a seesaw is a ridyhorse, and the freestone peach is an openstone peach. In central Kentucky, a moth is a candlefly.

In 2000, 96.1% of all residents five years old and older spoke only English at home, down from 97.5% in 1990.

The following table gives selected statistics from the 2000 Census for language spoken at home by persons five years old and over. The category "Other West Germanic languages" includes Dutch, Pennsylvania Dutch, and Afrikaans.

LANGUAGE NUMBER PERCENT
Population 5 years and over 3,776,230 100.0
  Speak only English 3,627,757 96.1
  Speak a language other than English 148,473 3.9
Speak a language other than English 148,473 3.9
  Spanish or Spanish Creole 70,061 1.9
  German 17,898 0.5
  French (incl. Patois, Cajun) 12,499 0.3
  Chinese 4,608 0.1
  Japanese 3,777 0.1
  Korean 3,730 0.1
  Other West Germanic languages 3,616 0.1
  Arabic 3,165 0.1
  Serbo-Croatian 3,070 0.1
  Vietnamese 3,018 0.1
  Russian 2,162 0.1
  Tagalog 2,070 0.1

RELIGIONS

Throughout its history, Kentucky has been predominantly Protestant. A group of New Light Baptists who, in conflict with established churches in Virginia, immigrated to Kentucky under the leadership of Lewis Craig and built the first church in the state in 1781, near Lancaster. The first Methodist Church was established near Danville in 1783; within a year, Roman Catholics had also built a church, and a presbytery of 12 churches had been organized. There were 42 churches in Kentucky by the time of statehood, with a total membership of 3,095.

Beginning in the last few years of the 18th century, the Great Revival sparked a new religious fervor among Kentuckians, a development that brought the Baptists and Methodists many new members. The revival, which had begun among the Presbyterians, led to a schism in that sect. Presbyterian minister Barton W. Stone organized what turned out to be the era's largest frontier revival meeting, at Cane Ridge (near Paris), in August 1801. Differences over doctrine led Stone and his followers to withdraw from the Synod of Kentucky in 1803, and they formed their own church, called simply "Christian." The group later formed an alliance with the sect now known as the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).

As of 2000, Evangelical Protestantism was predominant with the single largest denomination within the state being the Southern Baptist Convention with 979,994 adherents; there were 17,528 new baptized members in 2002. The next largest Protestant denomination is the United Methodist Church, which had 208,720 adherents in 2000, but reported only 152,727 members in 2003. The Christian Churches and Churches of Christ had 106,638 adherents in 2000 and the Roman Catholic Church had about 382,042 members in 2004. There were an estimated 11,350 Jews in Kentucky in 2000 and about 4,696 Muslims. Over 1.8 million people (46.6% of the population) were not counted as members of any religious organization in the 2000 survey.

TRANSPORTATION

Statewide transportation developed slowly in Kentucky. Although freight and passengers were carried by river and later by rail during the 19th century, mountains and lack of good roads made land travel in eastern Kentucky so arduous that the region was for a long time effectively isolated from the rest of the state.

The first railroad in Kentucky, the Lexington and Ohio, opened on 15 August 1832 with a 26-mi (42-km) route from Lexington to Frankfort. Not until 1851 did the railroad reach the Ohio River. In November 1859, Louisville was connected with Nashville, Tennessee, by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad; heavily used by the Union, it was well maintained during the Civil War. Railroad construction increased greatly after the conflict ended. By 1900, Kentucky had three times the track mileage it had in 1870. As of 2003, Kentucky had 2,823 rail mi (4,545 km), of which 2,299 miles were Class I track. In that same year, there were five Class I railroads operating in the state. Coal was the top commodity originating in the state shipped by the railroads. Rail service to the state, nearly all of which was freight, was provided by 15 railroads. As of 2006, there were four Amtrak stations in Kentucky.

The trails of Indians and buffalo became the first roads in Kentucky. Throughout the 19th century, counties called on their citi-zens to maintain some roads although maintenance was haphazard. The best roads were the toll roads. This system came to an end as a result of the "tollgate war" of the late 19th and early 20th centuriesa rebellion in which masked Kentuckians, demanding free roads, raided tollgates and assaulted their keepers. Not until 1909, however, was a constitutional prohibition against the spending of state funds on highways abolished. In 1912, a state highway commission was created, and by 1920, roads had improved considerably. In 2004, Kentucky had 77,366 mi (124,559 km) of public roads and 2.8 million licensed drivers. In that same year, there were some 1.855 million automobiles, about 1.415 million trucks of all types, and around 2,000 buses registered in the state.

Until displaced by the railroads in the late 1800s, the Ohio River and its tributaries, along with the Mississippi, were Kentucky's primary commercial routes for trade with the South and the West. The Kentucky Port and River Development Commission was created by the legislature in 1966 to promote river transportation. Louisville, on the Ohio River, is the chief port. In 2004, traffic through the port totaled 7.799 million tons. Paducah is the outlet port for traffic on the Tennessee River. In that same year, Kentucky had 1,591 mi (2,561 km) of navigable inland waterways. In 2003, waterborne shipments totaled 99.332 million tons.

In 2005, Kentucky had a total of 208 public and private-use aviation-related facilities. This included 149 airports, 58 heliports, and 1 STOLport (Short Take-Off and Landing). The largest of these was Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport, with 10,864,547 enplanements in 2004, making it the 22nd-busiest airport in the United States.

HISTORY

Six distinctive Indian cultures inhabited the region now known as Kentucky. The earliest nomadic hunters occupied the land for several thousand years, and were followed by the seminomadic Woodland and Adena cultures (1000 bc-ad 1000). Remains of the Mississippian and Fort Ancient peoples (ad 10001650) indicate that they were farmers and hunters who often dwelled in stockaded villages, subsisting on plentiful game and fish supplemented by crops of beans, corn, and squash.

No Indian nations resided in central and eastern Kentucky when these areas were first explored by British-American surveyors Thomas Walker and Christopher Gist in 1750 and 1751. The dominant Shawnee and Cherokee tribes utilized the region as a hunting ground, returning to homes in the neighboring territories of Ohio and Tennessee. Early descriptions of Kentucky generated considerable excitement about the fertile land and abundant wildlife. The elimination of French influence after the French and Indian War intensified pressures to open the region to American settlementpressures that were initially thwarted by Britain's Proclamation of 1763, barring such western migration until Native American interests could be protected. This artificial barrier proved impossible to maintain, however, and the first permanent white settlement in Kentucky was finally established at Harrodstown (now Harrodsburg) in 1774 by a group of settlers from Virginia and Pennsylvania.

The most ambitious settlement scheme involved the Transylvania Land Company, a creation of North Carolina speculator Richard Henderson, assisted by the famed woodsman Daniel Boone. Henderson purchased a huge tract of land in central Kentucky from the Cherokee and established Fort Boonesborough. The first political meeting by whites in Kentucky, held at Fort Boonesborough on 23 May 1775, provided for rule by the Transylvania proprietors and a representative assembly. Henderson then sought approval for creation of a 14th colony, but the plan was blocked by Virginians determined to claim Kentucky as a possession of the Old Dominion. On 1 December 1776, the new state of Virginia incorporated its new County of Kentucky.

Kentucky's image soon changed from "western Eden" to "dark and bloody ground," as it became the scene of frequent clashes between Ohio-based Indians and the growing number of white settlements dotting the central Bluegrass region. Nevertheless, immigrants continued to come westward, down the Ohio River and through the Cumberland Gap. Kentucky became the principal conduit for migration into the Mississippi Valley. By the late 1780s, settlements were gaining in population, wealth, and maturity, and it was obvious that Kentucky could not long remain under the proprietorship of distant Virginia. Virginia yielded permission for the drafting of a Kentucky state constitution, and in June 1792, Kentucky entered the Union as the 15th state.

Over the next several decades, Kentucky prospered because of its diverse agricultural and processing industries. Although there were 225,483 slaves in the state in 1860, Kentucky was spared the evils of one-crop plantation agriculture. Nevertheless, its economy was tightly linked to the lower South's, a tie facilitated by the completion in 1829 of a canal around the Ohio River falls at Louisville. Hemp was one such connection; the plant was the principal source of rope and bagging used to bind cotton bales. Kentucky was also a major supplier of hogs, mules, workhorses, prepared meats, salt, flour, and corn for the plantation markets of the South. The state became a center for breeding and racing fine thoroughbred horses, an industry that thrives today on Bluegrass horse farms as virtually the state symbol. More important was the growing and processing of tobacco, an enterprise accounting for half the agricultural income of Kentucky farmers by 1860. Finally, whiskey began to be produced in vast quantities by the 1820s, culminating in the standardization of a fine, aged amber-red brew known throughout the world as bourbon, after Bourbon County.

Despite this economic development, several social and cultural problems disturbed the state. Much of the agricultural productivity came from farms employing slave labor, while the less affluent majority of white families often dwelled on less fertile upland farms. Efforts were repeatedly made to consider the slavery question. Leaders such as Henry Clay, Reverend Robert J. Breckinridge, and the fiery antislavery advocate Cassius Marcellus Clay urged an end to the "peculiar institution." Because of racial phobias and hostility to "Yankee meddling," the appeal was rejected. During the Civil War, Kentuckians were forced to choose sides between the Union, led in the north by Kentucky native Abraham Lincoln, and the Confederacy, led in the South by Kentucky native Jefferson Davis.

Although the state legislature finally opted for the Union side, approximately 30,000 men went south to Confederate service, while up to 100,000including nearly 24,000 black soldiersserved in the Union army. For four years the state was torn with conflict over the collapse of slavery and wracked with guerrilla warfare and partisan feuds. Vigilantism and abuse of black people continued into the turbulent Reconstruction period, until legisla-tive changes in the early 1870s began to restrain Ku Klux Klan violence and bring increased civil rights to black people.

The decades to 1900 saw other progress. Aided by liberal tax exemptions, railroad construction increased threefold, and development of timber and coal reserves began in eastern Kentucky. Industrial employment and productivity increased by more than 200%, drawing rural folk into the growing cities of Louisville and Lexington. In 1900, Kentucky ranked first among Southern states in per capita income.

An economic and political crisis was developing, however, that would send shock waves across the state. Farmers, especially western Kentucky "dark leaf" tobacco farmers, were feeling the brunt of a prolonged price depression. The major national farm protest movementsthe Grange, the Farmers' Alliance, and the Populist Partyall found support here, for by 1900 a third of all Kentucky farmers were landless tenants, and the size of the average family farm had fallen below 10 acres (4 hectares). Calls for currency inflation, reform of corporate monopolies, and improved rights for industrial workers reached a climax in the gubernatorial election of 1899. Republican William S. Taylor narrowly defeated the more reform-minded Democrat William Goebel and was sworn into office. Democrats, claiming electoral fraud, instituted a recount. On 30 January 1900, Goebel, a state senator, was shot while approaching the capitol; as he lingered near death, the legislature, controlled by Democrats, declared him governor. Goebel died immediately thereafter, and his lieutenant governor, J. C. W. Beckham, was administered the oath of office. Further bloodshed was averted, the courts upheld the Goebel-Beckham election, and "Governor" Taylor fled the state.

Goebel's assassination weighed heavily, however. The state was polarized, outside investment plummeted, and Kentucky fell into a prolonged economic and moral depression. By 1940, the state ranked last among the 48 states in per capita income and was burdened by an image of clan feuding and homicide, poverty, and provincial courthouse politics. The Great Depression hit the state hard, though an end to Prohibition revived the dormant whiskey industry.

Kentucky Presidential Vote by Political Parties, 19482004
YEAR ELECTORAL VOTE KENTUCKY WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN STATES' RIGHTS DEMOCRAT PROHIBITION PROGRESSIVE SOCIALIST
*Won US presidential election
1948 11 *Truman (D) 466,756 341,210 10,411 1,245 1,567 1,284
1952 10 Stevenson (D) 495,729 495,029 1,161
1956 10 *Eisenhower (R) 476,453 572,192 2,145
1960 10 Nixon (R) 521,855 602,607
STATES' RIGHTS
1964 9 *Johnson (D) 669,659 372,977 3,469
AMERICAN IND. SOC. WORKERS
1968 9 *Nixon (R) 397,541 462,411 193,098 2,843
AMERICAN PEOPLE'S
1972 9 *Nixon (R) 371,159 676,446 17,627 1,118
1976 9 *Carter (D) 615,717 531,852 2,328 8,308
LIBERTARIAN CITIZENS
1980 9 *Reagan (R) 617,417 635,274 5,531 1.304
1984 9 *Reagan (R) 539,539 821,702 1,776 599
1988 9 *Bush (R) 580,368 734,281 4,994 1,256 2,118
IND. (Perot)
1992 8 *Clinton (D) 665,104 617,178 203,944 430 4,513 989
1996 8 *Clinton (D) 636,614 623,283 120,396 4,009
REFORM GREEN
2000 8 *Bush, G. W. (R) 638,898 872,492 4,173 2,896 23,192
WRITE-IN (Brown) CONSTITUTION (Peroutka) INDEPENDENT (Nader)
2004 8 *Bush, G. W. (R) 712,733 1,069,439 13 2,213 2,619 8,856

Kentucky changed greatly after World War II. Between 1945 and 1980, the farm population decreased by 76% and the number of farms by 53%. In later decades, after tobacco was revealed to be a public health hazard, many farmers turned to raising other crops. Although Kentucky remained relatively poor, positive change was evident even in rural communitiesthe result of better roads, education, and government programs. The state's poverty rate fell steadily over the decades, from 22.9% in 1969 to 13.5% in 1998, when it ranked as the 18th-poorest state in the nation (a great improvement from earlier in the century). However, in 200304, the state's poverty rate had increased to 16%, up from 14.3% in 200203. The national poverty rate in 200304 was 12.6%.

In response to lawsuits by a coalition of school districts, Kentucky's supreme court ruled in 1990 that the state's public education system was unconstitutional and ordered the legislature to design a new system of school funding and administration. In response, the Kentucky Education Reform Act was passed that year and implemented over the next five years. But more questions regarding the constitutionality of school programs, or prospective programs, lay ahead. By 2000 legislators were considering a proposal that would allow the Ten Commandments to be displayed in classrooms, alongside other historical documents. The proposal was part of a larger movement that urged officials to allow public schools to teach the role of religion in American history and culture. At the same time, many Kentuckians supported the return of prayer to schools. By 2003, federal judges had ordered the Ten Commandments be removed from school classrooms and court-houses in several Kentucky counties, ruling that the postings of the commandments had violated the separation between church and state.

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant was a point of concern for state environmentalists in 2000. Senior Kentucky environmental officials complained that the US Department of Energy (DOE) had used security clearances to prevent state environmental inspectors from getting full access to the plant, which enriches uranium for nuclear-reactor fuel. The plant was also the site of a massive cleanup effort in 2000, as DOE officials crushed drums that once contained uranium. Critics charged that the drums had been left in the open for decades and rain water had washed radioactivity into the environment.

Republican Ernie Fletcher was elected governor in 2003. By 2005 he had set about to make Kentucky more business-friendly, to create a flexible tax code, encourage healthy lifestyles (the governor is a physician), provide for quality education for Kentucky's children, and improve the transportation infrastructure. He reorganized the state government, eliminating some cabinet positions, and worked to make sure state resources were being used efficiently.

STATE GOVERNMENT

Kentucky's current and fourth constitution was adopted on 28 September 1891. By January 2005, it had been amended 41 times. Earlier constitutions were adopted in 1792, 1799, and 1850.

The state legislature, called the General Assembly, consists of the House of Representatives, which has 100 members elected for two-year terms, and the Senate, with 38 members elected for staggered four-year terms. A constitutional amendment approved by the voters in November 1979 provided for the election of legislators in even-numbered years, a change scheduled for completion by November 1988. The assembly meets in regular sessions of no more than 60 legislative days, beginning Tuesday after the first Monday in January of each even-numbered year. Only the governor may call special sessions, which are not limited in length. Except for revenue-raising measures, which must be introduced in the House of Representatives, either chamber may introduce or amend a bill. Most bills may be passed by voting majorities equal to at least two-fifths of the membership of each house. Measures requiring an absolute majority in each house include those that appropriate money or create a debt or enact emergency measures to take effect immediately. Proposed amendments to the constitution require a three-fifths vote of each house. A majority of the members of each house is required to override the governor's veto. If the governor neither vetoes nor signs a bill, it becomes law after 10 days when the legislature is in session, and 90 days after the adjournment of the legislature when it is not in session.

A member of the Senate must have been a citizen of Kentucky for six years preceding election, a representative for two. A senator must be at least 30 years old and a representative at least 24 years old. Legislators must have been residents in their districts for at least one year prior to election. The constitutional limit of $12,000 for salaries of public officials, which is thought to apply to legislators, has been interpreted by the courts in terms of 1949 dollars and thus may be increased considerablyand has been. In 2004 most legislators in Kentucky probably received less than $14,000 per year based on per diem in-session salaries of $166.34.

The elected executive officers of Kentucky are the governor and lieutenant governor (elected jointly), secretary of state, attorney general, treasurer, auditor of public accounts, and commissioner of agriculture. All serve four-year terms; a constitutional amendment allows a second term for those offices. The governor and lieutenant governor must be at least 30 years old, US citizens, and citizens and residents of Kentucky for six years. As of December 2004, the governor's salary was $127,146.

A three-fifths majority of each house plus a voting majority of the electorate must approve any proposed constitutional amendment. Before a constitutional convention may be called, two regular sessions of the General Assembly must approve it, and the call must be ratified at the polls by a majority voting on the proposal and equal to at last one-fourth the number of voters who cast ballots in the last general election.

To vote in Kentucky, one must be a US citizen, be at least 18 years old, have been a resident in the county for at least 28 days prior to election day, and not able to claim the right to vote elsewhere. Restrictions apply to convicted felons and those declared mentally incompetent by the court.

POLITICAL PARTIES

A rift was created in Kentucky politics by the presidential election of 1824, which had to be determined in the US House of Representatives because neither John Quincy Adams nor Andrew Jackson won a majority of the Electoral College. Representative Henry Clay voted for Adams, despite orders by the Kentucky General Assembly to support Jackson, thereby splitting the state into two factions: supporters of Clay, who became Whigs, and supporters of Jackson, who became Democrats. The Whigs dominated Kentucky politics until Clay's death in 1852, after which, as the Whigs divided over slavery, most Kentuckians turned first to the Native American (or Know-Nothing) Party and then to the Democrats. Regional divisions in party affiliation during the Civil War era, according to sympathy with the South and slavery (Democrats) or with the Union and abolition (Republicans), have persisted in the state's voting patterns. In general, the poorer mountain areas tend to vote Republican, while the more affluent lowlanders in the Bluegrass and Pennyroyal tend to vote Democratic.

Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush won the state by large margins in both 2000 and 200457% to Democrat Al Gore's 41% (2000) and 59.5% to Democrat John Kerry's 39.7% (2004). In 2004 there were 2,819,000 registered voters. In 1998, 61% of registered voters were Democratic, 32% Republican, and 7% unaffiliated or members of other parties. The state had eight electoral votes in the 2004 presidential election.

In 1983, Martha Layne Collins, a Democrat, defeated Republican candidate Jim Bunning to become Kentucky's first woman governor. Republican Ernie Fletcher was elected governor in 2003. In mid-2005, Republicans held 21 seats in the state Senate, Democrats held 15; and an Independent held 1. The Democrats dominated the House of Representatives, with 57 seats to the Republicans' 43. At the national level, Kentucky was represented by Republican Senator Mitch McConnell, reelected in 2002; and Republican Senator Jim Bunning, first elected in 1998 and reelected in 2004. As of 2004, Kentucky voters had elected five Republicans and one Democrat to the US House.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

The form of Kentucky's county government is of English origin. The chief governing body is the fiscal court, consisting of the county judge and district magistrates or commissioners. Other elected officials are the sheriff, jailer, attorney, and court clerk. All are elected for four-year terms. As of 2005, the state had 120 counties.

In 2005, Kentucky had 424 municipalities. Cities are assigned by the state's General Assembly to six classes, based on population. The two largest cities, categorized as first-class, are Louisville and Lexington. The mayor or other chief executive officer in the top three classes must be elected; in the bottom classes, the executive may be either elected by the people or appointed by a city council or commission. Mayors serve four-year terms; members of city legislative boards, also provided for in the state constitution, are generally elected for terms of two years.

Other units of local government in Kentucky include special districts (720 in 2005), such as districts for sewer and flood control and area-development districts for regional planning. The state had 176 public school districts in 2005.

In 2005, local government accounted for about 159,190 full-time (or equivalent) employment positions.

STATE SERVICES

To address the continuing threat of terrorism and to work with the federal Department of Homeland Security, homeland security in Kentucky operates under executive order; the homeland security director is designated as the state homeland security advisor.

Educational services are provided through the Department of Education. The Council on Postsecondary Education oversees the state-supported colleges, universities, and technical schools. The Human Rights Commission and the Commission on Women are administered by the governor's office. Transportation services are administered by the Transportation Cabinet. Health, welfare, and other human services are provided primarily by the Health and Family Services Cabinet. Among the agencies that provide public protection services are the Department of Military Affairs, the Public Protection Department, and the Consumer Protection and Education Division. Corrections and parole were transferred in 1981 from the Department of Justice to the Corrections Department. The Department of State Police is part of the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.

Housing rights for members of minority groups are provided by the Commission on Human Rights. The Cabinet for Economic Development oversees industrial and community development programs. Also assisting in community development are programs within the Office of Local Government, which was organized as an independent agency of the office of the governor in 1982.

Natural resource protection services are provided by the separate departments of Natural Resources and Environmental Protection, and by the Division of Mine Reclamation and Enforcement. The Commerce Cabinet deals with Kentucky's parks, tourism, cultural heritage, and arts.

Labor services are administered by the Labor Department; its areas of concern include labor-management relations, occupational safety and health, and occupational injury and disease compensation. Other cabinets include those for finance and administration and personnel.

JUDICIAL SYSTEM

In accordance with a constitutional amendment approved in 1975 and fully implemented in 1978, judicial power in Kentucky is vested in a unified court of justice. The highest court is the Kentucky Supreme Court, consisting of a chief justice and six associate justices. It has appellate jurisdiction and also bears responsibility for the budget and administration of the entire system. Justices are elected from seven supreme court districts for terms of eight years; they elect one of their number to serve for the remaining term as chief justice.

The Court of Appeals consists of 14 judges, 2 elected from each supreme court district. The court divides itself into panels of at least 3 judges that may sit anywhere in the state. The judges also serve eight-year terms and elect one of their number to serve a four-year term as chief judge.

Circuit courts, with original and appellate jurisdiction, are held in each county. There are 56 judicial circuits. Circuit court judges are elected for terms of eight years. In 1999, there were 108 circuit court judges. In circuits with more than one judge, the judges elect one of their number as chief judge for a two-year term. Under the revised judicial system, district courts, which have limited and original jurisdiction, replaced various local and county courts. There is no mandatory retirement age.

As of 31 December 2004, a total of 17,814 prisoners were held in Kentucky's state and federal prisons, an increase from 16,622 of 7.2% from the previous year. As of year-end 2004, a total of 1,560 inmates were female, up from 1,411 or 10.6% from the year before. Among sentenced prisoners (one year or more), Kentucky had an incarceration rate of 412 per 100,000 population in 2004.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Kentucky in 2004, had a violent crime rate (murder/nonnegligent manslaughter; forcible rape; robbery; aggravated assault) of 244.9 reported incidents per 100,000 population, or a total of 10,152 reported incidents. Crimes against property (burglary; larceny/theft; and motor vehicle theft) in that same year totaled 105,209 reported incidents or 2,537.7 reported incidents per 100,000 people. Kentucky has a death penalty, of which lethal injection is the sole method of execution for those sentenced after 31 March 1998. Inmates sentenced prior to that date may select lethal injection or electrocution. From 1976 through 5 May 2006, the state has executed only two persons. There were no executions in 2005 or 2006 (as of 5 May). As of 1 January 2006, Kentucky had 37 inmates on death row.

In the past, Kentucky had a reputation for lawlessness. In 1890, more homicides were reported in Kentucky than in any other state except New York. Blood feuds among Kentucky families were notorious throughout the country. However, crime rates have diminished to a comparatively low level.

In 2003, Kentucky spent $144,012,593 on homeland security, an average of $35 per state resident.

ARMED FORCES

The US Department of Defense had 22,861 personnel in Kentucky in 2004, including 17,039 active-duty military and 3,762 civilians. US Army installations in the state include Ft. Knox (site of the US gold depository) near Louisville, and Ft. Campbell (partly in Tennessee). Kentucky received $4.1 billion in prime federal defense contracts in 2004, and $2.4 billion in defense payroll spending.

There were 359,845 veterans of US military service in Kentucky as of 2003, of whom 46,266 served in World War II; 40,025 in the Korean conflict; 111,844 during the Vietnam era; and 57,006 during the Gulf War. Expenditures on Kentucky veterans amounted to more than $1.0 billion in 2004.

As of 31 October 2004, the Kentucky State Police employed 943 full-time sworn officers.

MIGRATION

During the frontier period, Kentucky first attracted settlers from eastern states, especially Virginia and North Carolina. Prominent among early foreign immigrants were people of English and Scotch-Irish ancestry, who tended to settle in the Kentucky highlands, which resembled their Old World homelands.

Kentucky's black population increased rapidly during the first 40 years of statehood. By the 1830s, however, slavery had become less profitable in the state, and many Kentucky owners either moved to the Deep South or sold their slaves to new owners in that region. During the 1850s, nearly 16% of Kentucky's slave populationmore than 43,000 blackswere sold or moved from the state. A tiny percentage of Kentucky's blacks, probably fewer than 200, emigrated to Liberia under the auspices of the Kentucky Colonization Society.

The waves of European immigration that inundated many states during the late 19th century left Kentucky virtually untouched. In 1890, Kentucky's population was nearly 98% native-born. At that time, there were more than 284,000 blacks in the statea number that was to fall precipitously until the 1950s because of migration to industrial cities in the Midwest.

Until the early 1970s there was a considerable out-migration of whites, especially from eastern Kentucky to industrial areas of Ohio, Indiana, and other nearby states. The state's net loss to migration from 1960 to 1970 totaled 153,000 persons. This tide of out-migration was temporarily reversed during the 1970s, with Kentucky recording a net migration gain of 131,000 persons. From 1980 to 1990, net loss to migration totaled about 22,000. Between 1990 and 1998, Kentucky had net gains of 90,000 in domestic migration and 14,000 in international migration. In 1998, 2,017 foreign immigrants arrived in the state. Between 1990 and 1998, Kentucky's overall population increased 6.8%. In the period 200005, net international migration was 27,435 and net internal migration was 32,169, for a net gain of 59,604 people.

INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERATION

Among the many interstate regional commissions in which Kentucky participates are the Breaks Interstate Park Compact with Virginia, Appalachian Regional Commission, Interstate Mining Compact Commission, Interstate Oil and Gas Compact, Southern Growth Policies Board, Ohio River Basin Commission, Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission, Southeastern Forest Fire Protection Compact, Southern Regional Energy Board, Southern States Energy Board, and Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway Development Authority. Kentucky also participates in the Tennessee Valley Authority. The Council of State Governments, founded in 1925 to foster interstate cooperation, has its headquarters in Lexington. Kentucky received $5.251 billion in federal grants in fiscal year 2005, an estimated $5.555 billion in fiscal year 2006, and an estimated $5.647 billion in federal grants in fiscal year 2007.

ECONOMY

Between statehood and the Civil War, Kentucky was one of the preeminent agricultural states, partly because of good access to river transportation down the Ohio and the Mississippi to southern markets. Coal mining had become an important part of the economy by the late 19th century. Although agriculture is still important in Kentucky, manufacturing has grown rapidly since World War II and was, by the mid-1980s, the most important sector of the economy as a source of both employment and personal income. Kentucky leads the nation in the production of bituminous coal and whiskey, and ranks second in tobacco output.

In contrast to the generally prosperous Bluegrass area and the growing industrial cities, eastern Kentucky, highly dependent on coal mining, has long been one of the poorest regions in the United States. Beginning in the early 1960s, both the state and federal governments undertook programs to combat poverty in Appalachian Kentucky. Personal income is much lower, and unemployment higher, than in the rest of the state. In 1997, 38 of the 49 Appalachian counties received Local Government Economic Development Fund (LGEDF) aid from the coal severance tax. The Kentucky Rural Development Act, covering all 49 Appalachian counties, gives liberal tax incentives to new manufacturing startups in those areas that have had higher unemployment rates than the state during the previous five years, or a have current rate that is at least twice the state average. During the 1990s, declines in Kentucky's traditional sectorstobacco, textiles, apparel, and coal miningwas compensated for by job growth in motor vehicle manufacturing, fabricated metals, appliances, and other durable goods. The establishment of a major UPS hub in Kentucky plus growth in agricultural research and commercialization activity helped further the state's economic transformation. Manufactures reached more than 27.5% of gross state product by 1998, when overall growth reached 6%. Growth in 1999 and 2000 averaged 4.35%, and then dropped to 2.6% in 2001 in the context of the national recession. Manufacturing output, which had grown 10.6% from 1997 to 2000, fell 1.9% in 2001, and to 25.2% as a percent of total state output. In 2002, job losses in manufacturing slowed while employment in service-producing sectors strengthened. Kentucky was one of only five states where employment grew more than 1% in 2002.

Kentucky's gross state product (GSP) in 2004 totaled $136.446 billion, of which manufacturing contributed the largest portion at $28.708 billion (21% of GSP), followed by real estate at $12.306 billion (9% of GSP), and health care and social services at $10.484 billion (7.6% of GSP). In that same year, there were an estimated 317,115 small businesses in Kentucky. Of the 83,046 businesses that had employees, a total of 80,595 or 97% were small companies. An estimated 8,807 new businesses were established in the state in 2004, up 8% from the year before. Business terminations that same year came to 8,597, down 20.4% from 2003. There were 319 business bankruptcies in 2004, down 2.4% from the previous year. In 2005, the state's personal bankruptcy (Chapter 7 and Chapter 13) filing rate was 722 filings per 100,000 people, ranking Kentucky 11th in the nation.

INCOME

In 2005 Kentucky had a gross state product (GSP) of $140 billion which accounted for 1.1% of the nation's gross domestic product and placed the state at number 27 in highest GSP among the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, in 2004 Kentucky had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $27,265. This ranked 44th in the United States and was 82% of the national average of $33,050. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of PCPI was 4.1%. Kentucky had a total personal income (TPI) of $112,925,244,000, which ranked 27th in the United States and reflected an increase of 5.7% from 2003. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of TPI was 4.9%. Earnings of persons employed in Kentucky increased from $81,381,470,000 in 2003 to $85,767,091,000 in 2004, an increase of 5.4%. The 200304 national change was 6.3%.

The US Census Bureau reports that the three-year average median household income for 200204 in 2004 dollars was $37,396, compared to a national average of $44,473. During the same period an estimated 15.4% of the population was below the poverty line as compared to 12.4% nationwide.

LABOR

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), in April 2006 the seasonally adjusted civilian labor force in Kentucky numbered 2,022,000, with approximately 123,600 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 6.1%, compared to the national average of 4.7% for the same period. Preliminary data for the same period placed nonfarm employment at 1,843,500. Since the beginning of the BLS data series in 1976, the highest unemployment rate recorded in Kentucky was 12.1% in December 1982. The historical low was 4% in March 2000. Preliminary nonfarm employment data by occupation for April 2006 showed that approximately 4.7% of the labor force was employed in construction; 14.1% in manufacturing; 20.7% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 4.8% in financial activities; 9.4% in professional and business services; 12.9% in education and health services; 9.2% in leisure and hospitality services; and 17% in government.

Although a small number of trade unions existed in Kentucky before the 1850s, it was not until after the Civil War that substantial unionization took place. During the 1930s, there were long, violent struggles between the United Mine Workers (UMW) and the mine owners of eastern Kentucky. The UMW won bargaining rights in 1938, but after World War II, the displacement of workers because of mechanization, a drastic drop in the demand for coal, and evidence of mismanagement and corruption within the UMW served to undercut the union's position. Following the announcement by the UMW in 1962 that its five hospitals would be sold or closed, unemployed mine workers began protracted picketing of nonunion mines. Episodes of violence accompanied the movement, which succeeded in closing the mines but not in keeping them closed. The protests dissipated when public works jobs were provided for unemployed fathers among the miners, beginning in late 1973. Increased demand for coal in the 1970s led to a substantial increase in jobs for miners, and the UMW, under different leaders, began a new drive to organize the Cumberland Plateau.

The US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that in 2005, a total of 164,000 of Kentucky's 1,696,000 employed wage and salary workers were formal members of a union. This represented 9.7% of those so employed, up from 9.6% in 2004, but still below the national average of 12%. Overall in 2005, a total of 184,000 workers (10.8%) in Kentucky were covered by a union or employee association contract, which includes those workers who reported no union affiliation. Kentucky is one of 28 states that do not have a right-to-work law.

As of 1 March 2006, Kentucky had a state-mandated minimum wage rate of $5.15 per hour. In 2004, women in the state accounted for 45.1% of the employed civilian labor force.

AGRICULTURE

With cash receipts totaling $3.9 billion$1.2 million from crops and $2.7 billion from livestockKentucky ranked 24th among the 50 states in farm marketings in 2005.

Kentucky tobacco, first marketed in New Orleans in 1787, quickly became the state's most important crop. Kentucky ranked first among tobacco-producing states until it gave way to North Carolina in 1929. Corn has long been one of the state's most important crops, not only for livestock feed but also as a major ingredient in the distilling of whiskey. Although hemp is no longer an important crop in Kentucky, its early significance to Kentucky farmers, as articulated in Congress by Henry Clay, was partly responsible for the establishment by the United States of a protective tariff system. From 1849 to 1870, the state produced nearly all the hemp grown in the United States.

In 2004 there were approximately 85,000 farms in Kentucky, with an average size of 162 acres (66 hectares). In 2005, 43% of Kentucky's population was considered rural, and 18% of the state's population owed its living to agriculture. In 2004 Kentucky farms produced some 234,500,000 lb of tobacco, the second most in the nation. Leading field crops (in bushels) in 2004 included corn for grain, 173,280,000; soybeans, 57,200,000; wheat, 20,520,000; sorghum, 1,040,000; and barley, 616,000. Farmers also harvested 5,928,000 tons of hay, including 888,000 tons of alfalfa.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

Since early settlement days, livestock raising has been an important part of Kentucky's economy. The Bluegrass region, which offers excellent pasturage and drinking water, has become renowned as a center for horse breeding, including thoroughbreds, quarter horses, American saddle horses, Arabians, and standardbreds. In 2004, sales of horses accounted for 23% of Kentucky's farm receipts.

In 2005, Kentucky had an estimated 2.25 million cattle and calves worth $1.82 billion. In 2004, Kentucky farmers had an estimated 350,000 hogs and pigs, worth around $27.6 million. Kentucky produced an estimated 1.46 billion lb (0.66 billion kg) of milk from 116,000 dairy cows in 2003.

FISHING

Fishing is of little commercial importance in Kentucky. In 2004, Kentucky had 580,917 fishing license holders. In 2005 there were 60 catfish farms covering 600 acres (243 hectares), with an inventory of 800,000 fingerlings in early 2006. The Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery in Jamestown raises rainbow and brown trout and stocks 90 different areas within the state.

FORESTRY

In 2004 there were 11,391,000 acres (4,828,000 hectares) of forested land in Kentucky47% of the state's land area. Over 90% of the forestland is classified as commercially viable for timber production.

The most heavily forested areas are in the river valleys of eastern Kentucky, in the Appalachians. In 2004, Kentucky produced 662 million board feet of lumber, nearly all of it in hardwoods. The Division of Forestry of the Department of Natural Resources manages approximately 30,000 acres (12,300 hectares) of state-owned forestland and operates two forest tree nurseries producing 7-9 million seedling trees a year.

There are two national foreststhe Daniel Boone and the Jefferson on Kentucky's eastern borderenclosing two national wilderness areas. These two national forests had a combined area of 1,415,744 acres (572,952 hectares) in 2005. Gross acreage of all Kentucky lands in the National Forest System was 2,212,000 acres (895,000 hectares) in 2003. National parks in the state include the Mammoth Cave National Park and the Cumberland Gap National Historical Park on Kentucky's eastern border.

MINING

According to preliminary data from the US Geological Survey (USGS), the estimated value of nonfuel mineral production by Kentucky in 2003 was $559 million, an increase from 2002 of 3%. The USGS data ranked Kentucky as 24th among the 50 states by the total value of its nonfuel mineral production, accounting for about 1.5% of total US output.

According to preliminary figures, crushed stone was the state's leading nonfuel mineral commodity, accounting for around 57% (51.9 million metric tons; $317 million) of Kentucky's nonfuel mineral production by value in 2003. It was followed (in descending order) by lime, cement (portland and masonry), and construction sand and gravel. Collectively, these four commodities accounted for about 98% of the state's nonfuel mineral output by value. Nationally, the state ranked third in ball clays and in lime, and 10th in common clay. According to preliminary USGS data for 2003, the state produced 8.8 million metric tons of construction sand and gravel, with a value of $35.2 million.

ENERGY AND POWER

As of 2003, Kentucky had 62 electrical power service providers, of which 30 were publicly owned and 24 were cooperatives. Of the remainder, six were investor owned, one was federally operated, and one was an owner of an independent generator that sold directly to customers. As of that same year there were 2,117,138 retail customers. Of that total, 1,170,276 received their power from investor-owned service providers. Cooperatives accounted for 744,263 customers, while publicly owned providers had 202,575 customers. There were 22 federal customers and two were independent generator or "facility" customers.

Total net summer generating capability by the state's electrical generating plants in 2003 stood at 19.068 million kW, with total production that same year at 91.718 billion kWh. Of the total amount generated, 88% came from electric utilities, with the remainder coming from independent producers and combined heat and power service providers. The largest portion of all electric power generated, 84.060 billion kWh (91.6%), came from coal-fired plants, with hydroelectric plants in second place at 3.948 billion kWh (4.3%) and petroleum fueled plants in third at 2.944 billion kWh (3.2%). Other renewable power sources and natural gas fueled plants accounted for 0.3% and 0.5%, respectively.

Southern Kentucky shares in the power produced by the Tennessee Valley Authority, which supports a coal-fired steam electric plant in Kentucky at Paducah.

Most of Kentucky's coal came from the western fields of the interior coal basin until late in the 19th century, when the lower-sulfur Cumberland Plateau coal reserves of the Appalachian region were discovered. In 2004, eastern Kentucky produced 90,871,000 short tons of coal, and western Kentucky 23,373,000 short tons. Overall, Kentucky in 2004, had 419 producing coal mines, 196 of which were surface mines and 223 were underground. Total coal output that year totaled 114,244,000 short tons, up from 112,806,000 short tons in 2003. Of the total produced in 2004, surface mines accounted for 42,487,000 short tons. Recoverable coal reserves in 2004 totaled 1.129 billion short tons. One short ton equals 2,000 lb (0.907 metric tons).

As of 2004, Kentucky had proven crude oil reserves of 27 million barrels, or less than 1% of all proven US reserves, while output that same year averaged 7,000 barrels per day. Including federal off shore domains, the state that year ranked 21st (20th excluding federal offshore) in proven reserves and 21st (20th excluding federal off shore) in production among the 31 producing states. In 2004 Kentucky had 18,075 producing oil wells. As of 2005, the state's two refineries had a combined crude oil distillation capacity of 227,500 barrels per day.

Oil shale is found in a band stretching from Lawrence County in the northeast through Madison and Washington counties in central Kentucky to Jefferson County in the north-central region.

In 2004, Kentucky had 13,920 producing natural gas and gas condensate wells. In 2003 (the latest year for which data was available), marketed gas production (all gas produced excluding gas used for repressuring, vented and flared, and nonhydrocarbon gases removed) totaled 87.608 billion cu ft (2.49 billion cu m). As of 31 December 2004, proven reserves of dry or consumer-grade natural gas totaled 1.880 billion cu ft (0.157 billion cu m).

INDUSTRY

Although primarily an agricultural state during the 19th century, Kentucky was a leading supplier of manufactures to the South before the Civil War. Manufacturing activities are largely concentrated in Louisville and Jefferson County and other cities bordering the Ohio River. Kentucky is the leading producer of American whiskey. It also is one of the nation's largest producers of trucks in assembly plants at Louisville as well as for automobiles at Bowling Green and Georgetown.

According to the US Census Bureau's Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) for 2004, Kentucky's manufacturing sector covered some 20 product subsectors. The shipment value of all products manufactured in the state that same year was $97.253 billion. Of that total, transportation equipment manufacturing accounted for the largest share at $34.220 billion. It was followed by primary metal manufacturing at $9.178 billion; chemical manufacturing at $7.984 billion; food manufacturing at $7.646 billion; and paper manufacturing at $4.418 billion.

In 2004, a total of 246,749 people in Kentucky were employed in the state's manufacturing sector, according to the ASM. Of that total, 187,621 were actual production workers. In terms of total employment, the transportation equipment manufacturing industry accounted for the largest portion of all manufacturing employees at 50,032, with 41,325 actual production workers. It was followed by food manufacturing at 22,863 employees (17,400 actual production workers); fabricated metal product manufacturing at 21,442 employees (15,783 actual production workers); plastics and rubber products manufacturing at 18,858 employees (15,068 actual production workers); and machinery manufacturing with 17,535 employees (11,982 actual production workers).

ASM data for 2004 showed that Kentucky's manufacturing sector paid $10.344 billion in wages. Of that amount, the transportation equipment manufacturing sector accounted for the largest share at $2.626 billion. It was followed by fabricated metal product manufacturing at $794.193 million; chemical manufacturing at $739.002 million; food manufacturing at $730.046 million; machinery manufacturing at $710.472 billion; and primary metal manufacturing at $634.640 billion.

COMMERCE

According to the 2002 Census of Wholesale Trade, Kentucky's wholesale trade sector had sales that year totaling $51.8 billion from 4,630 establishments. Wholesalers of durable goods accounted for 2,827 establishments, followed by nondurable goods wholesalers at 1,447 and electronic markets, agents, and brokers accounting for 356 establishments. Sales by durable goods wholesalers in 2002 totaled $20.5 billion, while wholesalers of nondurable goods saw sales of $27.1 billion. Electronic markets, agents, and brokers in the wholesale trade industry had sales of $4.08 billion.

In the 2002 Census of Retail Trade, Kentucky was listed as having 16,847 retail establishments with sales of $40.06 billion. The leading types of retail businesses by number of establishments were: gasoline stations (2,443); motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers (2,171); miscellaneous store retailers (1,978); and food and beverage stores (1,961). In terms of sales, motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts stores accounted for the largest share of retail sales at $9.5 billion, followed by general merchandise stores at $7.6 billion; food and beverage stores at $5.5 billion; gasoline stations at $4.5 billion; and building material/garden equipment and supplies dealers at $3.6 billion. A total of 214,192 people were employed by the retail sector in Kentucky that year.

Exporters located in Kentucky exported $14.8 billion in merchandise during 2005.

CONSUMER PROTECTION

Consumer protection is primarily the responsibility of the Office of Consumer Protection, which is a part of the state Attorney General's Office. Created in 1972, the office assists consumers with disputes in the marketplace through the mediation of consumer complaints; the litigation of violators of the Consumer Protection Act; and the education of consumers. The mediation branch handles consumer complaints.

However, other state agencies also operate consumer protection divisions that are specific to the particular agency. The Office of Insurance, which regulates insurance companies and agents within the state, has a Division of Consumer Protection and Education. The state's Department of Agriculture has a Division of Regulation and Inspection under its Office for Consumer and Environmental Services. The Division's responsibilities include the inspection of gas pumps, amusement park rides, weight and measurement devices, tobacco warehouses, and eggs. The state's Public Service Commission, which regulates utilities operating within the state, has a Division of Consumer Services.

When dealing with consumer protection issues, the state's Attorney General's Office can initiate civil and criminal proceedings; represent the state before state and federal regulatory agencies; administer consumer protection and education programs; and exercise broad subpoena powers. In antitrust actions, the Attorney General's Office can act on behalf of those consumers who are incapable of acting on their own; initiate damage actions on behalf of the state in state courts; initiate criminal proceedings; and represent counties, cities and other governmental entities in recovering civil damages under state or federal law.

The Consumer Protection Division has offices in the cities of Louisville and Frankfort.

BANKING

As of June 2005, Kentucky had 230 insured banks, savings and loans, and saving banks, plus 33 state-chartered and 75 federally chartered credit unions (CUs). Excluding the CUs, the Louisville market area had the most number of financial institutions with 53, as well as the largest portion of deposits at $19.289 billion in 2004, followed by the Lexington-Fayette area at 21 and $6.683 billion, respectively. As of June 2005, CUs accounted for 7.7% of all assets held by all financial institutions in the state, or some $4.378 billion. Banks, savings and loans, and savings banks collectively accounted for the remaining 92.3% or $52.280 billion in assets held.

Eighty-one percent of the state's insured banks have less than $250 million in assets. The median return on assets (ROA) ratio (the measure of earnings in relation to all resources) and net interest margin (the difference between the lower rates offered to savers and the higher rates charged on loans) increased in 2004 for Kentucky's banks. For that year, ROA stood at 1.10%, up from 1.05% in 2003, while NIM in 2004 stood at 4.01%, up from 3.95% in the previous year.

Regulation of Kentucky's state-chartered financial institutions is carried out by the state's Office of Financial Institutions.

INSURANCE

In 2004, Kentuckians held some 2.6 million life insurance policies, with a total value of over $139 billion; total value for all categories of life insurance (individual, group, and credit) was over $213 billion. The average coverage amount is $52,500 per policy holder. Death benefits paid that year totaled at about $679.3 million.

As of 2003, there were 8 property and casualty and 10 life and health insurance companies domiciled in the state. In 2004, direct premiums for property and casualty insurance totaled $5.75 billion. The same year, there were 20,921 flood insurance policies in force in the state, with a total value of $2 billion. About $150 million of coverage was held through FAIR plans, which are designed to offer coverage for some natural circumstances, such as wind and hail, in high risk areas.

In 2004, 52% of state residents held employment-based health insurance policies, 4% held individual policies, and 28% were covered under Medicare and Medicaid; 14% of residents were uninsured. In 2003, employee contributions for employment-based health coverage averaged at 20% for single coverage and 25% for family coverage. The state offers an 18-month health benefits expansion program for small-firm employees in connection with the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA, 1986), a health insurance program for those who lose employment-based coverage due to termination or reduction of work hours.

In 2003, there were over 2.8 million auto insurance policies in effect for private passenger cars. Required minimum coverage includes bodily injury liability of up to $25,000 per individual and $50,000 for all persons injured in an accident, as well as property damage liability of $10,000. Personal injury protection is also required. In 2003, the average expenditure per vehicle for insurance coverage was $737.46.

SECURITIES

There are no securities exchanges in Kentucky. In 2005, there were 480 personal financial advisers employed in the state and 2,350 securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents. In 2004, there were over 64 publicly traded companies within the state, with over 30 NASDAQ companies, 13 NYSE listings, and 3 AMEX listings. In 2006, the state had six Fortune 500 companies; Humana (in Louisville) ranked first in the state and 150th in the nation with revenues of over $14.4 million, followed by Ashland, Inc. (Covington), Yum Brands (Louisville), Omnicare (Covington), Lexmark International (Lexington), and Kindred Healthcare all of which are listed on the NYSE.

PUBLIC FINANCE

The Kentucky biennial state budget is prepared by the Governor's Office for Policy and Management late in each odd-numbered year and submitted by the governor to the General Assembly for approval. The fiscal year (FY) runs from 1 July to 30 June.

Fiscal year 2006 general funds were estimated at $9.1 billion for resources and $8.4 billion for expenditures. In fiscal year 2004, federal government grants to Kentucky were $6.7 billion.

TAXATION

In 2005, Kentucky collected $9.1 billion in tax revenues, or $2,179 per capita, which placed it 23rd among the 50 states in per capita tax burden. The national average was $2,192 per capita. Property taxes accounted for 5.2% of the total; sales taxes, 28.5%; selective sales taxes, 18.2%; individual income taxes, 33.4%; corporate income taxes, 5.3%; and other taxes, 9.3%.

As of 1 January 2006, Kentucky had six individual income tax brackets ranging from 2.0% to 6.0%. The state taxes corporations at rates ranging from 4.0% to 7.0% depending on tax bracket.

In 2004, state and local property taxes amounted to $2.14 billion, or $516 per capita. The per capita amount ranks the state 45th highest nationally. Local governments collected $1,680,995,000 of the total and the state government $455,460,000.

Kentucky taxes retail sales at a rate of 6%. Food purchased for consumption off-premises is tax exempt. The tax on cigarettes is

KentuckyState Government Finances
(Dollar amounts in thousands. Per capita amounts in dollars.)
AMOUNT PER CAPITA
Abbreviations and symbols: - zero or rounds to zero; (NA) not available; (X) not applicable.
source: U.S. Census Bureau, Governments Division, 2004 Survey of State Government Finances, January 2006.
Total Revenue 20,180,416 4,872.14
  General revenue 17,382,099 4,196.55
    Intergovernmental revenue 5,795,618 1,399.23
    Taxes 8,463,400 2,043.31
      General sales 2,466,033 595.37
      Selective sales 1,540,274 371.87
      License taxes 542,480 130.97
      Individual income tax 2,819,393 680.68
      Corporate income tax 381,538 92.11
      Other taxes 713,682 172.30
    Current charges 1,895,335 457.59
    Miscellaneous general revenue 1,227,746 296.41
  Utility revenue - -
  Liquor store revenue - -
  Insurance trust revenue 2,798,317 675.60
Total expenditure 20,072,526 4,846.10
  Intergovernmental expenditure 3,967,334 957.83
  Direct expenditure 16,105,192 3,888.26
    Current operation 11,108,836 2,682.00
    Capital outlay 1,604,185 387.30
    Insurance benefits and repayments 2,430,915 586.89
    Assistance and subsidies 533,329 128.76
    Interest on debt 427,927 103.31
Exhibit: Salaries and wages 3,067,912 740.68
Total expenditure 20,072,526 4,846.10
  General expenditure 17,641,550 4,259.19
    Intergovernmental expenditure 3,967,334 957.83
    Direct expenditure 13,674,216 3,301.36
  General expenditures, by function:
    Education 6,392,502 1,543.34
    Public welfare 5,274,909 1,273.52
    Hospitals 682,476 164.77
    Health 535,507 129.29
    Highways 1,730,937 417.90
    Police protection 155,292 37.49
    Correction 452,482 109.24
    Natural resources 345,119 83.32
    Parks and recreation 134,567 32.49
    Government administration 667,476 161.15
    Interest on general debt 427,927 103.31
    Other and unallocable 842,356 203.37
  Utility expenditure 61 .01
  Liquor store expenditure - -
  Insurance trust expenditure 2,430,915 586.89
Debt at end of fiscal year 8,116,460 1,959.55
Cash and security holdings 33,990,295 8,206.25

30 cents per pack, which ranks 45th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Kentucky taxes gasoline at 18.5 cents per gallon. This is in addition to the 18.4 cents per gallon federal tax on gasoline.

According to the Tax Foundation, for every federal tax dollar sent to Washington in 2004, Kentucky citizens received $1.45 in federal spending.

ECONOMIC POLICY

The Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development seeks to encourage businesses to locate in Kentucky and to expand through its job creation program. Various available programs offer companies tax credits totaling as much as 100% of their investment. Low interest loans and bonds also are available. Additional incentives are available to qualified businesses for locating in one of Kentucky's enterprise zones, Appalachian counties, or in Kentucky's federal empowerment zone. Incentives also are available for tourist attractions that locate in Kentucky. Regional industrial parks are currently being developed to provide available, accessible, and marketable land in areas where an abundant labor force is available. The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority (KEDFA) was established within the Cabinet for Economic Development to further the state's economic goals through financial assistance and tax credit programs. Tax credit programs offered include those under the Bluegrass State Skills Corporation Skills Training Investment Act; the Kentucky Rural Economic Development Act (to support manufacturing enterprises in rural areas); the Kentucky Jobs Act (for the expansion of service and technology related projects); the Kentucky Industrial Development Act (for new and expanding manufacturing projects); the Kentucky Economic Opportunity Zone Program (for certified Opportunity Zones); and the Kentucky Investment Fund Act (for approved venture capital investments). Other incentives are offered under programs for Enterprise Zones, Industrial Revenue Bonds, the Commonwealth Small Business Development Corporation, the Kentucky Tourism Development Act, and the Local Government Economic Development Fund.

HEALTH

The infant mortality rate in October 2005 was estimated at 6.6 per 1,000 live births. The birth rate in 2003 was 13.4 per 1,000 population. The abortion rate stood at 5.3 per 1,000 women in 2000. In 2003, about 87% of pregnant woman received prenatal care beginning in the first trimester. In 2004, approximately 79% of children received routine immunizations before the age of three.

The crude death rate in 2003 was 9.8 deaths per 1,000 population. As of 2002, the death rates for major causes of death (per 100,000 resident population) were: heart disease, 285.8; cancer, 230.6; cerebrovascular diseases, 62.4; chronic lower respiratory diseases, 58.7; and diabetes, 30.9. The mortality rate from HIV infection was 2.4 per 100,000 population. In 2004, the reported AIDS case rate was at about 6.1 per 100,000 population. In 2002, about 59.4% of the population was considered overweight or obese. As of 2004, Kentucky hosted the highest percentage of resident smokers, with about 27.4%.

In 2003, Kentucky had 103 community hospitals with about 14,900 beds. There were about 600,000 patient admissions that year and 8.5 million outpatient visits. The average daily inpatient census was about 9,300 patients. The average cost per day for hospital care was $1,106. Also in 2003, there were about 296 certified nursing facilities in the state with 25,629 beds and an overall occupancy rate of about 89%. In 2004, it was estimated that about 71.3% of all state residents had received some type of dental care within the year. Kentucky had 233 physicians per 100,000 resident population in 2004 and 904 nurses per 100,000 in 2005. In 2004, there were a total of 2,325 dentists in the state.

About 28% of state residents were enrolled in Medicaid and Medicare programs in 2004. Approximately 14% of the state population uninsured in 2004. In 2003, state health care expenditures totaled $5 million.

SOCIAL WELFARE

In 2004, about 121,000 people received unemployment benefits, with the average weekly unemployment benefit at $257. In fiscal year 2005, the estimated average monthly participation in the food stamp program included about 570,277 persons (245,707 households); the average monthly benefit was about $89.36 per person. That year, the total of benefits paid through the state for the food stamp program was about $611.4 million.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the system of federal welfare assistance that officially replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) in 1997, was reauthorized through the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. TANF is funded through federal block grants that are divided among the states based on an equation involving the number of recipients in each state. Kentucky's TANF program is called the Kentucky Transition Assistance Program (K-TAP). In 2004, the state program had 78,000 recipients; state and federal expenditures on this TANF program totaled $119 million in fiscal year 2003.

In December 2004, Social Security benefits were paid to 784,910 Kentucky residents. This number included 408,110 retired workers, 92,390 widows and widowers, 152,410 disabled workers, 50,400 spouses, and 81,590 children. Social Security beneficiaries represented 18.9% of the total state population and 92.9% of the state's population age 65 and older. Retired workers received an average monthly payment of $903; widows and widowers, $814; disabled workers, $879; and spouses, $425. Payments for children of retired workers averaged $441 per month; children of deceased workers, $596; and children of disabled workers, $261. Federal Supplemental Security Income payments in December 2004 went to 179,438 Kentucky residents, averaging $392 a month. An additional $1.4 million of state-administered supplemental payments were distributed to 4,406 residents.

HOUSING

In 2004, Kentucky had 1,842,971 housing units, 1,647,464 of which were occupied. About 70.1% were owner-occupied. About 67% of all units were single-family, detached homes; 13.9% were mobile homes. Though most units relied on utility gas or electricity for heating, about 11,533 units used coke or coal and 37,785 relied on wood. It was estimated that 109,895 units lacked telephone service, 13,677 lacked complete plumbing facilities, and 9,421 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household had 2.45 members.

In 2004, 22,600 privately owned units were authorized for construction. The median home value was $98,438. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $888. Renters paid a median of $503 per month. In September 2005, the state received grants of $2.15 million from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for rural housing and economic development programs. For 2006, HUD allocated to the state over $27.3 million in community development block grants.

EDUCATION

Kentucky was relatively slow to establish and support its public education system and has consistently ranked below the national average in the educational attainments of its citizens. In 2004, 81.8% of all adults had completed four years of high school, below the national average of 84%; 21% had completed four or more years of college, below the national average of 26%.

The total enrollment for fall 2002 in Kentucky's public schools stood at 661,000. Of these, 477,000 attended schools from kindergarten through grade eight, and 184,000 attended high school. Approximately 87% of the students were white, 10.4% were black, 1.5% were Hispanic, 0.8% were Asian/Pacific Islander, and 0.2% were American Indian/Alaskan Native. Total enrollment was estimated at 650,000 in fall 2003 but was expected to be 618,000 by fall 2014, a decline of 6.5% during the period 2002 to 2014. Expenditures for public education in 2003/04 were estimated at $5.24 billion. There were 71,067 students enrolled in 368 private schools in fall 2003. Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has tested public school students nationwide. The resulting report, The Nation's Report Card, stated that in 2005, eighth graders in Kentucky scored 274 out of 500 in mathematics compared with the national average of 278.

As of fall 2002, there were 225,489 students enrolled in institutions of higher education; minority students comprised 10.8% of total postsecondary enrollment. As of 2005, Kentucky had 77 degree-granting institutions. Kentucky's higher education facilities include 8 public 4-year institutions, 26 public 2-year schools, and 26 private 4-year nonprofit institutions. The University of Kentucky, established in 1865 at Lexington, is the state's largest public institution. The University of Louisville (1798) is also state supported. Loans and grants to Kentucky students are provided by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority.

In 1990 the Kentucky Education Reform Act established SEEK (Support Education Excellence in Kentucky). SEEK is a program that balances the available education dollars among poor and wealthy counties.

ARTS

The Kentucky Arts Council (KAC) was formed in 1965. The council is a division of the Kentucky Department of the Arts within the Commerce Cabinet and is authorized to promote the arts through such programs as Arts in Education and the State Arts Resources Program. Other ongoing programs include the Craft Marketing Program, which promotes the state's craft industry, and the Folklife Program, a partnership with the Kentucky Historical Society. The Arts Kentucky is a statewide membership organization for artists, performers, craftspeople, and community arts groups.

The Kentucky Center for the Arts in Louisville, dedicated in 1983, serves as home to the Louisville Orchestra (est. 1937) and the Kentucky Opera the twelfth-oldest opera company in the United States. The Louisville Ballet (est. 1952) also resides in the Kentucky Center for the Arts. Over the years, the Louisville Orchestra has recorded numerous works by contemporary composers. As of 2006, the Louisville Ballet entertained more than 75,000 people each year and reached over 15,000 children annually, through their education programs.

Bluegrass, a form of country music performed on fiddle and banjo and played at a rapid tempo is named after the style pioneered by Kentuckian Bill Monroe and his Blue Grass Boys. The Actors Theater of Louisville holds the annual Humana Festival of New American Plays; in 2006 the festival celebrated its 30th anniversary.

In 2005, the KAC and other arts organizations received 22 grants totaling $1,020,800 from the National Endowment for the Arts. KAC also receives funding from the state to develop its arts education programs. Kentucky Chautauqua, an ongoing program of the Kentucky Humanities Council, sponsors impersonations of historical characters from Kentucky's past that travel across the state for presentations. In 2005, the state received nine grants totaling $1,576,792 from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS

For the fiscal year ending in June 2001, Kentucky had 116 public library systems, with a total of 189 libraries, of which 73 were branches. In that same year, the systems had a combined total of 7,891,000 volumes of books and serial publications on their shelves, and a total circulation of 20,807,000. The system also had 269,000 audio and 225,000 video items, 12,000 electronic format items (CD-ROMs, magnetic tapes, and disks), and 94 bookmobiles. The regional library system included university libraries and the state library at Frankfort, as well as city and county libraries. The Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort also maintains a research library of more than 85,000 volumes. In fiscal year 2001, operating income for the state's public library system totaled $79,874,000, including $458,000 in federal grants and $5,033,000 in state funding. For that same year, operating expenditures totaled $70,421,000, of which 56.4% was spent on staff members, and 16.4% on the collection.

The state has more than 107 museums. Art museums include the University of Kentucky Art Museum and the Headley-Whitney Museum in Lexington, the Allen R. Hite Art Institute at the University of Louisville, and the J. B. Speed Art Museum, also in Louisville. Among Kentucky's equine museums are the International Museum of the Horse and the American Horse Museum, both in Lexington, and the Kentucky Derby Museum in Louisville. The John James Audubon Museum is located in Audubon State Park at Henderson.

Leading historical sites include Abraham Lincoln's birthplace at Hodgenville and the Mary Todd Lincoln and Henry Clay homes in Lexington. The Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort operates three museums, supports a mobile museum system that brings exhibits about Kentucky history to schools, parks, and local gatherings, and aids over 400 local historical organizations.

COMMUNICATIONS

Only 91.4% of all occupied housing units in the state had a telephone in 2004. In addition, by June of that same year there were 2,000,459 mobile wireless telephone subscribers. In 2003, 58.1% of Kentucky households had a computer and 49.6% had Internet access. By June 2005, there were 370,337 high-speed lines in Kentucky, 330,957 residential and 39,362 for business.

In 1922, Kentucky's first radio broadcasting station, WHAS, was established. By 2005, there were 73 major radio stations, 15 AM and 58 FM. That year there were 29 major television broadcasting stations, including 17 public broadcasting stations. There were 576,850 television households, 65% of which received cable in 1999. By 2000, Kentucky had registered a total of 39,264 Internet domain names.

PRESS

In 2005, Kentucky had 23 daily newspapers (10 morning, 13 evening), and 14 Sunday papers.

The following table shows the leading Kentucky newspapers with their approximate 2005 circulations:

AREA NAME DAILY SUNDAY
Lexington Herald-Leader (m,S) 114,234 145,500
Louisville Courier-Journal (m,S) 207,655 273,891

Magazines include Kentucky Living and Kentucky Monthly.

ORGANIZATIONS

In 2006, there were over 3,895 nonprofit organizations registered within the state, of which about 2,524 were registered as charitable, educational, or religious organizations. Notable organizations with headquarters in Kentucky include the Thoroughbred Club of America, the United States Polo Association, the Jockeys' Guild, and the Burley Tobacco Growers Cooperative Association (all in Lexington); the Burley Auction Warehouse Association (Mt. Sterling); the National Soft ball Association in Nicholasville, and Sons of the American Revolution and the American Saddlebred Horse Association (all in Louisville).

The Council of State Governments in Lexington is a co-sponsor of the National Crime Prevention Institute and the National Emergency Management Association (both are also in Lexington). The National Police Officers Association of America is based in Louisville.

The American Quilter's Society is located in Paducah. State organizations for local arts and culture include the Filson Club, the Kentucky Guild of Artists and Craftsmen, and the Ohio Valley Art League. Special interest organizations in the state include the American Checker Federation and the Corvette Club of America.

TOURISM, TRAVEL, AND RECREATION

The economic impact of tourism within the state approached $10 billion and supported of over 164,000 travel-related jobs. The strength of this sector of the economy was attributed, in part, to the impact of the Kentucky Tourism Development Act of 1996, which provides incentives for new or expanding tourist-related businesses. As of 2003, total private investment in tourism reached $500 million.

One of the state's top tourist attractions is Mammoth Cave National Park, which contains an estimated 150 mi (241 km) of underground passages. Other units of the national park system in Kentucky include a re-creation of Abraham Lincoln's birthplace in Hodgenville and Cumberland Gap National Historical Park, which extends into Tennessee and Virginia.

The state operates 15 resort parks (13 of them year round). The state also operates 15 recreational parks and 9 shrines. Breaks Interstate Park, on the Kentucky-Virginia border, is noted for the Russell Fork River Canyon, which is 1,600 feet (488 meters) deep; the park is supported equally by the two states.

In 1979, the Kentucky Horse Park opened in Lexington. The Kentucky State Fair is held every August at Louisville. The Kentucky Derby (horse racing) is the first leg of the prestigious Triple Crown held in May in Lexington. Cave City is home to Dinosaur World.

SPORTS

There are no major league professional sports teams in Kentucky. There is a minor league baseball team in Louisville that plays in the Triple-A International League. There are also two minor league hockey teams in Kentucky that play in the American Hockey League.

The first known horse race in Kentucky was held in 1783. The annual Kentucky Derby, first run on 17 May 1875, has become the single most famous event in US thoroughbred racing. Held on the first Saturday in May at Churchill Downs in Louisville, the Derby is one of three races for three-year-olds constituting the Triple Crown. Keeneland Race Course in Lexington is the site of the Blue Grass Stakes and other major thoroughbred races. The Kentucky Futurity, an annual highlight of the harness racing season, is usually held on the first Friday in October at the Red Mile in Lexington.

Rivaling horse racing as a spectator sport is collegiate basketball. The University of Kentucky Wildcats, who play in the Southeastern Conference, won National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I basketball championships in 194849, 1951, 1958, 1978, 1996, and 1998, and the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) in 1946 and 1976. The University of Louisville Cardinals, who play in Conference USA, captured the NCAA crown in 1980 and 1986, and won an NIT title in 1956. Kentucky Wesleyan, at Owensboro, was the NCAA Division II titleholder in 1966, 196869, 1973, 1987, 1990, 1999, and 2001.

FAMOUS KENTUCKIANS

Kentucky has been the birthplace of one US president, four US vice presidents, the only president of the Confederacy, and several important jurists, statesmen, writers, artists, and sports figures.

Abraham Lincoln (180965) the 16th president of the United States, was born in Hodgenville, Hardin (now Larue) County, and spent his developing years in Indiana and Illinois. Elected as the first Republican president in 1860 and reelected in 1864, Lincoln reflected his Kentucky roots in his opposition to secession and the expansion of slavery, and in his conciliatory attitude toward the defeated southern states. His wife, Mary Todd Lincoln (181882), was a native of Lexington.

Kentucky-born US vice presidents have all been Democrats. Richard M. Johnson (17801850) was elected by the Senate after a deadlock in the Electoral College; John C. Breckinridge (182175) in 1857 became the youngest man ever to hold the office; Adlai E. Stevenson (18351914) served in Grover Cleveland's second administration. The best-known vice president was Alben W. Barkley (18771956), who, before his election with President Harry S Truman in 1948, was a US senator and longtime Senate majority leader.

Frederick M. Vinson (18901953) was the only Kentuckian to serve as chief justice of the United States. Noteworthy associate justices were John Marshall Harlan (18331911), famous for his dissent from the segregationist Plessy v. Ferguson decision (1896), and Louis B. Brandeis (18561941), the first Jew to serve on the Supreme Court and a champion of social reform.

Henry Clay (b.Virginia, 17771852) came to Lexington in 1797 and went on to serve as speaker of the US House of Representatives, secretary of state, and US senator; he was also a three-time presidential candidate. Other important federal officeholders from Kentucky include attorneys general John Breckinridge (b.Virginia, 17601806) and John J. Crittenden (17871863), who also served with distinction as US senator; treasury secretaries Benjamin H. Bristow (183096) and John G. Carlisle (18351910); and US senator John Sherman Cooper (190191). Zachary Taylor (17841850), 12th US president, spent much of his adult life in Kentucky and is buried there.

Among noteworthy state officeholders, Isaac Shelby (b. Maryland 17501826) was a leader in the movement for statehood and the first governor of Kentucky. William Goebel (18561900) was the only US governor assassinated in office. Albert B. ("Happy") Chandler (18981991), twice governor, also served as US senator and as commissioner of baseball.

A figure prominently associated with frontier Kentucky is the explorer and surveyor Daniel Boone (b.Pennsylvania, 17341820). Other frontiersmen include Kit Carson (180968) and Roy Bean (1825?1903). During the Civil War, Lincoln's principal adversary was another native Kentuckian, Jefferson Davis (180889). Davis moved south as a boy to a Mississippi plantation home, subsequently serving as US senator from Mississippi, US secretary of war, and president of the Confederate States of America.

Other personalities of significance include James G. Birney (17921857) and Cassius Marcellus Clay (18101903), both major antislavery spokesmen. Clay's daughter Laura (18491941) and Madeline Breckinridge (18721920) were important contributors to the women's suffrage movement. Henry Watterson (18401921) founded and edited the Louisville Courier-Journal and was a major adviser to the Democratic Party. Carry Nation (18461911) was a leader of the temperance movement. During the 1920s, Kentuckian John T. Scopes (190070) gained fame as the defendant in the "monkey trial" in Dayton, Tenn.; Scopes was prosecuted for teaching Darwin's theory of evolution. Whitney M. Young (192171), a prominent black leader, served as head of the National Urban League.

Thomas Hunt Morgan (18661945), honored for his work in heredity and genetics, was a Nobel Prize winner. Journalists born in Kentucky include Irvin S. Cobb (18761944), who was also a humorist and playwright, and Arthur Krock (18871974), a winner of four Pulitzer Prizes. Notable businessmen include Harland Sanders (b.Indiana, 18901980), founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurants.

Kentucky has produced several distinguished creative artists. These include painters Matthew Jouett (17871827), Frank Duveneck (18481919), and Paul Sawyer (18651917); folk song collector John Jacob Niles (18911980); and novelists Harriette Arnow (190886) and Wendell Berry (b.1934). Robert Penn Warren (190589), a novelist, poet, and critic, won the Pulitzer Prize three times and was the first author to win the award in both the fiction and poetry categories.

Among Kentuckians well recognized in the performing arts are film innovator D. W. Griffith (David Lewelyn Wark Griffith, 18751948), Academy Award-winning actress Patricia Neal (b.1926), and country music singer Loretta Lynn (b.1932). Kentucky's sports figures include basketball coach Adolph Rupp (b.Kansas, 190177), shortstop Harold ("Pee Wee") Reese (191999), football great Paul Hornung (b.1935), and world heavyweight boxing champions Jimmy Ellis (b.1940) and Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay, b.1942).

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alvey, R. Gerald. Kentucky Bluegrass Country. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1992.

Bryant, Ron D. Kentucky History: An Annotated Bibliography. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2000.

Burns, David M. Gateway: Dr. Thomas Walker and the Opening of Kentucky. Middlesboro, Ky.: Bell County Historical Society, 2000.

Clark, Thomas Dionysius. The Kentucky. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1992.

Council of State Governments. The Book of the States, 2006 Edition. Lexington, Ky.: Council of State Governments, 2006.

Friend, Craig Thompson. Along the Maysville Road: The Early American Republic in the Trans-Appalachian West. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2005.

Harrison, Lowell Hayes, and James C. Klotter. A New History of Kentucky. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1997.

Jones, K. Randell. In the Footsteps of Daniel Boone. Winston-Salem, N.C.: John F. Blair, 2005.

Klass, Raymond. Mammoth Cave National Park: Reflections. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2005.

Kozar, Richard. Daniel Boone and the Exploration of the Frontier. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 1999.

Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development. Division of Research. 1997 Kentucky Deskbook of Economic Statistics. Frankfort, 1997.

Kleber, John E. (ed.). The Kentucky Encyclopedia. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1992.

Lucas, Marion Brunson. A History of Blacks in Kentucky: From Slavery to Segregation, 17601891. 2nd ed. Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society, 2003.

Miller, Penny M. Kentucky Politics & Government: Do We Stand United? Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1994.

US Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, US Census Bureau. Kentucky, 2000. Summary Social, Economic, and Housing Characteristics: 2000 Census of Population and Housing. Washington, D.C.: US Government Printing Office, 2003.

Williams, Rob (comp.). A Citizen's Guide to the Kentucky Constitution. Rev. ed. Frankfort: Legislative Research Commission, 1995.

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Kentucky

KENTUCKY

KENTUCKY. The date the first human walked on the land that now comprises Kentucky remains unknown to history. Archaeologists indicate it took place over twelve thousand years ago. But leaving no written record, no history, those lives can only be re-created by archaeological investigations, which describe the Native American presence in four stages. Paleo-indians, living from 12,000 years before the present (b.p.) to around 10,000, saw the end of the Ice Age. They were hunter-gathers who moved often, and their lives centered on simple survival. During the Archaic Period (1000 b.p.–3000 b.p.) the people in Kentucky continued to hunt and developed some limited trade routes. In the third culture, that of the Woodland Indians, which included the Hopewell and Adena subcultures, a more settled lifestyle resulted from agricultural cultivation. The final period, dating from the years a.d. 1000 to around a.d. 1700, has been called the Late Prehistoric or in the east the Fort Ancient and in the west the Mississippian. The latter featured sizable fortified villages with mounds organized around the water courses that supported farms.

Having been the lone occupiers of the land for century after century, Native Americans finally found that the place called Kentucky no longer would be theirs without conflict. The region quickly became a middle ground, a place of contact. Unfortunately one of the critical contacts came in the form of microbes. Disease probably had a greater impact than any other forms of contact with the European colonies. Death swept the land, tribal patterns changed, Indian numbers fell, and Native life never returned to past ways. When the first explorers from the colonies arrived, they found a different place than what had existed only a few years before. Once heavily peopled, Kentucky seemed vacant of inhabitants. The last recorded interior Indian village, Eskippakithiki, was abandoned by the 1750s. The region seemed to be more of a fought-over buffer between tribes to the north and south, and while various groups hunted the land, early English hunters and explorers left no record of seeing semipermanent villages. To their land-hungry eyes the area seemed to be a prize waiting to be taken.

Word soon spread across the colonial backcountry that beyond the mountains lay a land of much promise with fine forests, abundant game, and rich soil. Driven by this image of plenty and promise, imbued with "Kentucky fever," more and more ventured across the mountains to this First West. A series of long hunters, of whom Daniel Boone, James Harrod, and Simon Kenton are the best known, started the process, and land companies soon sent their own surveyors to map out the unexplored territory. Conflict with the Native peoples intensified. Mostly occurring while the Revolutionary War raged, the settlement of Kentucky represented simply another front in that conflict and a bloody one.

Coming down the Ohio River, Harrod established the first permanent settlement at Harrodsburg in 1774. Boone, working for the Transylvania Land Company, followed buffalo trails in part and blazed the Wilderness Road from Cumberland Gap to the central Bluegrass. These two paths were followed by thousands of men and women over the next two decades, and by the first census in 1790 some seventy-three thousand people (16 percent of them slaves) had moved to what was then part of Virginia. Others, about one in seventy who migrated, had been killed in the attempt. In those decades from settlement in the 1770s until the peace that followed the War of 1812, Kentucky started as the first step in the new nation's move westward, represented a testing ground for new ideas and plans, and matured into a new state, the first state west of the mountain barriers. Yet none of that came easily.

The land of milk and honey was also, as one Indian called it, "a dark and bloody ground." Yet the hopes and dreams of those in less-promising situations to the east brought many to risk all to try to find a better future. Some in fact did just that, and their descendants lived better lives as a result. However, for some the myth of plenty proved elusive. By 1800 half of Kentuckians owned land, but as many did not. That contradictory nature of early Kentucky has been a theme throughout the state's history.

Statehood and Slavery

As the region filled with people, questions arose on what future course should be followed, separation from Virginia and statehood, or something else? The so-called Spanish conspiracy, which left many Kentucky leaders under the pay of Spain, failed in its efforts to encourage Kentucky to become a separate nation. In 1792 Kentucky entered the Union as the fifteenth state with Isaac Shelby as its governor, and within a few months Frankfort became its capital. But issues of separation and of a state's role in the Union continued. Distrust of federal support for Kentucky's needs caused several prominent leaders, including the war hero George Rogers Clark, to aid the so-called French conspiracy in 1794 and later the Burr conspiracy. Reaction to Federalist actions in 1798 and 1799 brought forth the Kentucky Resolutions defending states' rights and even nullification. Yet these sentiments were partly muted over succeeding decades as Kentuckians fought in the nation's wars and as the rise of Henry Clay and his American System stressed the idea of a powerful, united country. Still Kentucky remained that middle ground of frontier times, only now a meeting place for South, North, and West.

The contrasting aspects present in early Kentucky emerged in the first constitution in 1792. While containing many elements that restricted the role of the people, indirect selection of state senators and the governor, for instance, it also included universal manhood suffrage except for slaves, the first to do so in the United States. In more debatable terms it opened the floodgates toward what became 120 counties, the third highest number in the nation. For a considerable time these almost self-perpetuating, feudal-like entities, those "little kingdoms," dominated the political face of Kentucky.

That contrast between an almost aristocratic heritage and a democratic one, as shown early in the settling of the land and in the formation of the first constitution, represented only one of the divisions that brought the historian Thomas D. Clark to call Kentucky a "land of contrast." Those divisions were clearly demonstrated when citizens turned to the subject of slavery. From the earliest English explorations, such as that of Christopher Gist in 1750–1751, black slaves had been a part of discovering the "new Eden." Harrodsburg's 1777 census showed that one in ten in that frontier post were enslaved peoples, and blacks fought side by side with whites against the common Indian foe, sometimes at the cost of their lives. But when the Indian wars ended and decision time came, ruling whites placed more emphasis on establishing slavery as a way to regulate race relations and as an economic system than on the idea of equality. By 1830 slaves made up 24 percent of the commonwealth's population, and on the eve of the Civil War, Kentucky had the third highest number of slaveholders among the slave states.

At the same time Kentucky had the third lowest average number of slaves held, 5.5 per family, and many places, such as the eastern mountains, held few slaves at all. Moreover a vocal antislavery movement existed throughout the antebellum period, ranging from the conservative colonization-oriented plans of Henry Clay and Robert J. Breckinridge to the vocal opposition of Cassius M. Clay to the true egalitarianism of John G. Fee. Yet as the eloquent voices of escaped Kentucky slaves, such as Henry Bibb, Josiah Henson, and the novelist William Wells Brown, showed, freedom came to most bondspeople through their own actions.

Slavery represented another paradox in a state that before the Civil War had become one of the most important and prosperous in the nation. In 1840 it stood first in the United States in the production of hemp and wheat, second in tobacco and corn, third in flax, and fourth in rye. Its reputation for producing fine thoroughbreds had already been established and later was enhanced with the Kentucky Derby, which began in 1875. Moreover for a time Kentucky's Transylvania University, with its medical and law schools, was the place of choice for the education of southern gentlemen as it was one of the best schools in the nation. In religion the Great Revival of 1801 spread from Kentucky across the nation as well, and a more diversified worship emerged. By 1850 Kentucky stood eighth in the United States in population and had a reputation as a modern, forward-looking commonwealth, a place for the ambitious and eager.

The state's antebellum importance came through clearly in the area of politics. Between 1824 and 1860 a Kentuckian ran for either president or vice president in seven of the ten presidential races. Three times the Whig leader Henry Clay won electoral votes. Twice Kentuckians served as vice president, the Democrats Richard M. Johnson and John C. Breckinridge, the latter also a presidential candidate who lost in 1860 to the native Kentuckian Abraham Lincoln. Ten Kentuckians filled presidents' cabinets, and three served as Speaker of the House.

When the threat of civil war emerged in the late 1850s, Henry Clay and his Whig Party had both died, the Know-Nothings had won a governorship in 1855 after a bloody riot in the state's economic center Louisville, and a divided commonwealth faced an uncertain future. With the failure of the Kentuckian John J. Crittenden's attempt at a compromise to keep the Union together, the state officially chose a pattern of neutrality from May to September 1861, and the nation divided into the United States, the Confederate States, and Kentucky. But, indicative of the state's past, Kentucky wanted both the Union and slavery and did not see the war as one against the "peculiar institution" at the conflict's beginning. Elections and enlistments showed a pro-union emphasis, and the commonwealth abandoned neutrality and remained officially a loyal state. Those friendly to the southern cause called a rump convention and declared the state a part of the Confederacy, and Kentucky became a star in both flags. Before it all ended perhaps as many as 100,000 fought for the North (23,000 of them former slaves, the second largest number of all the states), while some 40,000 entered the ranks of the Confederacy. It truly was a brothers' war for Kentucky.

The initial southern defense line from Cumberland Gap to the Mississippi splintered after defeats at Mill Springs and Fort Donelson in early 1862. That fall a major Confederate invasion tasted early success at the Battle of Richmond in Kentucky but then ended in retreat after the bloody Battle of Perryville on 8 October 1862. Thereafter raids by General John Hunt Morgan and brutal guerrilla warfare marked the rest of the conflict.

Perhaps the greatest effect of the war came from developments away from the battlefield. As the issue of slavery became a war aim, that, together with the unpopular Union military rule, turned Kentuckians more and more against the cause they had initially supported. By the war's end the commonwealth had become as sympathetic to the South as any of the seceding states. As a loyal state it never went through Reconstruction officially, but the "lost cause" attitudes displayed toward former slaves and toward the federal government brought martial law and the Freed-men's Bureau to Kentucky. The state became almost a spokesperson for the South, especially through the columns of the powerful Louisville Courier-Journal, edited by

Henry Watterson. For the next three decades the once-minority Democrats ruled with few challenges, and ex-Confederates, not the once-dominant Unionists, guided it.

Postwar Kentucky

Few reform elements emerged in those years. A fledgling women's rights group did organize in 1881, the first in the South. Advocates such as Laura Clay and Madeline McDowell Breckinridge eventually earned national leadership roles and made the state a strong force for suffrage, ratifying the federal amendment in 1920. During the same time the commonwealth once more showed its varied faces in its ability to reconcile racing, red-eye whiskey, and religion all at the same time. Kentucky voted in statewide prohibition despite its role as the nation's leading producer of bourbon, and in the 1920s it even seriously debated ending pari-mutuel betting despite its dependence on the horse industry.

But more reflective of the half century following the Civil War was the role violence played in Kentucky. In lynchings and in personal, honor-based actions, the commonwealth varied little from southern patterns. However, in the Appalachian Mountains feud violence broke out in a dozen or more major conflicts, the best-known (but not the bloodiest) of which was the Hatfield-McCoy dispute. Kentucky's increasing image as a place of violence intensified in January 1900 with the assassination of Governor William Goebel, the only governor to die in office as a result of assassination, and with the Black Patch War in the first decade of the twentieth century. That war united farmers against tobacco companies in what has been called the largest mass agricultural protest movement in the nation. Night riders used violence to enforce the growers' will and to intimidate the buyers, and the state's reputation suffered. With the boom and bust cycles in the eastern coal fields, labor and management divisions in the 1930s gave "Bloody Harlan" its name. But by the end of the twentieth century Kentucky ranked low on the crime scale in a drastic reversal.

The violent acts one after the other, the effect of prohibition on the economy, the lack of leadership, and a decline in education from its once-strong place in the South hurt Kentucky in the twentieth century. Despite the presence of military bases, such as Fort Knox with its gold depository, World War II also affected that growth, for of all the southern states Kentucky grew tenth slowest. Outmigrations to jobs in the North intensified in wartime and continued in the 1950s as the coal mines mechanized and Appalachians left for urban areas beyond the Ohio. But almost quietly Kentucky's economy changed. The 1960s War on Poverty did help those of lower income levels. Jobs also resulted when businesses expanded or new ones started, chiefly in Louisville and Lexington, including GE, Ford, Corvette, Brown-Foreman, Humana, Toyota, UPS, IBM (later Lexmark), Ashland Oil, and Kentucky Fried Chicken (Yum!Brands). While tardy in constructing highways, the state built interstates and toll roads that soon provided an excellent system that, coupled with river routes and rails as well as the state's central location, made it increasingly attractive to businesses. By the start of the twenty-first century the state's working profile largely resembled the nation's regarding manufacturing jobs. Kentucky was the third leading producer of motor vehicles and carried on extensive world trade, for example. Yet the one-time mainstays of the state, thoroughbreds, coal, and tobacco, still heavily influenced an economy that had moved beyond them in some ways.

Education remained a key to the so-called "new economy," and Kentucky for many decades of the 1900s stood near the bottom of the states in that regard. State-funded institutions of higher education began with the present-day University of Kentucky in 1865, Kentucky State University (as a segregated school) in 1886, various teacher colleges in 1908 and again in 1922, and the University of Louisville and Northern Kentucky University at the end of the 1960s. Combining those with an extensive community college system and strong private colleges, such as Transylvania, Centre, and Georgetown, the state offered the instruction needed, but too few attended. By 1980 the commonwealth stood near the bottom in high school and college graduates. In a 1989 decision the state supreme court ruled the existing elementary and secondary system unconstitutional, and the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) crafted an entirely new approach in 1990. Other states began to look on the commonwealth as a model for reform, and statistical improvements did follow. However, long decades of neglect and a poorly educated population meant that the issue remained.

Ironically, given the state's poverty and low educational attainments, Kentucky has had an exceptionally strong literary tradition and rich folklife element. Robert Penn Warren provided the most visible example of that, winning Pulitzer Prizes in both fiction and poetry, the only American so honored. But many others have made significant impacts as well, including James Lane Allen, John Fox Jr., Annie Fellows Johnston (The Little Colonel), Alice Hegan Rice (Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch), Irvin S. Cobb, Elizabeth Maddox Roberts, Allen Tate, Caroline Gordon, Cleanth Brooks, Jesse Stuart, James Still, Harriette Arnow (The Dollmaker), A. B. Guthrie, Janice Holt Giles, Thomas Merton, Bobbie Ann Mason, and Wendell Berry. Some strengths appeared in art over the years, such as Matthew Jouett, Paul Sawyier, and Frank Duveneck, and a few in film, such as the director D. W. Griffith, but another real area of contribution has been music. The bluegrass style of Bill Monroe represented part of a rich tradition in folk and country, with Kentuckians standing second in the number of representatives in the Country Music Hall of Fame. A strong arts community in Louisville, with its festival of new plays the centerpiece, showed the range of interests in the commonwealth.

But in some ways politics, even more than basketball, where the commonwealth's university and college teams have won many national titles, long dominated conversation. From 1895, when the first Republican governor was elected, until 1931 a fairly strong two-party system operated. The New Deal, with its actions that helped bring blacks and labor into the Democratic fold, gave that party almost unbroken control of the legislature and governor's office over the next decades. In the last three-quarters of the twentieth century Republicans held the executive office only eight years. At the same time the state's conservative voting nature emerged in elections for national office, with citizens selecting Republicans more often than Democrats in the late twentieth century. A 1992 amendment to the outdated 1891 state constitution finally allowed governors to serve two terms, which countered somewhat a growing legislative independence. Serious political corruption in the BOPTROT scandal that erupted in the early 1990s ended in the convictions of over a dozen legislators and one of the strongest ethics laws in the nation. Throughout all that the state produced several strong leaders at both the national and state levels, including Senator Alben Barkley, majority leader under Franklin Roosevelt; A. B. "Happy" Chandler, senator, two-term governor, and baseball commissioner; Chief Justice Fred Vinson; Senators John Sherman Cooper and Wendell Ford, the latter a majority whip; and Governors Earle Clements and Bert Combs.

Only slowly have two groups shared in that success. African Americans, for example, found their life after the Civil War segregated and restricted, varying little from southern patterns. The last integrated college in the South, Berea, was forced by state action to segregate in 1904. Yet unlike in the South, Kentucky blacks continued to vote, giving them an important power that translated into some support. Still, what the historian George C. Wright called a facade of polite racism dominated efforts at real equality. Work by Kentucky leaders, such as Charles W. Anderson Jr., the first black state legislator in the South after decades of exclusion; Whitney M. Young Jr., the head of the Urban League; and state senator Georgia Powers, helped break down the legal barriers. Nevertheless racism and lack of economic opportunity convinced many to migrate, and the state's African American population fell to some 7 percent. The commonwealth's Civil Rights Act of 1966 and Fair Housing Act two years later were the first in the South, and studies placed state schools as the most integrated in the nation by the 1990s.

After getting the vote, women reflected the state's dual character as well. The commonwealth elected one of the first eight women to Congress, Katherine Langley, and one of the first half-dozen women governors, Martha Layne Collins. It supported women's rights in the early struggle and ratified the failed Equal Rights Amendment decades later. Yet in the early twenty-first century Kentucky ranked near the bottom in the percentage of women legislators in its 138-member body and low in females in managerial positions and as business owners.

By the first decade of the twenty-first century the commonwealth stood exactly in the middle of the states in population, and its 4,041,769 residents ranked high in the nation in the percentage of people who still lived in the state of their birth. More urban than rural for the first time in 1970, a half century after the nation as a whole, Kentucky remained tied to the ideals of the family farm, small town life, and a sense of place. But another side of Kentucky reflected all the elements of modern America. In short, the contrasts that marked the state over the years continued.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Aron, Stephen. How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky from Daniel Boone to Henry Clay. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.

Clark, Thomas D. Kentucky: Land of Contrast. New York: Harper and Row, 1968.

Harrison, Lowell H. The Civil War in Kentucky. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1975.

Harrison, Lowell H., ed. Kentucky's Governors, 1792–1985. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1985.

Harrison, Lowell H., and James C. Klotter. A New History of Kentucky. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1997.

Kleber, John E., ed. The Kentucky Encyclopedia. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1992.

Klotter, James C. Kentucky: Portrait in Paradox, 1900–1950. Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society, 1996.

Klotter, James C., ed. Our Kentucky: A Study of the Bluegrass State. Rev. ed. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2000.

Lewis, R. Barry, ed. Kentucky Archaeology. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1996.

Lucas, Marion B., and George C. Wright. A History of Blacks in Kentucky. 2 vols. Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society, 1992.

Tapp, Hambleton, and James C. Klotter. Kentucky: Decades of Discord, 1865–1900. Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society, 1977.

Ulack, Richard, ed. Atlas of Kentucky. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1998.

Ward, William S. A Literary History of Kentucky. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1988.

James C.Klotter

See alsoBluegrass Country ; Coal Mining and Organized Labor ; Feuds, Appalachian Mountain ; Horse Racing and Showing ; Music: Bluegrass ; Westward Migration .

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Kentucky (state, United States)

Kentucky (kəntŭk´ē, kĬn–), state of the SE central United States. It is bordered by West Virginia and Virginia (E); Tennessee (S); the Mississippi River, across which lies Missouri (SW); and Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio, all across the Ohio River (W, N).

Facts and Figures

Area, 40,395 sq mi (104,623 sq km). Pop. (2010) 4,339,367, a 7.4% increase since the 2000 census. Capital, Frankfort. Largest city, Louisville. Statehood, June 1, 1792 (15th state). Highest pt., Black Mt., 4,145 ft (1,264 m); lowest pt., Mississippi River, 257 ft (78 m). Nickname, Bluegrass State. Motto, United We Stand, Divided We Fall. State bird, cardinal. State flower, goldenrod. State tree, Kentucky coffee tree. Abbr., Ky.; KY

Geography

From elevations of about 2,000 ft (610 m) on the Cumberland Plateau in the southeast, where Black Mt. (4,145 ft/1,263 m) marks the state's highest point, Kentucky slopes to elevations of less than 800 ft (244 m) along the western rim. The narrow valleys and sharp ridges of the mountain region are noted for forests of giant hardwoods and scented pine and for springtime blooms of laurel, magnolia, rhododendron, and dogwood. Unfortunately, these forests have suffered from the effects of acid rain. To the west, the plateau breaks in a series of escarpments, bordering a narrow plains region interrupted by many single conical peaks called knobs. Surrounded by the knobs region on the south, west, and east and extending as far west as Louisville is the bluegrass country, the heart and trademark of the state.

To the south and west lie the rolling plains and rocky hillsides of the Pennyroyal, a region that takes its name from a species of mint that grows abundantly in the area. There, underground streams have washed through limestone to form miles of subterranean passages, some of the notable ones being in Mammoth Cave National Park.

Northwest Kentucky is generally rough, rolling terrain, with scattered but important coal deposits. The isolated far-western region, bounded by the Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee rivers, is referred to as the Purchase, or Jackson Purchase (for Andrew Jackson, who was a prominent member of the commission that bought it from the Chickasaw in 1818). Consisting of floodplains and rolling uplands, it is among the largest migratory bird flyways in the United States.

Rivers are an important feature of Kentucky geography. The Ohio River forms the entire northern boundary of the state, flowing generally SW below Covington, until it joins the Mississippi River W of Paducah. At the southwest tip of the state about 5 sq mi (13 sq km) of Kentucky territory, created by a double hairpin turn in the Mississippi River, protrudes N from Tennessee into Missouri and is entirely separate from the rest of the state. In the east, the Big Sandy River and its tributary, the Tug Fork, form the boundary with West Virginia. Many rapid creeks in the Cumberland Mountains feed the Kentucky, the Cumberland, and the Licking rivers, which, together with the Tennessee and the Ohio, are the chief rivers of the state. The Kentucky Dam on the Tennessee River near Paducah, is a major part of the Tennessee Valley Authority system.

Kentucky's climate is generally mild, with few extremes of heat and cold. Frankfort is the capital, Louisville and Lexington the largest cities. Little remains of Kentucky's great forests that once spread over three quarters of the state and were renowned for their size and density. Tourist attractions include the famous Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs in Louisville and the celebrated horse farms surrounding Lexington in the heart of the bluegrass region. The Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site and Cumberland Gap National Historic Park are historic landmarks. At Fort Knox is the U.S. Depository.

Economy

Kentucky is noted for the distilling of Bourbon whiskey and for the breeding of thoroughbred racehorses. Tobacco, in which Kentucky is second only to North Carolina among U.S. producers, has long been the state's chief crop, and it is also its chief farm product, followed by horses and mules, cattle, and corn. Dairy goods, hay, and soybeans are also important.

Kentucky derives the greatest share of its income, however, from industry. Even Lexington, one of the world's largest loose-leaf tobacco markets, is industrialized. The state's chief manufactures include electrical equipment, food products, automobiles, nonelectrical machinery, chemicals, and apparel. Printing and publishing as well as tourism have become important industries. Kentucky is also one of the major U.S. producers of coal, the state's most valuable mineral; stone, petroleum, and natural gas are also extracted.

Government and Higher Education

Kentucky's state constitution was adopted in 1891. The governor is elected for a term of four years. The general assembly, or legislature, is bicameral, with a senate of 38 members and a house of representatives of 100 members. Kentucky is represented in the U.S. Congress by six representatives and two senators and has eight electoral votes. Paul Patton, a Democrat, was elected governor in 1995 and reelected in 1999, but Republican Ernie Fletcher won the governorship in 2003. In 2007 Fletcher lost his bid for reelection to Democrat Steve Beshear; Beshear was reelected in 2011.

Institutions of higher learning include the Univ. of Kentucky and Transylvania Univ., at Lexington; the Univ. of Louisville, at Louisville; Eastern Kentucky Univ., at Richmond; Murray State Univ., at Murray; Western Kentucky Univ., at Bowling Green; Kentucky Wesleyan College, at Owensboro; Union College, at Barbourville, Kentucky State Univ., at Frankfort; and Berea College, at Berea.

History

Early Exploration and Settlement

When the Eastern seaboard of North America was being colonized in the 1600s, Kentucky was part of the inaccessible country beyond the mountains. After Robert Cavelier, sieur de La Salle, claimed all regions drained by the Mississippi and its tributaries for France, British interest in the area quickened. The first major expedition to the Tennessee region was led by Dr. Thomas Walker, who explored the eastern mountain region in 1750 for the Loyal Land Company. Walker was soon followed by hunters and scouts including Christopher Gist. Further exploration was interrupted by the last conflict (1754–63) of the French and Indian Wars between the French and British for control of North America, and Pontiac's Rebellion, a Native American uprising (1763–66).

With the British victorious in both, settlers soon began to enter Kentucky. They came in defiance of a royal proclamation of 1763, which forbade settlement west of the Appalachians. Daniel Boone, the famous American frontiersman, first came to Kentucky in 1767; he returned in 1769 and spent two years in the area. A surveying party under James Harrod established the first permanent settlement at Harrodsburg in 1774, and the next year Boone, as agent for Richard Henderson and the Transylvania Company, a colonizing group of which Henderson was a member, blazed the Wilderness Road from Tennessee into the Kentucky region and founded Boonesboro. Title to this land was challenged by Virginia, whose legislature voided (1778) the Transylvania Company's claims, although individual settlers were confirmed in their grants.

Native American Resistance and Statehood

Kentucky was made (1776) a county of Virginia, and new settlers came through the Cumberland Gap and over the Wilderness Road or down the Ohio River. These early pioneers of Kentucky and Tennessee were constantly in conflict with the Native Americans. The growing population of Kentuckians, feeling that Virginia had failed to give them adequate protection, worked for statehood in a series of conventions held at Danville (1784–91). Others, observing the weaknesses of the U.S. government, considered forming an independent nation. Since trade down the Mississippi and out of Spanish-held New Orleans was indispensable to Kentucky's economic development, an alliance with Spain was contemplated, and U.S. General James Wilkinson, who lived in Kentucky at the time, worked toward that end.

However, in 1792 a constitution was finally framed and accepted, and in the same year the Commonwealth of Kentucky (its official designation) was admitted to the Union, the first state W of the Appalachians. Isaac Shelby was elected the first governor, and Frankfort was chosen capital. U.S. General Anthony Wayne's victory at the battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794 effectively ended Native American resistance in Kentucky.

River Rights and Banking Problems

In 1795, Pinckney's Treaty between the United States and Spain granted Americans the right to navigate the Mississippi, a right soon completely assured by the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. Enactment by the federal government of the Alien and Sedition Acts (1798) promptly provoked a sharp protest in Kentucky (see Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions). The state grew fast as trade and shipping centers developed and river traffic down the Ohio and Mississippi increased.

The War of 1812 spurred economic prosperity in Kentucky, but financial difficulties after the war threatened many with ruin. The state responded to the situation by chartering in 1818 a number of new banks that were allowed to issue their own currency. These banks soon collapsed, and the state legislature passed measures for the relief of the banks' creditors. However, the relief measures were subsequently declared unconstitutional by a state court. The legislature then repealed legislation that had established the offending court and set up a new one. The state became divided between prorelief and antirelief factions, and the issue also figured in the division of the state politically between followers of the Tennessean Andrew Jackson, then rising to national political prominence, and supporters of the Whig Party of Henry Clay, who was a leader in Kentucky politics for almost half a century.

The Slavery Issue and Civil War

In the first half of the 19th cent., Kentucky was primarily a state of small farms rather than large plantations and was not adaptable to extensive use of slave labor. Slavery thus declined after 1830, and for 17 years, beginning in 1833, the importation of slaves into the state was forbidden. In 1850, however, the legislature repealed this restriction, and Kentucky, where slave trading had begun to develop quietly in the 1840s, was converted into a huge slave market for the lower South.

Antislavery agitation had begun in the state in the late 18th cent. within the churches, and abolitionists such as James G. Birney and Cassius M. Clay labored vigorously in Kentucky for emancipation before the Civil War. Soon Kentucky, like other border states, was torn by conflict over the slavery issue. In addition to the radical antislavery element and the aggressive proslavery faction, there was also in the state a conciliatory group.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Kentucky attempted to remain neutral. Gov. Beriah Magoffin refused to sanction President Lincoln's call for volunteers, but his warnings to both the Union and the Confederacy not to invade were ignored. Confederate forces invaded and occupied part of S Kentucky, including Columbus and Bowling Green. The state legislature voted (Sept., 1861) to oust the Confederates and Ulysses S. Grant crossed the Ohio and took Paducah, thus securing the state was secured for the Union. After battles in Mill Springs, Richmond, and Perryville in 1862, there was no major fighting in the state, although the Confederate cavalryman John Hunt Morgan occasionally led raids into Kentucky, and guerrilla warfare was constant.

For Kentucky it was truly a civil war as neighbors, friends, and even families became bitterly divided in their loyalties. Over 30,000 Kentuckians fought for the Confederacy, while about 64,000 served in the Union ranks. After the war many in the state opposed federal Reconstruction policies, and Kentucky refused to ratify the Thirteenth and Fourteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

Postwar Adjustment

As in the South, an overwhelming majority of Kentuckians supported the Democratic party in the period of readjustment after the war, which in many ways was as bitter as the war itself. After the Civil War industrial and commercial recovery was aided by increased railroad construction, but farmers were plagued by the liabilities of the one-crop (tobacco) system. After the turn of the century, the depressed price of tobacco gave rise to a feud between buyers and growers, resulting in the Black Patch War. Night riders terrorized buyers and growers in an effort to stage an effective boycott against monopolistic practices of buyers. For more than a year general lawlessness prevailed until the state militia forced a truce in 1908.

The Twentieth Century

Coal mining, which began on a large scale in the 1870s, was well established in mountainous E Kentucky by the early 20th cent. The mines boomed during World War I, but after the war, when demand for coal lessened and production fell off, intense labor troubles developed. The attempt of the United Mine Workers of America (UMW) to organize the coal industry in Harlan co. in the 1930s resulted in outbreaks of violence, drawing national attention to "bloody" Harlan, and in 1937 a U.S. Senate subcommittee began an investigation into allegations that workers' civil rights were being violated. Further violence ensued, and it was not until 1939 that the UMW was finally recognized as a bargaining agent for most of the state's miners. Labor disputes and strikes have persisted in the state; some are still accompanied by violence.

After World War I improvements of the state's highways were made, and a much-needed reorganization of the state government was carried out in the 1920s and 30s. Since World War II, construction of turnpikes, extensive development of state parks, and a marked rise in tourism have all contributed to the development of the state. Kentucky benefited from the energy crisis of the 1970s, enjoying new prosperity when its large coal supply was in great demand during the 70s and 80s. The broader economy, however, recovered slowly from a decline in manufacturing during the same period.

Bibliography

See S. A. Channing, Kentucky (1977); F. G. Davenport, Ante-Bellum Kentucky: A Social History, 1800–1860 (1943, repr. 1983); J. Goldstein, Kentucky Government and Politics (1984); W. Winton, Pioneer Ghosts of Kentucky (1987).

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Kentucky

KENTUCKY


British and American surveyors, Thomas Walker and Christopher Gist first explored eastern and central Kentucky in 1751. As part of what was then called "the West," Kentucky held great promises for the use of its fertile land and abundant hunting grounds. Despite a British ban on western migration, settlers gradually began coming to Kentucky. In 1774 Harrodstown (now Harrodsburg) became the first white settlement in the region.

The Transylvania Land Company, assisted by famous frontiersman Daniel Boone (17341820), bought up a large tract of land from the Cherokee Nation and founded Fort Boonesborough in 1775. The colony of Virginia claimed Kentucky as part of its territory at this time. During and after the American Revolution (17751783) immigrants streamed in to the region, coming down the Ohio River or through the Cumberland Gap, as Kentucky became the principal route for migration into the Mississippi Valley. The settlements grew, and Kentucky strained at its bonds to Virginia. In 1792 Kentucky entered the Union as the fifteenth state.

Agricultural and processing industries enabled Kentucky to prosper over the next few decades. Kentucky was tied to the lower South economically, especially after the construction of a canal around the Ohio River Falls at Louisville in 1829. Kentucky supplied hemp, used to make ropes and bagging for cotton bales, as well as producing hogs, mules, workhorses, corn, flour, salt, and prepared meats. The state also became a large grower of tobacco, which by 1860 accounted for half the agricultural income in the state. Whiskey production began in the 1860s, with the most popular brew taking the name of the county where it was produced: Bourbon. Horse breeding and racing also developed during this period and became the trademark industry in the Bluegrass area near Lexington.

Kentucky was one of the border states with divided loyalties during the American Civil War (186165). Although the state ultimately backed the Union, thousands of soldiers from Kentucky also fought on the side of the Confederacy. A period of unrest and chaos followed the war during the Reconstruction (18651877) period.

By the 1870s economic health was gradually being restored in Kentucky. Liberal tax laws helped railroad construction to increase dramatically, and eastern Kentucky saw extensive development of timber and coal reserves. Many rural people moved into the cities of Louisville and Lexington as industrial growth flourished. In 1900 Kentucky held first place in per capita income among the southern states.

A bleaker picture, however, faced farmers in the state. The "dark-leaf" tobacco farmers of eastern Kentucky, as well as other farmers, experienced long-term price depression. Good land was also becoming hard to come by, as the size of the average family farm dropped to less than ten acres, and many were forced to become tenant farmers. New social movements aimed at farm unrest, including the Grange, the Farmers' Alliance, and the Populist Party, found many supporters in Kentucky.

Another of Kentucky's most important industries, coal mining, was going through hard times at the beginning of the twentieth century. By the late nineteenth century lower-sulfur coal had been mined out of the Cumberland coal reserves in the Appalachian region. Distant corporations with a highly developed profit motive employed many but did little to improve the ordinary lives of the people they employed. As mechanization of coal mining increased, jobs in the mining areas of the state became increasingly hard to come by. Deep mining began to give way to strip mining during this period.

During the 1920s a great deal of economic change hit Kentucky. The development of modern highways brought the political power center of the state to the Highway Commission. Political patronage under Governor Flem Sampson controlled nearly all the highway jobs until Sampson's ouster in 1931. Meanwhile, in the distillery industry, the enactment of Prohibition in 1918 had put thousands out of work. Coal mining experienced a boom in the early twenties, but declining prices after 1927 put thousands more into unemployment lines. Violent confrontations between mine owners and workers became common during this time. In Harlan and Bell counties hostilities were especially rampant and caused property destruction and many deaths.

During the dark days of the Great Depression (19291939) in the 1930s, Governor Albert B. ("Happy") Chandler brought a kind of "conservative progressivism" to the state after years of factional party politics. He used federal dollars from New Deal programs to cancel the state sales tax in favor of a progressive income tax and controversial taxes on cigarettes, whiskey, and beer. An unfortunate consequence of the sales tax loss prompted a downhill slide in funding for education and health care in the state. Adding to the state's woes, there were a number of violent confrontations during the 1930s between the United Mine Workers (UMW) and mine owners in eastern Kentucky. By 1940 Kentucky had acquired a negative image nationwide because of political corruption, poverty, and labor unrest. In that year the state ranked last among 48 states in per capita income.

World War II (193945) brought an economic boost to the state's economy by increasing the demand for coal and farm products, and also by stimulating the development of industry. As industries grew over the subsequent decades the percentage of people employed in farming decreased. Between 1945 and 1980 the farm population was reduced by 76 percent. Companies such as General Electric and Ford in Louisville and Rockwell International in Clark County helped bring Kentucky industry into the twentieth century. Lexington in particular changed from a farm and college town into a fast-growing metropolitan era, beginning with the arrival of International Business Machines (IBM) in 1956. A good measure of Kentucky's rise from the economic doldrums came from a steady influx of workers from 1970 on, after years of population loss.

Though still a poor state, economic conditions in Kentucky were greatly improved by the end of the twentieth century. The Bluegrass area and industrial cities were generally the most prosperous parts of the state. Despite federal programs that began in the 1960s to raise incomes in the eastern coal mining regions, income there was still lower and unemployment higher than in other areas of the state. A far higher percentage of the population in the Appalachian counties fell below the federal poverty level than in other counties. Though manufacturing cities, primarily along the Ohio River, provided high levels of employment, the state as a whole ranked only 42nd out of 50 states in per capita income with an average of $19,687 in 1996. Coal was still an important product of Kentucky, with over 114 million tons mined in 1996. A more recently discovered resource was petroleum, extracted mostly in Henderson County.

See also: Daniel Boone, Coal Industry, Farmer's Alliance, International Business Machines, National Grange, United Mine Workers


FURTHER READING

Alvey, R. Gerald. Kentucky Bluegrass Country. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 1992.

Axton, W.F. Tobacco and Kentucky. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1976.

Channing, Steven A. Kentucky: A Bicentennial History. New York: Norton, 1977.

Harrison, Lowell Hayes, and James C. Klotter. A New History of Kentucky. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1997.

Kleber, John E., ed. The Kentucky Encyclopedia. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1992.

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Kentucky

KENTUCKY


Frankfort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235

Lexington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247

Louisville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261

The State in Brief

Nickname: Bluegrass State

Motto: United we stand, divided we fall

Flower: Goldenrod

Bird: Cardinal

Area: 39,728 square miles (2000, U.S. rank: 37th)

Elevation: Ranges from 257 feet to 4,145 feet above sea level

Climate: Temperate, with plentiful rainfall; occasional winter temperature extremes in the mountains

Admitted to Union: June 1, 1792

Capital: Frankfort

Head Official: Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) (until 2007)

Population

1980: 3,661,000

1990: 3,685,296

2000: 4,041,769

2004 estimate: 4,145,922

Percent change, 19902000: 9.7%

U.S. rank in 2004: 26th

Percent of residents born in state: 73.7% (2000)

Density: 101.7 people per square mile (2000)

2002 FBI Crime Index Total: 118,799

Racial and Ethnic Characteristics (2000)

White: 3,640,889

Black or African American: 295,994

American Indian and Alaska Native: 8,616

Asian: 29,744

Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 1,460

Hispanic or Latino (may be of any race): 59,939

Other: 22,623

Age Characteristics (2000)

Population under 5 years old: 265,901

Population 5 to 19 years old: 847,743

Percent of population 65 years and over: 12.5%

Median age: 35.9 years

Vital Statistics

Total number of births (2003): 54,954

Total number of deaths (2003): 39,927 (infant deaths, 341)

AIDS cases reported through 2003: 2,359

Economy

Major industries: Food products, agriculture, coal mining, construction, manufacturing

Unemployment rate: 4.2% (December 2004)

Per capita income: $26,252 (2003; U.S. rank: 41st)

Median household income: $38,161 (3-year average, 2001-2003)

Percentage of persons below poverty level: 13.7% (3-year average, 2001-2003)

Income tax rate: ranges from 2.0% to 6.0%

Sales tax rate: 6.0% (food, utilities, and prescription drugs are exempt)

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Kentucky

Kentucky State in se central USA; the capital is Frankfort. Other major cities include Lexington and Louisville. Ceded to Britain by France in 1763, the territory was admitted to the Union in 1792. Its loyalties were divided at the outbreak of the Civil War, and the state was invaded by both sides. Most of the area is rolling plain. In the se the Cumberland Mountains dominate a rugged plateau region. The state is drained chiefly by the Ohio and Tennessee rivers. Tobacco is the chief crop, followed by hay, maize, and soya beans. Cattle are reared and Kentucky is noted for breeding thoroughbred racehorses. Industries: electrical equipment, machinery, chemicals, metals. Kentucky is one of the country's major coal producers. Area: 104,623sq km (40,395sq mi). Pop. (2000) 4,041,769.

Statehood :

June 1, 1792

Nickname :

Bluegrass state

State bird :

Kentucky cardinal

State flower :

Goldenrod

State tree :

Kentucky coffee tree

State motto :

United we stand, divided we fall

http://www.kentucky.com

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Kentucky (river, United States)

Kentucky, river, 259 mi (417 km) long, formed by the junction of the North Fork and the Middle Fork rivers, central Ky., and flowing NW to the Ohio River at Carrollton. Frankfort, Ky., is the river's largest city. The river is navigable for its entire length by means of locks. The Kentucky's upper course flows through a coal-mining district and the middle course through a deep gorge before entering the fertile bluegrass region.

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Kentucky

Kentuckychokey, croaky, folkie, folky, hokey, hokey-cokey, hoki, jokey, karaoke, Loki, okey-dokey, Okie, pokey, poky, smoky, trochee •adzuki, bouzouki, fluky, kabuki, kooky, pukey, saluki, spooky, Sukie, Suzuki, verrucae •bookie, cookie, hookey, hooky, nooky, rookie •netsuke •clucky, ducky, happy-go-lucky, Kentucky, lucky, mucky, plucky, yucky •bulky, sulky •chunky, clunky, flunkey, funky, hunky, junkie, junky, monkey, punky, spunky •dusky, husky, musky •synecdoche • Malachy • hillocky •bullocky •Andromache, logomachy, theomachy •hummocky • anarchy • monarchy •Cherokee • tussocky •herky-jerky, jerky, mirky, murky, perky, quirky, smirky, turkey •turnkey • Albuquerque

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Kentucky

KENTUCKY

KENTUCKY , state in the south central United States. A receipt with a Yiddish notation surviving from 1781 reveals that the firm of Cohen and Isaacs in Richmond, Virginia, paid Daniel Boone for surveying land on its behalf in Kentucky, and other evidence of early Jewish involvement in the area exists as well. The first Jewish settlers in Kentucky arrived at the very beginning of the 19th century, but they were unable to maintain a Jewish life on the frontier. The Baltimore-born John Jacob was apparently resident near Louisville as early as 1802, and Benjamin *Gratz, scion of the famous Philadelphia merchant family, settled in Lexington in 1819; both married gentile women not once, but twice.

Jewish communal life began in Kentucky in the 1830s, first in *Louisville and a little later elsewhere. Communal organizations appeared in Owensboro and Paducah, both on the Ohio River, in the late 1850s, and in Lexington just after the Civil War. By the 1870s there were lodges of B'nai B'rith in Louisville, Owensboro, Paducah, and Lexington. In 1880, four synagogue buildings stood in Louisville, one in Owens-boro, one in Paducah, and one in Henderson, and the Jewish population of Kentucky was reported to be 3,600, with 2,500 Jews in Louisville, 213 in Owensboro, 203 in Paducah, 140 in Lexington, and the rest in other small towns. By the turn of the 19th century, aside from Congregation Adas Israel in Henderson, Congregation Adath Israel in Owensboro, Temple Israel in Paducah, and a variety of Jewish institutions in Louisville, there was a multi-purpose Spinoza Society in Lexington (founded 1873) as well as Jewish social clubs in Henderson (the Harmony club, founded 1873), Owensboro (the Standard Club, founded 1889), Shelbyville (the Jewish Literary and Social Club, founded 1895), and Paducah (the Standard Club, founded 1903).

East European Jews arriving in Kentucky around the turn of the 19th century reinforced existing communities and also established additional Jewish centers. These immigrants founded Congregation Agudath Achim in Ashland in 1896, the United Hebrew Congregation in Newport in 1897, and congregations in Covington, Hopkinsville, and Harlan in the early

part of the 20th century. By the time of World War i, Lexington had two congregations: the Reform Adath Israel (founded 1904) and the Orthodox Ohavay Zion (founded 1912).

Immigrants established new ethnic and cultural institutions in several small towns as well. In Newport, for example, the Jewish community had created a Free Hebrew School offering programs for both children and adults as early as 1907. By that year, Newport's Jews also were supporting a branch of the Zionist Po'alei Zion and a Jewish Protective League, demanding better police protection for their community. In Lexington, the poet Israel Jacob *Schwartz (1885–1971) completed his epic Yiddish poem cycle Kentucky in 1922. In 1927, Kentucky's Jewish population was reported to be 19,500, with 12,500 Jews in Louisville and triple-digit communities in Ashland, Covington, Lexington, Newport, and Paducah. Henderson, Hopkinsville, Owensboro, and the area around Harlan each was home to between 65 and 90 Jewish individuals.

Throughout the 19th century and into the 20th, Jews were involved in civic affairs not only in Louisville, but also elsewhere. For example, Abraham *Jonas (1801–1864), brother of Joseph *Jonas, settled in Williamstown in 1827 and was elected several times to the state legislature. Meyer Weil (1830–91) served as mayor of Paducah between 1871 and 1881, and at about the same time the presiding officers of both chambers of the Lexington town council were Jews. Morris Weintraub of Newport (1909–96) was speaker of the Kentucky House of Representatives in the 1950s.

In the second half of the 20th century, Kentucky's Jewish population declined and, as elsewhere in the U.S., many small-town Jewish communities deteriorated. By the end of the century, fully functioning congregations and communal institutions could be found only in Louisville and Lexington, although tiny congregations holding occasional services still existed in Owensboro and Paducah. Kentucky's Jewish population was reported as 11,000 in 1960, 13,000 in 1984, and 11,500 at the turn of the 20th century.

bibliography:

L.S. Weissbach, The Synagogues of Kentucky: Architecture and History (1995); idem, "Kentucky's Jewish History in National Perspective: The Era of Mass Migration," in: The Filson Club Quarterly, 69 (July 1995), 255–74; idem, "Stability and Mobility in the Small Jewish Community: Examples from Kentucky History," in: American Jewish History, 79 (Spring 1990), 358–60; L.N. Dembitz, "Jewish Beginnings in Kentucky" in Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society, 1 (1898), 99–100.

[Lee Shai Weissbach (2nd ed.)]

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Kentucky

Kentucky

■ ALICE LLOYD COLLEGE G-15

100 Purpose Rd.
Pippa Passes, KY 41844
Tel: (606)368-2101
Admissions: (606)368-6134
Fax: (606)368-2125
Web Site: http://www.alc.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1923. Setting: 175-acre rural campus. Endowment: $21 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3000 per student. Total enrollment: 593. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. 881 applied, 59% were admitted. 30% from top 10% of their high school class, 58% from top quarter, 86% from top half. 9 valedictorians. Full-time: 575 students, 53% women, 47% men. Part-time: 18 students, 56% women, 44% men. Students come from 6 states and territories, 1 other country, 16% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 1% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.2% international, 5% 25 or older, 74% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 61% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, part-time degree program, internships. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.25 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay, 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $4900 includes full-time tuition ($0), mandatory fees ($1150), and college room and board ($3750). College room only: $1730. Part-time tuition: $212 per credit hour. Full-time students in the 108-county service area are granted guaranteed tuition.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 16 open to all; 16% of eligible men and 26% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Phi Beta Lambda, All Scholastic Society, Math/Science Club, Allied Health Sciences Club. Major annual events: Religious Emphasis Week, Alcohol Awareness Week, Homecoming. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service. 450 college housing spaces available; 440 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. On-campus residence required through senior year. McGaw Library and Learning Center with 74,216 books, 3,600 microform titles, 118 serials, 1,225 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $189,193. 85 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in a small, rural town, the primary industries being coal mining and farming.

■ ASBURY COLLEGE E-10

1 Macklem Dr.
Wilmore, KY 40390-1198
Tel: (859)858-3511
Free: 800-888-1818
Fax: (859)858-3921
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.asbury.edu/

Description:

Independent nondenominational, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1890. Setting: 400-acre small town campus with easy access to Lexington. Endowment: $28.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6843 per student. Total enrollment: 1,293. Faculty: 151 (86 full-time, 65 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 11:1. 797 applied, 74% were admitted. 35% from top 10% of their high school class, 64% from top quarter, 85% from top half. Full-time: 1,124 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 105 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 47 states and territories, 11 other countries, 67% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 1% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 4% 25 or older, 87% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 76% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: communication technologies; English; theology and religious vocations. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, 3 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: Rolling, Rolling for nonresidents. Notification: continuous, continuous for nonresidents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $23,762 includes full-time tuition ($18,808), mandatory fees ($148), and college room and board ($4806). College room only: $2810. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location. Part-time tuition: $723 per semester hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 35 open to all. Most popular organizations: Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Impact (community service), Christian Service Association, ministry teams, Student-Faculty Council. Major annual events: homecoming, Fall Revival, Missions Conference. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, late night security personnel. 1,253 college housing spaces available; 1,056 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Kinlaw Library with 145,424 books, 22,120 microform titles, 517 serials, 9,116 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $406,070. 189 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

This is rural town with air and bus service available in nearby Lexington, Kentucky. There are several natural and historic points of interest located nearby: High Bridge, Shakertown, Fort Harrod, Boone's Tavern, National Cemetery at Camp Nelson, Kentucky Horse Park, world famous thoroughbred farms and Natural Bridge.

■ ASHLAND COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE C-15

1400 College Dr.
Ashland, KY 41101-3683
Tel: (606)329-2999
Free: 800-370-7191
Admissions: (606)326-2114
Fax: (606)325-8124
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ashland.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1937. Setting: 47-acre small town campus. Endowment: $870,926. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3241 per student. Total enrollment: 2,565. 404 applied, 100% were admitted. Students come from 6 states and territories, 10% from out-of-state, 41% 25 or older. Retention: 44% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at University of Kentucky, other area colleges.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT COMPASS required; ACT recommended. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/20.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2940 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8820 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition varies according to reciprocity agreements.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 11 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Phi Beta Lambda, Kentucky Association of Nursing Students, Baptist Student Union/Students for Christ, Circle K. Major annual events: Back to School Barbecue/United Way Fundraiser, Spring Fling, Red Cross Bloodmobiles. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, electronic surveillance of bookstore and business office. College housing not available. Joseph and Sylvia Mansbach Memorial Library with 41,379 books, 391 serials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $378,995. 150 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

On the Ohio River, Ashland has a temperate climate with an average annual temperature of 55 degrees. This city has 25 industries including steel, oil refining, a coal and coke-processing plant and a firebrick factory. More than 21 million tons of barge traffic on the river passes the city annually. The Greenup Locks and Dam complex consist of two adjacent chambers which elevate 1,100 foot modern tows in 20 minutes as opposed to the six hours previously required. Transportation is provided by bus and railroad. Part time work is available. City services include a public library, churches of 15 denominations, Y's (no overnight facilities), and hospitals. Recreational facilities easily accessible are indoor theatres, several drive-ins, golf courses, boating, fishing, two state parks, bowling alleys, municipal swimming pool and private swim club, baseball, tennis, and croquet.

■ BECKFIELD COLLEGE A-10

16 Spiral Dr.
Florence, KY 41042
Tel: (859)371-9393
Fax: (859)371-5096
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.beckfield.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, terminal associate, and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1984. Setting: suburban campus. Total enrollment: 480. Full-time: 320 students, 50% women, 50% men. Students come from 3 states and territories, 60% 25 or older.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission.

■ BELLARMINE UNIVERSITY D-7

2001 Newburg Rd.
Louisville, KY 40205-0671
Tel: (502)452-8000
Free: 800-274-4723
Admissions: (502)452-8131
Fax: (502)452-8002
Web Site: http://www.bellarmine.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1950. Setting: 120-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $19.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6399 per student. Total enrollment: 2,800. Faculty: 251 (115 full-time, 136 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 2,024 applied, 71% were admitted. 18% from top 10% of their high school class, 51% from top quarter, 83% from top half. 1 National Merit Scholar, 3 class presidents, 72 student government officers. Full-time: 1,737 students, 66% women, 34% men. Part-time: 522 students, 65% women, 35% men. Students come from 39 states and territories, 22% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 4% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 15% 25 or older, 37% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 84% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at University of Louisville, Spalding University, Indiana University Southeast, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Presbyterian Seminary, Jefferson Community College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 2/1, 11/1 for early action. Notification: 12/1 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $31,030 includes full-time tuition ($23,300), mandatory fees ($850), and college room and board ($6880). College room only: $3860. Part-time tuition: $550 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $35 per course.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 61 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 2% of eligible men and 2% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student government, Delta Sigma Pi, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, campus ministry, Bellarmine Activities Council. Major annual events: Ball on the Belle, Homecoming, Pioneer Dance. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, 24-hour locked residence hall entrances, security cameras. 580 college housing spaces available; 520 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. W.L. Lyons Brown Library with 97,737 books, 609,287 microform titles, 401 serials, 3,853 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2 million. 160 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ BEREA COLLEGE G-11

Berea, KY 40404
Tel: (859)985-3000
Free: 800-326-5948
Admissions: (859)985-3500
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.berea.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1855. Setting: 140-acre small town campus. Endowment: $861.7 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8572 per student. Total enrollment: 1,595. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 11:1. 1,908 applied, 27% were admitted. 30% from top 10% of their high school class, 66% from top quarter, 91% from top half. Full-time: 1,529 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 66 students, 41% women, 59% men. Students come from 42 states and territories, 71 other countries, 57% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 19% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 7% international, 6% 25 or older, 84% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 82% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; engineering technologies. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, internships. Off campus study at Hastings College, Salem College, Austin College, Birmingham-Southern College, Eckerd College, Whitworth College. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: electronic application. Required: essay, high school transcript, interview, financial aid application, SAT or ACT. Recommended: 2 recommendations. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 4/30, 4/30 for nonresidents. Notification: continuous until 12/20, continuous until 12/20 for nonresidents. Preference given to Appalachian residents with high ability and limited economic resources.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $5496 includes full-time tuition ($0), mandatory fees ($516), and college room and board ($4980). Financial aid is provided to all students for tuition costs.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 77 open to all. Most popular organizations: Campus Activities Board, Cosmopolitan Club, Students for Appalachia, flag football and basketball intramurals, Baptist Student Union. Major annual events: Mountain Day Eve, Graduation, Labor Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, crime prevention programs. 1,370 college housing spaces available; 1,265 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Hutchins Library plus 2 others with 358,556 books, 132,888 microform titles, 1,918 serials, 11,593 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $869,669. 260 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Nestled in the foothills of the Cumberland Mountains, Berea draws 80% of its students from the Appalachian regions of nine southern states. Excellent motels are found in the community as well as the college hotel. The Churchill Weavers, one of the largest hand-weaving companies in the country, is located here.

■ BIG SANDY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE F-15

One Bert T. Combs Dr.
Prestonsburg, KY 41653-1815
Tel: (606)886-3863; 888-641-4132
Fax: (606)886-6943
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bigsandy.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards transfer associate and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1964. Setting: 50-acre rural campus. Endowment: $700,000. Total enrollment: 4,406. 0% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 0.2% Hispanic, 1% black, 0.2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 44% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. Off campus study at Morehead State University.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT required; ACT ASSET recommended. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2940 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3540 full-time, $118 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8820 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group. Social organizations: 8 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Baptist Student Union, Student Government Association, Phi Beta Lambda, Kentucky Association of Nursing Students. Major annual events: Spring Blowout, College Day Fair, Disabilities Awareness Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Magoffin Learning Resource Center with 34,668 books, 259 serials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $360,000. 200 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Prestonsburg is the site of a revolutionary war battle and General Garfield's headquarters in 1862. Surrounding the city are eastern Kentucky's coal, oil and gas fields. The urban area has transportation provided by bus and car. The city has hospitals, churches of all denominations, average shopping facilities, and good opportunities for part-time employment. Recreational facilities are available at a state park with boating, fishing, swimming, water skiing, horseback riding, and high lift. Locally are a public park, bowling alley, golf course, swimming pool and tennis courts. The Kentucky Highland Folk Festival, The Jenny Wiley Festival and Horse Show are annual events.

■ BOWLING GREEN TECHNICAL COLLEGE I-5

1845 Loop Dr.
Bowling Green, KY 42101
Tel: (270)901-1000
Fax: (270)746-7466
Web Site: http://www.bowlinggreen.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Founded 1938. Calendar: semesters.

■ BRESCIA UNIVERSITY F-3

717 Frederica St. Owensboro, KY 42301-3023
Tel: (270)685-3131; 877-273-7242
Admissions: (270)686-4241
Fax: (270)686-6422
Web Site: http://www.brescia.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1950. Setting: 9-acre urban campus. Endowment: $9 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3695 per student. Total enrollment: 709. 216 applied, 93% were admitted. 16% from top 10% of their high school class, 37% from top quarter, 76% from top half. Full-time: 477 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 192 students, 56% women, 44% men. 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 4% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 13% international, 44% 25 or older, 26% live on campus, 12% transferred in. Retention: 67% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at Kentucky Wesleyan College. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: 1 recommendation, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $15,330 includes full-time tuition ($12,400), mandatory fees ($220), and college room and board ($2710). College room only: $1560. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $395 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $10 per credit hour, $100 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 23 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Ichabod Society, National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Social Work Club, Spanish Club. Major annual events: Homecoming, Family Weekend, Inaugural Ball. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 269 college housing spaces available; 239 were occupied in 2003-04. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Brescia University Library with 331,620 microform titles, 2,466 serials, 6,717 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $203,469. 41 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Brescia University is located in Owensboro, Kentucky, on the Ohio River. With a metropolitan population of 55,000, Owensboro is easily accessible from any direction. The college campus is within walking distance of the revitalized downtown area, the performing arts center, public library, art museum, natural science and history museum, as well as numerous restaurants, churches, and parks. Many Owensboro industries and professional organizations cooperate with Brescia in providing enriching off-campus learning opportunities for students, particularly in the areas of business, education, psychology, social work, speech and hearing, and special education.

■ BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE-HOPKINSVILLE I-2

4001 Ft. Cambell Blvd.
Hopkinsville, KY 42240
Tel: (270)886-1302
Free: 800-359-4753
Fax: (270)886-3544
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.brownmackie.edu/locations.asp?locid=17

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards diplomas and transfer associate degrees. Setting: small town campus. Total enrollment: 146. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 89 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 146 students, 88% women, 12% men. 0% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 25% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript. Recommended: interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Tuition: $8592 full-time, $179 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $480 full-time, $10 per credit hour part-time.

■ BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE-LOUISVILLE D-7

300 High Rise Dr.
Louisville, KY 40213
Tel: (502)968-7191
Free: 800-999-7387
Fax: (502)968-1727
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.brownmackie.edu/locations.asp?locid=18

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards terminal associate degrees. Founded 1972. Setting: suburban campus. Total enrollment: 315. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. 128 applied, 72% were admitted. Students come from 3 states and territories, 1 other country, 7% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 34% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 63% 25 or older. Core. Academic remediation for entering students.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Tuition: $8592 full-time. Mandatory fees: $480 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, evening security guards, electronically operated building access. College housing not available. Main library plus 1 other with 1,210 books and 23 serials. 3 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE-NORTHERN KENTUCKY K-10

309 Buttermilk Pike
Fort Mitchell, KY 41017-2191
Tel: (859)341-5627
Free: 800-888-1445
Fax: (859)341-6483
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.brownmackie.edu

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of American Education Centers, Inc. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1927. Setting: 5-acre suburban campus with easy access to Cincinnati. Total enrollment: 465. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 500 applied. 0% from top 10% of their high school class, 0% from top quarter, 0% from top half. Full-time: 465 students, 70% women, 30% men. Students come from 3 states and territories, 12% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 8% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 59% 25 or older. Retention: 81% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Academic remediation for entering students, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: interview. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Major annual events: Summer Cook-Out, Chili Cook-Off, Halloween. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. 1,500 books and 50 serials. 50 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ CAMPBELLSVILLE UNIVERSITY G-8

1 University Dr.
Campbellsville, KY 42718-2799
Tel: (270)789-5000
Free: 800-264-6014
Admissions: (270)789-5220
Fax: (270)789-5071
Web Site: http://www.campbellsville.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Kentucky Baptist Convention. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1906. Setting: 80-acre small town campus. Endowment: $5.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3748 per student. Total enrollment: 2,286. Faculty: 217 (86 full-time, 131 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 1,351 applied, 73% were admitted. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 37% from top quarter, 65% from top half. 12 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,266 students, 52% women, 48% men. Part-time: 570 students, 65% women, 35% men. Students come from 27 states and territories, 18 other countries, 16% from out-of-state, 1% Hispanic, 6% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 18% 25 or older, 55% live on campus, 7% transferred in. Retention: 62% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; theology and religious vocations. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $22,272 includes full-time tuition ($15,960), mandatory fees ($380), and college room and board ($5932).

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 48 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Baptist Student Union, Phi Beta Lambda, African-American Leadership League, Fellowship of Christian Athletics. Major annual events: homecoming, Christmas celebration, Spring Formal. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 750 college housing spaces available; 748 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Montgomery Library plus 2 others with 172,000 books, 338,235 microform titles, 12,777 serials, 16,023 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $388,464. 148 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The 70-acre Campbellsville campus is situated precisely in the center of Kentucky, one-half mile from downtown Campbellsville (population 15,000), 40 minutes southeast of Elizabethtown, one and one-half hours from Louisville and Lexington, and just over two hours from Nashville. The college is located on KY55 and can be reached from the north by way of the Bluegrass Parkway and from the south by way of the Cumberland Parkway.

■ CENTRE COLLEGE F-9

600 West Walnut St. Danville, KY 40422-1394
Tel: (859)238-5200
Free: 800-423-6236
Admissions: (859)238-5350
Fax: (859)238-5456
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.centre.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1819. Setting: 100-acre small town campus. Endowment: $149.9 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $10,047 per student. Total enrollment: 1,130. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 11:1. 1,989 applied, 63% were admitted. 55% from top 10% of their high school class, 85% from top quarter, 96% from top half. 30 valedictorians, 120 student government officers. Full-time: 1,127 students, 51% women, 49% men. Part-time: 3 students, 67% women, 33% men. Students come from 35 states and territories, 12 other countries, 33% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 2% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 0% 25 or older, 95% live on campus, 1% transferred in. Retention: 92% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; history; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, part-time degree program, internships. Off campus study at Associated Colleges of the South. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 2/1, 12/1 for early action. Notification: 3/15, 1/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $30,810 includes full-time tuition ($23,110) and college room and board ($7700). College room only: $3900. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $830 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 76 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 37% of eligible men and 38% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: CARE (Centre Action Reaches Everyone), Christian Fellowship, College Democrats and Republicans, Student Congress, Outdoors Club. Major annual events: Homecoming, Spring Carnival, Family Weekend. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,000 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Doherty Library plus 1 other with 217,751 books, 52,512 microform titles, 750 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $811,184. 150 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Danville is a prosperous community located on the southern edge of Kentucky's famous bluegrass region. The town has a rich historical heritage. It was the first seat of government west of the Alleghenies, and is also known for its early contributions in medicine, education, and government. Today, Danville is a model in Kentucky and the region as a center for light industry, with more than a dozen major employers. Midwinter days average 35 degrees; midsummer temperatures average 80 degrees. There is sunshine 60% of the time. Transportation is provided by a bus line and three main highways. Danville has fine horse farms, many churches, a library, a Regional Arts Center, bowling alley, fishing, boating, waterskiing, golf, and theaters. Part-time jobs are available.

■ CLEAR CREEK BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE I-12

300 Clear Creek Rd.Pineville, KY 40977-9754
Tel: (606)337-3196
Web Site: http://www.ccbbc.edu/

Description:

Independent Southern Baptist, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1926. Setting: 700-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 212. 85% 25 or older. Retention: 82% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Summer session for credit, part-time degree program. Off campus study at University of Kentucky, Southeast Community College.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: essay, 4 recommendations. Recommended: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 7/15. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $7830 includes full-time tuition ($4520) and college room and board ($3310). College room only: $1870. Part-time tuition: $205 per semester hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, student patrols. Option: coed housing available. Carolyn Boatman Brooks Memorial Library with 38,000 books, 300 serials, and an OPAC. 15 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The campus bounds Pine Mountain State Park. Pineville, founded in 1799, is located in a rural area 16 miles north of Cumberland Gap, and is served by the Greyhound bus line. Churches, a small shopping area and some part-time employment are available.

■ DAYMAR COLLEGE (LOUISVILLE) D-7

4400 Breckenridge Ln., Ste. 415
Louisville, KY 40218
Tel: (502)495-1040
Web Site: http://www.daymarcollege.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 2001. Total enrollment: 227.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript, interview.

■ DAYMAR COLLEGE (OWENSBORO) F-3

3361 Buckland Square
Owensboro, KY 42301
Tel: (270)926-4040
Free: 800-960-4090
Fax: (270)685-4090
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.daymarcollege.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, and transfer associate degrees. Founded 1963. Setting: 1-acre small town campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $1200 per student. Total enrollment: 446. Full-time: 334 students, 85% women, 15% men. Part-time: 112 students, 84% women, 16% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 14% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 3% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 0% transferred in. Retention: 72% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Required for some: SAT or ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Major annual events: quarterly awards ceremonies, Student Appreciation Week, Graduation. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Learning Resource Center with 3,215 books, 67 serials, 77 audiovisual materials, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $10,000. 103 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ DRAUGHONS JUNIOR COLLEGE I-5

2421 Fitzgerald Industrial Dr.
Bowling Green, KY 42101
Tel: (270)843-6750
Fax: (270)843-6976
Web Site: http://www.draughons.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Administratively affiliated with Draughons Junior College, Inc. Awards diplomas and transfer associate degrees. Founded 1989. Setting: suburban campus with easy access to Nashville. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $10,800 per student. Total enrollment: 368. 120 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 172 students, 85% women, 15% men. Part-time: 196 students, 86% women, 14% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 10% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 27% 25 or older, 11% transferred in. Retention: 78% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application. Required: high school transcript. Placement: SAT or ACT recommended. Entrance: noncompetitive.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Tuition: $300 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1000 full-time. Full-time fees vary according to course load and program. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and program. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 1 open to all. Most popular organization: Student Council. Major annual events: food drives, blood drives, Cancer Walk-AThon. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Draughons Junior College Library with 5,000 books, 30 serials, 75 audiovisual materials, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2000. 52 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY F-11

521 Lancaster Ave.
Richmond, KY 40475-3102
Tel: (859)622-1000
Admissions: (859)622-2106
Fax: (859)622-1020
Web Site: http://www.eku.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Kentucky Council on Post Secondary Education. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1906. Setting: 500-acre small town campus with easy access to Lexington. Endowment: $38.3 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $639,776. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5228 per student. Total enrollment: 16,219. Faculty: 1,010 (556 full-time, 454 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 6,205 applied, 75% were admitted. Full-time: 10,919 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 3,023 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 41 states and territories, 42 other countries, 12% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 5% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 27% 25 or older, 33% live on campus, 7% transferred in. Retention: 66% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: health professions and related sciences; education; security and protective services. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission for state residents. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $4660 full-time, $194 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,070 full-time, $545 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $460 full-time. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. College room and board: $4088. College room only: $2208. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 160 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 8% of eligible men and 6% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Honor Society, Regular Society. Major annual events: Homecoming, Fall Festival, Spring Fling. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. 5,200 college housing spaces available. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. John Grant Crabbe Library plus 2 others with 768,300 books, 1.3 million microform titles, 3,128 serials, 13,580 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $4 million. 1,200 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Local industries are a miniature lamp plant and tool and die manufacturing. Richmond is located in the famous Bluegrass Region, 26 miles southeast of Lexington, and 55 miles to the State Capital of Frankfort on the Kentucky River. Recreational facilities are available at nearby parks and lakes. There are part-time work opportunities available.

■ ELIZABETHTOWN COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE F-6

600 College St. Rd.
Elizabethtown, KY 42701-3081
Tel: (270)769-2371; 877-246-2322
Fax: (270)769-1632
Web Site: http://www.elizabethtown.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1964. Setting: 40-acre small town campus with easy access to Louisville. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2715 per student. Total enrollment: 3,615. Full-time: 1,645 students, 69% women, 31% men. Part-time: 1,970 students, 68% women, 32% men. Students come from 10 states and territories, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 11% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 50% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Western Kentucky University.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission for state residents. Options: Common Application, early admission. Required: essay, high school transcript. Required for some: ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2352 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7056 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 18 open to all. Most popular organizations: Baptist Student Union, Kentucky Association of Nursing Students. Major annual events: Fall Festival, Hanging of the Greens, Social Science Seminar. Campus security: late night security. College housing not available. Elizabethtown Community College Media Center with 35,175 books, 240 serials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $459,000. 70 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Brown-Pusey Community House, formerly a stagecoach inn, has been restored and now serves as a community center and library. This is a rural area with rail and bus service, and a local airport. Elizabethtown provides recreation with two theaters, a recreational lake owned by the city, a park with olympic-size pool and a par-three golf course. Community services include the County Health Department, one hospital and 39 different organizations. A County Fair and City Festival are held annually.

■ GATEWAY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE A-10

1025 Amsterdam Rd.
Covington, KY 41011
Tel: (859)441-4500
Fax: (859)292-6415
Web Site: http://www.gateway.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, and transfer associate degrees. Founded 1961. Total enrollment: 2,597. Calendar: semesters.

Entrance Requirements:

Placement: ACT or ACT COMPASS required. Entrance: minimally difficult.

Costs Per Year:

State resident tuition: $2940 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8820 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

College housing not available.

■ GEORGETOWN COLLEGE D-10

400 East College St. Georgetown, KY 40324-1696
Tel: (502)863-8000
Free: 800-788-9985
Admissions: (502)863-8009
Fax: (502)868-8891
Web Site: http://www.georgetowncollege.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Baptist Church. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1829. Setting: 110-acre suburban campus with easy access to Cincinnati. Endowment: $34.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4483 per student. Total enrollment: 1,904. Faculty: 167 (101 full-time, 66 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 11:1. 1,063 applied, 95% were admitted. 31% from top 10% of their high school class, 58% from top quarter, 86% from top half. 15 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,310 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 55 students, 47% women, 53% men. Students come from 22 states and territories, 11 other countries, 17% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 4% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 2% 25 or older, 88% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 85% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; biological/life sciences; communications/journalism. Core. Calendar: semesters. Advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Central University of Iowa. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: ACT. Required for some: recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 7/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $26,770 includes full-time tuition ($20,700) and college room and board ($6070). College room only: $2940. Part-time tuition: $860 per hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 97 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities; 28% of eligible men and 40% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Campus Ministries, Association of Georgetown Students, Harper-Gatton Leadership Center, President's Ambassadors, Phi Beta Lambda. Major annual events: Hanging of the Green, Homecoming/Festival of Song, Belle of the Blue. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service. 1,238 college housing spaces available; 1,133 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Anna Ashcraft Ensor Learning Resource Center plus 1 other with 160,862 books, 189,419 microform titles, 541 serials, 5,547 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $677,879. 175 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

This town was the site of McClelland's Fort, a log stockade that was completed about 1776. Today the city is a residential and educational community located 12 miles north of Lexington and 75 miles east of Louisville, and can be reached by several major highways. Recently identified as one of Kentucky's two"safest cities," Georgetown is also the site of the Toyota Corporation's manufacturing plant. The Kentucky State Horse Park is only 5 miles south of the campus.

■ HAZARD COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE H-14

1 Community College Dr.
Hazard, KY 41701-2403
Tel: (606)436-5721
Free: 800-246-7521
Fax: (606)439-2988
Web Site: http://www.hazard.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 34-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 3,500. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 50% from top half. Students come from 3 states and territories, 5% from out-of-state, 35% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission for state residents. Options: Common Application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. Option: coed housing available. 36,550 books and 160 serials. 28 computers available on campus for general student use.

Community Environment:

Hazard, the County Seat of Perry County, is the retail and cultural center of southeastern Kentucky. The college serves an 8-county (Breathitt, Knott, Leslie, Letcher, Wolfe, Lee, Owsley, and Perry) all rural area. The College's service area is also in the heart of the state's coal country, in the Cumberland Mountains of Kentucky.

■ HENDERSON COMMUNITY COLLEGE F-1

2660 South Green St.
Henderson, KY 42420-4623
Tel: (270)827-1867
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.henderson.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards transfer associate and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1963. Setting: 120-acre small town campus. Total enrollment: 2,241. 1,923 applied, 100% were admitted. Students come from 12 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 5% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 57% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: Common Application. Required: high school transcript, ACT, ACT COMPASS. Required for some: essay, recommendations, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 9/1.

Costs Per Year:

State resident tuition: $2490 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8820 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, student-run radio station. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Hartfield Learning Resource Center plus 1 other with 30,206 books, 21,126 microform titles, 231 serials, 1,053 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $246,114. 200 computers available on campus for general student use.

Community Environment:

An industrial city, Henderson is on the Ohio River in an important oil-producing and agricultural area. Principal crops are corn, soybeans and tobacco. Part-time employment is available. Transportation provided by rail and bus lines within the city and airlines located in Evansville, Indiana, nine miles away. Ellis Park Racetrack, three miles north, offers thoroughbred racing August through Labor Day and harness racing from in late May to late July. 95 organizations embrace all types of activities. There is a hospital and clinics, public library, YMCA, and 36 churches offering community service. This is the home of Audubon Museum which houses the world's finest collection of Audubon items. The city has one of the finest summer recreational programs in the state of Kentucky. the finest summer recreational programs in the state of Kentucky.

■ HOPKINSVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE I-2

PO Box 2100
Hopkinsville, KY 42241-2100
Tel: (270)886-3921
Fax: (270)886-0237
Web Site: http://www.hopcc.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1965. Setting: 70-acre small town campus with easy access to Nashville. Endowment: $2.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6780 per student. Total enrollment: 3,104. Full-time: 1,413 students, 70% women, 30% men. Part-time: 1,691 students, 68% women, 32% men. Students come from 3 states and territories, 1 other country, 25% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 22% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 52% 25 or older, 61% transferred in. Retention: 55% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required for some: high school transcript, interview. Placement: ACT, ACT COMPASS required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2940 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8820 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to location and reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition varies according to location and reciprocity agreements.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 18 open to all; local fraternities. Most popular organizations: Baptist Student Union, Circle K, Minority Student Union, Donovan Scholars, Nursing Club. Major annual events: Fun Day, Appreciation Day, Circle of Love. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. HCC Library plus 1 other with 45,674 books, 25,613 microform titles, 147 serials, 4,377 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $134,000. 400 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Hopkinsville is noted as an agricultural and industrial center with important livestock, grain, and dark tobacco markets, flour and feed production, and the manufacturing of shoes, clothing, hardwood flooring, lighting fixtures, industrial springs, and automotive products. The city is served by rail, bus, and air lines via nearby Clarksville and Nashville, Tennessee.

■ ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (LEXINGTON) E-10

2473 Fortune Dr., Ste. 180
Lexington, KY 40509
Tel: (859)246-3300
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/

■ ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (LOUISVILLE) D-7

10509 Timberwood Circle, Ste. 100
Louisville, KY 40223-5392
Tel: (502)327-7424
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of ITT Educational Services, Inc. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1993. Setting: suburban campus. Core.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Recommended: recommendations. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available.

■ JEFFERSON COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE D-7

109 East Broadway
Louisville, KY 40202-2005
Tel: (502)213-5333
Admissions: (502)213-2183
Fax: (502)213-2115
Web Site: http://www.jctc.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 10-acre urban campus. Endowment: $1.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3580 per student. Total enrollment: 14,240. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. Full-time: 4,941 students, 52% women, 48% men. Part-time: 9,299 students, 51% women, 49% men. Students come from 11 states and territories, 3% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 16% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.3% international, 41% 25 or older, 11% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at members of the Kentuckiana Metroversity. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for high school students in early admissions programs. Option: early admission. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $3270 full-time, $109 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $9810 full-time, $327 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $50 full-time, $25 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. John T. Smith Learning Resource Center plus 2 others with 76,578 books, 156,316 microform titles, 391 serials, 15,103 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $311,000. 895 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of Louisville.

■ KENTUCKY CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY D-14

100 Academic Parkway
Grayson, KY 41143-2205
Tel: (606)474-3000
Free: 800-522-3181
Admissions: (606)474-3266
Fax: (606)474-3155
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.kcu.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Christian Churches and Churches of Christ. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1919. Setting: 124-acre rural campus. Endowment: $3.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2609 per student. Total enrollment: 559. 285 applied, 76% were admitted. 18% from top 10% of their high school class, 43% from top quarter, 69% from top half. 4 valedictorians. Full-time: 530 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 14 students, 79% women, 21% men. Students come from 26 states and territories, 7 other countries, 67% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 0.4% Hispanic, 1% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 12% 25 or older, 88% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 70% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early action, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, 3 recommendations, SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 8 open to all. Most popular organizations: Rotaract, SIFE, Matheteuo, Pi Chi Delta, Laos Alpha. Major annual events: Feast of Christmas, Campus Drama, Basketball Homecoming. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, patrols by trained security personnel (6pm-6am). 589 college housing spaces available; 473 were occupied in 2003-04. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Young Library with 103,323 books, 8,172 microform titles, 395 serials, 1,755 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $293,339. 50 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Grayson can be accessed via bus. It has many Protestant churches and several organizations, including the Creative Arts Club and Chamber of Commerce. Health services are provided by two clinic and two hospitals within 20 miles. Recreation available includes hunting, fishing, boating, bowling, swimming, horseback riding and miniature golf with three state parks in the area. Grayson is a friendly town with complete up-to-date modern stores comparable to a city twice its size.

■ KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN BIBLE COLLEGE F-8

PO Box 10
Vancleve, KY 41385-0010
Tel: (606)693-5000
Free: 800-879-KMBC
Fax: (606)693-7744
Web Site: http://www.kmbc.edu/

Description:

Independent interdenominational, 4-year, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1931. Setting: 35-acre rural campus. Endowment: $350,000. Total enrollment: 79. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 6:1. 52 applied, 46% were admitted. Students come from 50 states and territories, 3 other countries, 71% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 4% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 7% international, 24% 25 or older, 91% live on campus. Retention: 67% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, recommendations, ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to Christians.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $8460 includes full-time tuition ($4800), mandatory fees ($460), and college room and board ($3200). College room only: $1000. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $160 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $30 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 40 open to all. Most popular organizations: Drama Team, choral groups, Student Council, band, Student Involvement (missionary group). Major annual events: College Acquaintance Days, Missionary Convention, graduation. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: student patrols. 100 college housing spaces available; 73 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Gibson Library with 23,520 books, 81 microform titles, 175 serials, 1,263 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $35,500. 12 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Vancleve is a rural town located 7 miles northwest of Jackson just off State Highway 15. Radio Station WMTC is located here. Part-time employment found on campus.

■ KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY D-9

400 East Main St.
Frankfort, KY 40601
Tel: (502)597-6000
Free: 800-325-1716
Admissions: (502)597-6322
Fax: (502)597-6239
Web Site: http://www.kysu.edu/

Description:

State-related, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1886. Setting: 485-acre small town campus with easy access to Louisville. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $8.8 million. Total enrollment: 2,386. Faculty: 160 (152 full-time, 8 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 5,013 applied, 28% were admitted. Full-time: 1,619 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 609 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 29 states and territories, 24 other countries, 33% from out-of-state, 0.04% Native American, 0.4% Hispanic, 61% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.04% international, 80% 25 or older, 26% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 59% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Berea College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Option: early admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA, ACT. Required for some: essay, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $22. State resident tuition: $3550 full-time, $148 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $9992 full-time, $419 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $918 full-time, $20 per credit part-time, $49 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, course level, course load, location, program, reciprocity agreements, and student level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, course level, course load, location, program, reciprocity agreements, and student level. College room and board: $5620. College room only: $2592. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, location, and student level.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 45 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 6% of eligible men and 4% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Baptist Student Union, student government. Major annual events: Coronation, Greek Step-Show, Homecoming Concert. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, controlled dormitory access. 849 college housing spaces available. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Blazer Library with 296,631 books, 320,739 microform titles, 1,097 serials, 3,025 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $887,261. 230 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Founded in 1786, Frankfort was selected as Kentucky's capital in 1792. Located at the western edge of the Bluegrass region, Frankfort, population 27,500, is home to several plants which manufacture electronic equipment, shoes, underwear, metal auto trim, precision parts and screws. There is access to rail and bus lines. The city has a public library, hospital, Y's, shopping facilities, theatres, and swimming. Organizations including major civic, fraternal, and veterans' are located in the area.

■ KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE F-3

3000 Frederica St., PO Box 1039
Owensboro, KY 42302-1039
Tel: (270)926-3111
Free: 800-990-0592
Admissions: (270)852-3120
Fax: (270)926-3196
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.kwc.edu/

Description:

Independent Methodist, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1858. Setting: 52-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $24.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4043 per student. Total enrollment: 755. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 1,074 applied, 77% were admitted. 19% from top 10% of their high school class, 30% from top quarter, 75% from top half. 3 National Merit Scholars, 12 valedictorians. Full-time: 717 students, 49% women, 51% men. Part-time: 38 students, 53% women, 47% men. Students come from 22 states and territories, 8 other countries, 23% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 10% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 8% 25 or older, 46% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 71% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; communications/journalism; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships. Off campus study at Brescia College, Owensboro Community College, University of Evansville. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Required for some: recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 9/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $19,350 includes full-time tuition ($13,200), mandatory fees ($400), and college room and board ($5750). College room only: $2600. Part-time tuition: $400 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 40 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 15% of eligible men and 20% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Student Activities Programming

Board, Leadership KWC, Pre-Professional Society, Wesley Club. Major annual events: homecoming, Annual Thanksgiving Dinner, Leadership Symposium. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: late night transport-escort service, 12-hour patrols by trained security personnel. 413 college housing spaces available; 299 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Library Learning Center with a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $332,825. 110 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Owensboro, population 54,000, with sunshine 52-60 percent of the year is the largest city in western Kentucky. There are good commercial bus and air transportation facilities. The city has public libraries, many churches, a hospital, three medical centers and a public health center. Recreation facilities include theaters, drive-ins, bowling alleys, golf courses as well as fishing, boating, swimming, indoor athletics and other activities.

■ LEXINGTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE E-10

Cooper Dr.
Lexington, KY 40506-0235
Tel: (859)257-4872
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.uky.edu/lcc/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards transfer associate and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1965. Setting: 10-acre urban campus. Endowment: $750,000. Total enrollment: 8,639. 5,828 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 5,354 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 3,285 students, 61% women, 39% men. Students come from 35 states and territories, 5% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 11% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 20% 25 or older, 5% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for health technology programs, computer information systems. Option: early admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/2. Preference given to state residents.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 8 open to all. Most popular organizations: Baptist Student Union, Unity, KANS, Veterans Union, Athena. Major annual events: Black History Month, Spring Fling, Career Fair. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 576 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Lexington Community College Library with 27,000 books, 250 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $498,588. 80 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ LINDSEY WILSON COLLEGE H-8

210 Lindsey Wilson St.
Columbia, KY 42728-1298
Tel: (270)384-2126
Free: 800-264-0138
Admissions: (270)384-8100
Fax: (270)384-8200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.lindsey.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1903. Setting: 45-acre rural campus. Endowment: $15 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4000 per student. Total enrollment: 1,902. Faculty: 111 (70 full-time, 41 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 23:1. Full-time: 1,457 students, 64% women, 36% men. Part-time: 165 students, 79% women, 21% men. Students come from 22 states and territories, 31 other countries, 8% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 8% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 25% 25 or older, 47% live on campus, 12% transferred in. Retention: 53% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application. Required: high school transcript. Recommended: interview. Required for some: SAT or ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $20,601 includes full-time tuition ($14,208), mandatory fees ($230), and college room and board ($6163). Part-time tuition: $592 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 27 open to all. Major annual events: homecoming, Founders' Day, Malvina Farkie Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. 750 college housing spaces available; 720 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Katie Murrell Library with 80,000 books and 1,500 serials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $156,325. 80 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Columbia is the seat of Adair County. The climate is moderate. The city is located 8 miles from Green River Lake State Park and 20 miles from Cumberland Lake State Park, both known for their boating, fishing, water skiing and other water activities. Community services include seven churches, a modern hospital, and adequate shopping. There are several service clubs, and an excellent relationship exists between the local population and the college.

■ LOUISVILLE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE D-7

3901 Atkinson Square Dr.
Louisville, KY 40218-4528
Tel: (502)456-6509
Free: 800-884-6528
Fax: (502)456-2341
Web Site: http://www.louisvilletech.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of Sullivan University System. Awards certificates, diplomas, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1961. Setting: 10-acre suburban campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3000 per student. Total enrollment: 667. 182 applied, 77% were admitted. 8% from top 10% of their high school class, 28% from top quarter, 64% from top half. Full-time: 626 students, 33% women, 67% men. Part-time: 41 students, 63% women, 37% men. Students come from 6 states and territories, 17% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 11% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 32% 25 or older, 6% live on campus, 11% transferred in. Retention: 68% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, accelerated degree program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, interview, ACT, SAT or CPAt. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $90. One-time mandatory fee: $90. Tuition: $13,110 full-time, $270 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $435 full-time, $30 per course part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time and program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to program. College room only: $3960. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 5 open to all. Most popular organizations: ASID, IIDA, ADDA, Robotics International. Major annual events: School Picnic, River Boat Cruise, picnics, dinners and luncheons. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. 42 college housing spaces available; 39 were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Louisville Tech Library plus 1 other with 3,463 books, 96 serials, 242 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $32,491. 193 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ MADISONVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE G-2

2000 College Dr.
Madisonville, KY 42431-9185
Tel: (270)821-2250
Fax: (270)821-1555
Web Site: http://www.madcc.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 150-acre small town campus. Endowment: $2.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4341 per student. Total enrollment: 3,500. 0.2% from out-of-state, 42% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT, ACT ASSET required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Most popular organizations: student government, Baptist Student Union, Socratic Society, Student Ambassadors, Academic Team. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service, evening patrols. College housing not available. Loman C. Trover Library plus 1 other with 26,793 books, 21,346 microform titles, 227 serials, 1,688 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $211,216. 35 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Centered on a plateau between the Pond and Tradewater Rivers, Madisonville is one of the principal loose leaf tobacco markets in western Kentucky. Underground coal mining operations are in the vicinity. Good shopping facilities are available. The city has several churches, a public library, and one theatre. The climate is moderate and part-time employment is available.

■ MAYSVILLE COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE C-12

1755 US 68
Maysville, KY 41056
Tel: (606)759-7141
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.maycc.kctcs.net/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1967. Setting: 12-acre rural campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $1800 per student. Total enrollment: 1,917. 3 valedictorians. Full-time: 776 students, 74% women, 26% men. Part-time: 1,141 students, 63% women, 37% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 7% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 0.1% Hispanic, 2% black, 0.2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 40% 25 or older, 1% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, early childhood education, respiratory care, surgical technologist programs. Option: early admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 1 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Math and Science Club, Retail Marketing Club, Student Education Association. Major annual events: Student Government Food and Coat Drive, Blood Drive, election of homecoming princess. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: student patrols, evening parking lot security. College housing not available. Finch Library with 36,600 books, 7,700 microform titles, 288 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $60,717. 250 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

From 1786 to 1789, Daniel Boone and his wife operated a tavern in Maysville, one of the first incorporated towns in Kentucky. Today this is a metropolitan city. The average temperature is 55.3 degrees with an average rainfall of 43.58 inches. Known as one of the largest burley tobacco markets in the world, the city has three large redrying plants and 18 loose-leaf sale warehouses. These warehouses are open daily from 10 to 2 during the tobacco sale and auction season. The manufacturer of power driven pulleys and bicycle parts are also among Maysville's chief industries. There is a hospital and clinic in town, and various civic, fraternal and veteran's organizations are represented. There are excellent shopping facilities. Cinema 4, boating, golf courses, and several private clubs are easily accessible for recreation. Part-time employment is available.

■ MID-CONTINENT UNIVERSITY L-15

99 Powell Rd. East
Mayfield, KY 42066-9007
Tel: (270)247-8521
Fax: (270)247-3115
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.midcontinent.edu/

Description:

Independent Southern Baptist, 4-year, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1949. Setting: 60-acre small town campus. Endowment: $2.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2150 per student. Total enrollment: 649. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 285 applied. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 22% from top quarter, 68% from top half. 1 valedictorian. Full-time: 587 students, 46% women, 54% men. Part-time: 62 students, 53% women, 47% men. Students come from 16 states and territories, 8 other countries, 19% from out-of-state, 81% 25 or older, 33% live on campus, 24% transferred in. Retention: 75% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; psychology; English. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $15,800 includes full-time tuition ($8850), mandatory fees ($1250), and college room and board ($5700). Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $295 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 5 open to all. Most popular organizations: SGA, Baptist Student Union, Psychology Club, International Club, Ministry Association. Major annual events: Homecoming Spirit Week, Blue and Gold Awards, Student Development Impact Week. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: student patrols. 75 college housing spaces available; 65 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Anne P. Markham Library with 32,697 books, 70 serials, 509 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $78,593. 30 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Mayfield is centrally located in the Mississippi River Valley. Transportation, commerce, industry and agriculture contribute to the prosperity of the area. Religious, medical and social facilities are available in the area.

■ MIDWAY COLLEGE D-10

512 East Stephens St.
Midway, KY 40347-1120
Tel: (859)846-4421
Free: 800-755-0031
Admissions: (859)846-5799
Fax: (859)846-5823
Web Site: http://www.midway.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, women only, affiliated with Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1847. Setting: 105-acre small town campus with easy access to Louisville and Lexington. Endowment: $17 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4407 per student. Total enrollment: 1,279. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 423 applied, 75% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 35% from top quarter, 61% from top half. 1 class president, 38 student government officers. Full-time: 876 students. Part-time: 403 students. Students come from 33 states and territories, 6 other countries, 11% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 0.4% Hispanic, 6% black, 0.2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 63% 25 or older, 23% live on campus, 20% transferred in. Retention: 53% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; agriculture; health professions and related sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at Kentucky Institute of International Studies. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.2 high school GPA. Required for some: essay, recommendations, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $20,150 includes full-time tuition ($13,800), mandatory fees ($150), and college room and board ($6200). College room only: $3000. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, location, and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $460 per semester hour. Part-time tuition varies according to class time, location, and program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 21 open to all. Most popular organizations: student government, Midway Chorale, Midway Association of Nursing Students, Council on Religious Activities, Midway Horse Women's Association. Major annual events: Hanging of the Greens, Equine Gala, Night of Lights. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 220 college housing spaces available; 202 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Option: women-only housing available. Little Memorial Library with 96,236 books, 58,217 microform titles, 250 serials, 9,213 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $179,000. 60 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Appropriately named, Midway is located halfway between Lexington and Frankfort in Woodford County. The climate is moderate. Midway has seven churches of various denominations and several large horse farms.

■ MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY D-13

University Blvd.
Morehead, KY 40351
Tel: (606)783-2221
Free: 800-585-6781
Admissions: (606)783-2000
Fax: (606)783-5038
Web Site: http://www.moreheadstate.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1922. Setting: 1,016-acre small town campus. Endowment: $25.7 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5764 per student. Total enrollment: 9,062. Faculty: 534 (378 full-time, 156 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 5,092 applied, 69% were admitted. 17% from top 10% of their high school class, 39% from top quarter, 71% from top half. Full-time: 5,964 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 1,580 students, 77% women, 23% men. Students come from 39 states and territories, 22 other countries, 16% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 4% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.4% international, 23% 25 or older, 33% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 61% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; liberal arts/general studies. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Pikeville College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: ACT. Required for some: recommendations. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $4320 full-time, $180 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $11,480 full-time, $480 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $4830. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: national fraternities, national sororities; 20% of eligible men and 20% of eligible women are members. Major annual events: homecoming, Appalachian Celebration. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 3,651 college housing spaces available; 2,411 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Camden Carroll Library with 333,518 books, 781,060 microform titles, 2,627 serials, 1,808 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.7 million. 1,000 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The city of Morehead is located between Lexington, KY, and Huntington, WV. Community services include a hospital, several churches, five motels, several restaurants and 2 shopping centers. Area recreation includes the Daniel Boone National Forest. The campus is a 1-hour drive from several state parks, and 20 minutes from swimming, boating, fishing, and water skiing. The campus also has Eagle Lake for recreation with a golf course and horseback riding. Several annual local festivals and university-sponsored Appalachia celebrations provide further entertainment.

■ MURRAY STATE UNIVERSITY M-16

PO Box 9
Murray, KY 42071-0009
Tel: (270)762-3011
Free: 800-272-4678
Admissions: (270)762-3592
Fax: (270)762-3413
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.murraystate.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1922. Setting: 238-acre small town campus. Endowment: $40.9 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.6 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5696 per student. Total enrollment: 10,266. Faculty: 537 (386 full-time, 151 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 3,057 applied, 64% were admitted. 28% from top 10% of their high school class, 65% from top quarter, 99% from top half. 62 valedictorians. Full-time: 7,155 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 1,422 students, 61% women, 39% men. Students come from 49 states and territories, 56 other countries, 32% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 6% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 17% 25 or older, 40% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 80% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; communications/journalism. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at National Student Exchange. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Option: electronic application. Required: high school transcript, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Notification: continuous until 8/1, continuous until 8/1 for nonresidents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $3792 full-time, $185 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5464 full-time, $240 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $636 full-time, $23 per hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $4472. College room only: $2366. Room and board charges vary according to board plan.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 210 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 16% of eligible men and 12% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student government, Baptist Student Union, Phi Mu Alpha, Residential Colleges. Major annual events: Homecoming, All Campus Sing, Fall Family Weekend. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 3,200 college housing spaces available; 3,126 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Waterfield Library plus 1 other with 400,000 books, 200,814 microform titles, 2,500 serials, 10,500 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.8 million. 1,800 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The area around Munas has a hospital and several churches. Recreation is available at nearby Kentucky Lake, the largest lake created by the Tennessee Valley Authority, Lake Barkley, and Land Between Lakes, a recreation area of 177,000 acres. Part-time employment is available.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (DANVILLE) F-9

115 East Lexington Ave.
Danville, KY 40422
Tel: (859)236-6991
Free: 800-664-1886
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1962. Total enrollment: 326. Core. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, electronic application. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. 30 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (FLORENCE) A-10

7627 Ewing Blvd.
Florence, KY 41042
Tel: (859)525-6510
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (859)525-8961
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1941. Setting: suburban campus. Total enrollment: 189. Core. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Recommended: interview. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. 30 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (LEXINGTON) E-10

628 East Main St.
Lexington, KY 40508-2312
Tel: (859)253-0621
Free: 800-664-1886
Admissions: (859)266-0401
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1947. Setting: urban campus. Total enrollment: 378. Core. Advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. College housing not available. 30 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (LOUISVILLE) D-7

3950 Dixie Hwy.
Louisville, KY 40216
Tel: (502)447-7634
Free: 800-664-1886
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1990. Total enrollment: 678. Core. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Recommended: interview. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. 55 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (PIKEVILLE) G-16

288 South Mayo Trail, Ste. 2
Pikeville, KY 41501
Tel: (606)432-5477
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (606)437-4952
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1976. Setting: rural campus. Total enrollment: 219. Core. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Recommended: interview. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. 24 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (RICHMOND) F-11

139 South Killarney Ln.
Richmond, KY 40475
Tel: (859)623-8956
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (859)624-5544
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of National College of Business and Technology. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1951. Setting: suburban campus. Total enrollment: 363. Core. Advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Recommended: interview. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. 20 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY A-10

Louie B Nunn Dr.
Highland Heights, KY 41099
Tel: (859)572-5100
Free: 800-637-9948
Admissions: (859)572-5220
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.nku.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and first professional degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 320-acre suburban campus with easy access to Cincinnati. Endowment: $1.5 million. Total enrollment: 13,908. Faculty: 788 (487 full-time, 301 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. 4,369 applied, 81% were admitted. Full-time: 8,989 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 3,068 students, 59% women, 41% men. Students come from 32 states and territories, 11 other countries, 30% from out-of-state, 27% 25 or older, 9% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 63% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at all Kentucky state schools, members of the Greater Cincinnati Consortium of Colleges and Universities. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadlines: 8/1, 2/1 for early action. Notification: continuous, 2/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $4968 full-time, $207 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $9696 full-time, $404 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to location. Part-time tuition varies according to location. College room and board: $4660. College room only: $2580. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 100 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 4% of eligible men and 4% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: campus ministries, academic organizations, student government, Activities Program Board. Major annual events: Homecoming, Freshfusion, Rites of Spring. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,500 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Steely Library plus 2 others with 325,721 books, 771,708 microform titles, 2,217 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 600 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in the largest metropolitan area of any state university in Kentucky, NKU is seven miles southeast of Cincinnati, Ohio.

■ OWENSBORO COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE F-3

4800 New Hartford Rd.
Owensboro, KY 42303-1899
Tel: (270)686-4400; (866)755-6282
Admissions: (270)686-4527
Fax: (270)686-4496
Web Site: http://www.octc.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1986. Setting: 102-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $109,305. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $1348 per student. Total enrollment: 3,664. 789 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 1,848 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 1,816 students, 60% women, 40% men. Students come from 6 states and territories, 2 other countries, 5% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 0.3% Hispanic, 3% black, 0.5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 28% 25 or older, 2% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT required; ACT COMPASS required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 20 open to all. Most popular organizations: student government, Psychology Club, Nursing Club. Major annual events: Fall Fling, Spring Fling, Hanging of Greens. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Learning Resource Center with 18,200 books, 80 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $291,000. 90 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

A myriad of items including bread, soybean oil, paper, plastics, and electronic components are made in the Owensboro area. Thirty manufacturers have forty or more employees, including such national firms as Baskin-Robbins, General Electric, and Kimberly Clark. Eight percent of the land is used for farming. The fifth largest city in the state, population 53,549, it is home to the International Barbecue Festival, the International Bluegrass Museum Association, and the world's largest sassafras tree.

■ PADUCAH TECHNICAL COLLEGE K-15

509 South 30th St.,
PO Box 8252 Paducah, KY 42001
Tel: (270)444-9676
Admissions: (502)444-9676
Fax: (270)441-7202
Web Site: http://www.ptc-ky.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1964. Setting: small town campus. Total enrollment: 200. 82 applied, 100% were admitted. Students come from 4 states and territories, 48% from out-of-state. Calendar: trimesters. Summer session for credit, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

College housing not available. 17 computers available on campus for general student use.

■ PIKEVILLE COLLEGE G-16

147 Sycamore St.
Pikeville, KY 41501
Tel: (606)218-5250; (866)232-7700
Admissions: (606)218-5251
Fax: (606)218-5269
Web Site: http://www.pc.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Awards associate, bachelor's, and first professional degrees. Founded 1889. Setting: 25-acre small town campus. Endowment: $18.7 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6092 per student. Total enrollment: 1,129. Faculty: 61 (54 full-time, 7 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 520 applied, 100% were admitted. 40% from top quarter of their high school class, 81% from top half. Full-time: 778 students, 52% women, 48% men. Part-time: 66 students, 59% women, 41% men. Students come from 25 states and territories, 7 other countries, 19% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 8% black, 0.1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 18% 25 or older, 41% live on campus, 12% transferred in. Retention: 58% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: psychology; business/marketing; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, education programs. Options: electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: SAT or ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/16. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $16,500 includes full-time tuition ($11,500) and college room and board ($5000). Full-time tuition varies according to course load. Part-time tuition: $479 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 22 open to all. Most popular organizations: Pre-Professional Club, Phi Beta Lambda, Rotaract, Psychology Round Table, Nursing Club. Major annual events: Homecoming, Founders' Day. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, controlled dormitory access. 529 college housing spaces available; 326 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Allara Library plus 2 others with 72,673 books, 39,128 microform titles, 219 serials, 1,811 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $282,004. 162 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in the heart of Big Sandy Valley, Pikeville is an important mining and trade center in the midst of Elkhorn coalfield. Breaks Park, southeast of town and Jenny Wiley State Park north of town, provides recreational facilities. Part-time employment is available.

■ ROWAN TECHNICAL COLLEGE D-13

609 Viking Dr.
Morehead, KY 40351
Tel: (606)783-1538
Admissions: (606)759-7141
Fax: (606)784-9876
Web Site: http://www.rowtc.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1984. Total enrollment: 842. Full-time: 294 students, 35% women, 65% men. Part-time: 548 students, 26% women, 74% men. 0.1% Hispanic, 3% black, 0.2% Asian American or Pacific Islander. Calendar: semesters.

■ ST. CATHARINE COLLEGE F-8

2735 Bardstown Rd.
St. Catharine, KY 40061-9499
Tel: (859)336-5082
Fax: (859)336-5031
Web Site: http://www.sccky.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1931. Setting: 643-acre rural campus with easy access to Louisville. Endowment: $300,000. Total enrollment: 751. 700 applied, 45% were admitted. Students come from 45 other countries, 0.1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 9% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 32% 25 or older, 19% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission. Required: minimum ACT score of 12, ACT. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Most popular organizations: African-American Club, International Club, student government, Phi Theta Kappa. Major annual events: Homecoming Weekend, Christmas Dance, Awards Banquet. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, night security guard. Option: coed housing available. St. Catharine College Library with 25,000 books, 110 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 60 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SOMERSET COMMUNITY COLLEGE H-10

808 Monticello St.
Somerset, KY 42501-2973
Tel: (606)679-8501
Web Site: http://www.somerset.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1965. Setting: 70-acre small town campus. Endowment: $419,000. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3018 per student. Total enrollment: 5,850. 825 applied, 100% were admitted. Students come from 3 states and territories, 0.2% Native American, 0.3% Hispanic, 1% black, 0.2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 50% 25 or older. Retention: 60% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, clinical laboratory technology, physical therapy assistant, surgical technology, radiography programs. Options: Common Application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/22. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 6 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Students in Free Enterprise, Phi Beta Lambda, Phi Theta Kappa. Major annual events: graduation, drama presentations, Multicultural Day Events. College housing not available. Somerset Community College Library with 58,918 books, 4,548 microform titles, 154 serials, 1,233 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $102,000. 1,000 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in an urban area in south central Kentucky, railroad and bus service are available to Somerset. It has a local YMCA, library, hospital and other health services and various organizations including Rotary, Kiwanis, Jaycees, and a Chamber of Commerce. Recreation is provided with 3 theatres, drive-ins, golf, tennis, and Lake Cumberland with 1,225 miles of shoreline.

■ SOUTHEAST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE I-14

700 College Rd.
Cumberland, KY 40823-1099
Tel: (606)589-2145; 888-274-SECC
Fax: (606)589-5423
Web Site: http://www.soucc.kctcs.net/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1960. Setting: 150-acre small town campus. Endowment: $1.8 million. Total enrollment: 4,519. 0.2% Native American, 0.3% Hispanic, 1% black, 0.2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.02% international. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for allied health programs. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/20. Notification: continuous until 9/3.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2352 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7056 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $164 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 10 open to all. Most popular organizations: Professional Business Leaders, Student Government Association, Phi Theta Kappa, Black Student Union, Nursing Club. Major annual events: Octoberfest, Swappin' Meetin', Spring on Cloverlick. College housing not available. Gertrude Dale Library with 25,921 books, 200 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $480,000. 46 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Cumberland is a rural town in Harlan County of southeastern Kentucky. The city has Protestant and Catholic churches, and a community hospital and other medical services. Recreation is provided by movie theaters, fishing at Kingdom Come State Park Lake, picnic areas, a lodge and trailer park and a city park. Local merchants employ college students since the town serves an area of approximately 20,000 persons. Various civic, service, fraternal and veteran's organizations, including a Chamber of Commerce, enhance the community spirit.

■ SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY D-7

2825 Lexington Rd.
Louisville, KY 40280-0004
Tel: (502)897-4011
Web Site: http://www.sbts.edu/

Description:

Independent Southern Baptist, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1858. Total enrollment: 475.

Community Environment:

See University of Louisville.

■ SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS A-10

8095 Connector Dr.
Florence, KY 41042
Tel: (859)282-9999
Admissions: (859)341-6633
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.swcollege.net/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1978. Setting: suburban campus with easy access to Cincinnati. Total enrollment: 240. 97% 25 or older. Academic remediation for entering students, double major.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, early admission.

Collegiate Environment:

College housing not available.

■ SPALDING UNIVERSITY D-7

851 South Fourth St.
Louisville, KY 40203-2188
Tel: (502)585-9911
Free: 800-896-8941
Fax: (502)585-7158
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.spalding.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Roman Catholic Church. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1814. Setting: 5-acre urban campus. Endowment: $6.8 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $50,935. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7725 per student. Total enrollment: 1,641. Faculty: 174 (76 full-time, 98 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 493 applied, 67% were admitted. 0% from top 10% of their high school class, 28% from top quarter, 61% from top half. Full-time: 645 students, 79% women, 21% men. Part-time: 255 students, 81% women, 19% men. Students come from 8 states and territories, 27 other countries, 16% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 20% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 54% 25 or older, 13% live on campus, 10% transferred in. Retention: 71% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: health professions and related sciences; business/marketing; psychology; public administration and social services. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at 7 members of the Kentuckiana Metroversity. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Required for some: essay. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $19,572 includes full-time tuition ($15,300), mandatory fees ($600), and college room and board ($3672). College room only: $2100. Part-time tuition: $510 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $20 per hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 27 open to all. Most popular organizations: student government, Model United Nations/International Club, Nursing Society, National Education Association, Student Occupational Therapy Association. Major annual events: Rat Race - Run for the Rodents, International Week, Homecoming Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 200 college housing spaces available; 83 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. Spalding Library with 160,954 books, 16,273 microform titles, 655 serials, 30,140 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $397,805. 80 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of Louisville.

■ SPENCERIAN COLLEGE D-7

4627 Dixie Hwy.
Louisville, KY 40216
Tel: (502)447-1000
Free: 800-264-1799
Fax: (502)447-4574
Web Site: http://www.spencerian.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of The Sullivan University System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1892. Setting: 10-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 1,326. 1 valedictorian. Students come from 11 states and territories, 16% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 0.3% Hispanic, 25% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 50% 25 or older, 0% live on campus. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, part-time degree program, external degree program, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, electronic application. Required: high school transcript, interview. Recommended: SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay, recommendations. Notification: continuous until 9/1. Preference given to nursing programs have preferential admission.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $90. Tuition: $12,120 full-time, $202 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $575 full-time, $30. College room only: $3960.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: local fraternities; 1% of eligible men and 50% of eligible women are members. Most popular organization: Spencerian Business Leaders. Major annual events: Belle of Louisville Cruise, annual picnic, Derby Activities. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. Option: coed housing available. Laura Diener with an OPAC and a Web page. 81 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SPENCERIAN COLLEGE-LEXINGTON E-10

2355 Harrodsburg Rd.
Lexington, KY 40504
Tel: (859)223-9608
Admissions: 800-456-3253
Fax: (859)224-7744
Web Site: http://www.spencerian.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of Sullivan Colleges System. Awards certificates, diplomas, and terminal associate degrees. Setting: urban campus with easy access to Louisville. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2932 per student. Total enrollment: 376. 158 applied, 79% were admitted. Students come from 1 other country, 0% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 6% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.3% international, 31% 25 or older, 13% live on campus. Retention: 0% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, independent study, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: Common Application. Required: high school transcript, interview. Required for some: CPAt. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Major annual events: golf tournament, school picnic, Student Appreciation Week. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. 90 college housing spaces available; 50 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Spencerian College Library with 450 books, 30 serials, and 25 audiovisual materials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $4500. 14 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY D-7

3101 Bardstown Rd.
Louisville, KY 40205
Tel: (502)456-6504
Free: 800-844-1354
Admissions: (502)456-6505
Fax: (502)456-0040
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.sullivan.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Administratively affiliated with Sullivan Colleges System. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1864. Setting: 10-acre suburban campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2100 per student. Total enrollment: 4,639. Faculty: 213 (93 full-time, 120 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 22% from top quarter, 76% from top half. Students come from 22 states and territories, 11 other countries, 13% from out-of-state, 52% 25 or older, 9% live on campus. Retention: 60% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript, interview, ACT or CPAt. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $90. Tuition: $12,900 full-time, $215 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $435 full-time, $30 per course part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to program. College room only: $3960. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 15 open to all. Most popular organizations: student government, Travel Club, Sullivan Student Paralegal Association, American Marketing Association, Society of Hosteurs. Major annual events: Belle of Louisville Cruise, Summer Picnic/Festival, ski trip. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. 300 college housing spaces available; 215 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Option: coed housing available. McWhorter Library with 22,500 books, 222 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $475,000. 125 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ THOMAS MORE COLLEGE L-9

333 Thomas More Parkway Crestview Hills,
KY 41017-3495
Tel: (859)341-5800
Free: 800-825-4557
Admissions: (859)344-3332
Fax: (859)344-3638
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.thomasmore.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1921. Setting: 100-acre suburban campus with easy access to Cincinnati. Endowment: $9.6 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6056 per student. Total enrollment: 1,434. Faculty: 134 (71 full-time, 63 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 1,007 applied, 63% were admitted. 14% from top 10% of their high school class, 37% from top quarter, 70% from top half. 12 valedictorians. Students come from 56 states and territories, 10 other countries, 32% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 0.4% Hispanic, 6% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.4% international, 31% 25 or older, 20% live on campus. Retention: 67% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; history. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at members of the Greater Cincinnati Consortium of Colleges and Universities. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, rank in upper 50% of high school class, admissions committee may consider those not meeting criteria, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Required for some: essay, 2 recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/15. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $24,470 includes full-time tuition ($17,600), mandatory fees ($720), and college room and board ($6150). College room only: $2900. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $450 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $30 per credit hour, $15 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 29 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, orientation team, ACT More Program Board, Outdoors Club, Business Society. Major annual events: Homecoming, Senior Boat Cruise, Spring Fling Week/Spring Formal. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 400 college housing spaces available; 270 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Thomas More Library with 127,429 books, 51,551 microform titles, 609 serials, 2,178 audiovisual materials, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $345,094. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The campus is located just 10 minutes south of downtown Cincinnati. The Greater Cincinnati International Airport is a five-minute drive from campus. Numerous activities and faculties include the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, jazz clubs, restaurants, shops, live theater and ballet, the Cincinnati Zoo, the annual Riverfest, Oktoberfest and Taste of Cincinnati. Teams include the Cincinnati Reds and the Bengals.

■ TRANSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY E-10

300 North Broadway
Lexington, KY 40508-1797
Tel: (859)233-8300
Free: 800-872-6798
Admissions: (859)233-8242
Fax: (859)233-8797
E-mail: [email protected]/.edu
Web Site: http://www.transy.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1780. Setting: 35-acre urban campus with easy access to Cincinnati and Louisville. Endowment: $127.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7523 per student. Total enrollment: 1,151. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 1,222 applied, 84% were admitted. 50% from top 10% of their high school class, 75% from top quarter, 97% from top half. 7 National Merit Scholars, 31 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,135 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 16 students, 25% women, 75% men. Students come from 34 states and territories, 1 other country, 22% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 2% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.1% international, 0.4% 25 or older, 80% live on campus, 1% transferred in. Retention: 89% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-4-1. Advanced placement, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships. Off campus study at Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars, Kentucky Institute for International Studies. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.75 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Required for some: interview. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 2/1, 12/1 for early action. Notification: 3/15, 1/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $26,240 includes full-time tuition ($19,650) and college room and board ($6590). Room and board charges vary according to board plan and location. Part-time tuition: $2100 per course. Part-time mandatory fees: $84 per course.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 51 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 50% of eligible men and 50% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Alumni Association, Student Government Association, Student Activities Board, Crimson Crew, Alternative Spring Break. Major annual events: T-Day Week, Greek Week, Crimson Christmas. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 890 college housing spaces available; 850 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Transylvania Library with 124,000 books, 13,348 microform titles, 500 serials, 2,214 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $660,028. 250 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of Kentucky.

■ UNION COLLEGE I-12

310 College St. Barbourville,
KY 40906-1499
Tel: (606)546-4151
Free: 800-489-8646
Admissions: (606)546-1222
Fax: (606)546-1667
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.unionky.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1879. Setting: 110-acre small town campus. Endowment: $14.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5065 per student. Total enrollment: 1,224. Faculty: 71 (46 full-time, 25 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 596 applied, 64% were admitted. 6% from top 10% of their high school class, 28% from top quarter, 60% from top half. Full-time: 555 students, 42% women, 58% men. Part-time: 56 students, 63% women, 38% men. Students come from 18 states and territories, 5 other countries, 19% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 9% black, 0.2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 24% 25 or older, 45% live on campus, 10% transferred in. Retention: 56% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; psychology. Core. Calendar: semesters. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at members of the Mid-Appalachian Colleges Council. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission.Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT. Required for some: essay, recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. One-time mandatory fee: $800. Comprehensive fee: $19,890 includes full-time tuition ($14,950), mandatory fees ($340), and college room and board ($4600). College room only: $1700. Part-time tuition: $260 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $15 per semester hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 18 open to all. Most popular organizations: Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Baptist Student Union, Thespian Society, Newman Club, Psychology Club. Major annual events: Special Olympics, Homecoming, Springfest. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 325 college housing spaces available; 248 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Weeks-Townsend Memorial Library with 142,667 books, 444,016 microform titles, 8,612 serials, 5,198 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $327,564. 70 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF THE CUMBERLANDS J-11

6178 College Station Dr.
Williamsburg, KY 40769-1372
Tel: (606)549-2200
Free: 800-343-1609
Admissions: (606)539-4201
Fax: (606)539-4303
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cumberlandcollege.edu/

Description:

Independent Kentucky Baptist, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1889. Setting: 50-acre rural campus with easy access to Knoxville. Endowment: $55.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4962 per student. Total enrollment: 1,843. Faculty: 112 (86 full-time, 26 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 984 applied, 83% were admitted. 16% from top 10% of their high school class, 42% from top quarter, 70% from top half. 21 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,411 students, 52% women, 48% men. Part-time: 222 students, 56% women, 44% men. Students come from 34 states and territories, 23 other countries, 40% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 7% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 9% 25 or older, 53% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 63% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $19,984 includes full-time tuition ($13,298), mandatory fees ($360), and college room and board ($6326). Part-time tuition: $410 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $48.75 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 45 open to all. Most popular organizations: Baptist Student Union, Student Government Association, Campus Activity Board, Mountain Outreach, Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Major annual events: homecoming, Hanging of the Green, Spring Fever. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, patrols by trained security personnel 11pm-7am. 1,100 college housing spaces available; 929 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. 300 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in the southeastern part of Kentucky, Williamsburg is accessible via bus service and interstate highway. The city offers facilities that include 14 churches of various denominations, 4 medical clinics, civic organizations and city parks. Recreation is found at Cumberland Falls State Park, Cumberland Lake, Laurel Lake, cinemas and theaters. There is adequate modern housing available and motels nearby. Part-time employment opportunities are available for students.

■ UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY E-10

Lexington, KY 40506-0032
Tel: (859)257-9000
Admissions: (859)257-2000
Fax: (859)257-4000
Web Site: http://www.uky.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1865. Setting: 685-acre urban campus with easy access to Cincinnati and Louisville. Endowment: $538.4 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $187.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $10,365 per student. Total enrollment: 25,672. Faculty: 1,724 (1,211 full-time, 513 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 10,508 applied, 82% were admitted. 28% from top 10% of their high school class, 57% from top quarter, 86% from top half. 35 National Merit Scholars, 157 valedictorians. Full-time: 17,050 students, 52% women, 48% men. Part-time: 1,652 students, 49% women, 51% men. Students come from 52 states and territories, 91 other countries, 17% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 5% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 10% 25 or older, 31% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 79% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; communications/journalism; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Academic Common Market, University of Florida. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 2/15. Notification: continuous. Preference given to state residents for certain programs.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $5162 full-time, $216 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,148 full-time, $507 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $650 full-time, $16.25 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level, program, reciprocity agreements, and student level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level, program, reciprocity agreements, and student level. College room and board: $5129. College room only: $3363. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 305 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 15% of eligible men and 19% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Activities Board, Student Government Association, Campus Progressive Coalition, Ski and Snowboard Club, Society of Women Engineers. Major annual events: Homecoming, Student Center Night, Cultural Diversity Festival. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 5,600 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. William T. Young Library plus 15 others with 3.1 million books, 6.3 million microform titles, 29,633 serials, 86,690 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $20.4 million. 1,400 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Lexington is located in the famous Bluegrass area of Kentucky. It is centrally located with Louisville 80 miles to the west and Cincinnati 90 miles to the north. Travel is made easier with close access to Interstates 75 and 64. The Mountain Parkway connects the Bluegrass with eastern Kentucky, and the Bluegrass Parkway links the western part of the State and Interstate 65. Lexington, known throughout the world as the home of the thoroughbred, attracts thousands of horse fans and buyers each year. Keeneland, a thoroughbred race track, and the famous trotting track, the Red Mile draw racing fans. The thoroughbred is not Lexington's only equine citizen; the standardbred, the quarterhorse, the saddle horse, and the Arabian are some of the many other breeds that live on some of the world's most famous farms in the Bluegrass. Since 1974, Lexington has been governed by an urban county form of government. The Lexington-Fayette County population is approximately 250,000, and this second largest city in Kentucky has seen steady growth in population. Le

■ UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE D-7

2301 South Third St.
Louisville, KY 40292-0001
Tel: (502)852-5555
Free: 800-334-8635
Admissions: (502)852-6531
Fax: (502)852-4776
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.louisville.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1798. Setting: 169-acre urban campus. Endowment: $607.6 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $100.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $11,415 per student. Total enrollment: 20,734. Faculty: 1,313 (802 full-time, 511 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 5,712 applied, 79% were admitted. 22% from top 10% of their high school class, 51% from top quarter, 80% from top half. Full-time: 11,441 students, 53% women, 47% men. Part-time: 3,492 students, 51% women, 49% men. Students come from 51 states and territories, 65 other countries, 14% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 14% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 15% 25 or older, 15% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 76% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; engineering. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at 6 members of the Kentuckiana Metroversity. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.50 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $5532 full-time, $231 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,092 full-time, $629 per hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $6036. College room only: $4490. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 202 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 7% of eligible men and 3% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Spirit Club - 'L' Raisers, Baptist Student Union, Golden Key Society, Sigma Chi, Phi Eta Sigma. Major annual events: Homecoming events, NPHC Stepshow, Welcome. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,674 college housing spaces available; 1,590 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Option: coed housing available. William F. Ekstrom Library plus 5 others with 2 million books, 2.2 million microform titles, 24,910 serials, 35,429 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $71.7 million. 265 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Louisville is known as the Derby City for the annual running of the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs. The city was the base of supplies for Clark's expeditions, which culminated in the conquest of the northwest. U.S. river boats pass through the locks around 25-foot falls in the Ohio River. Louisville is an important distilling center and one of the largest tobacco product manufacturing centers in the world. There are many other local manufacturing firms in the area, and part-time employment is available. There is a community-wide fund for music, drama, and art, and the city has resident opera, ballet, orchestra, and theater companies.

■ WEST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE K-15

4810 Alben Barkley Dr.
PO Box 7380
Paducah, KY 42002-7380
Tel: (270)554-9200
Fax: (270)554-6217
Web Site: http://www.westkentucky.kctcs.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of University of Kentucky Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1932. Setting: 117-acre small town campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2042 per student. Total enrollment: 3,545. 14% from top 10% of their high school class, 56% from top quarter, 71% from top half. Students come from 12 states and territories, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 6% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 41% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: early admission. Required for some: high school transcript. Placement: ACT required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Area resident tuition: $98 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $118 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $294 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Student services: women's center. Campus security: 14-hour patrols by trained security personnel. College housing not available. Paducah Community College Library with 31,339 books, 152 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $358,108. 160 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

A busy town with a leisurely atmosphere, Paducah was named for Indian Chief, Paduke, who is buried on the bank of the river. It is an important market for burley and dark tobacco. Diversified industries include boat and barge builders, electronics and chemicals plants. Part-time work is available. Located at the confluence of the Tennessee and Ohio Rivers, average winter temperature is 46.2 degrees, summer, 73.4 degrees. Highways, airlines, and bus lines serve the community. A public library, churches, two hospitals, hotels and motels and many civic organizations are available. Recreation areas include nearby Kentucky and Barkley Lakes and the"Land Between Lakes" area as well as three state parks, several public parks, a swimming pool, golf courses and theatres.

■ WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY I-5

1 Big Red Way
Bowling Green, KY 42101-3576
Tel: (270)745-0111
Admissions: (270)745-2551
Fax: (270)745-6133
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wku.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees and post-master's and first professional certificates. Founded 1906. Setting: 223-acre suburban campus with easy access to Nashville. Endowment: $75.3 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $8.5 million. Total enrollment: 18,634. Faculty: 1,107 (694 full-time, 413 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 6,781 applied, 92% were admitted. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 36% from top quarter, 67% from top half. 4 National Merit Scholars, 105 valedictorians. Full-time: 13,053 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 2,914 students, 65% women, 35% men. Students come from 45 states and territories, 51 other countries, 17% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 9% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 20% 25 or older, 31% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 73% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; communications/journalism. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 8/1, 6/1 for nonresidents. Notification: continuous, continuous for nonresidents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $5316 full-time, $228 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,732 full-time, $537 per hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load, location, program, and reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition varies according to course load, location, program, and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $4876. College room only: $2800. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 215 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local sororities; 7% of eligible men and 9% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Campus Activities Board, Campus Crusade for Christ, campus ministries, Residence Hall Association. Major annual events: homecoming, football tailgating, step show. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. College housing designed to accommodate 4,513 students; 4,887 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Helm-Cravens Library plus 3 others with an OPAC and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $5.8 million. 1,300 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The city of Bowling Green is located on the Barrer River in Warren County in southern Kentucky. Situated 60 miles north of Nashville, and 103 miles south of Louisville, Bowling Green has about 80 churches of 26 denominations, a public library, and two hospitals. Recreation is provided by local theaters and parks, including nearby Mammoth Cave National Park.

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Kentucky

Kentucky

ALICE LLOYD COLLEGE

100 Purpose Rd.
Pippa Passes, KY 41844
Tel: (606)368-2101
Admissions: (606)368-6134
Fax: (606)368-2125
Web Site: http://www.alc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Joe A. Stepp
Registrar: Thelmarie Thornsberry
Admissions: Sean Damron
Financial Aid: Nancy Melton
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 73% ACT 18-23; 13% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 59 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $4900 includes full-time tuition ($0), mandatory fees ($1150), and college room and board ($3750). College room only: $1730. Part-time tuition: $212 per credit hour. Full-time students in the 108-county service area are granted guaranteed tuition. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 575, PT 18 Faculty: FT 28, PT 12 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 54 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 74 Library Holdings: 74,216 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 credit hours, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Golf M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W

ASBURY COLLEGE

1 Macklem Dr.
Wilmore, KY 40390-1198
Tel: (859)858-3511
Free: 800-888-1818
Fax: (859)858-3921
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.asbury.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Paul A. Rader
Registrar: Dr. Timothy L. Thomas
Admissions: Ronald Anderson
Financial Aid: Patricia Kelly
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: nondenominational Scores: 97% SAT V 400+; 96% SAT M 400+; 45% ACT 18-23; 40% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 74 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $23,762 includes full-time tuition ($18,808), mandatory fees ($148), and college room and board ($4806). College room only: $2810. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location. Part-time tuition: $723 per semester hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,124, PT 105, Grad 64 Faculty: FT 86, PT 65 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 71 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 87 Library Holdings: 145,424 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Soccer M & W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

ASHLAND COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

1400 College Dr.
Ashland, KY 41101-3683
Tel: (606)329-2999
Free: 800-370-7191
Admissions: (606)326-2114
Fax: (606)325-8124
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ashland.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Greg D. Adkins
Registrar: Willie G. McCullough
Admissions: Steven D. Flouhouse
Financial Aid: Martha J. Persinger
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Scores: 46% ACT 18-23; 7% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2940 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8820 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition varies according to reciprocity agreements. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 64, PT 68 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: ACT, Other Library Holdings: 41,379 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ARCEST, ACBSP, CARC, COE, NLN

BECKFIELD COLLEGE

16 Spiral Dr.
Florence, KY 41042
Tel: (859)371-9393
Fax: (859)371-5096
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.beckfield.edu/
President/CEO: Harry L. Beck
Registrar: Cindy Griggs
Admissions: Ken Leeds
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter Enrollment: FT 480 Faculty: FT 4, PT 22 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Professional Accreditation: ACICS

BELLARMINE UNIVERSITY

2001 Newburg Rd.
Louisville, KY 40205-0671
Tel: (502)452-8000
Free: 800-274-4723
Admissions: (502)452-8131
Fax: (502)452-8002
Web Site: http://www.bellarmine.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Joseph J. McGowan
Registrar: Beverly Gradisek
Admissions: Timothy A. Sturgeon
Financial Aid: David Wuinee
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400+; 46% ACT 18-23; 47% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 71 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $31,030 includes full-time tuition ($23,300), mandatory fees ($850), and college room and board ($6880). College room only: $3860. Part-time tuition: $550 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $35 per course. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,737, PT 522, Grad 541 Faculty: FT 115, PT 136 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 37 Library Holdings: 97,737 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 126 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, AACN, APTA, ASC, CARC, NAACLS, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M & W; Lacrosse M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

BEREA COLLEGE

Berea, KY 40404
Tel: (859)985-3000
Free: 800-326-5948
Admissions: (859)985-3500
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.berea.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Larry D. Shinn
Admissions: Jamie Ealy
Financial Aid: Bryan Erslan
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400+; 55% ACT 18-23; 40% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 27 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission Application Deadline: April 30 Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $5496 includes full-time tuition ($0), mandatory fees ($516), and college room and board ($4980). Financial aid is provided to all students for tuition costs. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,529, PT 66 Faculty: FT 130, PT 29 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 100 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 84 Library Holdings: 358,556 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 33 courses, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACN, AAFCS, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

BIG SANDY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

One Bert T. Combs Dr.
Prestonsburg, KY 41653-1815
Tel: (606)886-3863; 888-641-4132
Fax: (606)886-6943
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bigsandy.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. George D. Edwards
Admissions: Jim Glover
Financial Aid: Denese S. Atkinson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2940 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3540 full-time, $118 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8820 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 69, PT 45 Exams: ACT, Other Library Holdings: 34,668 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ADA, COE

BOWLING GREEN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

1845 Loop Dr.
Bowling Green, KY 42101
Tel: (270)901-1000
Fax: (270)746-7466
Web Site: http://www.bowlinggreen.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Jack Thomas
Financial Aid: Rick Wilson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Semester Professional Accreditation: CARC, COE

BRESCIA UNIVERSITY

717 Frederica St.
Owensboro, KY 42301-3023
Tel: (270)685-3131; 877-273-7242
Admissions: (270)686-4241
Fax: (270)686-6422
Web Site: http://www.brescia.edu/
President/CEO: Sr. Vivian Bowles, OSU
Registrar: Sr. Helena Fischer
Admissions: Sr. Mary Austin Blank
Financial Aid: Martie Ruxer-Bovken
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic Scores: 63% ACT 18-23; 34% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $15,330 includes full-time tuition ($12,400), mandatory fees ($220), and college room and board ($2710). College room only: $1560. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $395 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $10 per credit hour, $100 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 477, PT 192, Grad 40 Faculty: FT 43, PT 32 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 74 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 26 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 63 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: CSWE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis W; Volleyball W

BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE-HOPKINSVILLE

4001 Ft. Cambell Blvd.
Hopkinsville, KY 42240
Tel: (270)886-1302
Free: 800-359-4753
Fax: (270)886-3544
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.brownmackie.edu/locations.asp?locid=17
President/CEO: Elizabeth Ashy
Admissions: Brenda Cortez
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed % Accepted: 100 Application Deadline: Rolling Costs Per Year: Tuition: $8592 full-time, $179 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $480 full-time, $10 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter Enrollment: FT 146 Faculty: FT 3, PT 7 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT, ACICS

BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE-LOUISVILLE

300 High Rise Dr.
Louisville, KY 40213
Tel: (502)968-7191
Free: 800-999-7387
Fax: (502)968-1727
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.brownmackie.edu/locations.asp?locid=18
President/CEO: Terry Queeno
Admissions: Kathleen Belanger
Financial Aid: Beverly Sensenbrenner
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed % Accepted: 72 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Tuition: $8592 full-time. Mandatory fees: $480 full-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter Enrollment: FT 315 Faculty: FT 7, PT 10 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Library Holdings: 1,210 Credit Hours For Degree: 90 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT, ACICS

BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE-NORTHERN KENTUCKY

309 Buttermilk Pike
Fort Mitchell, KY 41017-2191
Tel: (859)341-5627
Free: 800-888-1445
Fax: (859)341-6483
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.brownmackie.edu
President/CEO: Dr. G. Edward Hughs
Registrar: Diana Wagner
Admissions: Joanne Dellefield
Financial Aid: Pamela Wright
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: American Education Centers, Inc Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 465 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Library Holdings: 1,500 Credit Hours For Degree: 102 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

CAMPBELLSVILLE UNIVERSITY

1 University Dr.
Campbellsville, KY 42718-2799
Tel: (270)789-5000
Free: 800-264-6014
Admissions: (270)789-5220
Fax: (270)789-5071
Web Site: http://www.campbellsville.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Michael V. Carter
Registrar: Rita L. Creason
Admissions: David Walters
Financial Aid: Chris Tolson
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Baptist Convention Scores: 87% SAT V 400+; 88% SAT M 400+; 57% ACT 18-23; 15% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 73 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $22,272 includes full-time tuition ($15,960), mandatory fees ($380), and college room and board ($5932). Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,266, PT 570, Grad 450 Faculty: FT 86, PT 131 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 77 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 55 Library Holdings: 172,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credits, Associates; 128 credits, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: CSWE, NASM Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

CENTRE COLLEGE

600 West Walnut St.
Danville, KY 40422-1394
Tel: (859)238-5200
Free: 800-423-6236
Admissions: (859)238-5350
Fax: (859)238-5456
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.centre.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John A. Roush
Registrar: Timothy Culhan
Admissions: J. Carey Thompson
Financial Aid: Elaine Larson
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 13% ACT 18-23; 63% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 63 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $30,810 includes full-time tuition ($23,110) and college room and board ($7700). College room only: $3900. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $830 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 1,127, PT 3 Faculty: FT 96, PT 27 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 61 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 95 Library Holdings: 217,751 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 111 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

CLEAR CREEK BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE

300 Clear Creek Rd.
Pineville, KY 40977-9754
Tel: (606)337-3196
Web Site: http://www.ccbbc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Bill D. Whittaker
Registrar: Brenda Hester
Admissions: Billy Howell
Financial Aid: Sam Risner
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southern Baptist Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For bachelor's degree program: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $7830 includes full-time tuition ($4520) and college room and board ($3310). College room only: $1870. Part-time tuition: $205 per semester hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 154, PT 58 Faculty: FT 8, PT 8 % Receiving Financial Aid: 67 Library Holdings: 38,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 66 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AABC

DAYMAR COLLEGE (LOUISVILLE)

4400 Breckenridge Ln., Ste. 415
Louisville, KY 40218
Tel: (502)495-1040
Web Site: http://www.daymarcollege.edu/
Admissions: Patrick Carney
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Quarter Professional Accreditation: ACICS

DAYMAR COLLEGE (OWENSBORO)

3361 Buckland Square
Owensboro, KY 42301
Tel: (270)926-4040
Free: 800-960-4090
Fax: (270)685-4090
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.daymarcollege.edu/
President/CEO: Mark Gabis
Registrar: Debi Sweeden
Admissions: Vickie McDougal
Financial Aid: Tricia Dukes
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 334, PT 112 Faculty: FT 9, PT 21 Student-Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 3,215 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

DRAUGHONS JUNIOR COLLEGE

2421 Fitzgerald Industrial Dr.
Bowling Green, KY 42101
Tel: (270)843-6750
Fax: (270)843-6976
Web Site: http://www.draughons.edu/
President/CEO: Melva Hale
Registrar: Sarah Hunley
Admissions: Melva Hale
Financial Aid: Mary Hood
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Draughons Junior College, Inc Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Tuition: $300 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1000 full-time. Full-time fees vary according to course load and program. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and program. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 172, PT 196 Faculty: FT 10, PT 17 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 5,000 Credit Hours For Degree: 63 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

521 Lancaster Ave.
Richmond, KY 40475-3102
Tel: (859)622-1000
Admissions: (859)622-2106
Fax: (859)622-1020
Web Site: http://www.eku.edu/
President/CEO: Joanne Glasser, Esq
Registrar: Jill Allgier
Admissions: Stephen Byrn
Financial Aid: Shelley Park
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Council on Post Secondary Education % Accepted: 75 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $4660 full-time, $194 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,070 full-time, $545 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $460 full-time. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. College room and board: $4088. College room only: $2208. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 10,919, PT 3,023, Grad 2,277 Faculty: FT 556, PT 454 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 54 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 33 Library Holdings: 768,300 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, AACN, AAFCS, AAMAE, ACCE, ACA, ADtA, AHIMA, AOTA, ASC, ASLHA, CSWE, JRCEMT, JRCEPAT, NAACLS, NAIT, NASM, NASPAA, NCATE NLN, NRPA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

ELIZABETHTOWN COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

600 College St. Rd.
Elizabethtown, KY 42701-3081
Tel: (270)769-2371; 877-246-2322
Fax: (270)769-1632
Web Site: http://www.elizabethtown.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Thelma White
Registrar: Peggy Hoskinson
Admissions: Dr. Dale Buckles
Financial Aid: Sharon Hodges
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2352 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7056 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,645, PT 1,970 Exams: ACT Library Holdings: 35,175 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: JRCERT, NLN

GATEWAY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

1025 Amsterdam Rd.
Covington, KY 41011
Tel: (859)441-4500
Fax: (859)292-6415
Web Site: http://www.gateway.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: G. Edward Hughes
Admissions: Paul Brinkman
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: State resident tuition: $2940 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8820 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Calendar System: Semester Exams: Other Professional Accreditation: COE

GEORGETOWN COLLEGE

400 East College St.
Georgetown, KY 40324-1696
Tel: (502)863-8000
Free: 800-788-9985
Admissions: (502)863-8009
Fax: (502)868-8891
Web Site: http://www.georgetowncollege.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. William H. Crouch, Jr.
Registrar: Winnie Bratcher
Admissions: Johnnie Johnson
Financial Aid: Rhyan Conyers
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Baptist Church Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 98% SAT M 400+; 51% ACT 18-23; 40% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 95 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: July 01 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $26,770 includes full-time tuition ($20,700) and college room and board ($6070). College room only: $2940. Part-time tuition: $860 per hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,310, PT 55, Grad 539 Faculty: FT 101, PT 66 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 66 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 88 Library Holdings: 160,862 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

HAZARD COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

1 Community College Dr.
Hazard, KY 41701-2403
Tel: (606)436-5721
Free: 800-246-7521
Fax: (606)439-2988
Web Site: http://www.hazard.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Jay Box
Registrar: Elizabeth Roberts
Admissions: Germain Shaffer
Financial Aid: Charles Anderson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 100, PT 60 Exams: ACT Library Holdings: 36,550 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: APTA, JRCERT, NAACLS

HENDERSON COMMUNITY COLLEGE

2660 South Green St.
Henderson, KY 42420-4623
Tel: (270)827-1867
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.henderson.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Patrick R. Lake
Registrar: Patricia Mitchell
Admissions: Patty Mitchell
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Admission Plans: Open Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: State resident tuition: $2490 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8820 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 690, PT 1,551 Faculty: FT 48, PT 53 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: ACT, Other Library Holdings: 30,206 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ADA, NAACLS, NLN

HOPKINSVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 2100
Hopkinsville, KY 42241-2100
Tel: (270)886-3921
Fax: (270)886-0237
Web Site: http://www.hopcc.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Bonnie L. Rogers
Registrar: Ruth Ann Rettie
Admissions: Ruth Ann Rettie
Financial Aid: Vincent Shykes
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Scores: 48.78% ACT 18-23; 14.53% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2940 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8820 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to location and reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition varies according to location and reciprocity agreements. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,413, PT 1,691 Faculty: FT 68, PT 101 Student-Faculty Ratio: 23:1 Exams: ACT, Other Library Holdings: 45,674 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (LEXINGTON)

2473 Fortune Dr., Ste. 180
Lexington, KY 40509
Tel: (859)246-3300
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Application Fee: $100.00 Exams: Other

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (LOUISVILLE)

10509 Timberwood Circle, Ste. 100
Louisville, KY 40223-5392
Tel: (502)327-7424
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/
President/CEO: Alan S. Crews
Admissions: Steve Allen
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: ITT Educational Services, Inc Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Not available Exams: Other Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates; 180 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACICS

JEFFERSON COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

109 East Broadway
Louisville, KY 40202-2005
Tel: (502)213-5333
Admissions: (502)213-2183
Fax: (502)213-2115
Web Site: http://www.jctc.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Anthony Newberry
Registrar: Vivian Thomas
Admissions: Melanie Vaughan-Cooke
Financial Aid: Angela Johnson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For certain academic programs (Allied Health): High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $3270 full-time, $109 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $9810 full-time, $327 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $50 full-time, $25 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,941, PT 9,299 Faculty: FT 304, PT 357 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Library Holdings: 76,578 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ACF, AOTA, APTA, CARC, NLN

KENTUCKY CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

100 Academic Parkway
Grayson, KY 41143-2205
Tel: (606)474-3000
Free: 800-522-3181
Admissions: (606)474-3266
Fax: (606)474-3155
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.kcu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Keith P. Keeran
Registrar: George Waggoner
Admissions: Sandra Deakins
Financial Aid: Jennie Bender
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Christian Churches and Churches of Christ Scores: 82.35% SAT V 400+; 85.19% SAT M 400+; 50% ACT 18-23; 27.08% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 530, PT 14, Grad 15 Faculty: FT 42, PT 16 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I and SAT II or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 81 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 88 Library Holdings: 103,323 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 66 credit hours, Associates; 132 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: CSWE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Soccer M & W; Volleyball W

KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN BIBLE COLLEGE

PO Box 10
Vancleve, KY 41385-0010
Tel: (606)693-5000
Free: 800-879-KMBC
Fax: (606)693-7744
Web Site: http://www.kmbc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Philip Speas
Registrar: Catherine Nelson
Admissions: Jay Wisler
Financial Aid: Jewel MacGregor
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: interdenominational Scores: 47.6% ACT 18-23; 9.5% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 46 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $8460 includes full-time tuition ($4800), mandatory fees ($460), and college room and board ($3200). College room only: $1000. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $160 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $30 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Faculty: FT 8, PT 7 Student-Faculty Ratio: 6:1 Exams: ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 75 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 91 Library Holdings: 23,520 Credit Hours For Degree: 65 credit hours, Associates; 130 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AABC

KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY

400 East Main St.
Frankfort, KY 40601
Tel: (502)597-6000
Free: 800-325-1716
Admissions: (502)597-6322
Fax: (502)597-6239
Web Site: http://www.kysu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Mary Evans Sias
Registrar: John Martin
Admissions: James Burrell
Financial Aid: Carmella Conner
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed % Accepted: 28 Admission Plans: Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $22.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $22. State resident tuition: $3550 full-time, $148 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $9992 full-time, $419 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $918 full-time, $20 per credit part-time, $49 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, course level, course load, location, program, reciprocity agreements, and student level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, course level, course load, location, program, reciprocity agreements, and student level. College room and board: $5620. College room only: $2592. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, location, and student level. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,619, PT 609, Grad 158 Faculty: FT 152, PT 8 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 47 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 26 Library Holdings: 296,631 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Air Force Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, CSWE, NASM, NASPAA, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE

3000 Frederica St., PO Box 1039
Owensboro, KY 42302-1039
Tel: (270)926-3111
Free: 800-990-0592
Admissions: (270)852-3120
Fax: (270)926-3196
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.kwc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Anne C. Federlein
Registrar: Donald C. Schmied
Admissions: Claude Bacon
Financial Aid: Vivian J. Rinaldo
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Methodist Scores: 78% SAT V 400+; 90% SAT M 400+; 54% ACT 18-23; 30% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 77 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: September 01 Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $19,350 includes full-time tuition ($13,200), mandatory fees ($400), and college room and board ($5750). College room only: $2600. Part-time tuition: $400 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 717, PT 38 Faculty: FT 34, PT 34 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 84 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 45 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 semester hours, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis W; Volleyball W

LEXINGTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Cooper Dr.
Lexington, KY 40506-0235
Tel: (859)257-4872
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.uky.edu/lcc/
President/CEO: Dr. James Kerley
Registrar: Becky Harp
Admissions: Shelbie Hugle
Financial Aid: Runan Pendergrast
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Scores: 50% ACT 18-23; 9% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 5,354, PT 3,285 Faculty: FT 155, PT 291 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 5 Library Holdings: 27,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ADA, CARC, NLN

LINDSEY WILSON COLLEGE

210 Lindsey Wilson St.
Columbia, KY 42728-1298
Tel: (270)384-2126
Free: 800-264-0138
Admissions: (270)384-8100
Fax: (270)384-8200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.lindsey.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. William T. Luckey, Jr.
Registrar: Sue Coomer
Admissions: Traci Pooler
Financial Aid: Denise Fudge
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Scores: 52% ACT 18-23; 15.9% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $20,601 includes full-time tuition ($14,208), mandatory fees ($230), and college room and board ($6163). Part-time tuition: $592 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,457, PT 165, Grad 280 Faculty: FT 70, PT 41 Student-Faculty Ratio: 23:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 91 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 47 Library Holdings: 80,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ACA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

LOUISVILLE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

3901 Atkinson Square Dr.
Louisville, KY 40218-4528
Tel: (502)456-6509
Free: 800-884-6528
Fax: (502)456-2341
Web Site: http://www.louisvilletech.com/
President/CEO: Dr. A.R. Sullivan
Registrar: Cathy Druin
Admissions: David Ritz
Financial Aid: Lisa Wright
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Sullivan University System Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $90.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $90. One-time mandatory fee: $90. Tuition: $13,110 full-time, $270 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $435 full-time, $30 per course part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time and program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to program. College room only: $3960. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 626, PT 41 Faculty: FT 30, PT 29 Student-Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Exams: Other % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 6 Library Holdings: 3,463 Credit Hours For Degree: 97 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

MADISONVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

2000 College Dr.
Madisonville, KY 42431-9185
Tel: (270)821-2250
Fax: (270)821-1555
Web Site: http://www.madcc.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Judith L. Rhoads
Registrar: Jay Parrent
Admissions: Jay Parent
Financial Aid: Caroline Clayton
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 95, PT 89 Exams: ACT, Other Library Holdings: 26,793 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: AOTA, APTA, CARC, NLN

MAYSVILLE COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

1755 US 68
Maysville, KY 41056
Tel: (606)759-7141
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.maycc.kctcs.net/
President/CEO: Augusta Julian
Registrar: Patricia K. Massie
Admissions: Patee Massie
Financial Aid: Jerome Greiner
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 776, PT 1,141 Faculty: FT 53, PT 68 Exams: ACT Library Holdings: 36,600 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: CARC

MID-CONTINENT UNIVERSITY

99 Powell Rd. East
Mayfield, KY 42066-9007
Tel: (270)247-8521
Fax: (270)247-3115
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.midcontinent.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Robert Imhoff
Registrar: Yvonne Yates
Admissions: Dr. Dutch Booth
Financial Aid: Kent Youngblood
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southern Baptist Scores: 44% ACT 18-23; 12% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $15,800 includes full-time tuition ($8850), mandatory fees ($1250), and college room and board ($5700). Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $295 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 587, PT 62 Faculty: FT 20, PT 36 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 74 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 33 Library Holdings: 32,697 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Cross-Country Running M & W; Soccer M; Softball W; Volleyball W

MIDWAY COLLEGE

512 East Stephens St.
Midway, KY 40347-1120
Tel: (859)846-4421
Free: 800-755-0031
Admissions: (859)846-5799
Fax: (859)846-5823
Web Site: http://www.midway.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. William B. Drake, Jr.
Registrar: P. Edward Presler
Admissions: Dr. Jim Wombles
Financial Aid: Karen Britt Statler
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Women Affiliation: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 82% SAT M 400+; 57% ACT 18-23; 15% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 75 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $20,150 includes full-time tuition ($13,800), mandatory fees ($150), and college room and board ($6200). College room only: $3000. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, location, and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $460 per semester hour. Part-time tuition varies according to class time, location, and program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 876, PT 403 Faculty: FT 50, PT 99 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 81 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 23 Library Holdings: 96,236 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 65 semester hours, Associates; 130 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball W; Equestrian Sports W; Soccer W; Softball W; Tennis W

MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY

University Blvd.
Morehead, KY 40351
Tel: (606)783-2221
Free: 800-585-6781
Admissions: (606)783-2000
Fax: (606)783-5038
Web Site: http://www.moreheadstate.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Ronald Eaglin
Registrar: Loretta Lykins
Admissions: Joel Pace
Financial Aid: Carol Becker
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 56% ACT 18-23; 18% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 69 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $4320 full-time, $180 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $11,480 full-time, $480 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $4830. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 5,964, PT 1,580, Grad 1,518 Faculty: FT 378, PT 156 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 67 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 33 Library Holdings: 333,518 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, AAFCS, ADtA, ACBSP, CARC, CSWE, JRCERT, NAIT, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Football M; Golf M; Riflery M & W; Soccer W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

MURRAY STATE UNIVERSITY

PO Box 9
Murray, KY 42071-0009
Tel: (270)762-3011
Free: 800-272-4678
Admissions: (270)762-3592
Fax: (270)762-3413
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.murraystate.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. F. King Alexander
Registrar: Donna Harris
Admissions: Jim Vaughn
Financial Aid: Charles Vinson
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education Scores: 57% ACT 18-23; 37% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 64 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $3792 full-time, $185 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5464 full-time, $240 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $636 full-time, $23 per hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $4472. College room only: $2366. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 7,155, PT 1,422, Grad 1,689 Faculty: FT 386, PT 151 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 44 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 40 Library Holdings: 400,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEJMC, AACN, AAFCS, AANA, ACA, ADtA, AOTA, ASLHA, CSWE, NASAD, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Riflery M & W; Soccer W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (DANVILLE)

115 East Lexington Ave.
Danville, KY 40422
Tel: (859)236-6991
Free: 800-664-1886
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
Admissions: Stacie Catlett
Financial Aid: Pamela Cotton
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 1, PT 29 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (FLORENCE)

7627 Ewing Blvd.
Florence, KY 41042
Tel: (859)525-6510
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (859)525-8961
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Frank Longaker
Admissions: Ron Thomas
Financial Aid: Pamela Cotton
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 2, PT 21 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (LEXINGTON)

628 East Main St.
Lexington, KY 40508-2312
Tel: (859)253-0621
Free: 800-664-1886
Admissions: (859)266-0401
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Frank Longaker
Registrar: Martha Arthur
Admissions: Kim Thomasson
Financial Aid: Pam Cotton
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 4, PT 41 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (LOUISVILLE)

3950 Dixie Hwy.
Louisville, KY 40216
Tel: (502)447-7634
Free: 800-664-1886
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Bob Boutell
Admissions: Mike Fiore
Financial Aid: Marsha Tucker
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 2, PT 34 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE, AHIMA

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (PIKEVILLE)

288 South Mayo Trail, Ste. 2
Pikeville, KY 41501
Tel: (606)432-5477
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (606)437-4952
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Tina Adkins
Admissions: Jerry Lafferty
Financial Aid: Rita Chaney
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 2, PT 13 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (RICHMOND)

139 South Killarney Ln.
Richmond, KY 40475
Tel: (859)623-8956
Free: 800-664-1886
Fax: (859)624-5544
Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/
President/CEO: Keeley Gadd
Admissions: Keeley Gadd
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: National College of Business and Technology Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Tuition: $6408 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $75 full-time, $15 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 1, PT 27 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

Louie B Nunn Dr.
Highland Heights, KY 41099
Tel: (859)572-5100
Free: 800-637-9948
Admissions: (859)572-5220
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.nku.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James C. Votruba
Registrar: Kimberly Taylor
Admissions: Melissa Gorbandt
Financial Aid: Robert Sprague
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 82.7% SAT V 400+; 82% SAT M 400+; 56% ACT 18-23; 18% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 81 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $4968 full-time, $207 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $9696 full-time, $404 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to location. Part-time tuition varies according to location. College room and board: $4660. College room only: $2580. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 8,989, PT 3,068, Grad 1,272 Faculty: FT 487, PT 301 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 60 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 9 Library Holdings: 325,721 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ABA, ACCE, AALS, CARC, CSWE, JRCERT, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

OWENSBORO COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

4800 New Hartford Rd.
Owensboro, KY 42303-1899
Tel: (270)686-4400; (866)755-6282
Admissions: (270)686-4527
Fax: (270)686-4496
Web Site: http://www.octc.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Jacqueline Addington
Registrar: Sandy Carden
Admissions: Barbara Tipmore
Financial Aid: Bernice Ayer
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Scores: 55% ACT 18-23; 16% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,848, PT 1,816 Faculty: FT 95, PT 108 Student-Faculty Ratio: 21:1 Exams: ACT, Other Library Holdings: 18,200 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: COE, JRCERT

PADUCAH TECHNICAL COLLEGE

509 South 30th St., PO Box 8252
Paducah, KY 42001
Tel: (270)444-9676
Admissions: (502)444-9676
Fax: (270)441-7202
Web Site: http://www.ptc-ky.com/
President/CEO: Jesse Adkison
Admissions: Arnold Harris
Financial Aid: Carolyn Watson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Trimester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 8, PT 4 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 72 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

PIKEVILLE COLLEGE

147 Sycamore St.
Pikeville, KY 41501
Tel: (606)218-5250; (866)232-7700
Admissions: (606)218-5251
Fax: (606)218-5269
Web Site: http://www.pc.edu/
President/CEO: Harold H. Smith
Registrar: Natalie Stewart
Admissions: Melinda Lynch
Financial Aid: Judy Vance Bradley
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Scores: 54% ACT 18-23; 15% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 16 Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For some part-time and nontraditional students: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $16,500 includes full-time tuition ($11,500) and college room and board ($5000). Full-time tuition varies according to course load. Part-time tuition: $479 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 778, PT 66 Faculty: FT 54, PT 7 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 96 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 41 Library Holdings: 72,673 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AOsA, NAACLS Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

ROWAN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

609 Viking Dr.
Morehead, KY 40351
Tel: (606)783-1538
Admissions: (606)759-7141
Fax: (606)784-9876
Web Site: http://www.rowtc.kctcs.edu/
Admissions: Patee Massie
Financial Aid: Jo McCarty
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 294, PT 548 Faculty: FT 22, PT 6 Professional Accreditation: CARC, COE

ST. CATHARINE COLLEGE

2735 Bardstown Rd.
St. Catharine, KY 40061-9499
Tel: (859)336-5082
Fax: (859)336-5031
Web Site: http://www.sccky.edu/
President/CEO: William D. Huston
Registrar: Anita Foster
Admissions: Amy C. Carrico
Financial Aid: Jane Moore
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic Admission Plans: Early Admission Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 35, PT 14 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 19 Library Holdings: 25,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 66 semester hours, Associates Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M & W; Basketball M & W; Softball W

SOMERSET COMMUNITY COLLEGE

808 Monticello St.
Somerset, KY 42501-2973
Tel: (606)679-8501
Web Site: http://www.somerset.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Jo Marshall
Registrar: Paula Guffey
Admissions: Tracy Casada
Financial Aid: Shawn Anderson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Scores: 51.82% ACT 18-23; 8.18% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 148, PT 161 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: ACT, Other Library Holdings: 58,918 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: APTA, COE, NAACLS, NLN

SOUTHEAST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

700 College Rd.
Cumberland, KY 40823-1099
Tel: (606)589-2145; 888-274-SECC
Fax: (606)589-5423
Web Site: http://www.soucc.kctcs.net/
President/CEO: Dr. W. Bruce Ayers
Registrar: Karin Gibson
Admissions: Cookie Baker
Financial Aid: Rebecca P. Robbins
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Community and Technical College System Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2352 full-time, $98 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7056 full-time, $294 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $164 full-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,939, PT 2,580 Faculty: FT 114, PT 64 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Library Holdings: 25,921 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: APTA, CARC, NAACLS, NLN

SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

2825 Lexington Rd.
Louisville, KY 40280-0004
Tel: (502)897-4011
Web Site: http://www.sbts.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. R. Albert Mohler, Jr.
Registrar: Kim Atchley
Admissions: Scott Davis
Financial Aid: Dr. Daniel Hatfield
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southern Baptist Scholarships: Available % Receiving Financial Aid: 17 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Professional Accreditation: AClPE, ATS, NASM

SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

8095 Connector Dr.
Florence, KY 41042
Tel: (859)282-9999
Admissions: (859)341-6633
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.swcollege.net/
President/CEO: Gary Wright
Admissions: Bruce Budesheim
Financial Aid: Kay Boone
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter Faculty: FT 1, PT 7 Student-Faculty Ratio: 30:1 Professional Accreditation: ACICS

SPALDING UNIVERSITY

851 South Fourth St.
Louisville, KY 40203-2188
Tel: (502)585-9911
Free: 800-896-8941
Fax: (502)585-7158
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.spalding.edu/
President/CEO: Jo Ann Rooney
Registrar: Jennifer Gohmann
Admissions: Vicki Prince
Financial Aid: Gina Kuzuoka
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic Church Scores: 85.3% SAT V 400+; 83% SAT M 400+; 2.3% ACT 18-23; 1.1% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 67 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $19,572 includes full-time tuition ($15,300), mandatory fees ($600), and college room and board ($3672). College room only: $2100. Part-time tuition: $510 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $20 per hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 645, PT 255, Grad 741 Faculty: FT 76, PT 98 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 13 Library Holdings: 160,954 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 125 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACN, AOTA, APA, CSWE, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Volleyball W

SPENCERIAN COLLEGE

4627 Dixie Hwy.
Louisville, KY 40216
Tel: (502)447-1000
Free: 800-264-1799
Fax: (502)447-4574
Web Site: http://www.spencerian.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. A. R. Sullivan
Registrar: Cheryl Eaton
Admissions: Terri D. Thomas
Financial Aid: Jill Schuler
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: The Sullivan University System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission Application Fee: $90.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $90. Tuition: $12,120 full-time, $202 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $575 full-time, $30. College room only: $3960. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter Enrollment: FT 1,326 Faculty: FT 48, PT 39 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 0 Credit Hours For Degree: 103 quarter credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

SPENCERIAN COLLEGE-LEXINGTON

2355 Harrodsburg Rd.
Lexington, KY 40504
Tel: (859)223-9608
Admissions: 800-456-3253
Fax: (859)224-7744
Web Site: http://www.spencerian.edu/
President/CEO: Ernest G. Clark
Registrar: Chris Douglas
Admissions: Victor Adcock, II
Financial Aid: Brian Highley
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Sullivan Colleges System Application Fee: $90.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 306, PT 70 Faculty: FT 17, PT 23 Student-Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Exams: Other % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 13 Library Holdings: 450 Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

3101 Bardstown Rd.
Louisville, KY 40205
Tel: (502)456-6504
Free: 800-844-1354
Admissions: (502)456-6505
Fax: (502)456-0040
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.sullivan.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. A.R. Sullivan
Registrar: Kim Mitchell
Admissions: Greg Cawthon
Financial Aid: Charlene Geiser
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Sullivan Colleges System Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $90.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $90. Tuition: $12,900 full-time, $215 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $435 full-time, $30 per course part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to program. College room only: $3960. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 93, PT 120 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: Other % Receiving Financial Aid: 71 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 9 Library Holdings: 22,500 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 95 quarter hours, Associates; 180 quarter hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AAMAE, ACF

THOMAS MORE COLLEGE

333 Thomas More Parkway
Crestview Hills, KY 41017-3495
Tel: (859)341-5800
Free: 800-825-4557
Admissions: (859)344-3332
Fax: (859)344-3638
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.thomasmore.edu/
President/CEO: Sr. Margaret Stallmeyer, CDP
Registrar: Patsy Kenner
Admissions: Angela Griffin-Jones
Financial Aid: Linda Hayes
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic Scores: 97% SAT V 400+; 94% SAT M 400+; 59% ACT 18-23; 23% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 63 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 15 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $24,470 includes full-time tuition ($17,600), mandatory fees ($720), and college room and board ($6150). College room only: $2900. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $450 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $30 per credit hour, $15 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,128, PT 215, Grad 91 Faculty: FT 71, PT 63 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 73 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 20 Library Holdings: 127,429 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

TRANSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY

300 North Broadway
Lexington, KY 40508-1797
Tel: (859)233-8300
Free: 800-872-6798
Admissions: (859)233-8242
Fax: (859)233-8797
E-mail: [email protected]/.edu
Web Site: http://www.transy.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Charles L. Shearer
Registrar: James M. Mills
Admissions: Deana Ison
Financial Aid: David Cecil
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 24% ACT 18-23; 57% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 84 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $26,240 includes full-time tuition ($19,650) and college room and board ($6590). Room and board charges vary according to board plan and location. Part-time tuition: $2100 per course. Part-time mandatory fees: $84 per course. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Miscellaneous, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,135, PT 16 Faculty: FT 81, PT 15 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 60 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 80 Library Holdings: 124,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 36 units, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

UNION COLLEGE

310 College St.
Barbourville, KY 40906-1499
Tel: (606)546-4151
Free: 800-489-8646
Admissions: (606)546-1222
Fax: (606)546-1667
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.unionky.edu/
President/CEO: Edward de Rosset
Registrar: Kathy Webb
Admissions: Jerry Jackson
Financial Aid: Andre Washington
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist % Accepted: 64 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. One-time mandatory fee: $800. Comprehensive fee: $19,890 includes full-time tuition ($14,950), mandatory fees ($340), and college room and board ($4600). College room only: $1700. Part-time tuition: $260 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $15 per semester hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 555, PT 56, Grad 613 Faculty: FT 46, PT 25 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I and SAT II or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 97 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 45 Library Holdings: 142,667 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

UNIVERSITY OF THE CUMBERLANDS

6178 College Station Dr.
Williamsburg, KY 40769-1372
Tel: (606)549-2200
Free: 800-343-1609
Admissions: (606)539-4201
Fax: (606)539-4303
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cumberlandcollege.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James Taylor
Registrar: Emily Meadors
Admissions: Sue Wake
Financial Aid: Steve Allen
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kentucky Baptist Scores: 96% SAT V 400+; 97% SAT M 400+; 70% ACT 18-23; 25% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 83 Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $19,984 includes full-time tuition ($13,298), mandatory fees ($360), and college room and board ($6326). Part-time tuition: $410 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $48.75 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,411, PT 222, Grad 210 Faculty: FT 86, PT 26 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 83 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 53 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M & W

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Lexington, KY 40506-0032
Tel: (859)257-9000
Admissions: (859)257-2000
Fax: (859)257-4000
Web Site: http://www.uky.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Lee T. Todd, Jr.
Admissions: Don Witt
Financial Aid: Lynda S. George
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 98.4% SAT V 400+; 99.23% SAT M 400+; 43.09% ACT 18-23; 46.83% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 82 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: February 15 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $5162 full-time, $216 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,148 full-time, $507 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $650 full-time, $16.25 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level, program, reciprocity agreements, and student level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level, program, reciprocity agreements, and student level. College room and board: $5129. College room only: $3363. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 17,050, PT 1,652, Grad 5,485 Faculty: FT 1,211, PT 513 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 38 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 31 Library Holdings: 3,092,616 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEHSA, ACEJMC, AAMFT, AACN, AAFCS, ABA, ACPhE, ADA, ADtA, ALA, AOTA, APTA, APA, ASLA, ASLHA, AClPE, AALS, CORE CSWE, FIDER, LCMEAMA, NAACLS, NASM, NASPAA, NCATE, NLN, SAF Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Gymnastics W; Riflery M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE

2301 South Third St.
Louisville, KY 40292-0001
Tel: (502)852-5555
Free: 800-334-8635
Admissions: (502)852-6531
Fax: (502)852-4776
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.louisville.edu/
President/CEO: James R. Ramsey
Registrar: Kathy L. Otto
Admissions: Jenny Sawyer
Financial Aid: Patricia O. Arauz
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 97% SAT V 400+; 98% SAT M 400+; 49% ACT 18-23; 41% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 79 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $5532 full-time, $231 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,092 full-time, $629 per hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $6036. College room only: $4490. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 11,441, PT 3,492, Grad 4,472 Faculty: FT 802, PT 511 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 51 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 14 Library Holdings: 1,983,162 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credit hours, Associates; 122 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, AAMFT, AACN, ABA, ADA, APTA, APA, ASLHA, AClPE, AALS, CSWE, FIDER, JRCERT, LCMEAMA, NASM, NASPAA, NAST, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Crew W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

WEST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

4810 Alben Barkley Dr.
PO Box 7380 Paducah, KY 42002-7380
Tel: (270)554-9200
Fax: (270)554-6217
Web Site: http://www.westkentucky.kctcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Barbara Veazey
Registrar: Sherry Cope
Admissions: Anton Reece
Financial Aid: Betsy Irby
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of Kentucky Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Area resident tuition: $98 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $118 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $294 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,455, PT 2,090 Faculty: FT 76, PT 77 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: ACT Library Holdings: 31,339 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ADA, APTA, COE, NLN

WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

1 Big Red Way
Bowling Green, KY 42101-3576
Tel: (270)745-0111
Admissions: (270)745-2551
Fax: (270)745-6133
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wku.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Gary A. Ransdell
Registrar: Freida K. Eggleton
Admissions: Dr. Dean R. Kahler
Financial Aid: Cindy Burnette
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 92.8% SAT V 400+; 90.09% SAT M 400+; 52.91% ACT 18-23; 22.22% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 92 Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $5316 full-time, $228 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,732 full-time, $537 per hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load, location, program, and reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition varies according to course load, location, program, and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $4876. College room only: $2800. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 13,053, PT 2,914, Grad 2,667 Faculty: FT 694, PT 413 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 54 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 30 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEJMC, AACN, AAFCS, ADA, AHIMA, AOTA, ASLHA, CEPH, CSWE, NAIT, NASAD, NASM, NCATE, NLN, NRPA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Riflery M & W; Soccer M; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

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Kentucky

Kentucky

ALICE LLOYD COLLEGE

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

History, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

ASBURY COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Ancient/Classical Greek Language and Literature, B

Applied Mathematics, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business/Commerce, B

Chemistry, B

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English as a Second Language, M

English Language and Literature, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

Health and Physical Education, B

Health/Medical Preparatory Programs, B

History, B

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Latin Language and Literature, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Sciences, B

Psychology, B

Radio and Television Broadcasting Technology/Technician, B

Religious Education, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, M

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

ASHLAND COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Engineering Technology, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

Real Estate, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

BECKFIELD COLLEGE

Business Administration and Management, AB

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, AB

Medical Office Management/Administration, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

BELLARMINE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Actuarial Science, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Arts Management, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Cardiopulmonary Technology/Technologist, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Science and Allied Professions, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Community Health Nursing, M

Community Organization and Advocacy, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering, B

Computer Science, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

CytoTechnology/Cytotechnologist, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Economics, B

Education, BM

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

Health Services/Allied Health/Health Sciences, B

History, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mathematics, B

Middle School Education, M

Music, B

Music Management and Merchandising, B

Musical Instrument Fabrication and Repair, B

Nursing, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nursing Administration, M

Nursing Education, M

Painting, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, B

Philosophy, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, B

Sculpture, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Theology/Theological Studies, B

BEREA COLLEGE

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Agriculture, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Child Development, B

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Developmental and Child Psychology, B

Dietetics/Dieticians, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Economics and Related Services, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, B

French Language and Literature, B

French Language Teacher Education, B

German Language and Literature, B

German Language Teacher Education, B

History, B

Industrial Technology/Technician, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, B

Women's Studies, B

BIG SANDY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

General Office Occupations and Clerical Services, A

Human Services, A

Information Technology, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Nursing, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Real Estate, A

BRESCIA UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Applied Mathematics, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art Therapy/Therapist, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Audiology/Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business/Commerce, AB

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, A

English Language and Literature, B

Finance, B

History, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Management, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics and Computer Science, B

Pre-Engineering, A

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, AB

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Theological and Ministerial Studies, AB

BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE-HOPKINSVILLE

Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Software Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE-LOUISVILLE

Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Gerontology, A

Graphic Design, A

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, A

Industrial Electronics Technology/Technician, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Pharmacy Technician/Assistant, A

BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE-NORTHERN KENTUCKY

Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping, A

Business Administration and Management, A

CAD/CADD Drafting and/or Design Technology/Technician, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Computer Software Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Pharmacy Technician/Assistant, A

System, Networking, and LAN/WAN Management/Manager, A

CAMPBELLSVILLE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, AB

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, AB

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), B

Economics, B

Education, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Information Science/Studies, AB

Journalism, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, BM

Music Teacher Education, BM

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Psychology Teacher Education, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Sacred Music, M

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Sciences, ABM

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Special Education and Teaching, M

Theology and Religious Vocations, M

Voice and Opera, B

CENTRE COLLEGE

Anthropology, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Chemistry, B

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Computer Science, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Mathematics, B

Molecular Biology, B

Music, B

Philosophy, B

Physics, B

Physiological Psychology/Psychobiology, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

CLEAR CREEK BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE

Bible/Biblical Studies, AB

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), AB

DAYMAR COLLEGE (LOUISVILLE)

Computer Installation and Repair Technology/Technician, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Medical Office Assistant/Specialist, A

DAYMAR COLLEGE (OWENSBORO)

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Communications Systems Installation and Repair Technology, A

Computer and Information Systems Security, A

Computer Engineering, A

Computer Graphics, A

Computer Hardware Engineering, A

Computer Installation and Repair Technology/Technician, A

Computer Programming, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Computer Programming, Vendor/Product Certification, A

Computer Science, A

Computer Software and Media Applications, A

Computer Software Engineering, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Data Modeling/Warehousing and Database Administration, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Medical Office Management/Administration, A

System Administration/Administrator, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, A

Word Processing, A

DRAUGHONS JUNIOR COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Information Technology, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, AB

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Agricultural Education, M

Agricultural Production Operations, B

Agriculture, B

Agriculture, Agriculture Operations and Related Sciences, A

Airline/Commercial/Professional Pilot and Flight Crew, B

Allied Health and Medical Assisting Services, M

Anthropology, B

Applied Mathematics, B

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Art Education, M

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Audiology/Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Education, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Commerce, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, BM

Child Care and Support Services Management, A

Child Care Provider/Assistant, A

Child Development, AB

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Clinical Psychology, M

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Communication Disorders, BM

Community Health and Preventive Medicine, M

Community Health Services/Liaison/Counseling, B

Composition, M

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Science, B

Computer Technology/Computer Systems Technology, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Consumer Merchandising/Retailing Management, B

Corrections, ABM

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, AB

Criminal Justice/Police Science, AB

Criminology, M

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Dietetics/Dieticians, B

Dietician Assistant, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Ecology, BM

Economics, B

Education, BM

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Hearing Impairments, Including Deafness, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Speech or Language Impairments, B

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, M

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), AB

Engineering, A

English, M

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental and Occupational Health, M

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, B

Environmental Health, B

Environmental Studies, B

Family and Community Services, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Farm/Farm and Ranch Management, B

Fashion Merchandising, B

Finance, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Fire Protection and Safety Technology/Technician, AB

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, A

Forensic Science and Technology, B

French Language and Literature, B

General Studies, B

Geography, B

Geology/Earth Science, BMD

Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator Production, AB

Health Education, M

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, AB

Health Information/Medical Records Technology/Technician, A

Health Services Administration, M

Health Teacher Education, B

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

Higher Education/Higher Education Administration, M

History, BM

Home Economics Education, M

Home Furnishings and Equipment Installers, A

Horticultural Science, AB

Housing and Human Environments, B

Human Development and Family Studies, B

Industrial and Organizational Psychology, M

Industrial Education, M

Industrial Technology/Technician, AB

Industrial/Management Engineering, M

Information Science/Studies, B

Insurance, B

Interior Design, AB

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Landscape Architecture, AB

Law Enforcement, M

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, AB

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Manufacturing Engineering, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, BM

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Medical Microbiology and Bacteriology, B

Medical Office Management/Administration, B

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Music, BM

Music Teacher Education, BM

Music Theory and Composition, M

Natural Sciences, B

Nursing, BM

Nursing - Advanced Practice, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Nutritional Sciences, M

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, BM

Office Management and Supervision, B

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, AB

Performance, M

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physical Sciences, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, BM

Pre-Engineering, A

Psychology, BMO

Public Administration, M

Public Relations, Advertising, and Applied Communication, B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Quality Control Technology/Technician, A

Radio and Television, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Real Estate, B

Recreation and Park Management, M

School Psychology, O

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, BM

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Securities Services Administration/Management, M

Security and Loss Prevention Services, B

Sign Language Interpretation and Translation, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, M

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, M

Statistics, B

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling, M

Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Subject Areas, B

Technical Teacher Education, AB

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, AB

Technology Teacher Education/Industrial Arts Teacher Education, B

Theater, M

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

Transportation and Materials Moving, B

Urban and Regional Planning, M

Wildlife and Wildlands Science and Management, B

Writing, M

ELIZABETHTOWN COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Child Development, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Finance, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Quality Control Technology/Technician, A

Real Estate, A

GEORGETOWN COLLEGE

Accounting, B

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Ecology, B

Economics, B

Education, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

European Studies/Civilization, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Philosophy, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

HAZARD COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer Typography and Composition Equipment Operator, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Forestry Technology/Technician, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Science, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

HENDERSON COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Programming, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Computer Programming, Vendor/Product Certification, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Engineering Technology, A

Human Services, A

Information Technology, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Word Processing, A

HOPKINSVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Animal/Livestock Husbandry and Production, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Child Care and Support Services Management, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Finance, A

Human Services, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Manufacturing Technology/Technician, A

Mental Health/Rehabilitation, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (LEXINGTON)

Business Administration and Management, B

CAD/CADD Drafting and/or Design Technology/Technician, A

Computer and Information Systems Security, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, AB

System, Networking, and LAN/WAN Management/Manager, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE (LOUISVILLE)

Animation, Interactive Technology, Video Graphics and Special Effects, B

Business Administration and Management, B

CAD/CADD Drafting and/or Design Technology/Technician, A

Computer and Information Systems Security, B

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

E-Commerce/Electronic Commerce, B

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

System, Networking, and LAN/WAN Management/Manager, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, B

JEFFERSON COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Child Development, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Culinary Arts/Chef Training, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Health Information/Medical Records Technology/Technician, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Real Estate, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Social Work, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

KENTUCKY CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

History, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, M

Religious Education, B

Social Work, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, M

KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN BIBLE COLLEGE

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, B

Pre-Theology/Pre-Ministerial Studies, B

Religion/Religious Studies, AB

Religious Education, B

KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY

Apparel and Textiles, B

Applied Mathematics, B

Aquaculture, M

Art Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Computer and Information Sciences, AB

Computer Science, M

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Executive Assistant/Executive Secretary, A

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Health and Physical Education, B

History, B

Human Development and Family Studies, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Mathematics, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Public Administration, BM

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Environmental Studies, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, B

History, B

Human Services, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Public Administration and Social Service Professions, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

LEXINGTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Architectural Drafting and Architectural CAD/CADD, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Dental Laboratory Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

LINDSEY WILSON COLLEGE

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, AB

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Chemistry, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, A

Education, B

Educational Psychology, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Health Services/Allied Health/Health Sciences, A

History, AB

Human Development, M

Human Services, BM

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, AB

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, AB

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Sciences, AB

LOUISVILLE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

Animation, Interactive Technology, Video Graphics and Special Effects, A

Architectural Drafting and Architectural CAD/CADD, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Architecture and Related Services, A

Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, A

CAD/CADD Drafting and/or Design Technology/Technician, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services, A

Computer and Information Systems Security, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Graphics, A

Computer Hardware Engineering, A

Computer Hardware Technology/Technician, A

Computer Installation and Repair Technology/Technician, A

Computer Programming, Vendor/Product Certification, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Computer Technology/Computer Systems Technology, A

Digital Communication and Media/Multimedia, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drafting/Design Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electrical/Electronics Equipment Installation and Repair, A

Electrical/Electronics Maintenance and Repair Technology, A

Electromechanical and Instrumentation and Maintenance Technologies/Technicians, A

Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Engineering Technology, A

Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator Production, A

Graphic Communications, A

Graphic Design, A

Housing and Human Environments, A

Industrial Electronics Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology, A

Information Technology, A

Interior Design, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Marine Technology, A

Mechanical Drafting and Mechanical Drafting CAD/CADD, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Prepress/Desktop Publishing and Digital Imaging Design, A

Robotics Technology/Technician, A

Small Engine Mechanics and Repair Technology/Technician, A

System Administration/Administrator, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

MADISONVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Banking and Financial Support Services, A

Biomedical Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Technology/Computer Systems Technology, A

Consumer Merchandising/Retailing Management, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Occupational Therapist Assistant, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, A

Real Estate, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

MAYSVILLE COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

MID-CONTINENT UNIVERSITY

Ancient Near Eastern and Biblical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Counseling Psychology, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

General Studies, B

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Organizational Behavior Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religious Education, B

Social Sciences, B

MIDWAY COLLEGE

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Chemistry, B

Computer and Information Sciences, AB

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Biology, B

Equestrian/Equine Studies, AB

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

Horse Husbandry/Equine Science and Management, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mathematics, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Psychology, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Adult and Continuing Education and Teaching, MO

Advertising and Public Relations, M

Agribusiness, A

Agriculture, B

Art Education, M

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Psychology, M

Communication and Media Studies, M

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Counseling Psychology, M

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MO

Criminology, M

Curriculum and Instruction, O

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Ecology, B

Education, MO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Electronic Commerce, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English, M

English Language and Literature, B

Exercise and Sports Science, M

Experimental Psychology, M

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, AB

Finance, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

General Studies, AB

Geography, B

Geology/Earth Science, B

Gerontology, M

Health Education, M

Health Teacher Education, B

Higher Education/Higher Education Administration, MO

History, B

Industrial Technology/Technician, AB

International and Comparative Education, M

Journalism, M

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, B

Management Information Systems and Services, AB

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, AB

Middle School Education, M

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Performance, M

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BM

Reading Teacher Education, M

Real Estate, B

Recreation and Park Management, M

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, BM

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, BM

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, BM

Theater, M

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

Vocational and Technical Education, M

MURRAY STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, BM

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Agricultural Sciences, M

Agricultural Teacher Education, B

Agriculture, AB

Apparel and Textiles, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Audiology/Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MD

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Commerce, B

Chemical Engineering, B

Chemical Technology/Technician, B

Chemistry, BM

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Child Care Provider/Assistant, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, AB

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Clinical Psychology, M

Communication Disorders, BM

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Corporate and Organizational Communication, M

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MO

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, AB

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, BM

Economics, BM

Education, MDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, BMO

Engineering Physics, B

Engineering Technology, B

English, M

English as a Second Language, M

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Environmental and Occupational Health, M

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, B

Executive Assistant/Executive Secretary, A

Family and Consumer Economics and Related Services, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Finance, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Fishing and Fisheries Sciences and Management, B

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

Foodservice Systems Administration/Management, A

Foreign Language Teacher Education, B

French Language and Literature, B

French Language Teacher Education, B

General Studies, B

Geography, B

Geology/Earth Science, B

Geosciences, M

German Language and Literature, B

German Language Teacher Education, B

Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator Production, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, BM

History Teacher Education, B

Human Development and Family Studies, B

Human Services, M

Industrial Technology/Technician, AB

Information Science/Studies, AB

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Leisure Studies, M

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Library Science, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Management of Technology, M

Manufacturing Technology/Technician, B

Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography, M

Marine Sciences, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, BM

Mathematics, BM

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Mechanical Drafting and Mechanical Drafting CAD/CADD, B

Mechanical Engineering, B

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Middle School Education, MO

Military Technologies, A

Music, BM

Music Teacher Education, BM

Nursing, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Occupational Safety and Health Technology/Technician, B

Office Management and Supervision, B

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, B

Perioperative/Operating Room and Surgical Nurse/Nursing, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physics, B

Physics Teacher Education, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BM

Public Administration, B

Public Affairs, M

Public Relations, Advertising, and Applied Communication, B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Radio and Television, B

Reading Teacher Education, BM

Recreation and Park Management, M

Safety Engineering, M

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BMO

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language/ESL Language Instructor, B

Technical and Business Writing, A

Technology Teacher Education/Industrial Arts Teacher Education, B

Telecommunications Management, M

Telecommunications Technology/Technician, B

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, AB

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, B

Vocational and Technical Education, M

Water Quality and Wastewater Treatment Management and Recycling Technology/Technician, AB

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (DANVILLE)

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (FLORENCE)

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (LEXINGTON)

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Radio and Television, A

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (LOUISVILLE)

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (PIKEVILLE)

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (RICHMOND)

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

Accounting, BM

Adult Health Nurse/Nursing, B

Anthropology, B

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Aviation/Airway Management and Operations, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MO

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Commerce, A

Chemistry, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, BM

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, BMO

Educational Leadership and Administration, M

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

Finance, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

Geography, B

Geology/Earth Science, B

History, B

Human Services, AB

Industrial and Organizational Psychology, M

Industrial Engineering, B

Industrial Radiologic Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, B

Information Science/Studies, BM

Information Technology, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Labor and Industrial Relations, B

Law and Legal Studies, PO

Liberal Studies, M

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Management of Technology, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Mental Health/Rehabilitation, B

Middle School Education, M

Music, B

Nursing, MO

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Operations Management and Supervision, A

Organizational Behavior Studies, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychiatric/Mental Health Services Technician, A

Psychology, B

Public Administration, BMO

Radio and Television, B

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BO

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Systems Science and Theory, M

Technical Teacher Education, A

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

OWENSBORO COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Agriculture, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Executive Assistant/Executive Secretary, A

Human Services, A

Information Technology, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Social Work, A

System Administration/Administrator, A

Word Processing, A

PADUCAH TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Communications Technology/Technician, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

PIKEVILLE COLLEGE

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Community Psychology, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, AB

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

History, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Osteopathic Medicine, P

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Sociology, B

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, B

ST. CATHARINE COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Agriculture, A

Animal Sciences, A

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, A

Art Teacher Education, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Bible/Biblical Studies, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business Machine Repairer, A

Business Teacher Education, A

Business/Managerial Economics, A

Ceramic Arts and Ceramics, A

Chemistry, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Dance, A

Education, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Environmental Studies, A

Farm/Farm and Ranch Management, A

Health Teacher Education, A

History, A

Horticultural Science, A

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Insurance, A

Japanese Language and Literature, A

Journalism, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Land Use Planning and Management/Development, A

Landscape Architecture, A

Landscaping and Groundskeeping, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mathematics, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Music, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Piano and Organ, A

Range Science and Management, A

Social Sciences, A

Social Work, A

Sociology, A

Spanish Language and Literature, A

SOMERSET COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Autobody/Collision and Repair Technology/Technician, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Avionics Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Business/Commerce, A

CAD/CADD Drafting and/or Design Technology/Technician, A

Carpentry/Carpenter, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Assistant, A

Communication and Media Studies, A

Cosmetology/Cosmetologist, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Diesel Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Information Technology, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Mason/Masonry, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Nail Technician/Specialist and Manicurist, A

Nursing, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

SOUTHEAST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Information Technology, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, MDP

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, D

Religious Education, MDP

Sacred Music, MDP

Theology and Religious Vocations, MDP

SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

Accounting, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Science, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

SPALDING UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business/Commerce, AB

Clinical Psychology, MD

Communication and Media Studies, M

Corporate and Organizational Communication, M

Education, BMD

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, D

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

English Language and Literature, B

History, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Middle School Education, M

Natural Sciences, B

Nursing, M

Nursing - Adult, M

Nursing - Advanced Practice, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nursing Administration, M

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, BM

Pediatric Nurse/Nursing, M

Philosophy, B

Psychology, BMD

Public Health (MPH, DPH), B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, BM

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Writing, M

SPENCERIAN COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Medical Office Management/Administration, A

SPENCERIAN COLLEGE-LEXINGTON

Architectural Drafting and Architectural CAD/CADD, A

Computer Graphics, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Mechanical Drafting and Mechanical Drafting CAD/CADD, A

SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY

Accounting, AB

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Computer Science, AB

Conflict Resolution and Mediation/Peace Studies, M

Consumer Merchandising/Retailing Management, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Culinary Arts/Chef Training, AB

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, AB

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, AB

Management of Technology, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, AB

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

THOMAS MORE COLLEGE

Accounting, AB

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, A

Art Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Commerce, AB

Chemistry, AB

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, AB

Computer and Information Sciences, AB

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, AB

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, AB

Economics, AB

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, AB

Fine/Studio Arts, A

Forensic Science and Technology, B

Gerontology, A

History, AB

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

International Relations and Affairs, AB

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Mathematics, AB

Music, A

Nursing, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Philosophy, AB

Physics, AB

Political Science and Government, A

Pre-Law Studies, A

Psychology, AB

Religion/Religious Studies, AB

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Sociology, AB

Spanish Language and Literature, A

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Subject Areas, B

Visual and Performing Arts, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

TRANSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Anthropology, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

History, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Social Sciences, B

Sociology, B

UNION COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Education, BM

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, O

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

Health Education, M

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Mathematics, B

Middle School Education, M

Music Teacher Education, M

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Psychology, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Sciences, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

UNIVERSITY OF THE CUMBERLANDS

Accounting, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Commerce, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Community Health Services/Liaison/Counseling, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Education, MO

Educational Administration and Supervision, O

Elementary Education and Teaching, BMO

English Language and Literature, B

Executive Assistant/Executive Secretary, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

General Studies, B

Health and Physical Education, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Mathematics, B

Middle School Education, M

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Organizational Behavior Studies, B

Philosophy and Religious Studies, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Religious Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, MO

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Accounting, BM

Advertising, B

Agricultural Economics, BMD

Agricultural Engineering, MD

Agricultural Sciences, MD

Agricultural/Biological Engineering and Bioengineering, B

Agriculture, Agriculture Operations and Related Sciences, B

Agronomy and Crop Science, B

Agronomy and Soil Sciences, MD

Allied Health and Medical Assisting Services, MD

Allopathic Medicine, PO

Anatomy, D

Animal Sciences, BMD

Anthropology, BMD

Apparel and Textiles, B

Architecture, BM

Art Education, M

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, BM

Art Teacher Education, B

Arts Management, B

Astronomy, MD

Audiology/Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Biochemistry, DO

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MDO

Biological Anthropology, MD

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biomedical Engineering, MD

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MD

Business/Commerce, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Cell/Cellular Biology and Anatomical Sciences, B

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BMD

Child and Family Studies, MD

Civil Engineering, BMD

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, BM

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Clinical Laboratory Sciences, MD

Clothing and Textiles, M

Communication and Media Studies, MD

Communication Disorders, M

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, MD

Counseling Psychology, MDO

Curriculum and Instruction, MD

Dentistry, MP

Design and Applied Arts, M

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, BMD

Education, MDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MDO

Educational Measurement and Evaluation, MD

Educational Psychology, MDO

Electrical Engineering, MD

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MD

English, MD

English Language and Literature, B

Entomology, MD

Exercise and Sports Science, D

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, BMD

Finance, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Food Science, B

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

Forest Sciences and Biology, B

Forestry, M

French Language and Literature, BM

Geography, BMD

Geology/Earth Science, BMD

German Language and Literature, BM

Gerontology, D

Health Physics/Radiological Health, M

Health Promotion, MD

Health Services Administration, M

Health Teacher Education, B

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

Higher Education/Higher Education Administration, M

Historic Preservation and Conservation, M

History, BMD

Hospitality Administration/Management, BM

Immunology, D

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Interior Design, BM

International Affairs, M

International Business/Trade/Commerce, M

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Movement Studies, MD

Landscape Architecture, B

Latin American Studies, B

Law and Legal Studies, PO

Library Science, M

Linguistics, B

Management Science, B

Manufacturing Engineering, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Materials Engineering, B

Materials Sciences, MD

Mathematics, BMD

Mechanical Engineering, BMD

Medical Physics, M

Microbiology, D

Mineral/Mining Engineering, MD

Mining and Mineral Engineering, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, MD

Music History, Literature, and Theory, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Natural Resources and Conservation, B

Neurobiology and Neurophysiology, D

Nursing, BMD

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nutritional Sciences, MD

Oral and Dental Sciences, M

Pharmaceutical Sciences, MD

Pharmacology, DO

Pharmacy, P

Philosophy, BMD

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Therapy/Therapist, BM

Physician Assistant, M

Physics, BMD

Physiology, D

Plant Pathology/Phytopathology, MD

Plant Physiology, D

Plant Sciences, M

Political Science and Government, BMD

Psychology, BMD

Public Administration, MDO

Public Health, MD

Radio and Television, B

Rehabilitation Counseling, M

Rehabilitation Sciences, D

Russian Language and Literature, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, BMD

Sociology, BMD

Spanish Language and Literature, BMD

Special Education and Teaching, BMDO

Statistics, MD

Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Subject Areas, B

Theater, M

Toxicology, MD

Veterinary Sciences, MD

Vocational and Technical Education, MDO

UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE

Accounting, BM

African Studies, M

African-American/Black Studies, B

Allopathic Medicine, PO

Analytical Chemistry, MD

Anatomy, MD

Anthropology, B

Applied Mathematics, D

Art Education, M

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, BMD

Art Therapy/Therapist, M

Biochemistry, MDO

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biophysics, MD

Biostatistics, MD

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, BM

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BMD

Civil Engineering, BMD

Clinical Psychology, D

Clinical Research, O

Communication and Media Studies, M

Communication Disorders, MD

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Composition, M

Computer Engineering, BMD

Computer Science, MD

Counseling Psychology, MD

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MD

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminology, M

Curriculum and Instruction, D

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, AB

Dentistry, P

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Economics, B

Education, MDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MDO

Educational Leadership and Administration, D

Educational Measurement and Evaluation, M

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Educational Psychology, MD

Electrical Engineering, M

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

Engineering, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MDO

Engineering Management, M

English, MD

English Language and Literature, B

Entrepreneurship/Entrepreneurial Studies, D

Environmental Biology, D

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, MD

Epidemiology, MD

Exercise and Sports Science, M

Experimental Psychology, D

Finance, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, M

French Language and Literature, BM

Geography, B

Health and Physical Education, B

Health/Medical Preparatory Programs, B

Higher Education/Higher Education Administration, MO

History, BM

Human Resources Development, M

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, MD

Immunology, MD

Industrial and Labor Relations, M

Industrial Education, M

Industrial Engineering, B

Industrial/Management Engineering, MD

Inorganic Chemistry, MD

Interdisciplinary Studies, M

Law and Legal Studies, PO

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, AB

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, BMD

Mechanical Engineering, BM

Microbiology, MD

Middle School Education, M

Molecular Biology, MDO

Music, B

Music History, Literature, and Theory, MD

Music Teacher Education, BM

Music Theory and Composition, M

Music Therapy/Therapist, B

Musicology and Ethnomusicology, D

Neurobiology and Neurophysiology, MD

Nursing, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Oral Biology, M

Organic Chemistry, MD

Performance, M

Pharmacology, MD

Philosophy, BM

Physical Chemistry, MD

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, M

Physics, BMD

Physiology, MD

Political Science and Government, BM

Psychology, BMD

Public Administration, MD

Public Affairs, D

Public Policy Analysis, M

Reading Teacher Education, M

Rhetoric, D

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Sign Language Interpretation and Translation, AB

Social Work, MD

Sociology, BM

Spanish Language and Literature, BM

Special Education and Teaching, MD

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, BM

Student Personnel Services, M

Theater, M

Toxicology, MD

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

Urban and Regional Planning, M

Urban Planning, M

Urban Studies/Affairs, D

Women's Studies, BMO

WEST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Consumer Merchandising/Retailing Management, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Radiologic Technology/Technician, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Advertising, B

Agricultural Production Operations, A

Agricultural Sciences, M

Agriculture, B

Anthropology, B

Apparel and Textiles, B

Architectural Drafting and Architectural CAD/CADD, A

Art Education, M

Art Teacher Education, B

Biochemistry, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Education, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, BM

Civil Engineering, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Communication and Media Studies, M

Communication Disorders, M

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Communication, Journalism and Related Programs, B

Community Health Services/Liaison/Counseling, B

Comparative Literature, M

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, M

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MO

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, AB

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Economics, B

Education, MO

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Speech or Language Impairments, B

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, BMO

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

English, M

English as a Second Language, M

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental and Occupational Health, M

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, B

Executive Assistant/Executive Secretary, A

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Finance, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Folklore, M

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

French Language and Literature, B

General Studies, AB

Geography, BM

Geology/Earth Science, BM

German Language and Literature, B

Gerontology, M

Health Information/Medical Records Technology/Technician, A

Health Services Administration, M

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

Historic Preservation and Conservation, M

History, BM

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, B

Housing and Human Environments, B

Industrial Production Technologies/Technicians, B

Industrial Technology/Technician, B

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, AB

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, BM

Mechanical Engineering, B

Middle School Education, M

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, BM

Nursing, BM

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physical Science Technologies/Technicians, A

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BMO

Public Affairs, M

Public Health, M

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Radio and Television, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Recreation and Park Management, M

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

School Psychology, O

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, BM

Secondary Education and Teaching, MO

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, BM

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Technical Teacher Education, A

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

Visual and Performing Arts, B

Writing, M

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Kentucky

KENTUCKY

STATE EDUCATION OFFICE

Stephanie Meagher, Secretary
Department for Technical Education
2009 Capitol Plz. Tower
500 Mero St.
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502)564-4286

STATE REGULATORY INFORMATION

Effective July 1, 1976 Kentucky House Bill 763 provided for the establishment of an eleven member State Board for Proprietary Education to "administer the provisions of (House Bill 763) pertaining to the conduct, operation, maintenance, and establishment of proprietary education institutions, and the activities of agents thereof when acting as such."
The bill defines a Proprietary School as "an education institution privately owned and operated by an individual, partnership, association or corporation offering training in business, trade, technical, industrial or related areas through residence, extension or correspondence for which tuition is charged." The definition of proprietary school in House Bill 763 does not include a school or educational institution licensed or approved by the Kentucky Board of Barbering (KRS 317.340), Hairdressers and Cosmetologists (KRS 317.480), Nursing Education (KRS 314.12 1), and Embalmers and Funeral Directors (KRS 316.170). An Agent is defined as "any person employed by an institution to act as agent, solicitor, broker or independent contractor to procure students for such school by solicitation of enrollment in any form made at any place other than the main office or principal place of business of the school." A proprietary school must hold a valid license from the State Board. Such licenses are valid for one school year beginning the first day of July and ending the thirtieth day of June the following year.
No proprietary school in Kentucky will be issued a license unless it meets certain minimum standards of instructional quality and course content; has adequate staffing, space, equipment, and materials; and has a certain quality of staff. The school must also provide a course outline and tuition schedule; award a diploma, degree, certificate or other appellation upon a student's satisfactory completion of instruction; maintain ordinances and state laws; and be financially sound and reasonably capable of fulfilling commitments to students for training and preparation. It also must not utilize advertising of any type which is untrue, deceptive or misleading; and it must adhere to a tuition refund schedule presented in published form prior to enrollment (in the event the student discontinues, or is excluded from, training).
The State Board for Proprietary Education has the power to inspect schools at times of its own choosing, requires financial surety from each school under its jurisdiction and has the mechanisms of a student redress system. It can close schools and, if the case warrants, invoke legal penalties against a school.

ASHLAND

Ashland Community and Technical College

1400 College Dr., Ashland, KY 41101. Other. Contact: Jimmy A. Cargill, Chief Academic Affairs Officer, (606)326-2114, 800-928-4256, E-mail: jim. [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ashland.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $98/credit resident; $294/credit non-resident. Enrollment: Total 500. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma, Associate. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Auto Mechanics (22 Mo); Banking (2 Yr); Business Technology (2 Yr); Carpentry (22 Mo); Clerical, General (11 Mo); Computer Aided Drafting (22 Mo); Computer Business Systems Technology (2 Yr); Cosmetology; Culinary Arts; Drafting Technology (22 Mo); Electronics, Industrial (22 Mo); Heavy Equipment (22 Mo); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Law Enforcement (2 Yr); Machine Tool Programming Technology (18 Mo); Management (2 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr); Medical Office Management; Nurse, Assistant (2 Mo); Nursing, Practical (12 Mo); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Pharmacy Technician; Physical Therapy Aide (2 Yr); Real Estate Management (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Surgical Technology; Telecommunications Technology (2 Yr); Truck Driving; Welding Technology (18 Mo)

King's Daughters Medical Center School of Radiologic Technology

2201 Lexington Ave., Ashland, KY 41101. Allied Medical, Two-Year College. Founded 1959. Contact: Krista Lambert, (606)327-4637, (606)327-5100, 888-377-KDMC, Fax: (606)327-7425, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kdmc.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,950/year or $3,900/2 years books, uniforms. Enrollment: Total 18. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: JRCERT. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology (24 Mo)

BARBOURVILLE

Kentucky Tech-Knox County Area Technology Center

210 Wall St., Barbourville, KY 40906. Trade and Technical. Founded 1936. Contact: Linda S. Floyd, Principal, (606)546-5310, Fax: (606)546-3818. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Quarter. Enrollment: Total 250. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Baker, Commercial Maritime (2 Yr); Carpentry (2 Yr); Computer Aided Drafting (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (2 Yr); Electronics & Communication (2 Yr); Health Occupations (2 Yr); Welding, Arc & Gas (1 Yr); Welding Technology (1 Yr)

BENTON

Marshall County Technical Center

341 High School Rd., Benton, KY 42025-7040. Trade and Technical. Founded 1972. Contact: Lewis Mathis, (270)527-8648, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Enrollment: men 400, women 150. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agricultural Science; Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Carpentry (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (3 Yr); Handicapped, Special Education; Health Occupations (3 Yr); High School Diploma; Industrial Technology (1 Yr); Marketing (1 Yr); Welding Technology (2 Yr)

BOWLING GREEN

Bowling Green Technical College

1845 Loop Dr., Bowling Green, KY 42101. Trade and Technical. Contact: Dr. Jack Thomas, Ceo/president, (270)901-1000, 800-790-0990, Fax: (270)901-1144, Web Site: http://www.bowlinggreen.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,760 in-state; $8,280 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

PJ's College of Cosmetology (Bowling Green)

1901 Russellville Rd., Bowling Green, KY 42101. Cosmetology. Contact: Judith Stewart, President/owner, (270)842-8149, 800-627-2566, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://gotopjs.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $3,029 - $10,670 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 4, women 238. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (700-1000Hr); Nail Technology (450-600 Hr)

Western Kentucky University

1906 College Heights Blvd., Bowling Green, KY 42101-3576. Other. Founded 1906. Contact: Dr. Dean Ray Kahler, Admissions Dir., (270)745-0111, (270)745-2551, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.wku.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,220/semester, full-time student in-state. Enrollment: men 7,356, women 11,157. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Administrative Assistant (2 Yr); Agri-Engineering & Mechanics (2 Yr); Business Technology (2 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Drafting, Architectural (2 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology; General Studies (2 Yr); Health Information Technology (2 Yr); Industrial Technology (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Instructor, Vocational Education (2 Yr); Manufacturing Technology (2 Yr); Medical Record Technology (2 Yr); Metrology (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Paralegal (2 Yr); Paramedic (2 Yr); Real Estate, Basic (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr)

BRANDENBURG

Meade County Area Technology Center

110 Greer St., Brandenburg, KY 40108. Trade and Technical. Founded 1975. Contact: Faye M. Campbell, Principal, (270)422-3955, E-mail: fayem. [email protected], Web Site: http://www.meade.k12.ky.us/ATC/index.htm. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 318. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Heating (2 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Construction Technology (2 Yr); Electronics, Industrial (2 Yr); Health Occupations (2 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr); Welding Technology (2 Yr)

CORBIN

Corbin Area Technology Center

1909 S. Snyder, Corbin, KY 40701. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Ronnie Partin, Principal, (606)528-5338, 800-418-6423, Fax: (606)528-0532, Web Site: http://www.corbinschools.org/CorbinVocational.htm. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $310 per semester. Enrollment: Total 250. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Appliance Repair (2640 Hr); Automotive Technology (2640 Hr); Drafting Technology (2640 Hr); Electrical Technology (2640 Hr); Health Care & Management (960 Hr); Health Occupations (960 Hr); Welding, Arc & Gas (1320 Hr); Welding Technology (1320 Hr)

CRESTVIEW HILLS

Thomas More College

333 Thomas More Pkwy., Crestview Hills, KY 41017. Other. Founded 1921. Contact: Carl Goodmonson, Dir. of Admissions, (859)341-5800, (859)344-3325, Fax: (859)344-3444, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.thomasmore.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $8,800 full-time, $450/credit part-time; room and board varies, starting at $2540/semester. Enrollment: Total 1,072. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: SACS; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Art; Computer Technology; Criminal Justice; Economics & Business Administration

CUMBERLAND

Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College (Cumberland)

700 College Rd., Cumberland, KY 40823. Two-Year College. Founded 1960. Contact: W. Bruce Ayers, Pres./CEO, (606)589-2145, (606)589-3001, 888-274-7322, Fax: (606)589-4941, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kctcs.edu; Walt Green, Dir., E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,516 in-state; $7,220 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 3,348. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning; Allied Health Occupations; Auto Body & Fender Repair; Automotive Technology; Bank Management; Business Management (2 Yr); Business Technology; Carpentry; Computer Aided Drafting; Diesel Technology; Electrical Technology; Electronics Technology; Golf Course Management; Heavy Equipment; Hospitality; Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Law Enforcement; Liberal Arts; Maintenance, Electronic Computer (2 Yr); Management; Medical Assistant; Medical Laboratory Technology; Medical Technology - Phlebotomy; Mining Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical; Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Technology; Physical Therapy Aide; Radiologic Technology; Respiratory Therapy; Secretarial, General (2 Yr); Surgical Technology; Technological Studies; Truck Driving; Welding Technology

DANVILLE

Bluegrass Community & Technical College (Danville)

59 Corporate Dr., Danville, KY 40422-9690. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Anthany Beatty, Admissions Counselor, (859)239-7030, Web Site: http://www.bluegrass.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $109/credit resident; $327/credit nonresident; $131/credit contiguous. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Medical Billing; Medical Information Specialist; Medical Record Technology; Medical Transcription; Nursing, Practical; Office Assistant; Office Technology

Durham Beauty School, Inc.

100 Fox Harbor Dr., Danville, KY 40422-2487. Cosmetology, Other. Founded 1941. Contact: Charlene D. Benge, President, (859)236-6268, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 25. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

National College of Business and Technology (Danville)

115 E. Lexington Ave, Danville, KY 40422. Two-Year College.(859)236-6991, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/danvilleky.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Management; Computer Applications; Medical Assistant; Medical Billing; Medical Transcription; Office Technology; Pharmacy Technician

EDGEWOOD

James D. Patton Area Vocational Education Center

3234 Turkeyfoot Rd, Edgewood, KY 41017-2645. Trade and Technical. Founded 1975. Contact: Ray Stanley, Principal, (859)341-2266. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Other. Tuition: None required. Enrollment: Total 300. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (2 Yr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Carpentry (2 Yr); Electricity, Industrial (2 Yr); Health Occupations (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Welding Technology (2 Yr)

ELIZABETHTOWN

Elizabethtown Beauty School

308 N. Miles St., Elizabethtown, KY 42701-1833. Cosmetology. Founded 1970. Contact: Martha Slinker, (270)765-2118, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $7,850. Enrollment: men 0, women 24. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (16 Mo)

Elizabethtown Community and Technical College

600 College St. Rd., Elizabethtown, KY 42701. Two-Year College. Founded 1964. Contact: Dr. Linda Thomas-Glover, Provost/Chief Academic Officer, (270)769-2371, 877-246-2322, Fax: (270)769-0736, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.elizabethtown.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $92/credit in-state; $95/credit contiguous county; $276/credit out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,746. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Banking (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Administration (2 Yr); Quality Control (2 Yr); Real Estate Management (2 Yr)

Hair Design School (Elizabethtown)

554 Westport Rd., Elizabethtown, KY 42701. Cosmetology. Founded 1972. Contact: Jan Rowland, Pres., (270)765-3374, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hairdesignschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,048-$9,986 full time. Enrollment: men 5, women 84. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1000 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

FLORENCE

Hair Design School (Florence)

7285 Turfway Rd., Florence, KY 41042. Cosmetology. Founded 1972. Contact: Jan Rowland, Pres., (859)283-2690, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hairdesignschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,048-$9,986 full time. Enrollment: Total 55. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

Interactive College of Technology (Florence)

11 Spiral Dr., Ste. 8, Turfway Business Pk., Florence, KY 41042. Trade and Technical. Contact: Kathy Fluehr, Campus Dir., (859)282-8989, 800-550-3475, Fax: (859)282-8475, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ict-ils.edu. Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $6,360 per year; $4,984 room and board. Enrollment: Total 101. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: English As A Second Language; Medical Billing; Office Technology

National College of Business and Technology (Florence)

7627 Ewing Blvd, Florence, KY 41042. Two-Year College.(859)525-6510, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/florence.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Management; Computer Applications; Medical Assistant; Medical Billing; Medical Transcription; Office Technology; Pharmacy Technician

Southwestern College of Business

8095 Connector Dr., Florence, KY 41042. Business. Founded 1914. Contact: Bruce Budesheim, (859)282-9999, Web Site: http://www.swcollege.net. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $1,550 Associate; $1,350 Diploma and Certificate. Enrollment: men 10, women 120. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Automated (1 Yr); Accounting, General (2 Yr); Administrative Assistant (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Computer Applications (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (1 Yr); Medical Assistant (1 Yr); Medical Technology - Phlebotomy (9 Mo); Microcomputers (9 Mo); Secretarial, Legal (1 Yr)

FRANKFORT

College of Cosmetology & HD

110 A Brighton Park Blvd., Frankfort, KY 40601. Cosmetology. Founded 1979. Contact: V. Michelle Whitaker, (502)695-9006, (502)695-8001, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $7,600 cosmetology; $2,300 manicuring; $3,300 cosmetology instructor; book kit and enrollment fees. Enrollment: Total 30. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (16 Mo); Cosmetology Instructor (6 Mo); Manicurist (600 Hr)

JM Academy of Cosmetology Inc.

110-A Brighton Park Blvd., Frankfort, KY 40601-3714. Cosmetology. Contact: V Michelle Whitaker, Dir., (502)695-9006. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $3300 or $8,100 Cosmetology; $2,300 Nail Technology. Enrollment: men 2, women 34. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1000-1800H); Nail Technology (600 Hr)

GLASGOW

PJ's College of Cosmetology (Glasgow)

124 S. Public Square, Glasgow, KY 42141. Cosmetology. Contact: Judith Stewart, Owner/Pres., (270)651-6553, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://gotopjs.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,029 - $10,670 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 0, women 47. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: COE. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (1000 Hr); Nail Technology (600 Hr)

GREENVILLE

Central Beauty College

520 Hopkinsville St., Greenville, KY 42345. Cosmetology. Founded 1979. Contact: Sandra Pride, Owner, (270)338-3200. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Enrollment: Total 20. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Financial aid not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr)

HAGERHILL

Big Sandy Community and Technical College (Hager Hill Campus)

150 Industrial Dr., Hagerhill, KY 41222. Two-Year College. Contact: Dr. Nancy B. Johnson, Academic and Student Affairs, (606)789-5690, 888-641-4132, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bigsandy.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $98 per credit hour in-state; $294 per credit out-of-state; $118 per credit hour contiguous counties. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (8 Qt); Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (8 Qt); Auto Body & Fender Repair (8 Qt); Automotive Technology (8 Qt); Business Education (4 Qt); Carpentry (8 Qt); Computer Aided Drafting (8 Qt); Cosmetology (5 Qt); Diesel Technology (8 Qt); Electricity, Industrial (8 Qt); Electronics Technology (8 Qt); Graphic Arts (8 Qt); Information Sciences Technology (8 Qt); Machine Tool Programming Technology (8 Qt); Manufacturing Technology (8 Qt); Masonry (8 Qt); Medical Office Management (6 Qt); Nursing, Practical (5 Qt); Respiratory Therapy (5 Qt); Surveying (8 Qt); Truck Driving (5 Mo); Welding Technology (6 Qt)

HARLAN

Jenny Lea Academy of Cosmetology (Harlan)

114 N. Cumberland Ave., Harlan, KY 40831. Cosmetology. Contact: Virginia Lewis, President, (606)573-4276, (606)573-9817. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $1,975-$7,775; $325 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 20. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1000-1800H); Manicurist (600 Hr)

Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College (Harlan)

164 Ball Park Rd., Harlan, KY 40831. Two-Year College. Founded 1942. Contact: W. Bruce Ayers, Pres./CEO, (606)573-1506, (606)589-3001, 888-274-7322, Fax: (606)589-4941, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,516 in-state; $7,220 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 380. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Automotive Collision Repair; Automotive Technology; Carpentry; Computer Repair; Diesel Technology; Electricity, Apprenticeship; Electricity, Industrial; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Medical Assistant; Welding Technology

HAZARD

Hazard Community and Technical College

101 Vo-Tech Dr., Hazard, KY 41701. Trade and Technical. Founded 1945. Contact: Germaine Shaffer, Enrollment Dir., (606)435-6101, (606)436-5721, 800-246-7521, Fax: (606)435-6086, Web Site: http://www.hazard.kctcs.edu/. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $92/credit in-state; $276/credit out-of-state; $1950/semester room and board. Enrollment: Total 1,931. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: SACS; APTA; CAPTE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (22 Mo); Auto Body & Fender Repair (22 Mo); Automotive Technology (22 Mo); Carpentry (22 Mo); Clerical, General (11 Mo); Cosmetology (15 Mo); Drafting Technology (22 Mo); Electrical Technology (22 Mo); Electronics Technology (22 Mo); Engineering Aide, Highway (22 Mo); Heavy Equipment (11 Mo); Industrial Maintenance (22 Mo); Mechanics, Heavy Equipment (18 Mo); Nursing, Practical (11 Mo); Office Technology (11 Mo); Welding Technology (11 Mo)

Hazard Community and Technical College

One Community College Dr., Hazard, KY 41701. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Dr. Jay Box, Pres/CEO, (606)436-5721, 800-246-7521, Fax: (606)439-2988, Web Site: http://www.hazcc.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $92/credit in-state; $276/credit out-of-state; $1950/semester room and board. Enrollment: Total 2,485. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Technology; Business Management; Dental Assisting; Dental Hygiene; Early Childhood Education; Forestry Technology; Human Services; Laboratory Technology; Nursing, R.N.; Office Technology; Physical Therapy Aide; Radiologic Technology

HENDERSON

Henderson Community College

2660 S. Green St., Henderson, KY 42420. Two-Year College. Founded 1960. Contact: Patty Mitchell, Dean of Student Affairs, (270)827-1867, (270)831-9611, 800-696-9958, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hencc.kctcs.net. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $98 per hour in-state; $118 per credit contiguous counties; $294 per credit out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 642. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC; SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agricultural Science (2 Yr); Business Technology (2 Yr); Data Processing (2 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Medical Assistant (2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr)

Pat Wilson Beauty College, Inc.

326 N. Main St., Henderson, KY 42420. Cosmetology. Founded 1975. Contact: Rhonda Dossett, (270)826-5195, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $1,650-$7,150 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 1, women 44. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

HOPKINSVILLE

Hopkinsville Community College

720 North Dr., PO Box 2100, Hopkinsville, KY 42241-2100. Two-Year College. Founded 1965. Contact: Dr. James E. Selbe, Acting Pres., (270)707-3700, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hopkinsville.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $98/credit in-state; $118/credit contiguous counties; $118/credit on-line; $294/credit out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 3,000. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agribusiness Technology; Agri-Management; Bank Management; Computer Aided Drafting; Drafting Aide; Early Childhood Education; Electrical Appliance; Electrical Technology; Electronics & Communication; Electronics, Industrial; Electronics Technology; Engineering Technology; Engineering Technology, Electronic; Human Services; Hydraulic Technology; Industrial Maintenance; Industrial Technology; Information Systems; Law Enforcement; Machine Specialist; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Management; Manufacturing Technology; Mechanics, Aviation; Nursing, R.N.; Office Technology; Quality Control; Robotics

LAWRENCEBURG

Bluegrass Community & Technical College (Lawrenceburg)

1500 Bypass North, US 127, Lawrenceburg, KY 40342-9465. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Anthany Beatty, Admissions Counselor, (502)839-8488, Web Site: http://www.bluegrass.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $109/credit resident; $327/credit nonresident; $131/credit contiguous. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Electrical Technology; Emergency Medical Technology; Fire Technology/Dispatch; Industrial Maintenance; Nurse, Assistant; Office Technology

LEXINGTON

Bluegrass Community & Technical College (Cooper)

470 Cooper Dr., Lexington, KY 40506-0235. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Anthany Beatty, Admissions Counselor, (859)246-6200, (866)774-4872, Web Site: http://www.bluegrass.kctcs.edu; Laquanda Miller. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $109/credit resident; $327/credit nonresident; $131/credit contiguous. Enrollment: Total 8,808. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Architectural Technology; Business Technology; Computer Information Science; Dental Hygiene; Dental Laboratory Technology; Early Childhood Education; Engineering Technology, Mechanical; Environmental Technology; Nuclear Medical Technology; Nursing, R.N.; Office Technology; Radiologic Technology; Respiratory Therapy

Bluegrass Community & Technical College (Leestown)

164 Opportunity Way, Lexington, KY 40511-2623. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Anthany Beatty, Admissions Counselor, (859)246-6200, Web Site: http://www.bluegrass.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $109/credit resident; $327/credit nonresident; $131/credit contiguous. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning; Auto Mechanics; Carpentry; Computer Aided Drafting; Cosmetology; Dental Assisting; Dental Hygiene; Education; Electrical Technology; Emergency Management; Environmental Technology; Esthetician; Information Technology; Machine Technology; Medical Assistant; Nursing, Practical; Radiologic Technology; Surgical Technology; Welding Technology

Bluegrass Community & Technical College (Regency)

2659 Regency Rd., Lexington, KY 40503-2922. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Anthany Beatty, Admissions Counselor, (859)246-6200, Web Site: http://www.bluegrass.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $109/credit resident; $327/credit nonresident; $131/credit contiguous. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Architectural Technology; Business Technology; Computer Information Science; Dental Hygiene; Dental Laboratory Technology; Early Childhood Education; Engineering Technology, Mechanical; Environmental Technology; Nuclear Medical Technology; Nursing, R.N.; Office Technology; Radiologic Technology; Respiratory Therapy

ITT Technical Institute (Lexington)

2473 Fortune Dr., Ste. 180, Lexington, KY 40509. Trade and Technical. (859)246-3300, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itttech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits)

Kaufman Beauty School, Inc.

701 E. High St., Lexington, KY 40502. Cosmetology. Founded 1959. Contact: Judy A. Farmer, Owner/Instructor, (859)266-5531, (859)266-2024, Fax: (859)268-3935, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kaufmaneducation.com; Faye A. Flynn, Dir.. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $9,200 cosmetology; $3,000 manicuring; $5,000 apprentice instructor. Enrollment: men 1, women 23. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

Lexington Beauty College

90 Southport Dr., Lexington, KY 40503. Cosmetology. Founded 1970. Contact: Ann Halloran, Owner, (859)252-7647, (859)252-7484, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://lexingtonbeautycollege.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $7,600 cosmetology; $2,596 nail tech; $3,000 instructor; $6,100 esthetician. Enrollment: Total 70. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

Nash Academy of Animal Arts

857 Lane Allen Rd., Lexington, KY 40504. Trade and Technical. Founded 1988. Contact: Tanya Nash, Dir., (859)277-2763, 888-491-2064, Fax: (859)277-1977, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.nashacademy.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,025 (160 hr. practical application course), $8,760 grooming, $7,765 all-breed certificate program. Enrollment: Total 75. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Pet Grooming (200-600 Hr)

National College of Business and Technology-Lexington

2376 Sir Barton Way, Lexington, KY 40509. Two-Year College. Founded 1941.(859)253-0621, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/lexington.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Enrollment: Total 2,124. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Management; Computer Applications; Medical Assistant; Medical Billing; Medical Transcription; Office Technology; Pharmacy Technician

LONDON

Somerset Community College (Laurel County Campus)

235 S. Laurel Rd., London, KY 40744-7914. Trade and Technical. Founded 1971. Contact: Trent Pool, Recruiter, (606)864-7311, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.somcc.kctcs.net/. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $98/credit resident; $294/credit non-resident. Enrollment: Total 471. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Administrative Assistant (4 Qt); Air Conditioning & Heating (8 Qt); Auto Body & Fender Repair (8 Qt); Automotive Technology (8 Qt); Carpentry (8 Qt); Computer Aided Drafting (8 Qt); Cosmetology (6 Qt); Legal Assistant (6 At); Machine Shop (8 Qt); Masonry (8 Qt); Medical Assistant (4 Qt); Medical Record Technology (4 Qt); Welding Technology (4 Qt)

LOUISVILLE

Daymar College (Louisville)

4400 Breckenridge Ln., Ste. 415, Louisville, KY 40218. Two-Year College. Founded 1963. Contact: Jim Weber, 877-258-7796, Fax: (270)926-4040, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.daymarcollege.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $9,360; $1,600 books and supplies; $4,740 room and board. Enrollment: Total 296. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business Education; Computer Networking; Criminal Justice; Medical Record Technology; Medical Transcription; Paralegal; Pharmacy Technician

Decker College

981 S. 3rd St., Louisville, KY 40203. Trade and Technical. Founded 1989. Contact: Gay St. Mary Williams, (502)583-2860, Fax: (502)583-5800, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.deckercollege.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: Varies according to program. Enrollment: Total 317. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Clerical (9 Mo); Accounting, General (2 Yr); Clerical, Medical (9 Mo); Computer Business Systems Technology (9 Mo); Finance (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Medical Office Management (2 Yr); Medical Record Technology (2 Yr); Microcomputers (9 Mo); Microsoft Certified Specialist (2 Yr); Paralegal (2 Yr)

Donta School of Beauty Culture

515 W. Oak St., Louisville, KY 40203. Cosmetology. Founded 1986. Contact: Beverly McCauley, (502)583-1018. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $7,700 or $3,600 Cosmetology; $1,700 Nail Tech. Enrollment: Total 28. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1000-1800H); Nail Technology (600)

Galen College of Nursing (Louisville)

612 S. 4th St., Ste. 400, Louisville, KY 40202. Nursing. Contact: Mark Vogt, President, (502)582-2305, (866)307-0198, Web Site: http://galened.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $12,900. Enrollment: Total 47. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: COE; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Nursing (1-2 Yr); Nursing, L.P.N. (12-18 Mo)

Hair Design School

5120 Dixie Hwy, Louisville, KY 40216. Cosmetology. Founded 1972. Contact: Jan Rowland, Pres., (502)447-0111, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hairdesignschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,048-$9,986 full time. Enrollment: Total 195. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

Hair Design School (Chenoweth)

151 Chenoweth Ln., Louisville, KY 40207. Cosmetology. Founded 1972. Contact: Jan Rowland, Pres., (502)897-9401, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hairdesignschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,048-$9,986 full time. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

Hair Design School (Highland)

1049 Bardstown Rd., Louisville, KY 40204. Cosmetology. Founded 1972. Contact: Jan Rowland, Pres., (502)459-8150, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hairdesignschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,048-$9,986 full time. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

Hair Design School (Hurstbourne, Louisville)

5314 Bardstown Rd., Louisville, KY 40291. Cosmetology. Founded 1972. Contact: Jan Rowland, Pres., (502)499-0070, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hairdesignschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,048-$9,986 full time. Enrollment: men 32, women 132. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

ITT Technical Institute (Louisville)

10509 Timberwood Cir., Louisville, KY 40223-5392. Two-Year College. Founded 1959. Contact: Michael W. Fiore, (502)327-7424, 888-790-7427, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Enrollment: Total 686. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits); Software Development/Engineering (96 Credits); Web Development (96 Credits)

Jefferson Community & Technical College

109 E. Broadway, Louisville, KY 40202. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Cynthia Walker, Student Affairs, (502)213-5333, (502)213-7238, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.jefferson.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: in-state: $98/credit hr.; out-of-county: $118/credit hr.; out-of-state: $294/credit hr. Enrollment: Total 2,473. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; APTA; SACS; CAAHEP; COE; AHIMA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Machine (2 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Chemical Technology (2 Yr); Commercial Art (2 Yr); Culinary Arts (2 Yr); Data Processing (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Electrical Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Electro-Mechanical Technology (2 Yr); Fire Protection Technology (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Information Systems (2 Yr); Liberal Arts (2 Yr); Mechanical Engineering (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Occupational Therapy Assistant (2 Yr); Office Administration (2 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide (2 Yr); Real Estate, Basic (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Social Work Technology (2 Yr)

Louisville Technical Institute

3901 Atkinson Square Dr., Louisville, KY 40218. Trade and Technical. Founded 1961. Contact: George Wright, Dir. of Admissions, (502)456-6509, 800-844-6528, Fax: (502)456-2341, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.louisvilletech.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $4,160, $4,440 per quarter; also varies with program. Enrollment: men 400, women 200. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Architectural Design Technology (18 Mo); Computer Aided Design (18 Mo); Computer Aided Drafting (18 Mo); Computer Electro-Mechanics (18 Mo); Computer Graphics (18 Mo); Computer Networking (21 Mo); Drafting & Design Technology (36 Wk); Drafting, Electro-Mechanical (66 Wk); Engineering Technology (18 Mo); Information Systems (21 Mo); Interior Design (18 Mo); Marine Technology (36 Wk); Robotics (66 Wk)

National College of Business and Technology (Louisville)

4205 Dixie Hwy, Louisville, KY 40216. Two-Year College.(502)447-7634, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/louisville.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Management; Computer Applications; Medical Assistant; Medical Billing; Medical Transcription; Office Technology; Pharmacy Technician

Spencerian College

4627 Dixie Hwy., Louisville, KY 40216. Trade and Technical, Allied Medical, Business, Nursing. Founded 1892. Contact: Jan Gordon, Exec.Dir, (502)447-1000, 800-264-1799, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.spencerian.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-Of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $12,649. Enrollment: Total 1,254. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: AAMAE; ACICS; CAAHEP; ABHES; JRCERT; ARCEST. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting & Business Administration (18 Mo); Accounting, General (12 Mo); Computer Applications (9 Mo); Executive Assistant (12 Mo); Medical Administrative Assistant (9 Mo); Medical Assistant (12 Mo); Medical Office Management (18 Mo); Medical Technology (21 Mo); Medical Technology - Phlebotomy (6 Mo); Medical Transcription (12 Mo); Nursing, Practical (12 Mo); Office Administration (9 Mo); Office Management (18 Mo); Radiologic Technology (9 Mo)

Stanley H. Kaplan Educational Center, Ltd.

420 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy., Ste. 204, Louisville, KY 40222. Other, Correspondence. Founded 1938. Contact: John M. Curd, (502)339-8021, 800-527-8378, Web Site: http://www.kaptest.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $345-$795. Enrollment: Total 1,000. Accreditation: ACCET. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Certified Public Review (12 Wk)

University of Louisville

Office of Admission, Dept. A O, Louisville, KY 40292. Other. Founded 1798. Contact: Jenny Sawyer, Exec. Dir. of Admissions, (502)852-6531, (502)852-4957, 800-334-8635, Fax: (502)852-4776, Web Site: http://www.louisville.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $231 per credit hour, $2,766 full-time, resident; $629 per credit hour, $7,546 full-time, non-resident. Enrollment: Total 21,725. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: ABET; ADA; APTA; CAAHEP; NASM; ACCSCT; NCATE; LCMEAMA; NASPE; SACS; NLNAC; ABA; AACSB. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Data Processing (2 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Medical Technology (1 Yr); Police Science (2 Yr)

Vogue Models, Inc. - School and Agency

2031 Frankfort Ave., Louisville, KY 40206-2028. Other. Founded 1979. Contact: Shirley Braun, (502)897-0089, Web Site: http://www.voguemodels.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 25, women 50. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Modeling & Personal Improvement (4 Wk); Modeling, Professional (10 Wk)

MADISONVILLE

Madisonville Community College

2000 College Dr., Madisonville, KY 42431. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Jay Parrent, Student Affairs, (270)821-2250, (270)824-8571, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.madcc.kctcs.net/. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $98/credit resident; $118/credit contiguous county; $294/credit non-resident. Enrollment: Total 2,150. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: SACS; AOTA; CAAHEP; CAPTE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Banking; Biomedical Technology; Business; Business Management; Computer Aided Design; Electrical Engineering Technology; Engineering Technology, Mechanical; Laser Technology; Medical Laboratory Technology; Mine Reclamation; Mining Technology; Nursing, R.N.; Office Administration; Optical Technology; Radiologic Technology; Real Estate, Basic; Respiratory Therapy; Retail Management

Madisonville State Vocational-Technical School

150 School Ave., Madisonville, KY 42431. Trade and Technical. Founded 1937. Contact: Thomas Marks, (270)824-7544, (270)824-7545, Fax: (270)824-7071. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $79 per credit hour. Enrollment: men 180, women 12. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Carpentry (22 Mo); Drafting Technology (22 Mo); Electricity, Industrial (22 Mo); Electronics, Industrial (22 Mo); Machine Shop (22 Mo); Welding Technology (18 Mo)

MAYSVILLE

Maysville Community and Technical College (Maysville)

1755 US 68, Maysville, KY 41056. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Dr. Augusta A. Julian, President, (606)759-7141, Web Site: http://www.maysville.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $98/credit in-state; $118/credit contiguous county; $294 out-of-state. Enrollment: men 317, women 726. Degrees awarded: Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agribusiness Technology (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (2 Yr); Electricity, Industrial (2 Yr); Electronics, Industrial (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Marketing, Department Store (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Administration (2 Yr); Retail Management (2 Yr); Secretarial, General (2 Yr)

MIDDLESBORO

Collins School of Cosmetology

111 W. Chester Ave., Middlesboro, KY 40965. Cosmetology. Founded 1953. Contact: Reta McDaniel, (606)248-3602, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $7,300. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College (Middlesboro Campus)

1300 Chichester Ave, Middlesboro, KY 40965. Two-Year College. Contact: Dr. Joseph Yazvac, Counselor, (606)242-2145, 888-274-7322, Fax: (606)242-2326, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kctcs.edu; Barb Tipmore, Counselor, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,516 in-state; $7,220 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Automotive Collision Repair; Automotive Technology; Carpentry; Computer Repair; Diesel Technology; Electricity, Apprenticeship; Electricity, Industrial; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Medical Assistant; Welding Technology

MIDWAY

Midway College

512 E. Stephens St., Midway, KY 40347-9137. Other. Founded 1847. Contact: Dr. William B. Drake, Jr., Pres., (859)846-4421, 800-755-0031, Web Site: http://www.midway.edu. Private. Women. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $11,850/year. Enrollment: Total 757. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Business Administration; Computer Information Science; Education; Horse Management; Nursing, R.N.; Veterinary Technology

MOREHEAD

Morehead State University

100 Admissions Center, Morehead, KY 40351. Other. Founded 1922. Contact: Kenya Arrington, Assistant Dir. of Admissions/Diversity, (606)783-2221, (606)783-2000, 800-585-6781, Fax: (606)783-5038, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.moreheadstate.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,463/semester, $122/credit part-time, resident; $3,890/semester, $325/credit part-time, non-resident. Enrollment: Total 6,376. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; NAIT; JRCERT; NASM; NCATE; ABA; AVMA; ADtA; ACBSP; CCNE; CSWE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agribusiness (2 Yr); Agribusiness Technology (2 Yr); Agriculture, General (2 Yr); Broadcasting Technology (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Construction Technology (2 Yr); Correctional Science (2 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Fashion Merchandising (2 Yr); Food Preparation & Service (2 Yr); Graphic Arts (2 Yr); Horticulture, Ornamental (2 Yr); Industrial Management & Supervision (2 Yr); Interior Decoration (2 Yr); Journalism (2 Yr); Machine Tool & Die (2 Yr); Mechanics, Power Fluid (2 Yr); Nursing, Vocational (2 Yr); Office Management (2 Yr); Radio & Television Technology (2 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Real Estate, Basic (2 Yr); Small Business Management (2 Yr); Veterinary Technology (2 Yr)

Tri-State Beauty Academy, Inc.

219 W. Main St., Morehead, KY 40351. Cosmetology. Founded 1965. Contact: Lisa Crawford, (606)784-6725, Fax: (606)784-6725, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $8,600. Enrollment: Total 23. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

MOUNT STERLING

Nu-Tek Academy of Beauty

153 Evans Dr., Mount Sterling, KY 40353-9768. Cosmetology. Founded 1973. Contact: Rebecca H. Taylor, (859)498-4460, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $8,000. Enrollment: Total 20. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

MOUNT VERNON

Rockcastle Area Technology Center

955 West Main St., PO Box 275, Mount Vernon, KY 40456. Trade and Technical. Founded 1969. Contact: Ralph Baker, Principal, (606)256-4346, Fax: (606)256-4337, Web Site: http://www.rockcastle.k12.ky.us/ratc.htm; Kristi Reynolds, Administrative Secretary, E-mail: [email protected] ky.us. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $75 per quarter; $50 registration, application, and enrollment fee. Enrollment: Total 340. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Technology (2640 Hr); Business, General Office (1080 Hr); Electricity, Industrial (2640 Hr); Nursing, Practical (1640 Hr); Respiratory Therapy (1640 Hr); Welding, Arc & Gas (1320 Hr); Welding Technology (1320 Hr)

MURRAY

Ezell's Cosmetology School

504 Maple St., Murray, KY 42071-2530. Cosmetology. Contact: Brenda J. Brown, Owner[a]dministrator, (270)753-4723. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $9,550. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

NEWPORT

Daymar College (Newport)

76 Carothers Rd., Newport, KY 41071. Two-Year College. Founded 1963. Contact: Jim Weber, 877-258-7796, Fax: (270)926-4040, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.daymarcollege.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $10,140; $1,526 books and fees; $4,740 room and board. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business Education; Computer Networking; Criminal Justice; Medical Assistant; Paralegal; Pharmacy Technician; Web Development

Melody Manor Dog Grooming Salon & Pet Supplies

935 Monmouth St., Newport, KY 41071-2114. Trade and Technical. Founded 1973. Contact: Kitty Pritchard, (859)441-7561. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Month. Tuition: $3,000; equipment $1,200 = total $4,200. Enrollment: Total 4. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Pet Grooming (4 Mo)

NICHOLASVILLE

Barrett and Company School of Hair Design

973 Kimberly Square, Unit F, Nicholasville, KY 40356-2152. Cosmetology. Founded 1984. Contact: Jamie B. Lovern, (859)885-9136. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,115 to $8,415. Enrollment: Total 137. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

OWENSBORO

Daymar College (Owensboro)

3361 Buckland Square, Owensboro, KY 42301. Two-Year College. Founded 1963. Contact: Jim Weber, (270)926-4040, 877-258-7796, Fax: (270)685-4090, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.daymarcollege.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $10,140; $1,526 books and fees; $4,740 room and board. Enrollment: Total 317. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting Technology; Business Management; Computer Networking; Computer Technology; Criminal Justice; Medical Assistant; Medical Office Management; Paralegal

Mr. Jim's Beauty College

2855 W. Parrish Ave., Owensboro, KY 42301-2690. Cosmetology. Founded 1967. Contact: Stephen Boyd, Dir., (270)684-3505. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Hour. Tuition: $4,228. Enrollment: Total 15. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr)

Owensboro Technical College (Main Campus)

1901 Southeastern Pkwy., Owensboro, KY 42303-1829. Trade and Technical. Founded 1971. Contact: Jacqueline Addington, Pres., (270)687-4400, (270)686-4500, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.octc.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $320 tuition plus $60 fees per semester. Enrollment: Total 405. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Auto Body & Fender Repair; Automotive Technology; Child Care & Guidance; Commercial Foods; Cosmetology; Diesel Technology; Office Technology; Welding Technology

PADUCAH

Daymar College (Paducah)

509 S. 30th St., Paducah, KY 42001. Two-Year College. Founded 1963. Contact: Jim Weber, 877-258-7796, Fax: (270)926-4040, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.daymarcollege.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Criminal Justice; Medical Assistant

Institute of Electronic Technology

509 S. 30th St., Paducah, KY 42001. Two-Year College. Founded 1964. Contact: Jesse Adkinson, Dir., (502)444-9676, 800-995-4438, Fax: (502)441-7202, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ptc-ky.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $5,300 per academic year. Enrollment: men 185, women 21. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Communications, Electronic; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Electrical Engineering Technology; Electronics & Communication; Electronics Technology; Engineering Technology, Computer; Industrial Technology; Microcomputers

Kentucky Tech, Paducah Area Technical Center

2400 Adams St., Paducah, KY 42003. Trade and Technical. Founded 1965. Contact: Don Rowlett, Principal, (270)443-6592, Fax: (270)442-6233. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 275, women 50. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Auto Body & Fender Repair (22 Mo); Auto Mechanics (22 Mo); Carpentry (22 Mo); Cosmetology (12 Mo); Electronics & Communication (22 Mo); Health Occupations (11 Mo); Small Engine Repair (11 Mo); Television Production (22 Mo); Welding Technology (11 Mo)

Paducah Beauty School

124 S. 4th St., Paducah, KY 42001. Cosmetology. Contact: Nelson E. Young, (270)442-0990. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $3,900. Enrollment: men 2, women 25. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr)

Paducah Technical College

509 South 30th St., Paducah, KY 42001-8252. Trade and Technical. Contact: Jesse Adkison, Campus Dir., (270)444-9676, 877-258-7796, Web Site: http://www.paducahtech.edu. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $7,675. Degrees awarded: Certificate.

West Kentucky Community & Technical College

4810 Alben Barkley Dr., PO Box 7380, Paducah, KY 42002-7380. Two-Year College. Founded 1909. Contact: Shery Cope, Registrar, (270)554-9200, (270)534-3264, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.westkentucky.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $98 per credit hr. in-state; $276 credit hr. out-of-state. Enrollment: men 2,643, women 3,232. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: APTA; NLNAC; SACS; ADA; CAAHEP; NCRA; CAPTE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (3 Sm); Administrative Assistant (3 Sm); Air Conditioning (4 Sm); Auto Body & Fender Repair (4 Sm); Barbering (4 Sm); Carpentry (3 Sm); Computer Aided Drafting (4 Sm); Cosmetology (3 Sm); Court Reporting (3-4 Sm); Culinary Arts (4 Sm); Dental Assisting (3 Sm); Diesel Technology (4 Sm); Early Childhood Specialist (2 Sm); Electrical Technology (4 Sm); Electronics Technology (4 Sm); Graphic Arts (4 Sm); Industrial Maintenance (4 Sm); Instrumentation Technology (4 Sm); Legal Assistant (2-3 Sm); Machine Shop (4 Sm); Manicurist (2 Sm); Medical Assistant (3 Sm); Medical Office Management (4 Sm); Nursing, Practical (3 Sm); Radiologic Technology (4 Sm); Respiratory Therapy (4 Sm); Surgical Technology (4 Sm); Ultrasonography (3 Sm); Welding Technology (4 Sm); Word Processing (3 Sm)

PAINTSVILLE

Big Sandy Community and Technical College (Mayo Campus)

513 3rd St., Paintsville, KY 41240. Two-Year College. Founded 1938. Contact: Bobby McCool, Institutional Services, (606)789-5321, 888-641-4132, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bigsandy.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $98 per credit hour in-state; $294 per credit out-of-state; $118 per credit hour contiguous counties. Enrollment: Total 2,045. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (8 Qt); Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (8 Qt); Auto Body & Fender Repair (8 Qt); Automotive Technology (8 Qt); Business Education (4 Qt); Carpentry (8 Qt); Computer Aided Drafting (8 Qt); Cosmetology (5 Qt); Diesel Technology (8 Qt); Electricity, Industrial (8 Qt); Electronics Technology (8 Qt); Graphic Arts (8 Qt); Information Sciences Technology (8 Qt); Machine Tool Programming Technology (8 Qt); Manufacturing Technology (8 Qt); Masonry (8 Qt); Medical Office Management (6 Qt); Nursing, Practical (5 Qt); Respiratory Therapy (5 Qt); Surveying (8 Qt); Truck Driving (5 Mo); Welding Technology (6 Qt)

PIKEVILLE

Big Sandy Community and Technical College (Pikeville Campus)

120 Riverfill Dr., Pikeville, KY 41501. Two-Year College. Contact: Randall Roberts, Campus Coordinator, (606)218-2060, 888-641-4132, Web Site: http://www.bigsandy.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $98 per credit hour in-state; $294 per credit out-of-state; $118 per credit hour contiguous counties. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (8 Qt); Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (8 Qt); Auto Body & Fender Repair (8 Qt); Automotive Technology (8 Qt); Business Education (4 Qt); Carpentry (8 Qt); Computer Aided Drafting (8 Qt); Cosmetology (5 Qt); Diesel Technology (8 Qt); Electricity, Industrial (8 Qt); Electronics Technology (8 Qt); Graphic Arts (8 Qt); Information Sciences Technology (8 Qt); Machine Tool Programming Technology (8 Qt); Manufacturing Technology (8 Qt); Masonry (8 Qt); Medical Office Management (6 Qt); Nursing, Practical (5 Qt); Respiratory Therapy (5 Qt); Surveying (8 Qt); Truck Driving (5 Mo); Welding Technology (6 Qt)

National College of Business and Technology (Pikeville)

50 National College Blvd, Pikeville, KY 41501. Two-Year College.(606)478-7200, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/pikeville.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Management; Computer Applications; Medical Assistant; Medical Billing; Medical Transcription; Office Technology; Pharmacy Technician

PINEVILLE

Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College (Pineville Campus)

3300 South Hwy 25E, Pineville, KY 40977. Two-Year College. Contact: Dr. Joseph Yazvac, Counselor, (606)337-3106, 888-274-7322, Fax: (606)337-5662, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kctcs.edu; Barb Tipmore, Counselor, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,516 in-state; $7,220 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Automotive Collision Repair; Automotive Technology; Carpentry; Computer Repair; Diesel Technology; Electricity, Apprenticeship; Electricity, Industrial; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Medical Assistant; Welding Technology

PRESTONSBURG

Big Sandy Community and Technical College (Prestonburg Campus)

One Bert T. Combs Dr., Prestonsburg, KY 41653. Two-Year College. Founded 1964. Contact: Gia R. Hall, Assoc. Dean of Student Affairs, (606)886-3863, 888-641-4132, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bigsandy.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $98 per credit hour in-state; $294 per credit out-of-state; $118 per credit hour contiguous counties. Enrollment: Total 2,547. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Real Estate Management (2 Yr)

RICHMOND

Eastern Kentucky University College of Health & Sciences

Rowlett 203, 521 Lancaster Ave., Richmond, KY 40475-3102. Allied Medical. Founded 1906. Contact: Dr. David D. Gale, Dean-Health Sciences, (859)622-1523, (859)622-2106, Fax: (859)622-1140, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.health.eku.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,330/semester, $194/credit part-time, resident; $6,535/semester, $545/credit part-time, out-of-state. Enrollment: men 8,000, women 9,000. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: AAMAE; CAAHEP; NLNAC; NAACLS; NCATE; JRCERT; SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agriculture, General; Agri-Engineering & Mechanics; Animal Science - Beef Production; Apparel Arts (4 Yr); Athletic Trainer (4 Yr); Chemical Technology; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Correctional Science; Dairy Technology; Dietary Assistant; Dietetic Technology (2-4 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology; Electronics Technology; Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); Engineering, Broadcast; Environmental Health (4 Yr); Family Living Specialist; Fire Science; Floriculture; Geology Laboratory Technology; Health Information Technology (2-4 Yr); Horticulture, Ornamental; Industrial Arts Technology; Industrial Technology; Interior Decoration; Juvenile Justice; Laboratory Technology (2-4 Yr); Law Enforcement; Legal Assistant; Medical Assistant (2-4 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Medical Record Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2-4 Yr); Occupational Therapy (4 Yr); Office Administration; Paralegal (2 Yr); Park & Recreation (4 Yr); Park & Turf Management; Physical Education (4 Yr); Police Science; Power Plant Mechanics; Printing Technology; Recreation Administration (4 Yr); Recreation Leadership; Secretarial, Executive; Secretarial, General; Secretarial, Legal; Secretarial, Medical; Security Training; Sports Management (4 Yr)

Eastern School of Hair Design

451 Big Hill Ave., Richmond Place, Richmond, KY 40475-2596. Cosmetology. Founded 1989. Contact: Mary Lou Campbell, (859)623-5472, Fax: (859)623-9829. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $4,755. Enrollment: men 1, women 20. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

National College of Business and Technology (Richmond)

125 S. Killarney Ln, Richmond, KY 40475. Two-Year College.(859)623-8956, Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/locations/richmond.asp; Web Site: http://www.ncbt.edu/contact/contactStaffForm.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $6,408 per year; $1,170 fees. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Management; Computer Applications; Medical Assistant; Medical Billing; Medical Transcription; Office Technology; Pharmacy Technician

ST. CATHARINE

St. Catharine College

2735 Bardstown Rd., St. Catharine, KY 40061. Two-Year College. Founded 1931. Contact: Toni M. Wiley, Dir. Admissions, (859)336-5082, 800-599-2000, Fax: (859)336-5031, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.sccky.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $5,460 per semester; $420/credit; $2,860 room and board per semester; $6,870/semester Health Science Programs. Enrollment: Total 681. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available.

SOMERSET

Somerset Beauty College

212 E. Mount Vernon St., Somerset, KY 42501-1413. Cosmetology. Founded 1967. Contact: Mary Lous, Owner, (606)679-3397. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $4,605-Kit, Books, Fees. Enrollment: Total 21. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr)

Somerset Community College

Monticello St., Somerset, KY 42501. Two-Year College. Founded 1965. Contact: Sandra Bourne, Admissions, (606)679-8501, 877-629-9722, Fax: (606)676-9065, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.somcc.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $98/credit resident; $294/credit, non-resident. Enrollment: men 830, women 1,725. Degrees awarded: Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business Technology; Laboratory Technology; Nursing, R.N.; Physical Therapy Aide

Somerset State Technical College

230 Airport Rd., Somerset, KY 42501. Trade and Technical. Founded 1940. Contact: Dr. Jo Marshall, Dir., (606)677-4049, 877-629-9722, Fax: (606)677-4053, Web Site: http://www.somerset.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $98/credit resident; $294/credit non-resident. Enrollment: men 200, women 235. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Airframe Mechanics (19 Mo); Appliance Repair (22 Mo); Auto Body & Fender Repair (22 Mo); Auto Mechanics (22 Mo); Business, General Office (22 Mo); Computer Literacy (20 Hr); Data Processing (18 Mo); Diesel Technology (52 Wk); Electronics Technology (22 Mo); Graphic Arts (22 Mo); Machine Shop (22 Mo); Nursing, Practical (12 Mo); Welding Technology (11 Mo)

SOUTH WILLIAMSON

Appalachian Beauty School

29100 U.S. Hwy. 119 S., Appalachian Plz., South Williamson, KY 41503. Cosmetology. Founded 1977. Contact: Deborah Johnson, (606)237-6650, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $7,400. Enrollment: Total 33. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1800 Hr)

WHITESBURG

Jenny Lea Academy of Cosmetology (Whitesburg)

74 Parkway Plaza Loop, Whitesburg, KY 41858. Cosmetology. (606)573-4276. (606)633-8784. Private. Coed. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $7,775. Enrollment: Total 19. Curriculum: Cosmetology

Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College (Whitesburg Campus)

2 Long Ave, Whitesburg, KY 41858. Two-Year College. Contact: Dr. Joseph Yazvac, Counselor, (606)633-0279, 888-274-7322, Fax: (606)633-7225, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kctcs.edu; Barb Tipmore, Counselor, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,516 in-state; $7,220 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Automotive Technology; Carpentry; Computer Repair; Diesel Technology; Electricity, Apprenticeship; Electricity, Industrial; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Medical Assistant; Welding Technology

WINCHESTER

Bluegrass Community & Technical College (Winchester-Clark County)

36 Wheeler Ave, Winchester, KY 40391-1804. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Anthany Beatty, Admissions Counselor, (859)737-3098, Web Site: http://www.bluegrass.kctcs.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $109/credit resident; $327/credit nonresident; $131/credit contiguous. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Architectural Technology; Business Technology; Computer Information Science; Dental Hygiene; Dental Laboratory Technology; Early Childhood Education; Engineering Technology, Mechanical; Environmental Technology; Nuclear Medical Technology; Nursing, R.N.; Office Technology; Radiologic Technology; Respiratory Therapy

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Kentucky

Kentucky

1 Location and Size

2 Topography

3 Climate

4 Plants and Animals

5 Environmental Protection

6 Population

7 Ethnic Groups

8 Languages

9 Religions

10 Transportation

11 History

12 State Government

13 Political Parties

14 Local Government

15 Judicial System

16 Migration

17 Economy

18 Income

19 Industry

20 Labor

21 Agriculture

22 Domesticated Animals

23 Fishing

24 Forestry

25 Mining

26 Energy and Power

27 Commerce

28 Public Finance

29 Taxation

30 Health

31 Housing

32 Education

33 Arts

34 Libraries and Museums

35 Communications

36 Press

37 Tourism, Travel & Recreation

38 Sports

39 Famous Kentuckians

40 Bibliography

Commonwealth of Kentucky

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Possibly derived from the Wyandot Indian word Kah-ten-tah-teh (land of tomorrow).

NICKNAME : The Bluegrass State.

CAPITAL: Frankfort.

ENTERED UNION: 1 June 1792 (15th).

OFFICIAL SEAL: In the center are two men exchanging greetings; above and below them is the state motto. On the periphery are two sprigs of goldenrod and the words “Commonwealth of Kentucky.”

FLAG: A simplified version of the state seal on a blue field.

MOTTO: United We Stand, Divided We Fall.

SONG: “My Old Kentucky Home.”

COLORS: Blue and gold.

FLOWER: Goldenrod.

TREE: Tulip poplar.

ANIMAL: Gray squirrel.

BIRD: Cardinal.

FISH: Bass.

INSECT: Viceroy butterfly.

FOSSIL: Brachiopod.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year’s Day, 1 January, plus one extra day; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Washington’s Birthday, 3rd Monday in February; Good Friday, March or April, half-day holiday; Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Veterans’ Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving Day, 4th Thursday in November, plus one extra day; Christmas Day, 25 December, plus one extra day.

TIME: 7 AM EST = noon GMT; 6 AM CST = noon GMT.

1 Location and Size

Located in the eastern south-central United States, the Commonwealth of Kentucky is the smallest of the eight south-central states and ranks 37th in size among the 50 states. The total area of Kentucky is 40,409 square miles (104,659 square kilometers), of which land makes up 39,669 square miles (102,743 square kilometers) and inland water 740 square miles (1,917 square kilometers). The state extends about 350 miles (563 kilometers) east-west and 175 miles (282 kilometers) north-south. Its total boundary length is 1,290 miles (2,076 kilometers). Because of a double bend in the Mississippi River, about 10 square miles (26 square kilometers) of south-west Kentucky is separated from the rest of the state by a narrow strip of Missouri.

2 Topography

The eastern quarter of the state is dominated by the Cumberland Plateau, which is on the western border of the Appalachians. At its western edge, the plateau meets the uplands of the Lexington Plain (known as the Bluegrass region) to the north and the hilly Pennyroyal to the south. These two regions, which together make up nearly half the state’s area, are separated by a narrow curving plain known as the Knobs, because of the shapes of its eroded hills. The most level area of the state consists of the western coalfields bounded by the Pennyroyal to the east and the Ohio River to the north. In the far west are the coastal plains of the Mississippi River, a region commonly known as the Purchase, having been purchased from the Chickasaw Indians.

The highest point in Kentucky is Black Mountain on the southeastern boundary in Harlan County, at 4,139 feet (2,162 meters). The lowest point is 257 feet (78 meters), along the Mississippi River in Fulton County.

The only large lakes in Kentucky are artificial. The biggest is Cumberland Lake, at 79 square miles (205 square kilometers). Kentucky Lake, Lake Barkley, and Dale Hollow Lake straddle the border with Tennessee.

Kentucky claims at least 3,000 miles (4,800 kilometers) of navigable rivers. Among the most important of Kentucky’s rivers are the Kentucky (259 miles/417 kilometers), the Cumberland, the Tennessee, the Big Sandy, Green, Licking, and Tradewater rivers. Completion in 1985 of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, linking the Tennessee and Tombigbee rivers in Alabama,

Kentucky Population Profile

Total population estimate in 2006:4,206,074
Population change, 2000–06:4.1%
Hispanic or Latino†:1.7%
Population by race 
One race:98.9%
White:89.9%
Black or African American:7.2%
American Indian /Alaska Native:0.2%
Asian:0.9%
Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander:0.1%
Some other race:0.7%
Two or more races:1.0%

Population by Age Group

Major Cities by Population
City Population % change 2000–05
Notes: †A person of Hispanic or Latino origin may be of any race. NA indicates that data are not available.
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey and Population Estimates. www.census.gov/ (accessed March 2007).
Louisville/Jefferson556,429NA
Lexington-Fayette268,0802.9
Owensboro55,4592.6
Bowling Green52,2726.0
Covington42,811-1.3
Richmond30,89313.8
Hopkinsville28,821-4.2
Henderson27,6661.1
Frankfort27,210-1.9
Florence26,34911.9

gave Kentucky’s Appalachian coalfields direct water access to the Gulf of Mexico for the first time.

Drainage through porous limestone rock of the Pennyroyal has created underground passages, the best known of which is Mammoth Cave, now a national park. The Cumberland Falls, 92 feet (28 meters) high and 100 feet (30 meters) wide, are located in Whitely County.

3 Climate

Kentucky has a moderate, relatively humid climate, with abundant rainfall. The southern and lowland regions are slightly warmer than the uplands. In Louisville, the normal monthly mean temperature ranges from 33°f (1°c) in January to 76°f (24°c) in July. The record high for the state was 114°f (46°c), set in Greensburg on 28 July in 1930. The record low, -37°f (-40°c), was set in Shelbyville of 19 January 1994. The average daily relative humidity in Louisville ranges from 58% to 81%. The normal annual precipitation is 44.5 inches (113 centimeters). Snowfall totals about 18 inches (46 centimeters) a year.

4 Plants and Animals

Kentucky’s forests are mostly of the oak and hickory variety, with some beech and maple areas. Four species of magnolia are found and the tulip poplar, eastern hemlock, and eastern white pine are also common. Kentucky’s famed bluegrass is actually blue only in May, when dwarf iris and wild columbine are in bloom. Rare plants include the swamp loosestrife and showy gentian. In April 2006, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed eight Kentucky plant species as threatened or endangered, including Braun’s rock-cress, Cumberland sandwort, running buffalo clover, and Short’s goldenrod.

Game mammals include the raccoon, muskrat, and opossum. The eastern chipmunk and flying squirrel are common small mammals. At least 300 bird species have been recorded, including blackbirds, cardinals (the state bird), and robins. More than 100 types of fish have been identified.

Rare animal species include the swamp rabbit, black bear, raven (Corvus corax), and mud darter. In April 2006, there were 31 animal species listed as threatened or endangered, including three species of bat (Indiana, Virginia big-eared, and gray), bald eagle, puma, piping plover,

Kentucky Population by Race

Census 2000 was the first national census in which the instructions to respondents said, “Mark one or more races.” This table shows the number of people who are of one, two, or three or more races. For those claiming two races, the number of people belonging to the various categories is listed. The U.S. government conducts a census of the population every ten years.

 Number Percent
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Census 2000: Redistricting Data. Press release issued by the Redistricting Data Office. Washington, D.C., March, 2001. A dash (—) indicates that the percent is less than 0.1.
Total population4,041,769100.0
One race3,999,32698.9
Two races39,8631.0
White and Black or African American11,0840.3
White and American Indian/Alaska Native12,8420.3
White and Asian4,7280.1
White and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander633
White and some other race6,1660.2
Black or African American and American Indian/Alaska Native1,174
Black or African American and Asian571
Black or African American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander141
Black or African American and some other race1,126
American Indian/Alaska Native and Asian174
American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander30
American Indian/Alaska Native and some other race233
Asian and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander251
Asian and some other race592
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and some other race118
Three or more races2,5800.1

Kentucky cave shrimp, and three species of pearly mussel.

5 Environmental Protection

The National Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet is the primary state agency for the environment. The Environmental Quality Commission, a watchdog group for environmental concerns, is a citizen’s group of seven members appointed by the governor.

The most serious environmental concern in Kentucky is repairing and minimizing damage to land and water from strip-mining.

Also active in environmental matters is the Department of Environmental Protection, consisting of four divisions. The Division of Water administers the state’s Safe Drinking Water and Clean Water acts and regulation of sewage disposal. The Division of Waste Management oversees solid waste disposal systems in the state. The Air Pollution Control Division monitors industrial discharges into the air and other forms of air pollution. A special division is concerned with Maxey Flats, a closed nuclear waste disposal facility in Fleming County, where leakage of radioactive materials was discovered.

Flooding is a chronic problem in southeastern Kentucky, where strip-mining has exacerbated soil erosion.

In 2003, Kentucky had 149 hazardous waste sites, 14 of which were on the National Priorities List, as of 2006.

6 Population

In 2005, Kentucky ranked 26th in population among the 50 states, with an estimated total of 4,206,074 residents. The projected population for 2025 is 4.48 million. The population density in 2004 was 104.7 persons per square mile (40.49 persons per square kilometer). In that same year, the median age was 37.3. In 2005, those 65 years or older accounted for 13% of all residents, while 24% of all residents were 18 years old or younger.

As of 2005, Louisville-Jefferson County had an estimated population of around 556,429 people. Lexington-Fayette had an estimated population of about 268,080. The population of Louisville metropolitan area (includes portions of Kentucky and Indiana) was estimated at 1,200,847.

7 Ethnic Groups

According to the 2000 census, the number of black Americans in Kentucky stood at 295,994 residents, representing 7.3% of the population. In 2006, the percentage of black residents was 7.2%. In 2000, the state’s Asian population was estimated at 29,744, and the Native American population was estimated at 8,616. In that same year, there were also 3,818 Koreans, 6,771 Asian Indians, 3,683 Japanese, 3,596 Vietnamese, and 5,397 Chinese. A total of 59,939 residents (1.5%) were Hispanic or Latino in 2000, with 31,385 reporting Mexican ancestry and 6,469 of Puerto Rican ancestry. In 2006, the Hispanic or Latino population accounted for 1.7% of all Kentucky residents. Pacific Islanders numbered 1,460, in 2000, while there were 80,271 foreign-born residents in that same year (about 2% of the total population). Among persons reporting a single ancestry a total of 391,542 were English, 514,955 were German, 424,133 were Irish, and 66,147 were French.

8 Languages

Speech patterns in the state generally reflect the Virginia and Kentucky backgrounds of the first settlers. South Midland features are best preserved in the mountains, but some common to Midland and Southern are widespread. Other regional features are typically both South Midland and Southern. After a vowel, the /r/ sound may be weak or missing. In southern Kentucky, earthworms are called redworms, a burlap bag is a tow sack, and green beans are called snap beans. Subregional terms appear in abundance. In the east, kindling is pine and a seesaw is a ridyhorse. In central Kentucky, a moth is a candlefly.

In 2000, of all residents five years old and older, 96.1% spoke only English at home. Other languages spoken at home included Spanish, German, Korean, and Chinese.

9 Religions

Throughout its history, Kentucky has been predominantly Protestant. The New Light Baptists immigrated from Virginia to Kentucky under the leadership of Lewis Craig and built the first church in the state near Lancaster in 1781. The first Methodist Church was established near Danville in 1783. In 1784, the Roman Catholics also built a church.

As of 2000, Evangelical Protestantism was predominant with the single largest denomination within the state being the Southern Baptists Convention with 979,994 adherents. The next largest Protestant denomination was the United Methodist Church with 208,720 adherents, but reported only 152,727 members in 2003. In 2000, the Christian Churches and Churches of Christ with 106,638 adherents. The Roman Catholic Church had about 382,042 members in 2004. There were an estimated 11,350 Jews in Kentucky in 2000, and about 4,696 Muslims. Over 1.8 million people (46.6% of the population) were not counted as members of any religious organization in the 2000 survey.

10 Transportation

As of 2003, Kentucky had 2,823 miles (4,545 kilometers) of railroad track, with five Class I railroads operating in the state. Rail service to the state, nearly all of which was freight, was provided by 15 railroads. As of 2006, there were four Amtrak stations in Kentucky.

The trails of Indians and buffalo became the first roads in Kentucky. Throughout the 19th century, counties called on their citizens to maintain some roads although maintenance was haphazard. The best roads were the toll roads. This system came to an end as a result of the “tollgate war” of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a rebellion in which masked Kentuckians, demanding free roads, raided tollgates and assaulted their keepers. In 1912, a state highway commission was created, and by 1920, roads had improved considerably. In 2004, Kentucky had 77,366 miles (124,559 kilometers) of public roads and 2.8 million licensed drivers. In the same year, there were some 1.855 million automobiles, about 1.415 million trucks, and around 2,000 buses registered in the state.

The Ohio River and its tributaries, along with the Mississippi, were Kentucky’s primary commercial routes for trade with the South and the West, until railroads became more popular. Louisville, on the Ohio River, is the chief port. Paducah is the outlet port for traffic on the Tennessee River.

In 2005 there were 149 airports, 58 heliports and 1 STOLport (Short Take-Off and Landing) in Kentucky. The largest of these is Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky International Airport, with 10,864,547 passenger boardings in 2004.

11 History

No Native American nations resided in central and eastern Kentucky when these areas were first explored by British-American surveyors Thomas Walker and Christopher Gist in 1750 and 1751. The dominant Shawnee and Cherokee tribes utilized the region as a hunting ground, returning to homes in the neighboring territories of Ohio and Tennessee. The first permanent colonial settlement in Kentucky was established at Harrodstown (now Harrodsburg) in 1774.

North Carolina speculator Richard Henderson, assisted by famed woodsman Daniel Boone, purchased a huge tract of land in central Kentucky from the Cherokee and established Fort Boonesborough. Henderson sought approval for creation of a 14th colony, but the plan was blocked by Virginians, who in 1776 incorporated the region as the County of Kentucky.

Kentucky became the principal gateway for migration into the Mississippi Valley. By the late 1780s, its settlements were growing, and it was obvious that Kentucky could not long remain

Kentucky Governors: 1792–2007

Democratic Republican - Dem-Rep
National Republican - Nat-Rep
Union Democrat - Union-Dem
1792–1796Isaac ShelbyDem-Rep
1796–1804James GarrardDem-Rep
1804–1808Christopher GreenupRepublican
1808–1812Charles ScottDem-Rep
1812–1816Isaac ShelbyDem-Rep
1816George MadisonDem-Rep
1816–1820Gabriel SlaughterDem-Rep
1820–1824John AdairDem-Rep
1824–1828Joseph DeshaDem-Rep
1828–1832Thomas MetcalfeNat-Rep
1832–1834John BreathittDemocrat
1834–1836James Turner MoreheadDemocrat
1836–1839James ClarkWhig
1839–1840Charles Anderson WickliffeWhig
1840–1844Robert Perkins LetcherWhig
1844–1848William OwsleyWhig
1848–1850John Jordan CrittendenWhig
1850–1851John Larue HelmDemocrat
1851–1855Lazarus Whitehead PowellDemocrat
1855–1859Charles Slaughter MoreheadAmerican
1859–1862Beriah MagoffinDemocrat
1862–1863James Fisher RobinsonDemocrat
1863–1867Thomas E. BramletteUnion-Dem
1867John Larue HelmDemocrat
1867–1871John White StevensonDemocrat
1871–1875Preston Hopkins LeslieDemocrat
1875–1879James Bennett McCrearyDemocrat
1879–1883Luke Pryor BlackburnDemocrat
1883–1887James Procter KnottDemocrat
1887–1891Simon Bolivar BucknerDemocrat
1891–1895John Young BrownDemocrat
1895–1899William O’Connell BradleyRepublican
1899–1900William Sylvester TaylorRepublican
1900William GoebelDemocrat
1900–1907John Crepps Wickliffe BeckhamDemocrat
1907–1911Augustus Everett WillsonRepublican
1911–1915James Bennett McCrearyDemocrat
1915–1919Augustus Owsley StanleyDemocrat
1919James Dixon BlackDemocrat
1919–1923Edwin Porch MorrowRepublican
1923–1927William Jason FieldsDemocrat
1927–1931Flem Davis SampsonRepublican
1831–1835Ruby LaffoonDemocrat
1835–1839Albert Benjamin ChandlerDemocrat
1839–1843Keen JohnsonDemocrat
1943–1947Simeon Slavens WillisRepublican
1947–1950Earle Chester ClementsDemocrat
1950–1955Lawrence Winchester Wetherby Democrat
1955–1959Albert Benjamin ChandlerDemocrat
1959–1963Bertram Thomas CombsDemocrat
1963–1967Edward Thompson BreathittDemocrat
1967–1971Louie Broady NunnRepublican
1971–1974Wendell Hampton FordDemocrat
1974–1979Julian Morton CarrollDemocrat
1979–1983John Young Brown, Jr.Democrat
1983–1987Martha Layne CollinsDemocrat
1987–1991Wallace G. WilkinsonDemocrat
1991–1995Brereton Chandler JonesDemocrat
1995–2003Paul E. PattonDemocrat
2003–Ernie FletcherRepublican

under the control of Virginia. In June 1792, Kentucky entered the Union as the 15th state.

State Development Kentucky became a center for breeding and racing fine thoroughbred horses, an industry that still thrives today. More important was the growing and processing of tobacco, which accounted for half the agricultural income of Kentucky farmers by 1860. Finally, whiskey began to be produced in vast quantities by the 1820s, culminating in the development of a fine, aged amber-red brew known throughout the world as bourbon, after Bourbon County.

During the Civil War, Kentuckians were forced to choose sides between the Union, led in the North by Kentucky native Abraham Lincoln, and the Confederacy, led in the South by Kentucky native Jefferson Davis. Although the state legislature finally opted for the Union side, approximately 30,000 men went south to Confederate service, while up to 100,000—including nearly 24,000 black soldiers—served in the Union army.

In the decades following the war, railroad construction increased threefold and exploitation of timber and coal reserves began in eastern Kentucky. By 1900, Kentucky ranked first among southern states in per capita (per person) income. However, wealth remained very unevenly distributed—a third of all Kentucky farmers were landless tenants. The gubernatorial election scandal of 1899, in which Republican William S. Taylor was charged with fraud and reform-minded Democrat William Goebel was assassinated, polarized the state. Outside investment plummeted, and Kentucky fell into a prolonged economic depression. By 1940, the state ranked last among the 48 states in per capita income and was burdened by an image of poverty and feuding clans. The Great Depression hit the state hard, though an end to Prohibition revived the inactive whiskey industry.

Post-World War II Kentucky has changed greatly since World War II. Between 1945 and 1980, the number of farms decreased by 53%, while the number of manufacturing plants increased from 2,994 to 3,504 between 1967 and 1982. Although Kentucky remains one of the poorest states in the nation, positive change is evident even in relatively isolated rural communities, the result of better roads, education, television, and government programs.

In the early 1990s, public corruption became a major issue in Kentucky politics. In a sting operation code-named Boptrot, legislators were filmed by hidden cameras accepting payments from lobbyists. Fifteen state legislators, lobbyists, and public figures were convicted or charged with bribery, extortion, fraud, and racketeering. An investigation carried out at the same time charged the husband of former Governor Martha Layne Collins, Dr. William Collins, with collecting $1.7 million in bribes while his wife was in office.

In 1990, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled that the state’s public education system was unconstitutional and ordered the state legislature to develop a new system of school administration and funding. The legislature responded with the Kentucky Education Reform Act, which it passed that same year and was implemented over the next five years.

In 2003, Republican Ernie Fletcher was elected governor, and by 2005, had moved to make the state more business-friendly through the creation of a more flexible tax code, improvements in the quality of education, encouraging more healthy lifestyles, and other governmental and administrative reforms.

12 State Government

The state legislature, called the General Assembly, consists of the House of Representatives, which has 100 members elected for 2-year terms, and the Senate with 38 members elected for staggered 4-year terms. Except for revenue-raising measures, which must be introduced in the House of Representatives, either chamber may introduce or amend a bill. Most bills may be passed by majority votes equal to at least two-fifths of the membership of each house. A majority of the members of each house is required to override the governor’s veto. The elected executive officers of Kentucky include the governor and lieutenant governor (elected jointly), secretary of state, attorney general, treasurer, auditor of public accounts, and commissioner of agriculture. All serve 4-year terms and may succeed themselves only once.

Kentucky Presidential Vote by Political Parties, 1948–2004

YEAR KENTUCKY WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN DEMOCRAT PROHIBITION STATES’ RIGHTS PROGRESSIVE SOCIALIST
*Won US presidential election.
1948*Truman (D)466,756341,21010,4111,2451,5671,284
1952Stevenson (D)495,729495,0291,161
1956*Eisenhower (R)476,453572,1922,145
1960Nixon (R)521,855602,607
    STATES’ RIGHTS    
1964*Johnson (D)669,659372,9773,469
    AMERICAN IND.   SOC. WRKRS
1968*Nixon (R)397,541462,411193,0982,843
     AMERICAN PEOPLE’S  
1972*Nixon (R)371,159676,44617,6271,118
1976*Carter (D)615,717531,8522,3288,308
      LIBERTARIAN CITIZENS
1980*Reagan (R)617,417635,2745,5311,304
1984*Reagan (R)539,539821,7021,776599
1988*Bush (R)580,368734,2814,9941,2562,118
    IND. (PEROT)    
1992*Clinton (D)665,104617,178203,9444304,513989
1996*Clinton (D)636,614623,283120,3964,009
    LIBERTARIAN REFORM   
2000*Bush, G. W. (R)638,898872,4922,8964,17323,192
2004*Bush, G. W. (R)712,7331,069,4392,619

As of December 2004, the governor’s salary was $127,146, and most legislators received less than $14,000 per year based upon salaries of $166.34 per day when the legislature is in session.

13 Political Parties

Regional divisions in party affiliation during the Civil War era, based upon sympathy with the South (Democrats) or with the Union (Republicans), have persisted in the state’s voting patterns. In general, in the 21st century, the poorer mountain areas tend to vote Republican, while the more affluent lowlanders in the Bluegrass and Pennyroyal areas tend to vote Democratic.

In 1983, Martha Layne Collins, a Democrat, defeated Republican candidate Jim Bunning to become Kentucky’s first woman governor. In 2004 there were 2,819,000 registered voters. In 1998, the party affiliation of registered voters was 61% Democratic, 32% Republican, and 7% unaffiliated or members of other parties. Republican Ernie Fletcher was elected governor in 2003. Republican George W. Bush defeated Democrat Al Gore 57% to 41% in the 2000 US presidential campaign. Bush also defeated Democrat John Kerry 59.5% to 39.7% in the 2004 presidential election.

Following the 2006 midterm elections, Republicans held 21 seats in the state senate, while Democrats held 16, and 1 was held by an independent. However in the state house, the Democrats continued to dominate, with 61 seats, to the Republicans’ 39. Sixteen women were elected to the state legislature in 2006, or 11.6%. At the national level, Kentucky was represented by Republican senators Mitch McConnell (reelected in 2002) and Jim Bunning (elected in 1998 and reelected in 2004). In the US House of Representatives, there were two Democrats and four Republicans following the 2006 elections.

14 Local Government

The chief governing body of Kentucky’s counties is the fiscal court. Elected officials include magistrates, commissioners, and sheriffs. As of 2005, the state had 120 counties and 424 cities. Cities are assigned by the General Assembly to one of six classes on the basis of population. Kentucky has two first-class cities, Louisville and Lexington. The mayor or other chief executive officer in the top three classes must be elected. In the bottom classes, the executive may be either elected by the people, or appointed by a city council or commission. Other units of local government in Kentucky included 720 special-purpose districts and 176 public school districts in 2005.

15 Judicial System

Judicial power in Kentucky is vested in a unified court of justice. The highest court is the supreme court, consisting of a chief justice and six associate justices. It has appeals jurisdiction and also bears responsibility for the budget and administration of the entire system. The court of appeals consists of 14 judges, 2 elected from each supreme court district.

Circuit courts, with original and appeals jurisdiction, are held in each county. There are 56 judicial circuits. Under the revised judicial system, district courts, which have limited and original jurisdiction, replaced various local and county courts. In 2004, Kentucky had a violent crime (murder/nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault) rate of 244.9 crimes per 100,000 people. As of 31 December 2004, there were 17,814 prisoners in Kentucky’s state and federal prisons. The state has a death penalty, of which the sole method of execution is lethal injection for those sentenced after 31 March 1998. Those inmates sentenced before that date may select electrocution, instead of lethal injection. From 1976 through 5 May 2006, the state had executed only 2 persons. As of 1 January 2006, there were 37 inmates on death row.

16 Migration

During the frontier period, Kentucky first attracted settlers from eastern states, especially Virginia and North Carolina. Prominent among early foreign immigrants were people of English and Scotch-Irish ancestry, who tended to settle in the Kentucky highlands, which resembled their Old World homelands.

Kentucky’s black population increased rapidly during the first 40 years of statehood through slavery. By the 1830s, however, many Kentucky owners either moved to the Deep South or sold their slaves to new owners in that region. During the 1850s, nearly 16% of Kentucky’s slave population, more than 43,000 people, were sold or moved from the state. A tiny percentage of Kentucky’s blacks, probably fewer than 200, emigrated to Liberia under the auspices of the Kentucky Colonization Society.

Until the early 1970s there was a considerable out-migration of whites, especially from eastern Kentucky to industrial areas of Ohio, Indiana, and other nearby states. Between 1990 and 1998, Kentucky had net gains of 90,000 in

domestic migration and 14,000 in international migration. In the period 2000–05, net international migration into the state totaled 27,435 people, while net domestic migration totaled 32,169, for a net gain of 59,604 people.

17 Economy

Although agriculture is still important in Kentucky, manufacturing has grown rapidly since World War II, and was by the mid-1980s, the most important area of the economy as a source of both employment and personal income. Kentucky leads the nation in the production of coal and whiskey, and ranks second in tobacco output. In contrast to the generally prosperous Bluegrass area and the growing industrial cities, eastern Kentucky, highly dependent on coal mining, is one of the poorest regions in the United States.

During the 1990s, declines in the tobacco, textiles, apparel, and coal mining areas were compensated for by job growth in motor vehicle manufacturing, fabricated metals, and appliances. The national recession of 2001 negatively impacted the economy, however, as manufacturing declined. Nonetheless, Kentucky was one of only five states where employment grew more than 1% in 2002.

Kentucky’s gross state product (GSP) in 2004 totaled $136.446 billion, of which manufacturing accounted for the largest portion at 21% of GSP, followed by real estate at 9%, and health care and social services at 7.6% of GSP. Of the 83,046 businesses in the state that had employees, 97% were small companies.

18 Income

In 2004, Kentucky had a per capita (per person) personal income of $27,265, which ranked the state 44th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia, compared to the national average of $33,050. Median household income for the three-year period 2002–04 was $37,396 in Kentucky, compared to the national average of $44,473. For that period, 15.4% of the state’s residents lived below the federal poverty level, compared to 12.4% nationwide.

19 Industry

Manufacturing industries are concentrated in Louisville and Jefferson County, and other cities along the Ohio River. Kentucky is the leading producer of bourbon whiskey, and is one of the largest producers of trucks in the nation, with assembly plants at Louisville, as well as for automobiles at Bowling Green and Georgetown. The shipment value of manufactured products in 2004 was $97.253 billion. Of that total, transportation equipment accounted for the largest share at $34.220 billion, followed by primary metals at $9.178 billion.

In 2004, a total of 246,749 people were employed in Kentucky’s manufacturing sector. Of that total, the transportation equipment manufacturing sector accounted for the largest portion at 50,032, followed by food manufacturing at 22,863.

20 Labor

In April 2006, the seasonally adjusted civilian labor force in Kentucky numbered 2,022,000, with approximately 123,600 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 6.1%, compared to the national average of 4.7% for the same period. According to early data on non-farm employment for that same period, about 4.7% of the labor force was employed in construction; 14.1% in manufacturing; 20.7% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 4.8% in financial activities; 9.4% in professional and business services; 12.9% in educational and health services; 9.2% in leisure and hospitality services; and 17% in government.

Although a small number of trade unions existed in Kentucky before the 1850s, it was not until after the Civil War that substantial unionization took place. During the 1930s, there were long, violent struggles between the United Mine Workers (UMW) and the mine owners of eastern Kentucky. The UMW won bargaining rights in 1938, but after World War II the displacement of workers because of mechanization, a drastic drop in the demand for coal, and evidence of mismanagement and corruption within the UMW served to undercut the union’s position. Increased demand for coal in the 1970s led to a substantial increase in jobs for miners and the UMW, under different leaders, began a new drive to organize the Cumberland Plateau.

In 2005, a total of 164,000 of Kentucky’s 1,696,000 employed wage and salary workers were members of a union. This represented 9.7% of those so employed, under the national average of 12%.

21 Agriculture

With cash receipts totaling $3.9 billion, Kentucky ranked 24th among the 50 states in farm marketings in 2005. Kentucky tobacco, first marketed in New Orleans in 1787, quickly became the state’s most important crop. Corn has long been one of the state’s most important crops, not only for livestock feed, but also as a major ingredient in the distilling of whiskey.

In 2004 there were approximately 85,000 farms in Kentucky, with an average size of 162 acres (66 hectares). In that same year, Kentucky farms produced some 234.5 million pounds (106.36 million kilograms) of tobacco, the second most in the nation. Other leading field crops in 2004 included corn for grain, soybeans, wheat, sorghum, and barley.

22 Domesticated Animals

The Bluegrass region, which offers excellent pasturage and drinking water, has become renowned as a center for horse breeding, including thoroughbreds, quarter horses, American saddle horses, Arabians, and standardbreds. In 2004, sales of horses accounted for 23% of Kentucky’s farm receipts.

In 2005, Kentucky had an estimated 2.25 million cattle and calves worth $1.82 billion. In 2004, Kentucky farmers had an estimated 350,000 hogs and pigs, worth around $27.6 million. Kentucky also produced an estimated 1.46 billion pounds (0.66 billion kilograms) of milk from 116,000 dairy cows in 2003.

23 Fishing

Fishing is of little commercial importance in Kentucky. In 2004, Kentucky had 580,917 fishing license holders. In 2005, there were 60 catfish farms operating within the state. The Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery in Jamestown raises rainbow and brown trout and stocks 90 different areas within the state.

24 Forestry

In 2004 there were 11,391,000 acres (4,828,000 hectares) of forested land in Kentucky, which is 47% of the state’s land area, with over 90% of the forestland classified as commercially viable for timber production.

The most heavily forested areas are in the river valleys of eastern Kentucky, in the Appalachians. In 2004, Kentucky produced 662 million board feet of lumber, nearly all of it in hardwoods. The Division of Forestry of the Department of Natural Resources manages approximately 30,000 acres (12,300 hectares) of state-owned forestland and operates two forest tree nurseries producing 7 to 9 million seedling trees a year.

There are two national forests (the Daniel Boone and the Jefferson on Kentucky’s eastern border) enclosing two national wilderness areas. These two national forests had a combined area of 1,415,744 acres (572,952 hectares) in 2005. Gross acreage of all Kentucky lands in the National Forest System was 2,212,000 acres (895,400 hectares) in 20031. National parks in the state include the Mammoth Cave National Park, and the Cumberland Gap National Historical Park on Kentucky’s eastern border.

25 Mining

The value of nonfuel mineral production in Kentucky in 2003 was estimated at $559 million. Nationally, Kentucky ranked 24th in non-fuel mineral production, by value. According to preliminary figures, in 2003, crushed stone accounted for about 57% of nonfuel mineral production value, followed by lime, cement (portland and masonry), and construction sand and gravel. Nationally, the state ranked third in ball clays and in lime, and tenth in common clay. According to early data for 2003, the state produced 8.8 million metric tons of construction sand and gravel, valued at $35.2 million.

26 Energy and Power

In 2003, Kentucky had 62 electric power service providers. In that same year, total net summer generating capacity was 19.068 million kilowatts, with total production at 91.718 billion kilowatt hours. Of the total amount generated, 91.6% came from coal-fired plants, with hydroelectric power accounting for 4.3% of production and 3.2% from petroleum-fired plants. The remaining production came from generating plants using natural gas, or other renewable energy sources.

Most of Kentucky’s coal came from the western fields of the interior coal basin until late in the 19th century, when the lower-sulfur Cumberland Plateau coal reserves of the Appalachian region were discovered. In 2004, eastern Kentucky produced 90,871,000 tons of coal, while western Kentucky produced 23,373,000 tons. In that same year, Kentucky had 419 active coal mines, of which 196 were surface (strip) mines and 223 were underground. Recoverable coal reserves as of 2004 stood at 1.129 billion tons.

In 2004, Kentucky produced an average of 7,000 barrels per day of crude petroleum. The state’s proven oil reserves in that same year stood at 27 million barrels. Kentucky had 18,075 producing oil wells in 2004. In 2003, Kentucky marketed 87.608 billion cubic feet (2.49 billion cubic meters) of natural gas. As of 31 December 2004, the state had proven reserves of dry or consumer-grade natural gas of 1.880 billion cubic feet (0.157 billion cubic meters).

As of 2005, Kentucky had two operating refineries with a combined crude oil refining capacity of 227,500 barrels per day.

27 Commerce

In 2002, Kentucky’s wholesale trade sector had sales totaling $51.8 billion, while the state’s retail sector had sales totaling $40.06 billion, that same year. Motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers accounted for the largest portion of retail sales in the state in 2002, at $9.5 billion, followed by general merchandise stores at $7.6 billion. Kentucky’s exports to foreign countries in 2005 totaled $14.8 billion.

28 Public Finance

The Kentucky biennial state budget is prepared by the Governor’s Office for Policy and Management late in each odd-numbered year and submitted by the Governor to the General Assembly for approval. The fiscal year runs from July 1 to June 30.

Total revenues in 2004 totaled $20.180 billion, while total expenditures amounted to $20.072 billion. The largest general expenditures were for education ($6.39 billion), public welfare ($5.27 billion), and highways ($1.7 billion). The total state debt at the end of 2004 stood at $8.1 billion, or $1,959.55 per capita (per person).

29 Taxation

As of 1 January 2006, Kentucky’s personal income tax consisted of a six-bracket schedule ranging from 2% to 6%. Corporate income is taxed according to a schedule ranging from 4% to 7%. Kentucky also levies a 6% sales and use tax, that exempts food, if it is eaten off-premises (such as at home). Gasoline and cigarettes are subject to a state excise tax.

State tax collections in Kentucky for 2005 totaled $9.1 billion, of which 33.4% was generated by the state’s personal income tax, followed by 28.5% from the state general sales and use tax, 18.2% by state excise taxes, 5.2% by state property taxes, and 5.3% by the state’s corporate income tax. In 2005, the per capita (per person) tax burden amounted to $2,179 as compared to the national average of $2,192.

In 2003, Kentucky’s overall death rate was 9.8 deaths per 1,000 inhabitants, while the infant mortality rate, as of October 2006, was estimated at 6.6 per 1,000 live births. As of 2002, Kentucky’s death rates for major causes of death (per 100,000 people) were 285.8 from heart diseases, 230.6 from cancer, 62.4 from cerebrovascular diseases, 58.7 from chronic lower respiratory diseases, and 30.9 from diabetes. Of all Kentuckians, 27.4% were smokers in 2004, the highest in the nation. There were 2.4 HIV-related deaths per 100,000 population. In 2004, the reported AIDS case rate was 6.1 per 100,000 people.

Kentucky’s 103 community hospitals had about 14,900 beds in 2003. In 2005, there were 904 nurses per 100,000 people, while in 2004 there were 233 physicians per 100,000 population, and a total of 2,325 dentists throughout the state. The average expense for community hospital care was $1,106 per inpatient day in 2003. In 2004, about 14% of the population was uninsured.

31 Housing

In 2004, Kentucky had 1,842,971 housing units, of which 1,647,464 were occupied. About 70.1% were owner-occupied. About 67% of all units were single-family, detached homes, and 13.9% were mobile homes. Though most units relied on utility gas or electricity for heating, about 11,533 units used coke or coal and 37,785 relied on wood. It was estimated that 109,895 units lacked telephone service, 13,677 lacked complete plumbing facilities, and 9,421 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household size was 2.45 people.

In 2004, a total of 22,600 privately owned units were authorized for construction. The median home value was $98,438. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $888. Renters paid a median of $503 per month.

32 Education

In 2004, a total of 81.8% of all adults in Kentucky had completed high school, which was below the national average of 84%. Also, 21% of all adults had completed four or more years of college, compared to the national average of 26%.

Total public school enrollment was estimated at 650,000 in fall 2003, but is expected to rise to decline to 618,000 by fall 2014. Enrollment in private schools in fall 2003 was 71,067. Expenditures for public education in 2003/2004 were estimated at $5.4 billion.

As of fall 2002, there were 225,489 students enrolled in institutions of higher education. Kentucky had 77 degree-granting institutions, as of fall 2005. Kentucky’s higher education facilities included 8 public and 26 private 4-year colleges and universities, and 26 public 2-year schools. The University of Kentucky, established in 1865 at Lexington, is the state’s largest public institution. The University of Louisville (1798) is also state supported.

33 Arts

The Kentucky Arts Council (est. 1965) is authorized to promote the arts through such programs as Arts in Education and the State Arts Resources Program. Ongoing programs include the Craft Marketing Program, which promotes the state’s craft industry, and the Folklife Program, a partnership with the Kentucky Historical Society.

Kentucky Chautauqua, an ongoing program of the Kentucky Humanities Council, sponsors impersonations of ten historical characters from Kentucky’s past who travel across the state for presentations. The Arts Kentucky is a statewide membership organization for artists, performers, craftspeople, and community arts groups.

The Actors Theater of Louisville holds a yearly festival of new American plays. In 2006, the festival celebrated its 30th anniversary. The Kentucky Center for the Arts in Louisville, dedicated in 1983, serves as home to the Louisville Orchestra (est. 1937), the Louisville Ballet (est. 1952), and the Kentucky Opera. As of 2006, the Louisville Ballet has entertained over 75,000 people, annually, and reached more than 15,000 children each year, through its education programs. Bluegrass, a form of country music performed on fiddle and banjo, and played at a rapid tempo, is named after the style pioneered by Kentuckian Bill Monroe and his Blue Grass Boys.

34 Libraries and Museums

In the year ending in June 2001, there were 116 public library systems in Kentucky, with a total of 189 libraries, of which 73 were branches. In that same year, there were over 7.89 million volumes, and a circulation of 20.8 million. The regional library system included university libraries and the state library at Frankfort, as well as city and county libraries. The Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort also maintains a research library of more than 85,000 volumes.

The state has over 107 museums. The Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort maintains the State History Museum and supports a mobile museum system that brings exhibits on Kentucky history to schools, parks, and local gatherings, and aids over 400 local historical organizations. Art museums include the University of Kentucky Art Museum and the Headley-Whitney Museum, both in Lexington. The Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville opened 21 November 2005.

Among Kentucky’s horse-related museums are the Kentucky Derby Museum in Louisville, and the International Museum of the Horse in Lexington. The John James Audubon Museum is located in Audubon State Park at Henderson. Leading historical sites include Abraham Lincoln’s birthplace at Hodgenville and the Mary Todd Lincoln and Henry Clay homes in Lexington.

35 Communications

In 2004, only 91.4% of all occupied housing units in the state had a telephone. In 2005, Kentucky had 73 major radio stations (15 AM and 58 FM), as well as 29 major television broadcasting stations, with 17 public broadcasting stations. There were 576,850 television households, 65% of which received cable. In 2003, computers were in 58.1% of all households in the state, while 49.6% had access to the Internet.

36 Press

In 2005, Kentucky had 23 daily newspapers (10 morning, 13 evening), and 14 Sunday papers. The leading Kentucky newspapers, with their 2005 daily circulations, were the Louisville Courier-Journal (207,655) and the Lexington Herald-Leader (114,234). Both were morning

and sunday papers. Magazines included Kentucky Living and Kentucky Monthly.

37 Tourism, Travel & Recreation

The economic impact of tourism within the state reached about $10 billion, and supported more than 164,000 travel-related jobs.

One of the state’s top tourist attractions is Mammoth Cave National Park, which contains over 365 miles of explored underground passages. Other units of the national park system in Kentucky include Abraham Lincoln’s birthplace in Hodgenville, and Cumberland Gap National Historical Park, which extends into Tennessee and Virginia. The state operates 17 resort parks (open year-round). The state also operates 24 recreational parks and 22 historic sites. The Kentucky State Fair is held every August at Louisville.

38 Sports

There are no major league professional sports teams in Kentucky. There is a minor league baseball team in Louisville that plays in the AAA International League. There are also two minor league hockey teams in Kentucky that play in the American Hockey League.

The first known horse race in Kentucky was held in 1783. The annual Kentucky Derby, first run on 17 May 1875, has become the single most famous event in US thoroughbred racing. Held on the first Saturday in May at Churchill Downs in Louisville, the Derby is one of three races for three-year-olds constituting the Triple Crown. Keeneland Race Course in Lexington is the site of the Blue Grass Stakes and other major thoroughbred races. The Kentucky Futurity, an annual highlight of the harness racing season, is usually held on the first Friday in October at the Red Mile in Lexington.

Rivaling horse racing as a spectator sport is collegiate basketball. The University of Kentucky Wildcats, who play in the Southeastern Conference, have won the NCAA Division I basketball championships six times, and the National Invitation Tournament twice. The University of Louisville Cardinals play in Conference USA. Kentucky Wesleyan, at Owensboro, was the NCAA Division II titleholder seven times, including 1999 and 2001.

39 Famous Kentuckians

Kentucky has been the birthplace of one US president, four US vice-presidents, the only president of the Confederacy, and several important jurists, statesmen, writers, artists, and sports figures. Abraham Lincoln, (1809–1865) the 16th president of the United States, was born in Hodgenville. His wife, Mary Todd Lincoln (1818–1882), was a native of Lexington. Kentucky-born US vice-presidents have all been Democrats. The best known were Adlai Stevenson (1835–1914), who served with Grover Cleveland, and Alben W. Barkley (1877–1956) who, before his election with President Harry S Truman in 1948, was a US senator and longtime Senate majority leader.

Frederick M. Vinson (1890–1953) was the only Kentuckian to serve as chief justice of the United States. Noteworthy associate justices were John Marshall Harlan (1833–1911), famous for his dissent from the segregationist Plessy v. Ferguson decision (1896); and Louis B. Brandeis (1856–1941), the first Jew to serve on the Supreme Court and a champion of social reform.

A figure prominently associated with frontier Kentucky is the explorer and surveyor Daniel Boone (b.Pensylvania, 1734–1820). Other frontiersmen include Kit Carson (1809–1868) and Roy Bean (1825?–1903).

Other personalities of significance include James G. Birney (1792–1857) and Cassius Marcellus Clay (1810–1903), both major antislavery

spokesmen. Clay’s daughter, Laura (1849–1941), and Madeline Breckinridge (1872–1920) were important contributors to the women’s suffrage movement. Carry Nation (1846–1911) was a leader of the temperance movement. During the 1920s, Kentuckian John T. Scopes (1900–1970) gained fame as the defendant in the “monkey trial” in Dayton, Tennessee. Scopes was charged with teaching Darwin’s theory of evolution.

Thomas Hunt Morgan (1866–1945), honored for his work in heredity and genetics, and chemist William N. Lipscomb (b.Ohio, 1919) were Nobel Prize winners. Notable businessmen include “Colonel” Harland Sanders (b.Indiana, 1890–1980), founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurants. Robert Penn Warren (1905–1989), a novelist, poet laureate, and critic, won the Pulitzer Prize three times and was the first author to win the award in both the fiction and poetry categories.

Among Kentuckians well recognized in the performing arts are film innovator D. W. Griffith (David Lewelyn Wark Griffith, 1875–1948); Academy Award-winning actress Patricia Neal (b.1926); and country music singers Loretta Lynn (b.1932) and her sister, Crystal Gayle (Brenda Gail Webb, b.1951). Kentucky’s sports figures include basketball coach Adolph Rupp (b.Kansas, 1901–1977); shortstop Harold (“Pee Wee”) Reese (1919–1999); football great Paul Hornung (b.1935); and world heavyweight boxing champions Jimmy Ellis (b.1940) and Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay, b.1942).

40 Bibliography

BOOKS

Bristow, M. J. State Songs of America. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2000.

Deady, Kathleen W. Kentucky Facts and Symbols. Rev. ed. Mankato, MN: Capstone, 2003.

Lantier, Patricia. Kentucky. Milwaukee, WI: Gareth Stevens, 2006.

Murray, Julie. Kentucky. Edina, MN: Abdo Publishing, 2006.

Williams, Suzanne M. Kentucky. New York: Children’s Press, 2001.

WEB SITES

Commonwealth of Kentucky. Kentucky.gov www.kentucky.gov (accessed March 1, 2007).

Official Kentucky Department of Travel. Kentucky: Unbridled Spirit. www.kytourism.com (accessed March 1, 2007).

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Kentucky

Kentucky

Kentucky entered the Union on June 1, 1792, as the fifteenth state. It is located in the eastern south central region of the United States and ranks thirty-seventh in size of the fifty states. Kentucky, known as the Bluegrass State, is surrounded by Tennessee , Missouri , Illinois , Indiana , Ohio , West Virginia , and Virginia .

Unlike most other states, Kentucky was not home to any Native Americans when white explorers first visited it in 1750. The Shawnee and Cherokee hunted on Kentucky land, but they lived in Ohio and Tennessee. The first colonial settlement was Harrods town (now Harrodsburg) in 1774.

A land speculator from North Carolina purchased land in central Kentucky and tried to create a fourteenth colony there. Virginians blocked the proposal, and in 1776, they incorporated the region as the County of Kentucky.

Kentucky was the main gateway for migration into the Mississippi Valley. By the late 1780s, its settlements were growing, and Virginia soon realized it could not retain control of the area.

By 1860, half of all Kentucky's agricultural income was from tobacco . Kentucky was unique during the American Civil War (1861–65) because it sent men to fight on both sides of the war. Perhaps more so than in any other state, Kentucky residents felt divided. In the North, Kentucky-born Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865; served 1861–65) was president of the United States. In the South, Kentucky native Jefferson Davis (1808–1889) was president of the Confederate States of America . Kentucky sent around one hundred thousand soldiers to serve in the Union army, while around thirty thousand fought for the Confederacy. After the war, railroad construction increased and led to the development of timber and coal industries in the eastern part of the state.

In 2006, Kentucky was home to more than four million people, 89.9 percent of them white. Frankfort is the capital city, but it ranks next-to-last in size of all the state's major cities. Louisville is the largest, with more than 550,000 residents. Kentucky is a mountainous state, its highest point being Black Mountain at 4,139 feet (1,262 meters). The Appalachian Mountains run through Kentucky.

As was true during the Civil War, Kentuckians remain divided in their loyalties to political parties. In the twenty-first century, poorer mountain areas tend to vote Republican, while the wealthier lowlanders usually vote Democratic.

Kentucky's economy was once agricultural, but manufacturing took over and continues to bring in the most money. Kentucky leads the United States in the production of coal and whiskey and ranks second in tobacco production. It is also one of the biggest producers of trucks and automobiles.

Kentucky is known for its fine thoroughbred racehorses, and it hosts the Kentucky Derby on the first Saturday in May every year, a tradition since 1875. It is the most famous event in thoroughbred horseracing in the world.

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Kentucky

KENTUCKY

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Kentucky

Kentucky

United we stand, divided we fall.

At a Glance

Name: Kentucky is from the Iroquois word Ken-tah-ten, which means "land of tomorrow."

Nickname: Bluegrass State

Capital: Frankfort

Size: 40,411 sq. mi. (104,665 sq km)

Population: 4,041,769

Statehood: Kentucky became the 15th state on June 1, 1792.

Electoral votes: 8 (2004)

U.S. Representatives: 6 (until 2003)

State tree: tulip poplar

State flower: goldenrod

State animal: gray squirrel

Highest point: Black Mountain, 4,145 ft. (1,263 m)

The Place

Kentucky is located in the south central United States and is bordered by seven states: Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, Missouri, and Illinois. The Mississippi River forms Kentucky's western border, and the state's eastern border lies in the Appalachian Mountains.

The eastern part of the state is mountainous and forested and has several large coal deposits. The Bluegrass Region, in the north central part of the state, is an area of gently rolling hills covered by the grass that gives the region its name. Some tobacco and corn is grown there. Most of Kentucky's famous thoroughbred horse farms are located in this region.

About two-thirds of the state's coal reserves are located in the northwestern region. To the south are the Mississippi floodplain and more gently rolling farmlands, as well as some of the longest cave systems in the world.

Forests cover about half of Kentucky. The state's climate is warm and rainy, with humid summers and cool winters. Most snow falls in the southern half of the state.

The Past

When British, French, and American explorers arrived in the Kentucky area in the 1600s and 1700s, they found many different Native American tribes living there. In 1774, James Harrod led a group of settlers from Pennsylvania into Kentucky and established the first permanent white settlement, Harrodsburg. The Native Americans, including Cherokee, Delaware, Iroquois, and Shawnee, were not willing to give up their land to the settlers without a fight. They waged war against the newcomers. Pioneers, including the legendary Daniel Boone, defended the settlers from the Native Americans.

Kentucky: Facts and Firsts

  1. Bluegrass is not really blue—it is green. In the spring, bluegrass produces bluish-purple buds. When a large number of these buds grow close together in a field, they give a blue cast to the grass.
  2. Middlesboro is the only city in the United States built inside a meteor crater.
  3. The Kentucky Derby, first run in 1875, is the oldest continuously held horse race in the United States. Each May, thousands of spectators come to the Churchill Downs racetrack in Louisville for the "run for the roses"—the blanket of roses presented to the winning horse and jockey.
  4. In 1887, Kentucky schoolteacher Mary Towles Sasseen Wilson held the first observance of Mother's Day. Mother's Day received national recognition in 1914. On May 9 of that year, President Woodrow Wilson signed a resolution that recommended Congress and the executive branch of the federal government observe Mother's Day. The next year, Wilson proclaimed Mother's Day an annual national observance.
  5. In 1893, two Louisville sisters, Mildred Hill and Patty Hill, created the song that became "Happy Birthday to You."
  6. The largest amount of gold in the world, more than $6 billion in the form of gold bullion, is stored underground at Fort Knox.

Kentucky became a U.S. territory and later, in 1792, a state. After Kentucky became a state, its population increased and more areas of farmland were opened to settlement. Farmers grew hemp and tobacco, as well as corn, rye, and other grains used to manufacture alcoholic beverages. Horse breeders began to move into the Bluegrass Region for its rich soil and grass.

Slavery was central to the state's agricultural economy. The abolition of slavery after the Civil War hurt Kentucky's horse breeding and tobacco industries; the state's growth and economic progress slowed. Agriculture in Kentucky suffered again during the Great Depression of the 1930s, when residents began to move from farms to the cities in search of work.

Kentucky: State Smart

Mammoth Cave, which stretches for more than 300 miles (483 km), is the world's longest known system of caves and underground passages.

The demand for food and war materials during World War II helped Kentucky restore its economy. After the war, manufacturing grew, and Kentucky began to shift from an agricultural to an industrial economy. During the 1960s, coal mining expanded greatly, and the construction of new highways increased tourism throughout the state.

The Present

Kentucky has long been known for its tobacco, racehorses, and whiskey. Today, Kentucky produces more burley tobacco and bourbon whiskey than any other state.

Huge deposits of coal and other mineral resources have made the state an important mining center. Manufacturing, too, has made Kentucky into an urban, industrial state. Automobiles and automobile parts are now the most valuable of Kentucky's manufactured goods. Other goods manufactured there include aircraft parts, pharmaceutical products, paints, industrial cleaners, elevators, typewriters, and printers.

Tourist attractions such as Cumberland Falls, Mammoth Cave, and Land Between the Lakes make Kentucky a popular vacation spot. The Kentucky Derby also attracts tourists from all over the world.

Born in Kentucky

  1. Muhammad Ali , boxer
  2. Louis D. Brandeis , jurist
  3. Christopher "Kit" Carson , scout
  4. George Clooney , actor
  5. Rosemary Clooney , singer
  6. Jefferson Davis , president of the Confederacy
  7. Johnny Depp , actor
  8. Naomi Judd and Wynonna Judd , singers
  9. Abraham Lincoln , U.S. president
  10. Diane Sawyer , broadcast journalist
  11. Robert Penn Warren , novelist

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Kentucky

Kentucky

More than any other crop, tobacco has been a central part of Kentucky culture since the late 1700s. Because of the rich soil in the central and western regions of the state, tobacco is well suited for Kentucky and was probably first harvested by the Shawnees. European settlers in Kentucky began growing tobacco as early as the mid-1700s, and the first tobacco warehouse in the area was established in 1788 when Virginia authorized warehouse inspectors to examine the tobacco's quality. Throughout the early 1800s, tobacco production increased steadily, and by the eve of the Civil War, Kentucky surpassed Virginia in tobacco production. Until the early 1900s, Kentucky led the nation in tobacco production.

The western part of the state, known as the Black Patch, became one of the world's foremost producers of dark tobacco, used primarily in snuff, chewing tobacco, and cigars. This variety was often cured in a barn with an open fire and therefore was called fire- or flue-cured tobacco. After the Civil War a lighter blend was introduced in Bracken County in the Bluegrass Region and was cured in the open air. This milder Burley tobacco became the prime ingredient in cigarettes, which became a popular product by the 1890s.

With the spectacular growth of the American Tobacco Company (ATC), whose dominance of the industry was unrivaled by the early 1900s, tobacco growers found that the prices they received from the company's buyers were often below even the cost of production. From 1874 to 1894, Kentucky tobacco prices fell 52 percent, and farmers waged an insurgency that became known as the Black Patch War, which lasted from 1904 to 1909. In the central region, growers in 1908 staged the only successful large-scale agricultural strike in American history. The growers refused to plant a crop of Burley tobacco, thereby diminishing its supply, forcing the ATC to relent and give in to all of the growers' demands. But by 1909 the producers of Burley tobacco still had only one major buyer for their crop, and their economic straits worsened.

With the end of the hostilities against the ATC, the tobacco industry in Kentucky evolved further. Marketing underwent various changes until the 1920s, when the loose-leaf system gained prominence. Under this system, growers brought their leaf to warehouses, where buyers competed for the crop. World War I was crucial in making cigarettes a common part of American culture, and during the war prices soared. Yet when markets opened in 1920, the price fell in central Kentucky from 35 cents per pound to just 3 cents. In Lexington, angry growers drew their guns, threatening another war against the tobacco industry. Throughout the 1920s, while Kentucky remained a major producer of tobacco, its farmers continued to receive drastically lower prices. With the inclusion of tobacco as a core commodity in the Agricultural Adjustment Act in 1933, tobacco prices were guaranteed by the federal government.

Since the early 1900s, there has been a steady shrinkage of small, family-owned tobacco farms in Kentucky. What had once been a labor-intensive crop was made easier by the invention of mechanical devices such as pickers and other machines. The cost of producing tobacco has increased and, consequently, while the number of farmers has decreased, the size of the average tobacco farm in Kentucky has increased. Despite all of these changes, tobacco remains labor intensive and promises little in the way of income. Future price support remains doubtful, causing additional worry to growers.

The role of tobacco consumption in Kentucky is also somewhat remarkable. Tobacco use has long been a core component of Kentucky culture, especially in rural areas, and Kentucky has always been one of the leading states in per capita cigarette consumption. In 1995 Kentucky had the highest per capita smoking rates in the nation at 27.8 percent. By 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention placed that figure at 30.5 percent and concluded that 7,791 Kentuckians died that year from smoking-related illnesses. Also, an estimated 15 percent of the state's Medicaid funds were used to treat tobacco-related diseases. By 2003 Kentucky continued to lead the nation in per capita smoking, and debates raged about the public health consequences for the state's citizens.

The Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933

T his New Deal law was one of many passed during President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's administration to assist the American farmer. It was intended to compel farmers to reduce their production of agricultural products, thus driving up prices. While involvement in the program was voluntary, the economic reality of the Great Depression practically necessitated participation. In addition to paying farmers for allowing their acreage to lay fallow and raising fewer animals, the government promised participants a minimum price for the goods they did produce and protected them from creditors by providing generous loans.

While smoking bans were contemplated, the state maintained the second-lowest cigarette tax in the nation at 3 cents per pack, a level that was still holding in 2004. A century earlier, tobacco brought millions to the state in income, but by 2000, with ever-diminishing prices, fewer farmers, and declining national smoking rates, the crop was becoming an economic drain on an already impoverished state.

See Also American Tobacco Company; Black Patch War; Consumption (Demographics); United States Agriculture.

▌ TRACY CAMPBELL

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Axton, William F. Tobacco and Kentucky. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1975.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Smoking and Health. "Tobacco Information and Prevention Source." Atlanta, Ga.: Centers for Disease Control, 2004.

snuff a form of powdered tobacco, usually flavored, either sniffed into the nose or "dipped," packed between cheek and gum. Snuff was popular in the eighteenth century but had faded to obscurity by the twentieth century.

flue-cured tobacco also called Bright Leaf, a variety of leaf tobacco dried (or cured) in air-tight barns using artificial heat, distributed through a network of pipes, or flues, near the barn floor.

Medicaid a public health program in the United States through which certain medical expenses of low-income persons are paid from state and federal funds.

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Kentucky

KENTUCKY

A forty-thousand-square-mile region of grassland and forest bounded by the Appalachian Mountains and the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, Kentucky derives its name from Iroquois and Shawnee words for "grassland" and "dark and bloody ground." While the area had few permanent Native American settlements during the era of European colonization, it was a favorite Shawnee and Cherokee hunting preserve and the junction of several major Indian paths.

In 1750 Virginia explorers led by Thomas Walker discovered the Cumberland Gap, which allowed regular overland travel from Virginia to central Kentucky. Surveyors and hunters from Pennsylvania and Virginia, including Daniel Boone (c. 1734–1820), followed Walker's party in the 1760s and 1770s, despite a royal proclamation of 1763 forbidding white settlement west of the Appalachians. These adventurers' reports encouraged Virginia speculators to claim and sell Kentucky lands and white farmers to establish permanent settlements there, beginning with Harrodsburg in 1774.

The Ohio Valley Indians resisted the intruders, and skirmishes between warriors and settlers led to Dunmore's War (1774), whereby Virginia laid claim to the Kentucky region. During the Revolutionary War the Shawnees and other British-allied Woodland Indian warriors ambushed white travelers, plundered flatboats, and besieged frontier outposts in Kentucky. The Indian confederates renewed their guerrilla war in the 1780s and maintained it until 1794 in an effort to bar white farmers from the Ohio Valley. White Kentuckians built blockhouses, organized punitive raids, and in 1779 captured the British post of Vincennes, but ultimately they could not secure their settlements without outside assistance. They finally received it in the 1790s, when the U.S. Army broke the Northwest Indians' confederacy at the Battle of Fallen Timbers on 20 August 1794.

Migration from the eastern states to Kentucky continued in spite of the war, encouraged by a liberal Virginia land law of 1779 that opened Kentucky lands to white settlement and allowed old settlers to buy land at a discount. Kentucky's non-Indian population increased over 900 percent in the 1780s, and with the end of Indian warfare and Spain's opening of the Mississippi River to American shipping in the 1790s, immigration surged. In 1790 the total population of Kentucky was 73,677 and its slave population was 12,430. These figures grew to 220,955 and 40,343 in 1800; 406,511 and 80,561 in 1810; 564,317 and 126,732 in 1820; and 687,917 and 165,213 in 1830.

Kentucky's economy concurrently changed from a subsistence culture to a commercial one. Farmers in the Bluegrass raised wheat, tobacco, hemp, cattle, and horses for export to the Lower South and New Orleans. The villages of Lexington and Louisville had grown into booming cities by 1830. Businessmen financed ropewalks, sawmills, and gristmills and opened dozens of private banks. In fact, Kentucky chartered one-third of the approximately four hundred American banks that opened between 1815 and 1820.

Economic growth had some adverse social costs. Many planters increased their profits by employing African American slaves, particularly on the state's hemp and tobacco plantations. Hard work, harsh punishments, and unstable family life were norms for Kentucky slaves, though opportunities for escape were greater than in other southern states because of the North's proximity. The spread of the institution of slavery, the growth of a cash and credit economy, and frequent litigation stemming from inaccurate land surveys concentrated wealth in the hands of planters, merchants, and lawyers. Thousands of less successful families, like that of Thomas and Nancy Lincoln, the parents of the future president, left Kentucky after 1800 in search of better opportunities.

Educational opportunities were limited in early national-era Kentucky, and private academies remained the sole source of schooling until the 1830s. Religious institutions, however, experienced explosive growth during a series of Protestant revivals that produced tens of thousands of converts. The Cane Ridge Revival of 1801 drew over twenty thousand attendees, and membership in Baptist and Methodist churches tripled within a few years. The Presbyterians and Disciples of Christ also used revivals to increase their membership. Kentucky Evangelicals later took the lead in establishing the state's first temperance society in 1830 and transforming Transylvania University into an eminent institution of higher learning.

Kentuckians' political outlook remained localist and populist throughout the period. Kentucky settlers denounced the never-consummated Jay-Gardoqui Treaty of 1785–1786, opposed the federal Constitution of 1787, and refused to pay the Federalists' whiskey excise of 1791. Kentucky's admission to the Union as the fifteenth state in 1792 did not improve its relationship with the federal government, and in 1798 the legislature threatened to nullify the Alien and Sedition Acts as unconstitutional. In national elections Kentuckians voted for the Democratic Republican Party, then in the 1820s, when that party splintered into factions, supported the presidential candidacy of Henry Clay (1777–1852). Clay, a native Virginian and lawyer, moved to Lexington in 1797 and successively served in the Kentucky General Assembly, the U.S. Senate, and the U.S. House of Representatives. He became Speaker of the House in 1811, and later served on the commission which negotiated the Treaty of Ghent and crafted the legislation that resolved the Missouri Controversy. Clay's reputation suffered, however, after he helped engineer the election of President John Quincy Adams in 1824 and became Adams's Secretary of State. Meanwhile, a state controversy over banking, debtor relief, and judicial reform from 1823 to 1825 led many Kentuckians to transfer their political allegiance to Andrew Jackson in 1828.

See alsoAlien and Sedition Acts; American Indians: American Indian Resistance to White Expansion; Fallen Timbers, Battle of; Frontier; Frontier Religion; Northwest and Southwest Ordinances; Revivals and Revivalism; Ohio .

bibliography

Aron, Stephen. How the West Was Lost: The Transformation of Kentucky from Daniel Boone to Henry Clay. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.

Friend, Craig Thompson. The Buzzel about Kentuck: Settling the Promised Land. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1999.

Hammon, Neal, and Richard Taylor. Virginia's Western War, 1775–1786. Mechanicsburg, Pa.: Stackpole, 2002.

Rohrbough, Malcolm J. The Trans-Appalachian Frontier: People, Societies, and Institutions, 1775–1850. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978. Reprint, Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth, 1990.

David A. Nichols

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Kentucky

Kentucky

ALICE LLOYD COLLEGE G-15
ASBURY COLLEGE E-10
ASHLAND COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE C-15
BECKFIELD COLLEGE A-10
BELLARMINE UNIVERSITY D-7
BEREA COLLEGE G-11
BIG SANDY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE F-15
BOWLING GREEN TECHNICAL COLLEGE I-5
BRESCIA UNIVERSITY F-3
BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE, HOPKINSVILLE CAMPUS I-2
BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE, LOUISVILLE CAMPUS D-7
BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE, NORTHERN KENTUCKY CAMPUS K-10
CAMPBELLSVILLE UNIVERSITY G-8
CENTRAL KENTUCKY TECHNICAL COLLEGE E-10
CENTRE COLLEGE F-9
CLEAR CREEK BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE I-12
DAYMAR COLLEGE (LOUISVILLE) D-7
DAYMAR COLLEGE (OWENSBORO) F-3
DRAUGHONS JUNIOR COLLEGE I-5
EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY F-11
ELIZABETHTOWN COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE F-6
ELIZABETHTOWN TECHNICAL COLLEGE F-6
GATEWAY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE A-10
GEORGETOWN COLLEGE D-10
HAZARD COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE H-14
HENDERSON COMMUNITY COLLEGE F-1
HOPKINSVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE I-2
ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE D-7
JEFFERSON COMMUNITY COLLEGE D-7
JEFFERSON TECHNICAL COLLEGE D-7
KENTUCKY CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY D-14
KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN BIBLE COLLEGE F-8
KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY D-9
KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE F-3
LEXINGTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE E-10
LINDSEY WILSON COLLEGE H-8
LOUISVILLE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE D-7
MADISONVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE G-2
MAYSVILLE COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE C-12
MID-CONTINENT UNIVERSITY L-15
MIDWAY COLLEGE D-10
MOREHEAD STATE UNIVERSITY D-13
MURRAY STATE UNIVERSITY M-16
NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (DANVILLE) F-9
NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (FLORENCE) A-10
NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (LEXINGTON) E-10
NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (LOUISVILLE) D-7
NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (PIKEVILLE) G-16
NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (RICHMOND) F-11
NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY A-10
OWENSBORO COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE F-3
PADUCAH TECHNICAL COLLEGE K-15
PIKEVILLE COLLEGE G-16
ROWAN TECHNICAL COLLEGE D-13
ST. CATHARINE COLLEGE F-8
SOMERSET COMMUNITY COLLEGE H-10
SOUTHEAST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE I-14
SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY D-7
SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS A-10
SPALDING UNIVERSITY D-7
SPENCERIAN COLLEGE D-7
SPENCERIAN COLLEGE-LEXINGTON E-10
SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY D-7
THOMAS MORE COLLEGE L-9
TRANSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY E-10
UNION COLLEGE I-12
UNIVERSITY OF THE CUMBERLANDS J-11
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY E-10
UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE D-7
WEST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE K-15
WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY I-5

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Kentucky

Kentucky

ALICE LLOYD COLLEGE
ASBURY COLLEGE
ASHLAND COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
BECKFIELD COLLEGE
BELLARMINE UNIVERSITY
BEREA COLLEGE
BIG SANDY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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BRESCIA UNIVERSITY
BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE, HOPKINSVILLE CAMPUS
BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE, LOUISVILLE CAMPUS
BROWN MACKIE COLLEGE, NORTHERN KENTUCKY CAMPUS
CAMPBELLSVILLE UNIVERSITY
CENTRAL KENTUCKY TECHNICAL COLLEGE
CENTRE COLLEGE
CLEAR CREEK BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE
DAYMAR COLLEGE (LOUISVILLE)
DAYMAR COLLEGE (OWENSBORO)
DRAUGHONS JUNIOR COLLEGE
EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY
ELIZABETHTOWN COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
ELIZABETHTOWN TECHNICAL COLLEGE
GATEWAY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN BIBLE COLLEGE
KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY
KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE
LEXINGTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE
LINDSEY WILSON COLLEGE
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NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (PIKEVILLE)
NATIONAL COLLEGE OF BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY (RICHMOND)
NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY
OWENSBORO COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
PADUCAH TECHNICAL COLLEGE
PIKEVILLE COLLEGE
ROWAN TECHNICAL COLLEGE
ST. CATHARINE COLLEGE
SOMERSET COMMUNITY COLLEGE
SOUTHEAST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS
SPALDING UNIVERSITY
SPENCERIAN COLLEGE
SPENCERIAN COLLEGE-LEXINGTON
SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
THOMAS MORE COLLEGE
TRANSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY
UNION COLLEGE
UNIVERSITY OF THE CUMBERLANDS
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE
WEST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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Kentucky

KENTUCKY

ALICE LLOYD COLLEGE
ASBURY COLLEGE
ASHLAND COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
BECKFIELD COLLEGE
BELLARMINE UNIVERSITY
BEREA COLLEGE
BIG SANDY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
BRESCIA UNIVERSITY
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CAMPBELLSVILLE UNIVERSITY
CENTRE COLLEGE
CLEAR CREEK BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE
DAYMAR COLLEGE (LOUISVILLE)
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EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY
ELIZABETHTOWN COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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HAZARD COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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HOPKINSVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE
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KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN BIBLE COLLEGE
KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY
KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE
LEXINGTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE
LINDSEY WILSON COLLEGE
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MADISONVILLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE
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MIDWAY COLLEGE
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MURRAY STATE UNIVERSITY
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OWENSBORO COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
PADUCAH TECHNICAL COLLEGE
PIKEVILLE COLLEGE
ST. CATHARINE COLLEGE
SOMERSET COMMUNITY COLLEGE
SOUTHEAST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS
SPALDING UNIVERSITY
SPENCERIAN COLLEGE
SPENCERIAN COLLEGE-LEXINGTON
SULLIVAN UNIVERSITY
THOMAS MORE COLLEGE
TRANSYLVANIA UNIVERSITY
UNION COLLEGE
UNIVERSITY OF THE CUMBERLANDS
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE
WEST KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE
WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

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Kentucky

Kentucky

Blue Licks Battlefield
Boonesborough
Cumberland Gap National Historical Park
Fort Jefferson
Harrodsburg Site
Louisville
Shelby (Isaac) Grave
William Whitley House

During the colonial era the British attempted to limit westward settlement to the headwaters of rivers flowing into the Atlantic (the Proclamation Line of 1763), but with no success. Only the perils of the wilderness and the actual inahbitants of the region, the Indians, kept the whites from moving west even faster. Five Indian nations had settlements within the region that is now Kentucky: the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Mosopelea, Yuchi, and especially the Shawnee. However, the center of each of these nations lay outside of this contested region. The first permanent white settlement was established at Harrodsburg in 1775, followed the next year by Boonesborough and St. Aspah (Logan's Fort).

The American Revolution in Kentucky was the struggle of these and later settlements to survive the sporadic efforts of British-supported Indian and Loyalist raiders. The colonists' victory at Point Pleasant (now in West Virginia) in 1774 permitted the first real surge of settlement. British-supported raids in 1778 wiped out all but three strong-points (those mentioned above); then the victories of George Rogers Clark in the Old Northwest in 1778 to 1779 prompted a new wave of immigration, mainly along Boone's Wilderness Trail from Cumberland Gap, but some down the Ohio from Fort Pitt.

In 1776 Virginia formed Kentucky County to encompass virtually all the present state of Kentucky. But the Old Dominion had too many troubles east of the mountains to give the Kentuckians much military support or an adequate system of local government. On the other hand, the frontier settlements in Kentucky, which may mean "dark and bloody ground," did not have the large number of skirmishes that occurred during the Revolution in New York, Pennsylvania, and the southern colonies. Hence there are fewer historic sites of the Revolution in Kentucky than one might suspect. Most of these are now state parks or "shrines" and are identified below.

The Kentucky Historical Highway Marker Program, which includes more than 1,750 markers of various historical topics, is administered by the Kentucky Historical Society. It sells a guide to these markers, Roadside History: A Guide to Kentucky Highway Markers (2002). The book is available through the University Press of Kentucky and can be ordered online or by calling (800) 839-6855. The Kentucky Historical Society publishes a number of other books as well, some of which pertain to the state's colonial history. The Society is located at 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, Ky., 40601. Phone: (502) 564-1792.

Tourist literature is available from the Kentucky Department of Tourism at the following address: Capitol Plaza Tower, 22nd floor, 500 Mero Street, Frankfort, Ky. 40601. Website: www.kentuckytourism.com; phone: (502) 564-4930. The Department of Tourism has several brochures and maps obtainable online or by calling the agency directly.

Blue Licks Battlefield

Blue Licks Battlefield, U.S. 68 at crossing of Licking River, near village of Blue Lick Springs, Nicholas County. Often and incorrectly called the last battle of the Revolution, this was a victory of the ferocious Simon Girty over a bunch of foolish frontiersmen on 19 August 1782. A party of Loyalist and Indian raiders threatened Wheeling, West Virginia, in July and then tried, unsuccessfully, to surprise Bryan's Station, just north of modern Lexington. Three days later, 18 August, they started withdrawing slowly to the northeast. Frontiersmen including Daniel Boone and Benjamin Logan started converging on Bryan's Station a few hours after the enemy left the vicinity, and the next morning about 180 of them caught up with Girty's force. Daniel Boone and others advocated waiting until Logan closed up with a large force, but hotter heads prevailed. Simon Girty was waiting with superior numbers (about 250 men) when the Kentuckians made a disorganized charge through the deep ford on a fork of the Licking River.

The tactical lesson ended in a few minutes; then the slaughter began. The Patriots lost about seventy killed and captured, and Daniel Boone's son Israel was among the dead.

Most of the battlefield is included in the 150-acre Blue Licks Battlefield State Park. It is in an attractive section of the state well worth visiting just to enjoy the scenery. But the state park is exceptionally well developed, with landmarks of the battle marked and an interpretive museum that includes a small relief model of the field. Recreational facilities (campsites, picnic areas, playground, and a community pool) are open in season; the museum, souvenir shop, and battlefield are open year-round. Phone: (800) 443-7008.

Boonesborough

Boonesborough, 9 miles north of Richmond, Exit 95 off Interstate 75 on Ky. Route 627, Madison County. Daniel Boone explored extensively in 1769 to 1771 through Cumberland Gap into the center of what is now the state of Kentucky. He returned in 1775 as an agent of the Transylvania Company, led his thirty axmen to this spot, and started construction of a fort. When completed in July 1776, at which time Indian hostilities were on the upswing, Boone's fort had four blockhouses and a palisade. Settlers arrived before the fort was completed, using the Wilderness Road through Cumberland Gap that Boone's axmen had opened. In September 1778 Boonesborough and nearby Harrodsburg withstood a sustained Indian campaign that wiped out all but one of the other Kentucky settlements. When the operations of George Rogers Clark in 1778 to 1779 established control in the Old Northwest, new settlers streamed into Kentucky (a county of Virginia from the fall of 1776), making Boonesborough a boom town. A short time later it went into a decline and soon disappeared.

No trace of the fort remains, but there are markers erected by the DAR and the Transylvanians of Henderson, Kentucky. The 108-acre Fort Boonesborough State Park includes the site of the settlement and the Kentucky River Museum. In addition, there are building reconstructions, a gift shop, hiking trails, and a variety of outdoor recreational activities available. Phone: (859) 527-3131. The site of the original Fort Boonesborough was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1996.

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park. The more than 20,000 acres of this park cover parts of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia, with the visitors' center just south of Middlesboro, Kentucky. P.O. Box 1848, Middlesboro, Ky. 40965. Phone: (606) 248-2817.

Long before the white man reached America, Indian war and hunting parties followed Warrior's Path through the natural passage named Cave Gap by Dr. Thomas Walker of Castle Hill, Virginia in 1750. His expedition spent two months exploring the region, but did not get much farther west than the river they named the Cumberland.

John Finley had visited the fabled Bluegrass region of central Kentucky that Walker's party was unable to find, and in 1769 he convinced Daniel Boone, a fellow soldier of the Seven Years' War (1754–1763), that this could be reached through Cumberland Gap. With only four companions, Boone and Finley spent nearly four years exploring the Bluegrass. In September 1773 Boone led an unsuccessful effort to establish a settlement, but three years later he founded Boonesborough.

During the Revolution the Gap was frequently unpassable because of the Indians, but after George Rogers Clark's victories in the Old Northwest in 1778 to 1779, settlers surged through. By the end of the war some twelve thousand people had entered the promised land of Caintuck, most of them through Cumberland Gap (the others down the Ohio, the route used for establishment of the first settlement in 1775 at Harrodsburg). The Wilderness Road was improved for wagon traffic in 1796, but by 1825 it had lost importance except for driving cattle to eastern markets.

About 2 miles of the road remains in the national historical park. In addition to the wilderness scenery and spectacular views from Tri-State Peak and the Pinnacle, the park has ruins of an early iron furnace and Civil War fortifications.

Fort Jefferson

Fort Jefferson, Mississippi River near Wickliffe, Ballard County. This westernmost American base was established by George Rogers Clark after his conquest of the Illinois Country in 1779. The next year it successfully withstood six days of attack by Chickasaws and Choctaws, but in June 1781 it was abandoned as untenable. A blockhouse similar to the one at Fort Jefferson has been reconstructed in the Columbus-Belmont Memorial State Park, site of the Civil War works some 15 miles south of where Fort Jefferson stood. Phone: (270) 667-2327.

Harrodsburg Site

Harrodsburg Site, Lexington and Warwick Streets, Harrodsburg, Mercer County. In flagrant defiance of the Proclamation of 1763 limiting westward expansion of white settlers to the watershed of the Alleghenies, three settlements were established in central Kentucky just before the American Revolution.

The oldest permanent one is the present Harrodsburg. James Harrod (1742–1793) was a Pennsylvania frontiersman in the heroic mold, a skilled marksman with a remarkable mastery of woodcraft. During the Seven Years' Wars he served as a private under General John Forbes, and later he explored the Kentucky region. In 1774 he and thirty men picked the site of Harrodsburg and started building cabins, but because of the Indian troubles that culminated in Dunmore's War of that year they had to abandon this initial effort. Harrod took part in the Battle of Point Pleasant, West Virginia, then in 1775 resumed the work that made him famous as founder of Kentucky's first permanent settlement.

Harrod unsuccessfully opposed the ambitious schemes of Richard Henderson's Transylvania Company, whose first settlement, Boonesborough, was established in 1775 only 30 miles northeast of Harrodsburg. Harrod had an active part in the Revolution, building his fort in 1777, escorting military supplies from Virginia to the Ohio River, and taking part in a number of expeditions against the Indians. His settlement and Boonesborough were among the few that survived the Indian attacks of September 1778. After the Revolution the forts at both places disappeared, having outlived their usefulness (no mean trick on the frontier). Harrod himself was not so lucky: he disappeared in 1793 under mysterious circumstances and is believed to have been murdered by an enemy who lured him from home in search of a fabled silver mine.

Development of the area surrounding the site of Old Fort Harrod into the Pioneer Memorial State Park was undertaken in the 1920s. A 28-acre state park now includes a reconstruction of the fort on a slightly reduced scale. The original spring is still flowing inside a 12-foot-high palisade that connects the blockhouses and cabins. Old Fort Harrod State Park is open all year. Phone: (859) 734-3314. Park staff in period costume present an interpretive history. "The Legend of Daniel Boone" is a musical performed in the park during the summer. Another musical, this one from the Shawnee perspective, "Shadows in the Forest," is performed in repertory with the Daniel Boone show.

Louisville

Louisville, Falls of the Ohio. At this point navigation of the mighty Ohio is interrupted by falls and rapids along a 2-mile stretch where the water drops 26 feet. For 6 miles above this obstacle the Ohio is calm and about a mile wide. The Falls of the Ohio probably were visited by La Salle around 1670. They subsequently became a major landmark in the operations of George Rogers Clark in the Old Northwest during the Revolution. Captain Thomas Bullitt, a military companion of George Washington during the Seven Years' War, surveyed 2,000 acres in the area of today's Louisville in 1773, laid out a town, and attempted to start a permanent settlement. Bullitt was unable to get the necessary approval for his initial survey, and Governor Dunmore meanwhile conveyed the tract to his notorious friend Dr. John Connolly (see also forks of the ohio, pennsylvania, and point pleasant, west virginia).

A spit of land above the falls later called Corn Island (and since eaten by the river) was where George Rogers Clark established a fortified camp in the summer of 1778 before undertaking the remarkable operations in the Old Northwest (see vincennes under Indiana). About twenty English, Scottish, and Irish families had come along with Clark, "much against my inclination," as he wrote later, but he admitted that they proved to be of service in guarding a blockhouse built on the island for his supplies. When Clark's expedition of some two hundred troops moved on (26 June 1778)—shooting the rapids during a total eclipse of the sun—the twenty families remained. During the next winter the settlers built Fort Nelson on the mainland (where Seventh and Main Streets now intersect) and established a town government. Called "the Falls of the Ohio" initially, in 1780 the place was named Louisburg for Louis XVI (whose aid was already recognized as being critical in winning American independence). At this time (14 May 1780) the Virginia legislature declared that Dr. Connolly's title was forfeited. In 1828 Louisville was chartered as a city.

Meanwhile, the "Conqueror of the Old Northwest," whose achievements with a handful of men had done so much to give the United States legal claim to Kentucky and the vast Illinois country, had spent the last nine years of his life in a handsome brick home, Locust Grove, that has been preserved in Louisville. His brother-in-law, Major William Croghan, started building this two-story house in 1802. Clark's personal fortunes had declined after 1786, and since 1803 he had been living across the river from Louisville in a cabin, operating a grist mill, and deteriorating physically. After suffering a stroke of paralysis and having a leg amputated, Clark moved to his sister's home in 1809. He died there in 1818, and his grave was at Locust Grove until moved in 1869 to Cave Hill Cemetery, at Broadway and Baxter Avenue. "A red brick house of architectural distinction," as the National Survey calls it, Locust Grove (c. 1790) is preserved in northeast Louisville and is part of the 55-acre George Rogers Clark Park (561 Blankenbaker Lane). It is designated a National Historic Landmark. Phone: (502) 897-9845.

Shelby (Isaac) Grave

Shelby (Isaac) Grave, Shelby City, Lincoln County. The military exploits of this second-generation frontiersman spanned many states and are associated prominently with many of the most important sites covered in this book. But Kentucky claims him as its first governor. Elected in 1792, he declined the office in 1796, but again became governor in 1812. His grave is in the half-acre Isaac Shelby Cemetery State Historic Site, located 6 miles south of Danville on Highway 127.

William Whitley House

William Whitley House (Sportsman's Hill), off U.S. 150 on William Whitley Road about 9 miles southeast of Stanford, near Crab Orchard, Lincoln County. Often called the oldest brick residence west of the Alleghenies (which it is not), built between 1787 and 1794, the architecturally important two-and-a-half-story structure with handsome paneling was the home of a remarkable warrior. The state's tourism department bills it as "the first brick home in Kentucky." Whitley came to Kentucky from Virginia in 1775 and took part in Revolutionary War events, but was most famous for protecting emigrant parties from Indian attack along the Wilderness Road. As an elderly man he enlisted as a private in the War of 1812 and died in the Battle of the Thames (1813). The William Whitley State Historic Site was able to purchase about 30 acres of an adjacent farm in 2004 and add to its then 10-acre site. The use for that extra tract is yet to be established, although hiking trails are already formed. This historic site is open all year and has picnic areas. Phone: (606) 355-2881.

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