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Maryland

Maryland

State of Maryland

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Named for Henrietta Maria, queen consort of King Charles I of England.

NICKNAME: The Old Line State and the Free State.

CAPITAL: Annapolis.

ENTERED UNION: 28 April 1788 (7th).

SONG: "Maryland, My Maryland."

MOTTO: Fatti maschii, parole femine (Manly deeds, womanly words).

FLAG: Bears the quartered arms of the Calvert and Crossland families (the paternal and maternal families of the founders of Maryland).

OFFICIAL SEAL: reverse: A shield bearing the arms of the Calverts and Crosslands is surmounted by an earl's coronet and a helmet and supported by a farmer and fisherman. The state motto (originally that of the Calverts) appears on a scroll below. The circle is surrounded by the Latin legend Scuto bonœ voluntatis tuœ; coronasti nos, meaning "With the shield of thy favor hast thou compassed us"; and "1632," the date of Maryland's first charter. obverse: Lord Baltimore is seen as a knight in armor on a charger. The surrounding inscription, in Latin, means "Cecilius, Absolute Lord of Maryland and Avalon New Foundland, Baron of Baltimore."

BIRD: Baltimore oriole.

FISH: Rockfish.

FLOWER: Black-eyed Susan.

TREE: White oak.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year's Day, 1 January; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Presidents' day, 3rd Monday in February; Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Columbus Day, 12 October; Veterans' Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving Day, 4th Thursday in November plus one day; Christmas Day, 25 December.

TIME: 7 AM EST = noon GMT.

LOCATION, SIZE, AND EXTENT

Located on the eastern seaboard of the United States in the South Atlantic region, Maryland ranks 42d in size among the 50 states.

Maryland's total area10,460 sq mi (27,092 sq km)comprises 9,837 sq mi (25,478 sq km) of land and 623 sq mi (1,614 sq km) of inland water. The state extends 199 mi (320 km) e-w and 126 mi (203 km) n-s.

Maryland is bordered on the n by Pennsylvania; on the e by Delaware and the Atlantic Ocean; on the s and sw by Virginia, the District of Columbia, and West Virginia (with the line passing through the Chesapeake Bay and Potomac River); and on the extreme w by West Virginia. Important islands in Chesapeake Bay, off Maryland's Eastern Shore (the Maryland sector of the Delmarva Peninsula), include Kent, Bloodsworth, South Marsh, and Smith.

The total boundary length of Maryland is 842 mi (1,355 km), including a general coastline of 31 mi (50 km); the total tidal shoreline extends 3,190 mi (5,134 km). The state's geographic center is in Prince George's County, 4.5 mi (7.2 km) nw of Davidsonville.

TOPOGRAPHY

Three distinct regions characterize Maryland's topography. The first and major area, falling within the Atlantic Coastal Plain, is nearly bisected by the Chesapeake Bay, dividing Maryland into the Eastern Shore and the Western Shore. The Piedmont Plateau, west of the coastal lowlands, is broad, rolling upland with several deep gorges cut by rivers. Further west, from the Catoctin Mountains in Frederick County to the West Virginia border, is the Appalachian Mountain region, containing the state's highest hills. Backbone Mountain, in Garrett County in westernmost Maryland, is the state's highest point, at 3,360 ft (1,025 m). The mean elevation of the state is approximately 350 ft (107 m).

A few small islands lie in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland's dominant waterway. Extending 195 mi (314 km) inland from the Atlantic and varying in width from 3 to 20 mi (5-32 km), the bay comprises 3,237 sq mi (8,384 sq km), of which 1,726 sq km (4,470 sq km) are under Maryland's jurisdiction. Principal rivers include the Potomac, forming much of the southern and western border; the Patapsco, which runs through Baltimore; the Patuxent, draining the Western Shore; and the Susquehanna, crossing the Pennsylvania border and emptying into the Chesapeake Bay in northeastern Maryland. The state has 23 rivers and other bays, as well as many lakes and creeks, none of any great size. The lowest point of the state is at sea level at the Atlantic Ocean.

CLIMATE

Despite its small size, Maryland exhibits considerable climatic diversity. Temperatures vary from an annual average of 48°f (9°c) in the extreme western uplands to 59°f (15°c) in the southeast, where the climate is moderated by the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. The annual average temperature for Baltimore is 56°f (13°c), ranging from 33°f (1°c) in January to 78°f (25°c) in July. The record high temperature for the state is 109°f (43°c), set on 10 July 1936 in Cumberland and Frederick counties; the record low, 40°f (40°c), occurred on 13 January 1912 at Oakland in Garrett County.

Precipitation averages about 49 in (124 cm) annually in the southeast, but only 36 in (91 cm) in the Cumberland area west of the Appalachians; Baltimore averaged 41.9 in (106 cm) annually 19712000. As much as 100 in (254 cm) of snow falls in western Garrett County, while 8-10 in (20-25 cm) is average for the Eastern Shore; and Baltimore receives about 20.8 in (52 cm).

FLORA AND FAUNA

Maryland's three life zonescoastal plain, piedmont, and Appalachianmingle wildlife characteristic of both North and South. Most of the state lies within a hardwood belt in which red and white oaks, yellow poplar, beech, blackgum, hickory, and white ash are represented; shortleaf and loblolly pines are the leading softwoods. Honeysuckle, Virginia creeper, wild grape, and wild raspberry are also common. Wooded hillsides are rich with such wild flowers as Carolina cranesbill, trailing arbutus, Mayapple, early blue violet, wild rose, and goldenrod. Seven plant species were listed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as threatened or endangered in April 2006, including Canby's dropwort, sandplain gerardia, northeastern bulrush, and harperella.

The white-tailed (Virginia) deer, eastern cottontail, raccoon, and red and gray foxes are indigenous to Maryland, although urbanization has sharply reduced their habitat. Common small mammals are the woodchuck, eastern chipmunk, and gray squirrel. The brown-headed nuthatch has been observed in the extreme south, the cardinal and tufted titmouse are common in the piedmont, and the chestnut-sided warbler and rose-breasted grosbeak are native to the Appalachians. Among saltwater species, shellfishespecially oysters, clams, and crabshave the greatest economic importance. Eighteen Maryland animal species (vertebrates and invertebrates) were listed as threatened or endangered in 2006, including the Indiana bat, Maryland darter, bald eagle, Delmarva Peninsula fox squirrel, three species of whale, and five species of turtle.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Maryland's Department of Natural Resources manages water allocation, fish and wildlife, state parks and forests, land reclamation and open space. The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) serves as the state's primary environmental protection agency. MDE protects and restores the quality of Maryland's land, air, and water by assessing, preventing and controlling sources of pollution for the benefit of public health, the environment and future generations. MDE regulations control the storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous wastes and ensure long-term, environmentally sound solid waste recycling and disposal capabilities. In 2003, 45.5 million lb of toxic chemicals were released in the state. Also in 2003, Maryland had 168 hazardous waste sites listed in the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) database, 17 of which were on the National Priorities List as of 2006, including Andrews Air Force Base, Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard, and Patuxent River Naval Air Station. In 2005, the EPA spent over $962,000 through the Superfund program for the cleanup of hazardous waste sites in the state. The same year, federal EPA grants awarded to the state included $2.3 million to support various Chesapeake Bay ecosystem protection projects.

MDE has broad regulatory, planning, and management responsibility for water quality, air quality, solid and hazardous waste management, stormwater management, sediment control, wetlands and waterways management, and water allocation. MDE also plays a pivotal role in Maryland's initiatives to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay and has divided the state into 10 major tributary watershed basins, each of which have specific nutrient reduction strategies designed to give the Bay added protection from the effects of stormwater run-off, airborne pollutants, and direct discharges. The Chesapeake Bay Estuarine Complex was designated as a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance in 1987. In total, Maryland has about 591,000 acres (239,169 hectares) of wetlands.

MDE operates an innovative infrastructure financing program that leverages federal, state, and local funds to upgrade wastewater treatment plants, connect residents to public sewer systems, and improve water supply facilities. In addition, the Maryland Environmental Service, a quasi-public agency, contracts with local governments to design, construct, finance, and operate wastewater treatment plants, water supply systems, and recycling facilities.

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is responsible for the management, enhancement, and preservation of the state's living and natural resources. Utilizing an ecosystem approach to land, waterway, and species management, DNR programs and services support the health of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries, sustainable populations of fishery and wildlife species, and an integrated network of public lands and open space.

The Maryland Office of Planning's mission is to plan for the most effective development of the state and all of its resources. The Office assists state agencies and local governments to more effectively achieve environmental, agricultural, and natural resource objectives by integrating them with comprehensive planning and land use management. The state has recently embarked on a Neighborhood Conservation and Smart Growth initiative to encourage population and economic growth in priority funding areas, and to use a Rural Legacy Program to preserve agricultural, forest, and other rural lands from development.

POPULATION

Maryland ranked 19th in population in the United States with an estimated total of 5,600,388 in 2005, an increase of 5.7% since 2000. Between 1990 and 2000, Maryland's population grew from 4,781,468 to 5,296,486, an increase of 10.8%. The population is projected to reach 6.2 million by 2015 and 6.7 million by 2025. In 2004 the median age was 36.8. Persons under 18 years old accounted for 25.1% of the population while 11.4% was age 65 or older.

The state's population doubled between 1940 and 1970 and increased 7.5% between 1970 and 1980. The enormous expansion of the federal government and exodus of people from Washington, DC, to the surrounding suburbs contributed to the rapid growth that made Maryland the 17th most populous state in 1980, with 4,216,446 residents. There was an increase of 13.4% between 1980 and 1990, when Maryland held the 19th ranking, with 4,781,468 people. The population density in 2004 was 572.3 persons per sq mi, the fifth-highest among the 50 states.

Almost all the growth since World War II has occurred in the four suburban counties around Washington, DC, and Baltimore. Metropolitan Baltimore, embracing Carroll, Howard, Hartford, Anne Arundel, and Baltimore counties, expanded from 2,244,700 to 2,491,254 between 1984 and 2000; the city of Baltimore, on the other hand, declined from 763,570 to 736,000 during the same period, and to an estimated 638,614 in 2002. Baltimore is the state's only major city; the estimated population in 2004 for the city prop-er was 636,251. The Baltimore metropolitan area has an estimated population of 2,639,213 in 2004. Several west-central counties belong to the Washington metropolitan area, and Cecil County, in the northeast, is part of metropolitan Wilmington, Delaware.

ETHNIC GROUPS

Blacks, numbering 1,477,411 in 2000, constitute the largest racial minority in Maryland. About one-third of Maryland's black population lives in the city of Baltimore. In 2004, 29.1% of the population was black.

Hispanics and Latinos, mostly from Puerto Rico and Central America, numbered 227,000 in 2000 (4.3% of the total population), up from 125,000. In 2004, 5.4% of the population was of Hispanic or Latino origin. In 2000, the Asian population was relatively large: 39,155 Koreans, 49,400 Chinese (nearly double the 1990 total of 26,479), 26,608 Filipinos, 6,620 Japanese, and 16,744 Vietnamese (up from 7,809 in 1990); the total Asian population was estimated at 210,929 in 2000. In 2004, 4.6% of the population was Asian. Pacific Islanders numbered 2,303 in 2000. In 2004, 0.1% of the population was of Pacific Island origin.

Foreign-born residents numbered 518,315, or 9.8% of the total population, in 2000, up from 313,494, or 6.5%, in 1990. Many immigrated to Maryland in the 1970s. A significant proportion of the state's German, Polish, and Russian immigrants were Jewish refugees arriving just before and after World War II. In 2000, the combined Native American population (including Eskimos and Aleuts) was estimated at 15,423. In 2004, 0.3% of the population was of American Indian or Native Alaskan origin.

LANGUAGES

Several Algonkian tribes originally inhabited what is now Maryland. There are some Indian place-names, such as Potomac, Susquehanna, and Allegheny.

The state's diverse topography has contributed to unusual diversity in its basic speech. Geographical isolation of the Delmarva Peninsula, proximity to the Virginia piedmont population, and access to southeastern and central Pennsylvania helped to yield a language mixture that now is dominantly Midland and yet reflects earlier ties to Southern English.

Regional features occur as well. In the northeast are found eastern Pennsylvania pavement (sidewalk) and baby coach (baby carriage). In the north and west are poke (bag), quarter till, sick on the stomach, openseed peach (freestone peach), and Pennsylvania German ponhaws (scrapple). In the southern portion are found light bread (white bread), curtain (shade), carry (escort), crop as /krap/, and bulge with the vowel of put. East of Chesapeake Bay are mosquito hawk (dragonfly), paled fence (picket fence), poor (rhyming with mower ), and Mary with the vowel of mate. In central Maryland, an earthworm is a baitworm.

In 2000, some 4,322,329 residents, or 87% of the population five years old or older (down from 91.1% in 1990) spoke only English at home.

The following table gives selected statistics from the 2000 Census for language spoken at home by persons five years old and over. The category "African languages" includes Amharic, Ibo, Twi, Yoruba, Bantu, Swahili, and Somali. The category "Other Asian languages" includes Dravidian languages, Malayalam, Telugu, Tamil, and Turkish. The category "Other Indic languages" includes Bengali, Marathi, Punjabi, and Romany.

LANGUAGE NUMBER PERCENT
Population 5 years and over 4,945,043 100.0
  Speak only English 4,322,329 87.4
  Speak a language other than English 622,714 12.6
Speak a language other than English 622,714 12.6
  Spanish or Spanish Creole 230,829 4.7
  French (incl. Patois, Cajun) 42,838 0.9
  Chinese 41,883 0.8
  African languages 36,967 0.7
  Korean 32,937 0.7
  German 23,796 0.5
  Tagalog 18,495 0.4
  Russian 17,584 0.4
  Vietnamese 14,891 0.3
  Italian 13,798 0.3
  Other Asian languages 12,405 0.3
  Persian 11,951 0.2
  Hindi 11,389 0.2
  Other Indic languages 11,345 0.2
  Greek 10,717 0.2
  Arabic 10,458 0.2

RELIGIONS

Maryland was founded as a haven for Roman Catholics, who still make up the largest single religious group in the states although their political supremacy ended in 1692, when Anglicanism (now the Episcopal Church) became the established religion. Laws against "popery" were enacted by 1704 and Roman Catholic priests were harassed; the state constitution of 1776, however, placed all Christian faiths on an equal footing. The state's first Lutheran church was built in 1729, the first Baptist church in 1742, and the earliest Methodist church in 1760. Jews settled in Baltimore in the early 1800s, with a much larger wave of Jewish immigration in the late 19th century.

As of 2000, there were 952,389 Roman Catholics in Maryland; the Archdiocese of Baltimore reported 517,679 Catholics in 2005. Adherents of the major Protestant denominations (with 2000 data) include United Methodists, 297,729 members; Southern Baptists, 142,401 members; Evangelical Lutherans, 103,644 members; and Episcopalians, 81,061 members. In 2000, there were an estimated 216,000 Jews and about 52,867 Muslims. Though membership numbers were unavailable, reports indicate there were about 32 Buddhist congregations and 26 Hindu congregations in 2000. Over 3 million people (about 56.7% of the population) were not counted as members of any religious organization.

The Lutheran World Relief organization is based in Baltimore as is World Relief, an affiliate of the National Association of Evangelicals. The Adventist Community Services relief program is based in Silver Springs.

TRANSPORTATION

Some of the nation's earliest efforts toward the development of a reliable transportation system began in Maryland. In 1695, a public postal road was opened from the Potomac River through Annapolis and the Eastern Shore to Philadelphia. Construction on the National Road (now US 40) began at Cumberland in 1811; within seven years, the road was a conduit for settlers in Ohio. The first commercial steamboat service from Baltimore started in 1813, and steamboats were active all along the Chesapeake during the 1800s. The Delaware and Chesapeake Canal, linking Chesapeake Bay and the Delaware River, opened in 1829.

Maryland's first railroad, the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O), was started in 1828. In 1835, it provided the first passenger train service to Washington, DC, and Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia). By 1857, the line was extended to St. Louis, and its freight capacity helped build Baltimore into a major center of commerce. In the 1850s, the Pennsylvania Railroad began to buy up small Maryland lines and provide direct service to northern cities.

CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern are the Class I railroads operating in the state, along with one regional, five local, and two switching and terminal railroads. As of 2003, total rail miles in Maryland amounted to 1,153 mi (1,856 km), including about 835 mi (1,343 km) of Class I track. The Maryland Transportation Department's Railroad Administration subsidizes four commuter lines, as well as freight lines in western Maryland and on the Eastern Shore. As of 2006, Amtrak operated four stations in Maryland, providing east-west service from Washington DC to Chicago and north-south service on the Northeast Corridor main line.

The Maryland Mass Transit Administration inaugurated Baltimore's first subway line on 21 November 1983. The combined underground-elevated line ran for 8 mi (13 km) from downtown Baltimore to Reisterstown Plaza. Later, the Baltimore Metro was extended for 6 mi (10 km) to Owings Mills, just outside the city limits. The Metro cost nearly $1 billion to build. In 1984, the Washington, DC, mass transit system was extended to the Maryland suburbs, including Bethesda and Rockville.

About half of Maryland's roads serve metropolitan Baltimore and Washington. As of 2004, there were 30,809 mi (49,602 km) of public roadway. The major toll road is the John F. Kennedy Memorial Highway (I-95), linking Baltimore with Wilmington, Delaware, and the New Jersey Turnpike. There were 3,594,251 licensed drivers and 4.150 million motor vehicles of all types registered in Maryland as of 2004.

The Port of Baltimore handled 47.399 million tons of cargo in 2004, making it the 17th busiest port in the United States. Of that total, 24.950 million tons were imports that year. For that same year, Maryland had 532 mi (856 km) of navigable inland waterways. In 2003, waterborne shipments totaled 47.533 million tons.

In 2005, Maryland had a total of 221 public and private-use aviation-related facilities. This included 145 airports, 69 heliports, 1 STOLport (Short Take-Off and Landing), and 6 seaplane bases. Baltimore-Washington International (BWI) Airport is the state's main air terminal and also serves the Washington DC, area. In 2004, Baltimore-Washington had 10,103,563 enplanements, making it the 23rd-busiest airport in the United States.

HISTORY

The Indian tribes living in the region that was to become Maryland were Algonkian-speakers: the Accomac, Nanticoke, and Wicomico on the Eastern Shore, and the Susquehannock, Yacomico, and Piscataway on the Western Shore. The Susquehannock, the most powerful tribe at the time of English colonization, claimed all the land lying between the Susquehanna and Potomac rivers. Although the Algonkian Indians hunted for much of their food, many tribes (including the Susquehannock) also had permanent settlements where they cultivated corn (maize), vegetables, tobacco, and other crops. George Alsop, in his Character of the Province of Maryland (1666), noted that Susquehannock women "are the Butchers, Cooks, and Tillers of the ground but the men think it below the honour of a Masculine to stoop to any thing but that which their Gun, or Bow and Arrows can Command." European penetration of the Chesapeake region began early in the 16th century, with the expeditions of Giovanni da Verrazano, a Florentine navigator, and the Spaniard Lucas Vázquez de Ayllón. Captain John Smith, leader of the English settlement at Jamestown, Virginia, was the first English explorer of Chesapeake Bay (1608) and produced a map of the area that was used for years.

The founding of Maryland is intimately tied to the career of another Englishman, George Calvert. A favorite of King James I, Calvert left the Church of England in 1624 to become a Roman Catholic. He announced his conversion in 1625 andbecause Catholics were not allowed to hold public office in England at that timethen resigned his post as secretary of state and, against the king's wishes, retired from the royal court. As a reward for Calvert's service, the king bestowed upon him large Irish estates and a peerage with the title of Baron of Baltimore. Two years later, Calvert sailed for the New World, landing in Newfoundland, to which he had received title in 1621. After a severe winter, however, Calvert decided to seek his fortunes where the weather was warmerin Virginia. Not well-received there because of his religion, Calvert returned to England and asked King Charles I (James's successor) for land south of Virginia; instead he received a grant north of the Potomac. Virginia's agents in England contested Calvert's right to this land strenuously but unsuccessfully, and when he died in 1632, the title passed to his son Cecilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore (usually called Lord Baltimore), who named the region Maryland after the queen consort of Charles I, Henrietta Maria. At this time, the land grant embraced not only present-day Maryland but also the present State of Delaware, a large part of Pennsylvania, and the valley between the north and south branches of the Potomac River. Not until the 1760s was the final boundary between Pennsylvania and Maryland (as surveyed by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon) established by royal decree, and nearly a century passed before Maryland conceded to Virginia the land between the north and south branches of the Potomac.

The government of provincial Maryland was absolute, embodying the most extensive grant of royal powers to a colonial settlement. Lord Baltimore's main source of income as lord proprietary was the quitrents settlers paid for their land; in return for his authority, Calvert had to give the king only two Indian arrows yearly. Lord Baltimore assigned to his half-brother, Leonard Calvert, the task of organizing the settlement of the colony. On 22 November 1633, Calvert and approximately 250 settlers, including many Roman Catholics and two Jesuit priests, set sail for America on two ships, the Ark and the Dove. They landed at St. Clements Island on 25 March 1634. Two days later, Calvert purchased a site from the Indians, named it St. Marys (the first capital of Maryland), and assumed the governorship of the colony.

The early days of settlement were tumultuous. The refusal by a Virginia colonist, William Claiborne of Kent Island, to acknowledge Lord Baltimore's charter led to a small war that ended in 1638 with a temporary victory for Governor Calvert. The conflict in England during the 1640s found an echo in the struggle between Puritans and Roman Catholics in Maryland, a conflict that saw the two-year exile of Governor Calvert to Virginia, the assumption of power by English representatives (including Claiborne and one of the Puritan leaders) in 1652, a subsequent civil war, and finally the recognition of Lord Baltimore's charter by Oliver Cromwell in 1657.

Cecilius Calvert died in 1675. His successor was Charles Calvert, 3rd Baron Baltimore and the next lord proprietary. His tenure, which lasted until 1715, saw a decisive change in the character of the province. In 1689, with Protestants ascendant in both England and Maryland, the British crown assumed direct control over the province, and in 1692, the Church of England became Maryland's established religion. When Charles Calvert died, his successor, Benedict Leonard Calvert, 4th Baron Baltimore, was granted full proprietary rightsbut only because he had embraced the Protestant faith. Proprietary rule continued through his legitimate heirs until the eve of the American Revolution.

Throughout this period, the upper and lower houses of the colonial assemblyconsisting, respectively, of the governor and his council and of delegates elected from the countiesquarreled over taxation and the extension of English statutes to free Marylanders. Having already secured most rights from the proprietor, the lower house was somewhat reluctant to vote for independence from the British crown, on whose authority the proprietary government now rested. After its initial hesitancy, however, Maryland cast its lot with the Revolution and sent approximately 20,000 soldiers to fight in the war. The Continental Congress met in Baltimore from December 1776 to March 1777 and in Annapolis from November 1783 to June 1784. These cities were thus among the eight that served as US capitals before the designation of a permanent seat of government in Washington, DC.

Maryland was one of the last states to sign the Articles of Confederation, not ratifying them until other states dropped their claims to what later became the Northwest Territory. On 28 April 1788, Maryland became the seventh state to ratify the federal Constitution. The state constitution, drawn up in 1776, was weighted heavily in favor of property holders and the rural counties, at the expense of the propertyless and the city of Baltimore; the legislature removed the property qualifications in 1810.

Maryland's prosperity during the colonial and early federal period waxed and waned according to the world price of tobacco, the staple crop of tidewater and southern Maryland. Planters increasingly employed slave labor on farms and plantations, and the black population grew rapidly in the 18th century. German immigrants began moving into western Maryland, where wheat became the primary crop. The cultivation of wheat also helped make Baltimore's fortune. Founded in 1729 and incorporated in 1796, the city of Baltimore was blessed with a harbor well suited to the export and import trade. As commerce developed, shipbuilding emerged as a major economic activity. By the early 19th century, Baltimore was already the state's major center of commerce and industry.

The city and harbor were the site of extensive naval and military operations during the War of 1812. It was during the bombardment of Ft. McHenry in 1814 that Francis Scott Key, detained on the British frigate, composed "The Star-Spangled Banner," which became the US national anthem in March 1931.

After the War of 1812, Maryland history was marked by the continued growth of Baltimore and increasing division over immigration, slavery, and secession. The chartering in 1827 of the Baltimore and Ohio (B and O) Railroad, which eventually linked Maryland with the markets of the Ohio Valley and the West, added to the city's economic vitality. But distrust of the thousands of newcomersespecially of Irish immigrants and their Roman Catholicismand fear of the economic threat they supposedly represented spurred the rise of nativist political groups, such as the Know-Nothings, who persecuted the immigrants and dominated Maryland politics in the 1850s.

Although not many Marylanders were in favor of secession, they were hostile to the idea of using force against the secessionist states. On 19 April 1861, as the 6th Massachusetts Regiment passed through Baltimore, it was attacked by a mob of southern sympathizers in a riot that left 4 soldiers and 12 civilians dead. Ten days later, the Maryland house of delegates, following the lead of Governor Thomas Hicks, rejected a bill of secession. Throughout the Civil War, Maryland was largely occupied by Union troops because of its strategic location and the importance for the northern cause of the B and O Railroad. Marylanders fought on both sides during the war, and one major battle took place on Maryland soilthe Battle of Antietam (1862), during which a Union army thwarted a Confederate thrust toward the north, but at an enormous cost to both sides. Confederate armies invaded the state on two other occasions, when General Robert E. Lee brought his troops through the state on the way to Gettysburg in 1863 and when Lieutenant general Jubal Early ravaged the Hagerstown area and threatened Baltimore in 1864. The Maryland legislature, almost totally pro-Union by 1864, passed a new constitution, which among other things abolished slavery.

The state's economic activity increased during Reconstruction, as Maryland, and especially Baltimore, played a major role in rebuilding the South. Maryland's economic base gradually shifted from agriculture to industry, with shipbuilding, steelmaking, and the manufacture of clothing and shoes leading the way. The decades between the Civil War and World War I were also notable for the philanthropic activities of such wealthy businessmen as John Hopkins, George Peabody, and Enoch Pratt, who endowed some of the state's most prestigious cultural and educational institutions. The years after World War I saw the emergence of a political figure without equal in Maryland's more recent history: Albert C. Ritchie, a Democrat who won election to the governorship in 1919 and served in that office until 1935, just one year before his death. Stressing local issues, states' rights, and opposition to prohibition, Ritchie remained in power until Harry W. Nice, a Republican but an advocate of New Deal reforms, defeated him in 1934.

The decades after World War II were marked by significant population growth. From 1980 to 1990 alone, Maryland grew by 13.4%, well above the national rate of 9.8%. Baltimore, which, though still the hub of the state's economy, had fallen into decay and became the focus of a redevelopment project. Much of the downtown area and harbor facilities were revitalized by urban projects, begun in the late 1970s and continued into the 21st century. These featured the Charles Center development, the waterfront renovation of the Inner Harbor, Oriole Park at Camden Yards, and a $150-million convention center at the Inner Harbor.

Although Maryland's economy declined less than those of other states during the recession of the late 1980s, the state suffered from the contraction of defense industry. Nevertheless, service indus-try employment, primarily in the Baltimore-Washington corridor, gave Maryland the fifth-highest state income in the country as of the mid-1990sa ranking it maintained as of 1998. Federal government and high-tech employment accounted for many of these jobs. As of 2004, Maryland had the third-highest median household income among the states, at $57,424, which is 29% higher than the national median. Maryland in 2004 ranked fourth among the states in per capita personal income ($39,247). Maryland had the sixth-lowest poverty rate in the nation in 2004, at 8.8%, compared with 13.1% for the nation as a whole.

Maryland's 370-year history of tobacco farming appeared to be drawing to a close in 2000. Nearly 90% of the state's tobacco farmers indicated they would accept a government buyout later that year. The crop that had settled the Chesapeake had become risky, with the tobacco industry under attack for the health hazards of its products. The state by 2003 had implemented a tobacco buyout program, whereby the state agreed to pay farmers $1 per pound of tobacco that they would sell for the following 10 years based on the average amount of tobacco they sold between 1996 and 1998. Farmers agree to plant alternative crops instead of tobacco. As of January 2004, 785 growers were to participate in the buyout program, representing 80% of eligible growers and 7.3 million lb of tobacco.

The environmental cleanup of Chesapeake Bay, begun in the mid-1980s, continued into the 21st century. In an effort to further protect the bay's ecosystem, in 1999 Maryland Governor Parris Glendening announced a plan to protect 60,000 forested acres on the Eastern Shore from development. Nevertheless, the bay faced more immediate threats such as the April 2000 oil spill into the Patuxent River, which flows into the Chesapeake. Federal officials faulted Maryland Power Company for its efforts to clean up the spill, the worst in the company's 104-year history. Governor Rob-ert L. Ehrlich Jr., elected in 2002, was continuing the cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay.

Maryland Presidential Vote by Political Parties, 19482004
YEAR ELECTORAL VOTE MARYLAND WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN PROGRESSIVE STATES' RIGHTS DEMOCRAT SOCIALIST
*Won US presidential election.
1948 8 Dewey (R) 286,521 294,814 9,983 2,467 2,941
1952 9 *Eisenhower (R) 395,337 499,424 7,313
1956 9 *Eisenhower (R) 372,613 559,738
1960 9 *Kennedy (D) 565,808 489,538
1964 10 *Johnson (D) 730,912 385,495
AMERICAN IND.
1968 10 Humphrey (D) 538,310 517,995 178,734
AMERICAN
1972 10 *Nixon (R) 505,781 829,305 18,726
1976 10 *Carter (D) 759,612 672,661
LIBERTARIAN
1980 10 Carter (D) 726,161 680,606 14,192
1984 10 *Reagan (R) 787,935 879,918 5,721
1988 10 *Bush (R) 826,304 876,167 5,115 6,748
IND. (Perot)
1992 10 *Clinton (D) 988,571 707,094 2,786 4,715 281,414
1996 10 *Clinton (D) 966,207 681,530 8,765 115,812
GREEN REFORM
2000 10 Gore (D) 1,145,782 813,797 53,768 5,310 4,248
POPULIST
(Nader)
2004 10 Kerry (D) 1,334,493 1,024,703 3,632 6,094 11,854

In 2005, Governor Ehrlich announced conservation of 828 acres near Antietam Battlefield. The plan supported Maryland's $9.3 billion tourism industry, and provides environmental benefits for the state. Annually, 11 million visitors take advantage of Maryland's parks and natural, historic, and cultural resources.

STATE GOVERNMENT

Maryland's first state constitution was enacted in 1776. Subsequent constitutions were ratified in 1851, 1864, and 1867. By January 2005, it had 218 amendments.

Under the 1867 constitution, as amended, the General Assembly, Maryland's legislative body, consists of two branches: a 47-member Senate and a 141-member house of delegates. Legislative sessions begin the second Wednesday of January of each year and are limited to 90 calendar days. Special sessions, which are limited to 30 calendar days, may be called by a petition of the majority in each house. All legislators serve four-year terms and must have been citizens of the state for at least a year and of their district for at least six months prior to election. Senators must be at least 25 years old, delegates 21. The legislative salary was $31,509 in 2004.

Executives elected statewide are the governor and lieutenant governor (who run jointly), the comptroller of the treasury, and the attorney general; all serve four-year terms. The state treasurer is elected by joint ballot of the General Assembly, while the secretary of state is appointed by the governor. The governor, who may serve no more than two four-year terms in succession, also appoints other members of the executive council (cabinet) and the heads of major boards and commissions. The chief executive must be a US citizen at least 30 years old, must have been a resident of Maryland for five years before election, and must have been a reg-istered voter in the state for five years. As of December 2004, the governor's salary was $135,000.

Bills passed by majority vote of both houses of the assembly become law when signed by the governor or if left unsigned for six days while the legislature is in session or 30 days if the legislature has adjourned. The only exception is the budget bill, which becomes effective immediately upon legislative passage. Gubernatorial vetoes may be overridden by three-fifths votes of the elected members in both houses. Proposed constitutional amendments also require approval by three-fifths of both houses of the legislature before submission to the voters at the next general election.

Eligible voters are US citizens who are at least 18 years old and are residents of the Maryland county in which they will vote. Restrictions apply to convicted felons and those declared mentally incompetent by the court.

POLITICAL PARTIES

The Republican and Democratic parties are the dominant political groups in Maryland. Before the Civil War, the Democrats drew much of their strength from the slaveholding Eastern Shore, while their opponents, the Whigs, were popular in Baltimore and other centers of antislavery activity. The collapse of the Whigs on both the national and local levels corresponded with the rise in Maryland of the Native American ("Know-Nothing") Party, whose anti-immigrant and anti-Catholic attitudes appealed to Marylanders who saw their livelihood threatened by Roman Catholic immigrants. The Know-Nothings swept Baltimore in 1855 and won the governorship in 1857; Maryland was the only state to cast its electoral votes for the Know-Nothing presidential candidate, Millard Fillmore, in 1856. The Native American Party declined rapidly, however, and by 1860, Maryland was back in the Democratic column, voting for the secessionist John Breckinridge.

Revelations of influence peddling and corruption afflicted both major parties during the 1970s. In 1973, Republican Spiro T. Agnew, then vice president of the United States, was accused of taking payments from people who had done business with the state government while he was Baltimore County executive and then governor of Maryland until 1969. Agnew pleaded nolo contendere to a federal charge of income tax evasion and resigned from the vice-presidency on 10 October 1973. His gubernatorial successor, Democrat Marvin Mandel, was convicted of mail fraud and racketeering in 1977; he served 20 months of a 36-month prison sentence before receiving a presidential pardon in 1981.

Maryland was one of the few states carried by President Jimmy Carter in the November 1980 presidential election, but four years later the state went for President Ronald Reagan in the national Republican landslide. In 2000, Maryland gave 57% of its vote to Democrat Al Gore, 40% to Republican George W. Bush, and 3% to Green Party candidate Ralph Nader. In 2004, Democratic challenger John Kerry won 55.7% of the vote to incumbent Bush's 44.6%.

In the 1994 governor's race, one of the closest in Maryland history, Democrat Parris N. Glendening won; he was reelected in 1998. Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was elected governor in 2002. The two senators from Maryland, Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara Mikulski, both Democrats, were reelected in 2000 and 2004, respectively. In 2004 there were 3,105,000 registered voters. In 1998, 58% of registered voters were Democratic, 20% Republican, and 12% unaffiliated or members of other parties.

Following the November 2004 elections, Maryland's US congressional delegation consisted of six Democrats and two Republicans. In mid-2005 there were 33 Democrats and 14 Republicans in the state Senate, and 98 Democrats and 43 Republicans in the state House. The state had 10 electoral votes in the 2000 presidential election.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

As of 2005, there were 24 counties, 157 municipal governments, and 85 special districts in Maryland. Most counties have charter governments, in which voters elect a county executive and council members. The other counties, which tend to be rural, are governed by boards of county commissioners. County government is highly developed in Maryland, and there are numerous appointed county officials with responsibilities ranging from civil defense to liquor licensing.

The city of Baltimore is the only one in Maryland not contained within a county. It provides the same services as a county, and shares in state aid according to the same allocation formulas. The city (not to be confused with Baltimore County, which surrounds the city of Baltimore but has its county seat at Towson) is governed by an elected mayor and city council. Other cities and towns are each governed by a mayor, with or without a council, depending on the local charter. In 2005, Maryland had 25 public school systems.

In 2005, local government accounted for about 187,955 full-time (or equivalent) employment positions.

STATE SERVICES

To address the continuing threat of terrorism and to work with the federal Department of Homeland Security, homeland security in Maryland operates under the authority of executive order; the homeland security director is designated as the state homeland security advisor.

The State Ethics Commission, established in 1979, monitors compliance by state officeholders and employees with the Maryland public ethics law in order to avoid conflicts of interest; the Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics, created in 1972, has similar responsibilities with respect to General Assembly members. The Fair Campaign Financing Commission provides for the public financing of elections and sets campaign spending limits.

The State Board of Education is an independent policymaking body whose 12 members are appointed by the governor; its responsibilities include selection of a superintendent of schools to run the Education Department. The growth and development of postsecondary institutions are the responsibility of the Maryland Higher Education Commission. The Department of Transportation oversees air, road, rail, bridge, and mass transit. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene coordinates public health programs, regulates in-state medical care, and supervises the 24 local health departments. Social services and public assistance programs as well as employment security lie within the jurisdiction of the Department of Human Resources. The Department of Housing and Community Development assures the provision of low-cost housing. The Department of Business and Economic Development advances job opportunities and works to bring new businesses into the state. It also serves in a public relations capacity at home and abroad to stimulate international trade and tourism, and also invests in the arts and promotes sports events.

Maryland's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services has statewide responsibility for the supervision and rehabilitation of adjudicated individuals, while the Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation supervises employment training, job match services, unemployment insurance, and many of the state's licensing and regulatory boards for businesses and trades. The Department of State Police enforces state motor vehicle and criminal laws, preserves public peace, maintains safe traffic on public streets and highways, enforces laws relating to narcotics, and incorporates the office of the State Fire Marshal. Other organizations include the departments of agriculture, assessments and taxation, natural resources, personnel, and rehabilitation services (for those with disabilities).

JUDICIAL SYSTEM

The Court of Appeals is Maryland's highest court. It is comprised of a chief judge and six associate judges. Each is appointed to the court by the governor, but must be confirmed by the voters within two years of appointment. Most criminal appeals are decided by the court of special appeals, consisting of a chief judge and 12 associate judges, selected in the same manner as judges of the high court. Each case must be heard by a panel of at least three judges of the high court. All state judges serve 10-year terms.

In 1971, 12 district courts took the place of all justices of the peace, county trial judges, magistrates, people's courts, and the municipal court of Baltimore. District courts handle all criminal, civil, and traffic cases, with appeals being taken to one of eight circuit courts. Circuit court judges are appointed by the governor and stand for election to 15-year terms. District court judges are appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate to 10-year terms. The city of Baltimore and all counties except Montgomery and Hartford have orphans' courts composed of two judges and one chief judge, all of them elected to four-year terms.

As of 31 December 2004, a total of 23,285 prisoners were held in Maryland's state and federal prisons, a decrease from 23,791 of 2.1% from the previous year. As of year-end 2004, a total of 1,180 inmates were female, down from 1,248 or 5.4% from the year before. Among sentenced prisoners (one year or more), Maryland had an incarceration rate of 406 per 100,000 population in 2004.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Maryland in 2004, had a violent crime rate (murder/nonnegligent manslaughter; forcible rape; robbery; aggravated assault) of 700.5 reported incidents per 100,000 population (third-highest among the states in the United States after Florida and South Carolina), or a total of 38,932 reported incidents. Crimes against property (burglary; larceny/theft; and motor vehicle theft) in that same year totaled 202,326 reported incidents or 3,640.2 reported incidents per 100,000 people. Maryland has a death penalty, of which lethal injection or lethal gas are the methods of execution. However, the latter method is open only to those inmates convicted of capital offenses that were committed on or after 25 March 1994. From 1976 through 5 May 2006, the state executed five persons, including one execution in 2005. As of 1 January 2006, Maryland had eight inmates on death row.

In 2003, Maryland spent $495,455,173 on homeland security, an average of $91 per state resident.

ARMED FORCES

As of 2004, there were 35,531 active US military personnel in Maryland, 2,593 National Guard and Reserve, and 25,417 civilian personnel. Ft. Meade is located in Baltimore, and the Aberdeen Proving Ground is in Harford County. Perhaps Maryland's best-known defense installation is Andrews Air Force Base in Camp Springs, a military airlift center. Annapolis is the home of the US Naval Academy. Total military personnel at all naval facilities, including the National Naval Medical Center at Bethesda, was 7,335 in 2004. Federal defense contract awards to Maryland firms were approximately $9.2 billion in 2004, fourth-highest in the United States for that year. In addition, there was another $4.9 billion in defense payroll spending, including retired military pay.

There were 486,298 veterans of US military service in Maryland as of 2003, of whom 57,970 served in World War II; 46,740 in the Korean conflict; 142,266 during the Vietnam era; and 86,225 in the Gulf War. In 2004, expenditures on veterans exceeded $1.1 billion.

As of 31 October 2004, the Maryland State Police employed 1,575 full-time sworn officers.

MIGRATION

Maryland's earliest white settlers were English; many of them farmed lands on the Eastern Shore. As tobacco crops wore out the soil, these early immigrants moved on to the fertile Western Shore and piedmont. During the 19th century, Baltimore ranked second only to New York as a port of entry for European immigrants. First to come were the Germans, followed by the Irish, Poles, East European Jews, and Italians; a significant number of Czechs settled in Cecil County during the 1860s. After the Civil War, many blacks migrated to Baltimore, both from rural Maryland and from southern states.

Since World War II, intrastate migration has followed the familiar urban/suburban pattern: both the Baltimore metropolitan area and the Maryland part of the metropolitan Washington, DC, area have experienced rapid growth while the inner cities have lost population. Overall, Maryland experienced a net loss from migration of about 36,000 between 1970 and 1980, much of it to Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Florida; the out-migration stopped during the 1980s, however, with a net gain of over 200,000 from 1980 to 1990. Between 1990 and 1998, Maryland had a net loss of 49,000 in domestic migration and a net gain of 118,000 in international migration. Maryland's foreign-born population totaled 412,000, or 8% of the total population, in 1996. In 1998, 15,561 foreign immigrants arrived in the statethe 10th-highest total of any state for that year. Between 1990 and 1998, the state's overall population increased 7.4%. In the period 200005, net international migration was 108,972 and net internal migration was 9,752, for a net gain of 118,724 people.

INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERATION

Maryland is active in several regional organizations, including the Southern Regional Education Board, Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, Interstate Mining Compact Commission, Appalachian Regional Commission, Susquehanna River Basin Commission (with Pennsylvania and New York), and the Potomac River Fisheries Commission (with Virginia). Representatives of Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia form the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, which coordinates regional mass transit. Other cooperation focuses on the Chesapeake Bay, and on the creation of the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and Tunnel. The Delmarva Advisory Council, representing Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, works with local organizations on the Delmarva Peninsula to develop and implement economic improvement programs. In fiscal year 2005, federal grants to Maryland totaled $8.589 billion, an estimated $8.892 billion in fiscal year 2006, before falling to an estimated $8.217 billion in fiscal year 2007.

ECONOMY

Throughout the colonial period, Maryland's economy was based on one croptobacco. Not only slaves but also indentured servants worked the fields, and when they earned their freedom, they too secured plots of land and grew tobacco for the European market. By 1820, however, industry was rivaling agriculture for economic preeminence. Shipbuilding, metalworking, and commerce transformed Baltimore into a major city. Within 60 years, it was a leading manufacturer of men's clothing and had the largest steel making plant in the United States.

Although manufacturing output continues to rise, the biggest growth areas in Maryland's economy are government, construction, trade, and services. Maryland employees are the best educated in the nation, with more than one-third of those over age 25 possessing a bachelor's degree in 2000. With the expansion of federal employment in the Washington metropolitan area by 40% from 1961 to 1980, many US government workers settled in suburban Maryland, primarily Prince George's and Montgomery counties. Construction and services in those areas expanded accordingly. The growth of state government boosted employment in Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties. Also of importance to the economy are fishing and agriculture (primarily dairy and poultry farming) on the Eastern Shore and coal mining in Garrett and Allegheny counties. Manufacturing has shifted toward high technology, information, and health-related products. While manufacturing output (durable and nondurable goods) has continued to grow, its relative weight in the gross state product has fallen from 8.5% in 1997 to 6.1% in 2004. Annual growth rates averaged 6.2% 1998 to 2000, and only fell to 5.4% in the national recession and slowdown of 2001. Increased federal government spending, particularly in defense-related industries, is expected to assure Maryland's economic recovery in 2002, and into 2003.

Maryland's gross state product (GSP) was $227.991 billion in 2004, of which the real estate sector accounted for the largest portion at $34.763 billion or 15.2% of GSP, followed by professional and technical services at $22.780 billion (9.9% of GSP), and healthcare and social services at $16.815 billion (7.3% of GSP). In that same year, there were an estimated 477,233 small businesses in Maryland. Of the 137,338 businesses that had employees, a total of 134,095 or 97.6% were small companies. An estimated 21,751 new businesses were established in the state in 2004, up 5,1% from the year before. Business terminations that same year came to 20,636, down 4.9% from 2003. There were 417 business bankruptcies in 2004, down 20.3% from the previous year. In 2005, the state's personal bankruptcy (Chapter 7 and Chapter 13) filing rate was 618 filings per 100,000 people, ranking Maryland as the 19th highest in the nation.

INCOME

In 2005 Maryland had a gross state product (GSP) of $245 billion which accounted for 2.0% of the nation's gross domestic product and placed the state at number 15 in highest GSP among the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, in 2004 Maryland had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $39,631. This ranked fifth in the United States and was 120% of the national average of $33,050. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of PCPI was 4.5%. Maryland had a total personal income (TPI) of $220,402,185,000, which ranked 14th in the United States and reflected an increase of 6.8% from 2003. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of TPI was 5.5%. Earnings of persons employed in Maryland increased from $145,140,178,000 in 2003 to $155,190,491,000 in 2004, an increase of 6.9%. The 200304 national change was 6.3%.

The US Census Bureau reports that the three-year average median household income for 2002 to 2004 in 2004 dollars was $56,763 compared to a national average of $44,473. During the same period an estimated 8.6% of the population was below the poverty line as compared to 12.4% nationwide.

LABOR

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), in April 2006 the seasonally adjusted civilian labor force in Maryland numbered 2,997,700, with approximately 105,700 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 3.5%, compared to the national average of 4.7% for the same period. Preliminary data for the same period placed nonfarm employment at 2,580,100. Since the beginning of the BLS data series in 1976, the highest unemployment rate recorded in Maryland was 8.3% in August 1982. The historical low was 3.3% in March 2000. Preliminary nonfarm employment data by occupation for April 2006 showed that approximately 7.3% of the labor force was employed in construction; 5.3% in manufacturing; 18.4% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 6.2% in financial activities; 15% in professional and business services; 14% in education and health services; 9% in leisure and hospitality services; and 18.2% in government.

Baltimore was a leading trade union center by the early 1830s although union activity subsided after the Panic of 1837. The Baltimore Federation of Labor was formed in 1889, and by 1900, the coal mines had been organized by the United Mine Workers. In 1902, Maryland passed the first workers' compensation law in the United States. It was declared unconstitutional in 1904 but was subsequently revived.

The US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that in 2005, a total of 337,000 of Maryland's 2,530,000 employed wage and salary workers were formal members of a union. This represented 13.3% of those so employed, up from 10.9% in 2004, and above the national average of 12%. Overall in 2005, a total of 379,000 workers (15%) in Maryland were covered by a union or employee association contract, which includes those workers who reported no union affiliation. Maryland is one of 28 states that do not have a right-to-work law.

As of 1 March 2006, Maryland had a state-mandated minimum wage rate of $6.15 per hour. In 2004, women in the state accounted for 48.1% of the employed civilian labor force.

AGRICULTURE

Maryland ranked 36th among the 50 states in agricultural income in 2005, with estimated receipts of $1,666 million, about 41% of that in crops.

Until the Revolutionary War, tobacco was the state's only cash crop; in 2004, Maryland produced an estimated 1,870,000 lb of tobacco. Corn and cereal grains are grown mainly in southern Maryland. Production in 2004 included 65,025,000 bushels of corn for grain; 21,285,000 bushels of soybeans, $112,811,000; 8,555,000 bushels of wheat, $26,093,000, and 2,847,000 bushels of barley, $5,409,000. Commercial vegetables, cultivated primarily on the Eastern Shore, were valued at $36.6 million in 2004. Fruits are also cultivated.

Maryland had some 12,100 farms covering 2,050,000 acres (830,000 hectares) in 2004.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

The Eastern Shore is an important dairy and poultry region; cattle are raised in north-central and western Maryland, while the central region is notable for horse breeding. In 2003, poultry farmers produced an estimated 6.4 million lb (2.9 million kg) of chickens and 1.37 billion lb (0.63 billion kg) of broilers for around $494.7 million. Also in 2003, Maryland farmers produced an estimated 813 million eggs worth around $46.2 million.

An estimated 1.2 billion lb (0.6 billion kg) of milk was produced in 2003 from 78,000 dairy cows. Maryland farms and ranches had an estimated 235,000 cattle and calves worth around $237 million in 2005. In 2004, there were an estimated 26,000 hogs and pigs, worth $2.6 million.

FISHING

In 2004, Maryland had a total commercial catch of 49.5 million lb (22.5 million kg), valued at $49.2 million. Maryland is a leading source of oysters, clams, and crabs. About 19% of the nation's supply of hard blue crabs comes from Maryland. Ocean City is the state's leading fishing port.

In 2003, the state had 17 processing and 58 wholesale plants with a total of about 1,417 employees. In 2001, the commercial fleet had at least 32 vessels.

The Fisheries Administration of the Department of Natural Resources monitors fish populations and breeds and implants oysters. It also stocks inland waterways with finfish. The state has five cold water and four warm water hatcheries. Maryland had 362,181 licensed sport anglers in 2004.

FORESTRY

Maryland's 2,566,000 acres (1,139,000 hectares) of forestland covers about 40% of the state's land area. More than 90% of that (2,372,000 acres/961,570 hectares) was classified as commercial forest, 90% of it privately owned. Hardwoods predominate, with red and white oaks and yellow poplar among the leading hardwood varieties. Lumber production in 2004 was 272 million board feet.

Forest management and improvement lie within the jurisdiction of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Forest Service.

MINING

According to preliminary data from the US Geological Survey (USGS), the estimated value of nonfuel mineral production by Maryland in 2003 was $382 million, a decrease from 2002 of about 4.5%. The USGS data ranked Maryland as 33rd among the 50 states by the total value of its nonfuel mineral production, accounting for 1% of total US output.

Portland cement, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel were the state's leading nonfuel minerals, by value, in 2003. Collectively, these three commodities (with crushed marble, shell and taprock) accounted for over 95% of the state's output of non-fuel minerals, by value.

According to preliminary figures from the USGS for 2003, the production of portland cement in Maryland totaled 1.9 million metric tons, and was valued at $143 million. Crushed stone output that same year stood at 21.8 million metric tons, and had a value of $138 million, while construction sand and gravel production totaled 11.4 million metric tons and was valued at $78.1 million). Maryland in 2003 was also a producer of dimension stone and common clays.

ENERGY AND POWER

As of 2003, Maryland had 24 electrical power service providers, of which 5 were publicly owned and 3 were cooperatives. Of the remainder, four were investor owned, one was an owner of an independent generator that sold directly to customers, while six were generation only suppliers and five were delivery only service providers. As of that same year there were 2,295,305 retail customers. Of that total, 2,010,338 received their power from investor-owned service providers. Cooperatives accounted for 174,291 customers, while publicly owned providers had 32,111 customers. There was only one independent generator or "facility" customer. Generation-only suppliers had 78,564 customers. There was no data on the number of customers using delivery-only providers.

Total net summer generating capability by the state's electrical generating plants in 2003 stood at 12.472 million kW, with total production that same year at 52.244 billion kWh. Of the total amount generated, only 0.1% came from electric utilities, with the remaining 99.9% coming from independent producers and combined heat and power service providers. The largest portion of all electric power generated, 29.939 billion kWh (57.3%), came from coal-fired plants, with nuclear plants in second place at 13.690 billion kWh (18.9%) and petroleum fueled plants in third at 3.572 billion kWh (6.8%). Other renewable power sources accounted for 1.7%% of all power generated, with hydroelectric accounting for 5.1%, natural gas fueled plants at 2.3%, plants using other types of gases at 0.6%.

As of 2006, Maryland had one nuclear power generating facility, the Calvert Cliffs plant.

Coal, Maryland's lone fossil fuel resource, is mined in Allegheny and Garrett counties, along the Pennsylvania border. In 2004, Maryland had 19 producing coal mines, 16 of which were surface mines and 3 were underground. Coal production that year totaled 5,225,000 short tons, up from 5,056,000 short tons in 2003. Of the total produced in 2004, the state's three underground mines accounted for the bulk at 3,339,000 short tons. Recoverable coal reserves in 2001 totaled 17 million short tons. One short ton equals 2,000 lb (0.907 metric tons).

As of 2004, Maryland had no crude oil refineries, nor any proven reserves, or production.

In 2004, Maryland had seven producing natural gas and gas condensate wells. In 2003 (the latest year for which data was available), marketed gas production (all gas produced excluding gas used for repressuring, vented and flared, and nonhydrocarbon gases removed) totaled 48 million cu ft (1.36 million cu m). There was no data available on the state's proven reserves of natural gas.

INDUSTRY

During the early 1800s, Maryland's first industries centered around the Baltimore shipyards. Small ironworks cast parts for sailing vessels, and many laborers worked as shipbuilders. By the 1850s, Baltimore was also producing weather-measuring instruments and fertilizers, and by the 1930s, it was a major center of metal refining. The city remains an important manufacturer of automobiles and parts, steel, and instruments. Manufacturing is led by the printing and publishing industry, the food industry, the machinery industry, and the chemical industry.

According to the US Census Bureau's Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) for 2004, Maryland's manufacturing sector covered some 19 product subsectors. The shipment value of all products manufactured in the state that same year was $36.489 billion. Of that total, computer and electronic product manufacturing accounted for the largest share at $5.839 billion. It was followed by food manufacturing at $5.477 billion; chemical manufacturing at $4.990 billion; transport equipment manufacturing at $2.394 billion; and fabricated metal product manufacturing at $2.175 billion.

In 2004, a total of 135,773 people in Maryland were employed in the state's manufacturing sector, according to the ASM. Of that total, 85,668 were actual production workers. In terms of total employment, the computer and electronic product manufacturing industry accounted for the largest portion of all manufacturing employees at 23,880, with 6,897 actual production workers. It was followed by printing and related support activities at 15,332 employees (11,195 actual production workers); food manufacturing at 14147 employees (10,187 actual production workers); fabricated metal product manufacturing at 12,297 employees (8,699 actual production workers); chemical manufacturing at 9,626 employees (5,694 actual production workers); machinery manufacturing at 8,224 employees (5,003 actual production workers); and plastics and rubber products manufacturing with 6,851 employees (5,189 actual production workers).

ASM data for 2004 showed that Maryland's manufacturing sector paid $6.309 billion in wages. Of that amount, the computer and electronic product manufacturing sector accounted for the largest share at $1.653 billion. It was followed by printing and related support activities at $556.758 million; chemical manufacturing at $528.906 million; fabricated metal product manufacturing at $490.015 million; and food manufacturing at $471.262 million.

COMMERCE

According to the 2002 Census of Wholesale Trade, Maryland's wholesale trade sector had sales that year totaling $60.6 billion from 6,104 establishments. Wholesalers of durable goods accounted for 3,764 establishments, followed by nondurable goods wholesalers at 1,813 and electronic markets, agents, and brokers accounting for 527 establishments. Sales by durable goods wholesalers in 2002 totaled $30.8 billion, while wholesalers of nondurable goods saw sales of $22.8 billion. Electronic markets, agents, and brokers in the wholesale trade industry had sales of $6.9 billion.

In the 2002 Census of Retail Trade, Maryland was listed as having 19,394 retail establishments with sales of $60.06 billion. The leading types of retail businesses by number of establishments were: food and beverage stores (3,332); clothing and clothing accessories stores (2,918); miscellaneous store retailers (2,075); and motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers (1,746). In terms of sales, motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers accounted for the largest share of retail sales at $16.3 billion, followed by food and beverage stores at $10.5 billion; general merchandise stores at $7.7 billion; building material/garden equipment and supplies dealers at $4.8 billion; and gasoline stations at $4.1 billion. A total of 285,561 people were employed by the retail sector in Maryland that year.

Most of Maryland's retail facilities are located in the Baltimore metropolitan area and Montgomery and Prince George's counties surrounding Washington, DC. These counties are home to about 90% of Maryland's 5 million residents. The Washington-Baltimore Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area is among the nation's top 10 retail markets.

Exports by Maryland companies totaled $7.1 billion in 2005. While export activities in established markets such as Europe and Canada are still predominant, strong inroads have been made in targeted trade areas of Asia and Latin America.

CONSUMER PROTECTION

The state agency generally responsible for controlling unfair and deceptive trade practices is the Division of Consumer Protection within the Attorney General's Office. However, consumer complaints involving state-chartered financial institutions are the responsibility of the Office of Financial Regulation, while the state's automotive "Lemon Law" is the responsibility of the Motor Vehicle Administration, which is part of the Department of Transportation, although any litigation is handled by the Attorney General's Office.

When dealing with consumer protection issues, the state's Attorney General's Office can initiate civil and criminal proceedings (the latter must be done in conjunction with the local district attorney); administer consumer protection and education programs; handle formal consumer complaints; and exercise broad subpoena powers. However, the Attorney General cannot represent the state before state and federal regulatory agencies. In antitrust actions, the Attorney General's Office cannot act on behalf of those consumers who are incapable of acting on their own, but can initiate damage actions on behalf of the state in state courts; file criminal proceedings; and represent counties, cities and other governmental entities in recovering civil damages under state or federal law.

The Consumer Protection Division's main office is located in Baltimore, but it also has regional offices in Cumberland, Frederick, Hagerstown, Hughesville and Salisbury. County government consumer protection offices are located in Columbia and Rockville.

BANKING

As of June 2005, Maryland had 113 insured banks, savings and loans, and saving banks, plus 11 state-chartered and 109 federally chartered credit unions (CUs). Excluding the CUs, the Washington DC-Arlington-Alexandria market area, the Baltimore-Tow-son-Alexandria market area accounted for the largest portion of the state's financial institutions and deposits in 2004, at 90 and $43.864 billion, respectively. As of June 2005, CUs accounted for 21.5% of all assets held by all financial institutions in the state, or some $13.558 billion. Banks, savings and loans, and savings banks collectively accounted for the remaining 78.5% or $49.420 billion in assets held.

All state-chartered banks, savings and loan associations and trusts are regulated by the state's Commissioner of Financial Regulation, within the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.

In 2004, the median percentage of past-due and nonaccrual loans to total loans was 0.93%, down from 1.14% in 2003. As of fourth quarter 2005 that same rate had fallen further to 0.89%.

INSURANCE

In 2004 there were over 3.47 million individual life insurance policies in force with a total value of about $275 billion; total value for all categories of life insurance (individual, group, and credit) was over $433 billion. The average coverage amount is $79,200 per policy holder. Death benefits paid that year totaled at over $1.17 billion.

As of 2003, there were 46 property and casualty and 10 life and health insurance companies domiciled in the state. In 2004, direct premiums for property and casualty insurance totaled $8.28 billion. That year, there were 54,882 flood insurance policies in force in the state, with a total value of $8 billion.

The Maryland Automobile Insurance Fund, a quasi-independent agency created in 1972, pays claims against uninsured motorists (i.e., hit-and-run drivers, out-of-state uninsured motorists, and state residents driving in violation of Maryland's compulsory automobile insurance law), and sells policies to Maryland drivers unable to obtain insurance from private companies.

In 2004, 61% of state residents held employment-based health insurance policies, 4% held individual policies, and 19% were covered under Medicare and Medicaid; 14% of residents were uninsured. In 2003, employee contributions for employment-based health coverage averaged at 23% for single coverage and 29% for family coverage. The state offers an 18-month health benefits expansion program for small-firm employees in connection with the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA, 1986), a health insurance program for those who lose employment-based coverage due to termination or reduction of work hours.

In 2003, there were over 3.7 million auto insurance policies in effect for private passenger cars. Required minimum coverage includes bodily injury liability of up to $20,000 per individual and $40,000 for all persons injured in an accident, as well as property damage liability of $15,000. Personal injury protection and uninsured motorist coverage are also mandatory. In 2003, the average expenditure per vehicle for insurance coverage was $890.86.

The State Insurance Division of the Department of Licensing and Regulation licenses all state insurance companies, agents, and brokers, and must approve all policies for sale in the state.

SECURITIES

There are no securities or commodities exchanges in Maryland. In 2005, there were 2,450 personal financial advisers employed in the state and 3,600 securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents. In 2004, there were over 175 publicly traded companies within the state, with over 67 NASDAQ companies, 37 NYSE listings, and 13 AMEX listings. In 2006, the state had five Fortune 500 companies; Lockheed Martin (in Bethesda) ranked first in the state and 52nd in the nation with revenues of over $37.2 billion, followed by Constellation Energy (Baltimore), Marriott International (Bethesda), Coventry Health Care (Bethesda), and Black and Decker (Towson). All five companies are listed on the NYSE.

PUBLIC FINANCE

The state budget, prepared by the Department of Budget and Management, is submitted annually by the governor to the General Assembly for amendment and approval. The fiscal year (FY) runs from 1 July to 30 June.

Fiscal year 2006 general funds were estimated at $13.5 billion for resources and $12.3 billion for expenditures. In fiscal year 2004, federal government grants to Maryland were $8.8 billion.

In the fiscal year 2007 federal budget, Maryland was slated to receive: $178.5 million for the continued consolidation of Food and Drug Administration facilities at White Oak. The request includes funding for the Building One renovation and for construction of the Office of the Commissioner and Office of Regulatory Affairs office building, and for other infrastructure needs; $6 million for improvements at the Center for Veterinary Medicine in Laurel. These funds will support the replacement of the underground water distribution systems for a central utility plant and 13 laboratory buildings with a modern, high efficiency, high quality, and low maintenance system; $5.8 million for improvements at the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's (CDRH) White Oak site in Silver Spring. These funds will allow for the upgrade of the major mechanical systems of an old laboratory and convert it into a machine fabrication shop and a photo science laboratory for the CDRH.

TAXATION

In 2005, Maryland collected $13,497 million in tax revenues or $2,410 per capita, which placed it 14th among the 50 states in per capita tax burden. The national average was $2,192 per capita. Property taxes accounted for 3.9% of the total, sales taxes 21.4%, selective sales taxes 17.7%, individual income taxes 41.9%, corporate income taxes 6.0%, and other taxes 9.0%.

MarylandState Government Finances
(Dollar amounts in thousands. Per capita amounts in dollars.)
AMOUNT PER CAPITA
Abbreviations and symbols:zero or rounds to zero; (NA) not available; (X) not applicable.
source: U.S. Census Bureau, Governments Division, 2004 Survey of State Government Finances, January 2006.
Total Revenue 28,395,564 5,106.20
  General revenue 22,841,717 4,107.48
    Intergovernmental revenue 6,456,870 1,161.10
    Taxes 12,314,799 2,214.49
      General sales 2,945,060 529.59
      Selective sales 2,267,364 407.73
      License taxes 511,559 91.99
      Individual income tax 5,277,844 949.08
      Corporate income tax 447,487 80.47
      Other taxes 865,485 155.63
    Current charges 2,304,963 414.49
    Miscellaneous general revenue 1,765,085 317.40
  Utility revenue 107,076 19.25
  Liquor store revenue - -
  Insurance trust revenue 5,446,771 979.46
Total expenditure 25,343,680 4,557.40
  Intergovernmental expenditure 5,632,520 1,012.86
  Direct expenditure 19,711,160 3,544.54
    Current operation 14,025,013 2,522.03
    Capital outlay 1,624,740 292.17
    Insurance benefits and repayments 2,493,018 448.30
    Assistance and subsidies 697,114 125.36
    Interest on debt 871,275 156.68
Exhibit: Salaries and wages 4,011,309 721.33
Total expenditure 25,343,680 4,557.40
  General expenditure 22,299,005 4,009.89
    Intergovernmental expenditure 5,632,520 1,012.86
    Direct expenditure 16,666,485 2,997.03
  General expenditures, by function:
    Education 7,366,076 1,324.60
    Public welfare 5,490,400 987.30
    Hospitals 405,108 72.85
    Health 1,524,186 274.08
    Highways 1,655,814 297.75
    Police protection 418,856 75.32
    Correction 1,064,123 191.35
    Natural resources 484,135 87.06
    Parks and recreation 255,796 46.00
    Government administration 785,901 141.32
    Interest on general debt 871,275 156.68
    Other and unallocable 1,977,335 355.57
  Utility expenditure 551,657 99.20
  Liquor store expenditure - -
  Insurance trust expenditure 2,493,018 448.30
Debt at end of fiscal year 13,600,741 2,445.74
Cash and security holdings 44,014,692 7,914.89

As of 1 January 2006, Maryland had four individual income tax brackets ranging from 2.0 to 4.75%. The state taxes corporations at a flat rate of 7.0%.

In 2004, state and local property taxes amounted to about $6 billion or $1,082 per capita. The per capita amount ranks the state 17th highest nationally. Local governments collected $5,539,833,000 of the total and the state government $478,796,000.

Maryland taxes retail sales at a rate of 5%. Food purchased for consumption off-premises is tax exempt. The tax on cigarettes is 100 cents per pack, which ranks 19th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Maryland taxes gasoline at 23.5 cents per gallon. This is in addition to the 18.4 cents per gallon federal tax on gasoline.

According to the Tax Foundation, for every federal tax dollar sent to Washington in 2004, Maryland citizens received $1.44 in federal spending.

ECONOMIC POLICY

The Department of Business and Economic Development (DBED), created in 1995, encourages new firms to locate in Maryland and established firms to expand their in-state facilities, promotes the tourist industry, and disseminates information about the state's history and attractions. The department helps secure industrial mortgage loans for businesses that create new jobs, and also provides small-business loans, low-interest construction loads, assistance in plant location and expansion; and supports the Division of Business Development to allow companies to maximize their use of state services. In addition, the department assists local governments in attracting federal funds for economic development and maintains programs to encourage minority businesses, the marketing of seafood, and the use of Ocean City Convention Hall. In 2006, the DBED maintained international offices in Mexico City, Monterrey (Mexico), Beijing, Shanghai, Taipei, Singapore, Bangalore (India), Shorashim (Israel), and Paris. The Department of State Planning oversees state and regional development programs and helps local governments develop planning goals.

During the 1930s, Maryland pioneered in urban design with the new town of Greenbelt, in Prince George's County. A wholly planned community, Columbia, was built in Howard County during the 1960s. More recently, redevelopment of Baltimore's decaying inner city has been aggressively promoted. Harborplace, a waterside pavilion featuring hundreds of shops and restaurants, formally opened in 1980, and an industrial park was developed in a high-unemployment section of northwest Baltimore during the early 1980s. Not far from Harborplace are the 33-story World Trade Center and the National Aquarium. Urban restoration has also been encouraged by urban homesteading: a Baltimorean willing to make a commitment to live in an old brick building and fix it up can submit a closed bid to buy it. An analogous "shopsteading" program to attract merchants has also been encouraged.

In 1982, Maryland initiated a program of state enterprise zones to encourage economic growth by focusing state and local resources on designated areas requiring economic stimulus. Five of these enterprise zones were located in western Maryland, four in the central part of the state, and one on the Eastern Shore. There were 29 state enterprise zones in 2006. With Delaware, Virginia, and Washington DC, Maryland has been recognized as part of an international life sciences hub, dubbed the BioCapital hub. Maryland companies and agencies participate in bioscience "hotbed" campaigns, concerted efforts by groups made up of government development agencies, pharmaceutical and bioscience companies, research institutes, universities, and nonprofits to attract capital, personnel and resources to develop a life sciences cluster. Over 500 foreign-based businesses have been established in Maryland, creating over 75,000 jobs. The Office of International Business (OIB) within the DBED, offers assistance to foreign companies for location, relocation, and expansion, in addition to providing assistance to Maryland exporters.

HEALTH

The infant mortality rate in October 2005 was estimated at 8.2 per 1,000 live births. The birth rate in 2003 was 13.6 per 1,000 population. The abortion rate stood at 29 per 1,000 women in 2000. In 2003, about 83.7% of pregnant woman received prenatal care beginning in the first trimester. In 2004, approximately 80% of children received routine immunizations before the age of three.

The crude death rate in 2003 was 8.1 deaths per 1,000 population. As of 2002, the death rates for major causes of death (per 100,000 resident population) were: heart disease, 220; cancer, 190.4; cerebrovascular diseases, 51.5; chronic lower respiratory diseases, 35.6; and diabetes, 27.8. The mortality rate from HIV infection was 11.2 per 100,000 population, representing the second-highest rate in the country (following the District of Columbia at 40.8 per 100,000); the national HIV death rate was 4.9 per 100,000. In 2004, the reported AIDS case rate was at about 26.1 per 100,000 population, the fourth-highest rate in the country. In 2002, about 55.2% of the population was considered overweight or obese. As of 2004, about 19.5% of state residents were smokers.

In 2003, Maryland had 51 community hospitals with about 11,600 beds. There were about 645,000 patient admissions that year and 6.5 million outpatient visits. The average daily inpatient census was about 8,700 patients. The average cost per day for hospital care was $1,571. Also in 2003, there were about 243 certified nursing facilities in the state with 29,362 beds and an overall occupancy rate of about 86.1%. In 2004, it was estimated that about 75.8% of all state residents had received some type of dental care within the year. Maryland had 389 physicians per 100,000 resident population in 2004 and 875 nurses per 100,000 in 2005. In 2004, there were a total of 4,169 dentists in the state.

About 19% of state residents were enrolled in Medicaid and Medicare programs in 2004. Approximately 14% of the state population was uninsured in 2004. In 2003, state health care expenditures totaled $6.8 million.

Maryland's two medical schools are at Johns Hopkins University, which operates in connection with the Johns Hopkins Hospital and has superbly equipped research facilities, and at the University of Marylandboth located in Baltimore. Johns Hopkins Hospital ranked first on the Honor Roll of Best Hospitals 2005 by U.S. News & World Report ; in the same report, it ranked third for best pediatric hospitals and best care for cancer and heart disease. Federal health centers located in Bethesda include the National Institutes of Health and the National Naval Medical Center.

SOCIAL WELFARE

In 2004, about 109,000 people received unemployment benefits, with the average weekly unemployment benefit at $254. In fiscal year 2005, the estimated average monthly participation in the food stamp program included about 288,943 persons (131,556 households); the average monthly benefit was about $92.33 per person. That year, the total of benefits paid through the state for the food stamp program was about $320.1 million.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the system of federal welfare assistance that officially replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) in 1997, was reauthorized through the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. TANF is funded through federal block grants that are divided among the states based on an equation involving the number of recipients in each state. Maryland's TANF program is called the Family Investment Program (FIP). In 2004, the state program had 59,000 recipients; state and federal expenditures on this TANF program totaled $32 million in fiscal year 2003.

In December 2004, Social Security benefits were paid to 761,160 Maryland residents. This number included 499,620 retired workers, 75,210 widows and widowers, 86,860 disabled workers, 35,200 spouses, and 64,270 children. Social Security beneficiaries represented 13.7% of the total state population and 87.4% of the state's population age 65 and older. Retired workers received an average monthly payment of $962; widows and widowers, $923; disabled workers, $926; and spouses, $493. Payments for children of retired workers averaged $511 per month; children of deceased workers, $639; and children of disabled workers, $287. Federal Supplemental Security Income payments in December 2004 went to 92,776 Marylanders, averaging $408 a month. An additional $641,000 of state-administered supplemental payments were distributed to 2,973 residents.

HOUSING

Maryland has sought to preserve many of its historic houses. Block upon block of two-story brick row houses, often with white stoops, fill the older parts of Baltimore, and stone cottages built to withstand rough winters are still found in the western counties. Greenbelt and Columbia exemplify changing modern concepts of community planning.

There were an estimated 2,250,339 housing units in Maryland in 2004, of which 2,077,900 were occupied; 69.5% were owner-occupied. About 51.9% of all units are single-family, detached homes. Most units rely on utility gas and electricity for heating. It was estimated that 61,901 units lacked telephone service, 6,034 lacked complete plumbing facilities, and 5,885 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household had 2.61 members.

In 2004, 27,400 privately owned units were authorized for construction. The median home value was $216,529. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $1,406. Renters paid a median of $837 per month. In 2006, the state received over $8 million in community development block grants from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The city of Baltimore received over $23.9 million in community development block grants.

The Department of Housing and Community Development, formed in 1987, oversees all housing and cultural resource areas, providing neighborhood rehabilitation and revitalization, development financing, historical and cultural programs, and information technology. The Maryland Housing Fund of the Department insures qualified lending institutions against losses on home mortgage loans.

EDUCATION

As of 2004, 87.4% of Marylanders 25 years and older had completed high school compared the national average of 84%. Some 35.2% had at least four years of college, far surpassing the national average of 26%. Maryland students must pass state High School Assessments (HSA) in order to graduate from high school.

The total enrollment for fall 2002 in Maryland's public schools stood at 867,000. Of these, 610,000 attended schools from kindergarten through grade eight, and 256,000 attended high school. Approximately 50.4% of the students were white, 37.9% were black, 6.4% were Hispanic, 4.9% were Asian/Pacific Islander, and 0.4% were American Indian/Alaskan Native. Total enrollment was estimated at 863,000 in fall 2003 and was expected to be 858,000 by fall 2014, a decline of 1% during the period 2002 to 2014. There were 149,253 students enrolled in 727 private schools. Expenditures for public education in 2003/04 were estimated at $8.7 billion. Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has tested public school students nationwide. The resulting report, The Nation's Report Card, stated that in 2005 eighth graders in Maryland scored 278 out of 500 in mathematics, matching the national average.

As of fall 2002, there were 300,269 students enrolled in college or graduate school; minority students comprised 36% of total post-secondary enrollment. In 2005 Maryland had 63 degree-granting institutions. The institutions of higher education in Maryland are organized as follows: (1) the public four-year colleges and universities, (2) the community colleges, (3) the independent colleges and universities, and (4) the private career schools.

The state's public four-year institutions include the University of Maryland System, Morgan State University, and St. Mary's College of Maryland. The University of Maryland System is comprised of 13 separate degree-granting institutions located throughout the state. Included, there are two research and public service institutions reporting to the Systemthe Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies and the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute. These institutions are governed by a single board of regents and a system administration. Morgan State University, the designated public urban teaching university, is governed by a single board of regents. Morgan is one of Maryland's four historically black institutions. St. Mary's College of Maryland, the State's public honors college, is the state's only "state-related" institution. As such, the college has more operational autonomy than the other public four-year institutions, particularly concerning procurement, budget, and personnel administration.

The 16 community colleges are two-year, open-admission institutions with courses and programs leading to certificates and associate degrees, as well as career-oriented and continuing education/community service programs. They receive their funding from three sources: 1) state funding through a funding formula; 2) local funding through a negotiated budget process; and 3) students' tuition and fees. Baltimore City Community College became a state institution in 1990/91 and receives the majority of its funding from the state. The state provides funding to independent colleges and universities in Maryland under a statutory formula. Eligible independent institutions must meet certain standards concerning the date of establishment, type of degrees conferred, accreditation, and affirmative action programs. St. John's College in Annapolis is known for its unique program that includes study of the ancient Greek and Latin classics in their original languages.

The Maryland Higher Education Commission serves as the state's agency that provides, as part of its primary mission, coordination, regulatory oversight, and program approval for Maryland's postsecondary education system. The State Scholarship Administration oversees state scholarship programs.

ARTS

Although close to the arts centers of Washington, DC, Maryland has its own cultural attractions. Baltimore, a major theatrical center in the 1800s, still has many legitimate theaters. Center Stage in Baltimore is the designated state theater of Maryland, and the Olney Theatre in Montgomery County is the official state summer theater. Arts organizations are aided by the Maryland State Arts Council, established in 1967 and led by a body of 17 appointed citizens.

The state's leading orchestra is the Baltimore Symphony; it began in 1916 and is the only major American orchestra that started as an established branch of the municipal government. In early February 2005, the Baltimore Symphony began performing in the new Music Center at Strathmore. Baltimore is also the home of the Baltimore Opera Company, and its jazz clubs were the launching pads for such musical notables as Eubie Blake, Ella Fitzgerald, and Cab Calloway. Annapolis hosts a symphony, an opera company, and the Ballet Theatre of Maryland. The National Ballet (est. 1948) is the oldest professional ballet company in the state. One of the newest additions to the arts community is the Maryland Symphony Orchestra in Hagerstown, established in 1982. The Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore is one of the nation's most distinguished music schools. As of 2006, the Peabody Institute's conservatory offered 26 major fields including opera, chamber music, composition, computer music, recording arts, and music education. Both the Maryland Ballet Company and Maryland Dance Theater are nationally known.

In 2005, the Maryland State Arts Council and other arts organizations received grants totaling 36 grants totaling $2,507,890 from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The Maryland Humanities Council (MHC) was founded in 1973. The MHC reached approximately 900,000 Marylanders through their programs in 2004. As of 2006, MHC provided programs such as "Maryland Center for the Book" and the first annual Youth Film JAM in May 2006a festival providing free screenings of award-winning films followed by discussions with film critics and the festival advisory committee. In 2005, the state received 26 grants, totaling $2,645,201, from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS

For the fiscal year ending June 2001, Maryland's 24 public library systems had 175 libraries, of which 158 were branches. In that same year, the system also operated 19 bookmobiles, had 15,323,000 volumes of books and serial publications on its shelves, and had a combined total circulation of 46,595,000. The system also had 774,000 audio and 443,000 video items, and 5,000 electronic format items (CD-ROMs, magnetic tapes, and disks). The center of the state library network is the Enoch Pratt Free Library in the city of Baltimore. Founded in 1886, it had 28 branches, over 2.8 million volumes, and a circulation of over 1.5 million in 1999. Each county also has its own library system. The largest academic libraries are those of Johns Hopkins University (2,507,232 volumes in 1999) and the University of Maryland at College Park (2.2 million). The Maryland Historical Society Library specializes in genealogy, heraldry, and state history. The Maryland State Archives houses government records, private manuscripts, maps, and photographs. Maryland is also the site of several federal libraries, including the National Agricultural Library at Beltsville, with over 2 million volumes; the National Library of Medicine at Bethesda, 2,200,000; and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Library at Rockville, with about 1 million volumes in 1999. In 2001, operating income for the state's public library system was $182,940,000, including $1,854,000 in federal grants and $24,406,000 in state grants.

Of the approximately 147 museums and historic sites in the state, the major institutions are the US Naval Academy Museum in Annapolis and Baltimore's Museum of Art, National Aquarium Seaport and Maritime Museum, Maryland Academy of Sciences, the Maryland Historical Society Museum, and Peale Museum, the oldest museum building in the United States. Important historic sites include Ft. McHenry National Monument and Shrine in Baltimore (inspiration for "The Star-Spangled Banner") and Antietam National Battlefield Site near Sharpsburg.

COMMUNICATIONS

In 2004, 93.4% of Maryland's occupied housing units had telephones. Additionally, by June of that same year there were 3,575,747 mobile wireless telephone subscribers. In 2003, 66.0% of Maryland households had a computer and 59.2% had Internet access. By June 2005, there were 913,068 high-speed lines in Maryland, 822,436 residential and 90,632 for business.

The state had 12 major AM and 35 major FM radio stations in 2005. Maryland has 13 major television stations, including public broadcasting stations in Annapolis, Baltimore, Frederick, Hagerstown, Oakland, and Salisbury. Maryland also receives the signals of many Washington, DC. broadcast stations. The Baltimore area had almost 1 million television households, 68% of which received cable in 1999.

PRESS

The Maryland Gazette, established at Annapolis in 1727, was the state's first newspaper. It wasn't until 1773 that Baltimore got its first paper, the Maryland Journal and Baltimore Advertiser, but by 1820 there were five highly partisan papers in the city. The Baltimore Sun, founded in 1837, reached its heyday after 1906, when H. L. Mencken became a staff writer. Mencken, who was also an important editor and critic, helped found the American Mercury magazine in 1924.

As of 2005, Maryland had 10 morning and 3 afternoon dailies, as well as 9 Sunday papers. The most influential newspaper published in Baltimore is the Sun (daily, 280,717; Sunday, 454,045). The Washington Post (707,690 daily; 1,007,487 Sundays) is also widely read in Maryland.

ORGANIZATIONS

In 2006, there were over 6,690 nonprofit organizations registered within the state, of which about 4,804 were registered as charitable, educational, or religious organizations. National medically oriented organizations with headquarters in Maryland include the National Federation of the Blind, the American Urological Association, the American Occupational Therapy Association, National Foundation for Cancer Research, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, the National Association of the Deaf, and the American Music Therapy Association.

Leading commercial, professional, and trade groups include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the American Fisheries Society, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, and the Retailer's Bakery of America.

Lacrosse, a major sport in the state, is represented by the Lacrosse Foundation in Baltimore and the US Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association in Chestertown. The National Amateur Baseball Federation, the American Tennis Association, and the National 4-H Council are also based in the state.

A number of military organizations are based in Maryland, including the Air Force Historical Foundation, the American Military Society, AMVETS (American Veterans of World War II, Korea, and Vietnam), the Black Military History Institute of America, the Vietnam Veterans of America, and the Blue Star Mothers of America. The National Flag Day Foundation is based in Baltimore.

Historical and cultural organizations include the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Historical Society, the Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore, and the Folk Alliance. There are also a number of county and regional historical societies. Education and research associations on the national level include the Jane Goodall Institute for Wildlife Research, Education, and Conservation, and the Wildlife Society.

Social action and civil rights organizations based in Maryland include the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Catholic Relief Services, and Goodwill Industries International.

TOURISM, TRAVEL, AND RECREATION

In 2004, the state hosted over 21 million travelers. About 80% of all travelers were residents of one of the following states: Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, New Jersey, Florida, North Carolina, California, Ohio, Delaware, and West Virginia.

Attractions include parks, historical sites, and national seashore (Assateague Island). Annapolis, the state capital, is the site of the US Naval Academy. On Baltimore's waterfront are monuments to Francis Scott Key and Edgar Allan Poe, historic Ft. McHenry, and many restaurants serving the city's famed crab cakes and other seafood specialties. Ocean City is the state's major seaside resort, and there are many resort towns along Chesapeake Bay. Camp David, in Thurmont, is the home of presidential retreat. The Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library is in College Park. The state's office of tourism developed a "Star Spangled Banner Tour"a 100-mi (160-km) scenic driving tour ending at Fort McHenry, where the national anthem was composed. Near Camden Yard (home of the Baltimore Orioles) is the childhood home of Babe Ruth, who played for the New York Yankees. Baltimore also features the National Aquarium. The Preakness Race (thoroughbred racing) is the second leg of the Triple Crown and is run at the State Fairgrounds in Baltimore. There are 19 state parks with camping facilities and 10 recreation areas. The Civil War battlefield at Antietam and other Civil War trails are located in Maryland.

SPORTS

Maryland has two major professional sports teams: the Baltimore Orioles of Major League Baseball and the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League. The Ravens (formerly the Browns) moved from Cleveland after the 1995 season, and play in a downtown stadium, built in 1998, near Oriole Park at Camden Yards. The NFL's Washington Redskins play in a new stadium, Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, in Landover, but are still considered a team of the District of Columbia. The Orioles won the World Series in 1966, 1970, and 1983, and American League titles in 1969, 1971, 1979, and 1983.

There are several minor league baseball teams in the state, including teams in Bowie, Frederick, Delmarva, Aberdeen, and Hagerstown.

Ever since 1750, when the first Arabian thoroughbred horse was imported by a Maryland breeder, horse racing has been a popular state pastime. The major tracks are Pimlico (Baltimore), Bowie, and Laurel. Pimlico is the site of the Preakness Stakes, the second leg of racing's Triple Crown. Harness racing is held at Ocean Downs in Ocean City; quarter-horse racing takes place at several tracks throughout the state; and several steeplechase events, including the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup, are held annually.

In men's collegiate basketball, the University of Maryland won the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Championship in 2002, the ACC Tournament title in 2004, and the National Invitation Tournament in 1972. The Maryland women's basketball team won the National Championship in 2006. Morgan State took the NCAA Division II title in 1974. Another major sport is lacrosse; Johns Hopkins, the Naval Academy, and the University of Maryland all have performed well in intercollegiate competition. In fact, Johns Hopkins has won the NCAA National Championship eight times, most recently in 2005.

Every weekend from April to October, Marylanders compete in jousting tournaments held in four classes throughout the state. In modern jousting, designated as the official state sport, horseback riders attempt to pick up small rings with long, lance-like poles. The state championship is held in October.

Babe Ruth, perhaps the greatest baseball player to ever play the game, was one of many star athletes to be born in the state.

FAMOUS MARYLANDERS

Politicians

Maryland's lone US vice president was Spiro Theodore Agnew (191896), who served as governor of Maryland before being elected as Richard Nixon's running mate in 1968. Reelected with Nixon in 1972, Agnew resigned the vice-presidency in October 1973 after a federal indictment had been filed against him. Roger Brooke Taney (17771864) served as attorney general and secretary of the treasury in Andrew Jackson's cabinet before being confirmed as US chief justice in 1836; his most historically significant case was the Dred Scott decision in 1856, in which the Supreme Court ruled that Congress could not exclude slavery from any territory.

Three associate justices of the US Supreme Court were also born in Maryland. Thomas Johnson (17321819), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, served as the first governor of the State of Maryland before his appointment to the Court in 1791. Samuel Chase (17411811) was a Revolutionary leader, another signer of the Declaration of Independence, and a local judicial and political leader before being appointed to the high court in 1797; impeached in 1804 because of his alleged hostility to the Jeffersonians, he was acquitted by the Senate the following year. As counsel for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Thurgood Marshall (190893), argued the landmark Brown v. Board of Education school desegregation case before the Supreme Court in 1954; President Lyndon Johnson appointed him to the Court 13 years later.

Other major federal officeholders born in Maryland include John Hanson (172183), a member of the Continental Congress and first president to serve under the Articles of confederation (178182); Charles Carroll of Carrollton (17371832), a signer of the Declaration of Independence and US senator from 1789 to 1792; John Pendleton Kennedy (17951870), secretary of the Navy under Millard Fillmore and a popular novelist known by the pseudonym Mark Littleton; Reverdy Johnson (17961876), attorney general under Zachary Taylor; Charles Joseph Bonaparte (18511921) secretary of the Navy and attorney general in Theodore Roosevelt's cabinet; and Benjamin Civiletti (b.New York, 1935), attorney general under Jimmy Carter. Among the many important state officeholders are William Paca (174099), a signer of the Declaration of Independence and later governor; Luther Martin (b.New Jersey, 17481826), Maryland's attorney general from 1778 to 1805 and from 1818 to 1822, as well as defense counsel in the impeachment trial of Chase and in the treason trial of Aaron Burr; John Eager Howard (17521827), Revolutionary soldier, governor, and US senator; and Albert C. Ritchie (18761936), governor from 1919 to 1935. William D. Schaefer (b.1921) was mayor of Baltimore from 197187; he was elected governor in 1987.

Lawyer and poet Francis Scott Key (17791843) wrote "The Star-Spangled Banner"now the national anthemin 1814. The prominent abolitionists Frederick Douglass (Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, 1817?95) and Harriet Tubman (1820?1913) were born in Maryland, as was John Carroll (17351815), the first Roman Catholic bishop in the United States and founder of Georgetown University. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton (b.New York, 17741821), canonized by the Roman Catholic Church in 1975, was the first native-born American saint. Stephen Decatur (17791820), a prominent naval officer, has been credited with the toast "Our country, right or wrong!"

Business Leaders

Prominent Maryland business leaders include Alexander Brown (b.Ireland, 17641834), a Scotch-Irish immigrant who built the firm that is now the second-oldest private investment banking house in the United States; George Peabody (b.Massachusetts, 17951869), founder of the world-famous Peabody Conservatory of Music (now the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University); and Enoch Pratt (b.Massachusetts, (180896) who endowed the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore. Benjamin Banneker (17311806), a free black, assisted in surveying the new District of Columbia and published almanacs from 1792 to 1797. Ottmar Mergenthaler (b.Germany, 185499), who made his home in Baltimore, invented the linotype machine.

Educators and Physicians

Financier-philanthropist Johns Hopkins (17951873) was a Marylander, and educators Daniel Coit Gilman (b.Connecticut, 18311908) and William Osler (b.Canada, 18491919, also a famed phy-sician), were prominent in the establishment of the university and medical school named in Hopkins' honor. Peyton Rous (18791970) won the 1966 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.

Writers

Maryland's best-known modern writer was H(enry) L(ouis) Mencken (18801956), a Baltimore newspaper reporter who was also a gifted social commentator, political wit, and student of the American language. Edgar Allan Poe (b.Massachusetts, 180949), known for his poems and eerie short stories, died in Baltimore, and novelist-reformer Upton Sinclair (18781968) was born there. Other writers associated with Maryland include James M. Cain (18921976), Leon Uris (19242003), John Barth (b.1930), and Russell Baker (b.1925). Painters John Hesselius (b.Pennsylvania, 172878) and Charles Willson Peale (17411827) are also linked with the state.

Actors and Musicians

Most notable among Maryland actors are Edwin Booth (183393) and his brother John Wilkes Booth (183865), notorious as the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. Maryland was the birthplace of several jazz musicians, including James Hubert "Eubie" Blake (18831983), William Henry "Chick" Webb (190739), and Billie Holiday (191559).

Sports Figures

Probably the greatest baseball player of all time, George Herman "Babe" Ruth (18951948) was born in Baltimore. Other prominent ballplayers include Robert Moses "Lefty" Grove (190075), James Emory "Jimmy" Foxx (190767), and Al Kaline (b.1934). Former lightweight boxing champion Joe Gans (18741910) was a Maryland native.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alampi, Gary, (ed.). Gale State Rankings Reporter. Detroit: Gale Research, Inc., 1994.

Cities of the United States. 5th ed. Farmington Hills: Thomson Gale, 2005.

Council of State Governments. The Book of the States, 2006 Edition. Lexington, Ky.: Council of State Governments, 2006.

Coursey, Denise Hawkins, and Matthew Coursey. Frommer's Maryland & Delaware. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide, 2000.

DeGrove, John Melvin. Planning Policy and Politics: Smart Growth and the States. Cambridge, Mass.: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, 2005.

FDIC, Division of Research and Statistics. Statistics on Banking: A Statistical Profile of the United States Banking Industry. Washington, D.C.: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 1993.

Fuke, Richard Paul. Imperfect Equality: African Americans and the Confines of White Racial Attitudes in Post-Emancipation Maryland. New York: Fordham University Press, 1999.

Harp, David W. The Great Marsh: An Intimate Journey into a Chesapeake Wetland. Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.

Leone, Mark P. The Archaeology of Liberty in an American Capital: Excavations in Annapolis. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005.

Maryland, State of. Department of Economic and Community Development. Maryland Statistical Abstract 199394. Annapolis: State of Maryland, 1995.

Marzec, Robert P. (ed.). The Mid-Atlantic Region. Vol. 2 in The Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Regional Cultures. West-port, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2004.

Riordan, Timothy B. The Plundering Time: Maryland and the English Civil War, 16451646. Baltimore, Md.: Maryland Historical Society, 2004.

US Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, US Census Bureau. Maryland, 2000. Summary Social, Economic, and Housing Characteristics: 2000 Census of Population and Housing. Washington, D.C.: US Government Printing Office, 2003.

US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Office of Educational Research and Improvement. Digest of Education Statistics, 1993. Washington, D.C.: US Government Printing Office, 1993.

US Department of the Interior, US Fish and Wildlife Service. Endangered and Threatened Species Recovery Program. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1990.

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Maryland

MARYLAND

MARYLAND. A small state on the Atlantic coast, midway between the northern and southern boundaries of the United States, Maryland embraces the Chesapeake Bay and extends narrowly westward into the Appalachian Mountains. When the first European settlers arrived in the area, there were a dozen or more Native American tribes, each with 200 or more members crisscrossing the land, living mostly on the seafood from the Chesapeake. For sixty years after European settlement, relations between the Indians and the settlers were tense but short of war, and during the 1690s most of the Indians of the area moved south or west.

Seventeenth-Century Settlement

Explorers arrived in the 1580s, and in 1607 the London Company, with a British title to the land that is now Maryland, settled at Jamestown. The Virginians mapped the Chesapeake, traded with the Indians, and in 1631 William Claibourne from Jamestown established a furtrading settlement at Kent Island. Maryland's existence as a separate colony, however, emerged from the Calvert family. George Calvert was a personal friend of King James I, liked by the king for his Roman Catholic faith and his devotion to conservative feudal ideals. King James elevated him to the peerage as Lord Baltimore and gave him title to lands in Newfoundland. From 1620 to 1629, Calvert invested in the colony that he called Avalon, but the climate was too severe and the colony failed. In 1632, Calvert persuaded King Charles I to reclaim from the London Company the Potomac River and the Virginia lands to the north, and to transfer this land to him. Calvert diplomatically named the grant for the king's wife.

George Calvert died before settlement could proceed, but his sons ably took up the project. The oldest son Cecil became the second Lord Baltimore and managed colonization from London. The second son Leonard led the expedition of the Arc and Dove that landed at St. Clement's Island in the Potomac on 25 March 1634 and proceeded a few days later to settle permanently at St. Mary's. The first settlers included about seventeen gentlemen-investors who were mostly Catholic, about thirty freemen, and about eighty indentured servants who were mostly Protestant. The expedition also included two Africans who boarded the ship in the Caribbean, presumably as indentures. The Calverts gave at least 2,000 acres to investors who paid the way of five or more servants, and they gave 100 acres to freemen who paid their own way. The Calverts sold additional land, and they collected quitrents on the lands they gave away or sold.

Within a few years the settlers were widely scattered, cultivating corn for subsistence and tobacco for sale to England. At least until the end of the century, life was extremely rude. The ratio of men to women was three to one, and life expectancy was far below that in England. Still, there was easy upward mobility for those who survived, and for those who bought servants and collected the land bounty for them, and newcomers kept arriving. In 1649 the Calverts made the most of their settlers' religious diversity, accepting an Act of Religious Toleration to encourage more settlers. It was one of the first such acts in the history of Christianity.

Life was harsh enough on this outer edge of civilization, and eight decades of intermittent warfare made it

harsher. From 1645 to 1660 Maryland repulsed at least three expeditions of attacking Virginians who proclaimed fear of their Catholic-led neighbors and who sought booty for themselves in the wilderness. Then, periodically, especially from 1689 to 1715, the colony was torn by civil war as younger planters revolted against the Calvert proprietors and their appointed governors. The rebellions expanded the power of the General Assembly over the governor, moved the capital from Catholic-leaning St. Mary's to Puritan-leaning Annapolis (1694), and repealed the Toleration Act in order to establish the Anglican Church (1702). The chastened Calverts—there were six generations from George Calvert to the American Revolution—joined the Anglican Church and regained most of their authority over the governor.

The Eighteenth Century and the American Revolution

The transition from rudeness to prosperity—from a population of 30,000 in 1700 to 340,000 in 1800—came largely with slavery. The Calvert proprietors and the settlers increasingly saw permanent bondage as an avenue toward stability and prosperity, and tolerance of slavery grew into active promotion. When slavery became fully legal in 1664, Africans numbered no more than 2 percent of the population, but their numbers surged to 20 percent in 1710, and 30 percent in 1750. The result was an economic takeoff—a surge in tobacco exports, and the rise of a money economy. A rich and stable planter class emerged, and fine Georgian country houses appeared. Scotch-Irish and Germans poured in, moving into the backcountry to establish new towns like Frederick and Hagerstown. Wheat came to supplement tobacco as an export crop, and Baltimore grew as a trade center. Artisan industry emerged and iron manufacturing began.

The new prosperity gave way to new tensions, less between settlers and proprietor than among classes, sections, ideas, and especially between America and the British Empire. New ideas found expression in a newspaper, the Maryland Gazette, and in able local leaders like Daniel Dulaney, Dr. Alexander Hamilton, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, Samuel Chase, and William Paca. Maryland planters and merchants howled against the British Stamp Act of 1765, and in June 1774, the anti-British faction in the General Assembly picked a fight with the proprietary governor who was enforcing the British laws. The patriot-secessionists formed a Provisional Convention that assumed control of the government. They drew up a conservative constitution that they adopted in 1776 without a referendum. It reestablished toleration for all Christians, and shifted taxes from a per capita base to land assessment, but it retained property qualifications for voting, limited voting to the election of delegates to the General Assembly, and actually increased property qualifications for holding office.

The General Assembly hesitated in calling out the state militia for its loyalty was doubtful, but numerous volunteers, encouraged by a state bounty, joined the Continental Army and gained renown as the "Maryland Line." Slave masters sometimes collected the bounty for enlistment, sent off their slaves to serve, and usually freed the slaves when the war ended. Maryland shipbuilders built warships for the Continental Navy, and Maryland shippers, with a subsidy from the General Assembly, armed their vessels to prey on British commerce.

Tobacco production declined after the Revolution, but otherwise the economy flourished and new institutions burgeoned—state banks, state-supported turnpikes and canals, organized medical and legal professions, and a multitude of colleges. In 1784 the Methodist Church was born in Maryland, the first formal separation from its Anglican parent. Marylanders were leaders in the establishment of American branches of the Catholic, Episcopal, Presbyterian, and African Methodist Churches. Maryland was a leader in calls for a stronger central government, a United States Constitution, and in the formation of political parties. Maryland happily ceded land for the new District of Columbia.

The Nineteenth Century and the City

The nineteenth century brought urbanization, democracy, industry, and the end of slavery. State population grew from 340,000 in 1800 to 1,200,000 in 1900, and Baltimore City grew from 8 percent of the total to 43 percent. The size and wealth of the city overwhelmed Annapolis and the state's long-established plantation culture.

The city—with its merchant, professional, artisan, and proletarian classes—led the statewide movement toward democracy and party politics. Property qualifications for voting ended in 1802; property qualifications for holding office ended in 1809; a public school system began, at least in theory, in 1825; Jews were allowed to vote in 1826; popular election of the governor came in 1837, election of city and county officials in 1851; African Americans were enfranchised in 1870; the secret ballot came in 1901; and women gained the vote in 1920. Actually, Maryland tended to lag behind other states in most of these reforms.

The city won its first notable struggle with the planters in the War of 1812. Federalist planters, eager to maintain their profitable trade with Great Britain, opposed the war, but Baltimore relished the alliance with France and another chance to loose its privateers on British commerce. When the British landed at Bladensburg in 1814, the planter-led militia let them pass; but three weeks later when the British attacked Baltimore, the city militia held firm. Francis Scott Key, watching the British bombardment, wrote a poem celebrating the victory over the British that became the words to the National Anthem. The planter-led Federalist party of Maryland never recovered.

Especially from the 1820s to the 1850s, Maryland's General Assembly, dominated by Whigs, promoted a frenzy of capital formation and construction projects. First came the turnpikes. The assembly gave rights-of-way to private companies to improve the roads, establish stagecoaches, and charge tolls. Most famous was the National Pike that, with its extensions, stretched from Baltimore to Ohio. Then came a craze for canals, the most famous of which was the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, designed to reach from Washington to Cincinnati. It nearly bankrupted the state and never got beyond Cumberland. The grandest and most successful of the projects were the railroads. The line from Baltimore to Ohio was one of the first and busiest in the country, and by 1840 other lines extended to Washington, Philadelphia, and central Pennsylvania.

Eventually urbanization, democracy, and capitalism came up against the continued existence of slavery. After the collapse of tobacco, slavery was barely profitable in Maryland, and by midcentury there were almost as many free blacks as slaves. African Americans like Richard Allen, Harriet Tubman, and Frederick Douglass were leaders of their people. Still, battered Maryland planters clung desperately to the institution. Roger B. Taney of Mary-land, Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, was a powerful spokesman for slavery's expansion.

By the 1850s change was coming too fast and tensions were too great, and Maryland drifted toward chaos. Party structure collapsed, rioting turned Baltimore into mobtown, and for a while the Know-Nothings ruled the state with a platform that made a scapegoat of immigrants.

When the Civil War came, Maryland was overwhelmingly pro-slave; in the presidential election of 1860 only 2 percent of the votes went to Abraham Lincoln. But the state was also mostly opposed to secession. After his inauguration, Lincoln intervened forcibly, arresting some 3,000 community leaders who were Southern sympathizers and allowing many more to be disfranchised. Southern sympathy waned. About 50,000 Marylanders eventually enlisted in the Union army, including 9,000 African Americans. About 20,000 Maryland whites fled to join the army and navy of the Confederacy.

From 1864 to 1867, with pro-Southern Marylanders disfranchised, the state launched its own radical reconstruction, foreshadowing what was to come in the South. The radicals abolished slavery, threatened to seize slave-holders' property to pay for the war, and established an authoritarian and far-reaching school system for whites and former slaves. As the war ended, however, and as Southern sympathizers returned home, radicalism collapsed and conservative leadership reasserted itself.

After the war people were concerned mainly with things economic. The railroads, led by the aggressive John W. Garrett, spread into every county. Coal mining expanded in the western counties, oystering expanded on the Eastern Shore, and in Baltimore came vast steel mills, copper and tin smelting, a ready-to-wear clothing industry, canning, and meat packing. Immigrants poured into the city and state—Germans, Irish, Italians, Poles, Jews, and others—often into crowded tenements. Industry and labor sometimes fought; scores died in the Great Railroad Strike of 1877. Many people still lived on farms, although the farms were usually small and poor. The very rich provided grand philanthropies—the Garrett State Forests, the Enoch Pratt libraries, the Walters Art Gallery, and the great Johns Hopkins University. The two political parties—Democrats and Republicans—were nearly balanced after the war, both run by bosses who were closely allied with business, both offering generous patronage to faithful followers.

Twentieth-Century Suburbanization

Twentieth-century change was measurable in a demographic shift—the rise of the suburbs and the corresponding decline of the city and farm. Maryland population grew from 1,200,000 in 1900 to 5,200,000 in 2000, and the suburbs grew from 2 percent to about 80 percent of that total. People moved from factory and farm into middle-class, white-collar, and service occupations.

As the century began, the rising middle classes—doctors, lawyers, managers, engineers, accountants, bureaucrats—were asserting themselves as a Progressive movement, less concerned with creating new wealth than with its management, by people like themselves, for the benefit of all society. Working through both political parties, the Progressives forced through a mass of new laws in the 1900s and 1910s establishing nonpartisan citizen boards to replace politicians in control of the schools, parks, hospitals, and libraries. Other citizen boards gained control over rates charged by electric, water, telephone, railroad, and shipping companies. In 1904, in the midst of these reforms, much of Baltimore burned in what was until then the greatest conflagration in American history, but this only stimulated city planning and new housing codes. Progressivism, however, also had its dark side. The middle class was eager to disfranchise illiterate voters, especially African Americans. Disfranchisement failed in Maryland as blacks and immigrants joined to protect their right to vote, but the reforms succeeded in legalizing racial segregation in most public and commercial facilities. World War I provided a culmination of Progressivism as citizen commissions promoted war production and patriotism with equal fervor.

By the 1920s people were tired of reform and eager to enjoy themselves. Local police refused to enforce the national prohibition laws that lasted from 1919 to 1933, and illegal booze may have flowed more freely in Maryland than in any other state. Eubie Blake and Cab Calloway played in the local jazz clubs. Marylanders like H. L. Mencken, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ogden Nash caught the mood of the times. Baseball was the rage, and its greatest hero was Baltimore's Babe Ruth, even if he played for New York. Maryland became famous for its horse racing and slot machines. Albert Ritchie was the state's all-time most popular governor, serving from 1919 to 1934. Aristocratic and autocratic, he believed in state rights and unfettered capitalism. Three times he tried to gain the Democratic nomination for president, arguing that Presidents Coolidge and Hoover were spendthrift radicals.

The Great Depression descended relentlessly, first to the farms, then to the city and suburbs. From 1929 to 1933, Maryland's per capita income dropped 45 percent, industrial production dropped 60 percent. Maryland received less from the New Deal than most states because of its unwillingness to provide matching funds. The New Deal built the model town of Greenbelt in Maryland, with cooperative housing and stores. The town was a success but opponents scuttled its experiment in socialism.

In World War II, Maryland, because of its location, became a center of military training, arms and aircraft production, and shipments abroad. African Americans and women made major inroads into the labor market, where they would remain. After the war, prosperity continued but politics grew shrill. A liberal governor, William P. Lane, enacted a sales tax and built airports and a spectacular bridge across the Chesapeake Bay; but a conservative General Assembly enacted the Ober Law, the country's most far-reaching loyalty oath and a forerunner of McCarthyism.

Meanwhile, burgeoning suburbanization was transforming the state's economic and political landscape. The movement began with the trolley lines of the 1890s and the automobile of the 1920s, mostly into affluent enclaves out from Washington and Baltimore. Then the suburban population doubled in the late 1940s, this time mostly into inexpensive housing tracts, bringing shopping strips and drive-in movies; it doubled again in the 1950s and 1960s with planned bedroom cities like Bowie and Columbia; it doubled again in the 1970s and 1980s, bringing beltways and malls; and it continued after that, bringing office towers, mass transit, and ethnic diversity.

The other side of suburban growth was urban and rural decline. Baltimore reached its peak about 1920 with half the state's population and by far its highest per capita income; but in 2000 it had fallen to 12 percent of the state population and by far the lowest per capita income. Urban renewal programs lurched forward by trial and error. In the 1970s, Mayor Donald Schaefer built a sparkling Harborplace development that attracted tourists into the city for spending and recreation.

Suburbanization provided a liberal tilt to Maryland politics, and Maryland kept pace and occasionally offered leadership to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. African American leaders like Lillie Mae Jackson and Thurgood Marshall worked comfortably with Governors Theodore McKeldin and Millard Tawes. Baltimore was the first major segregated city to integrate its schools, a year before court requirements, and state laws were ahead of federal laws in promoting civil rights. The state suffered from race riots in the late 1960s, but the civil rights movement did not go backward for state agencies promoted school busing and affirmative action, and an ever larger portion of the African Americans entered the middle class.

Idealism slumped into malaise in the 1970s. Two successive governors, Spiro Agnew and Marvin Mandel, plus many other local officials, pled guilty to accepting bribes. They were caught between the old politics of favors and the newer middle-class ethic that was tinged with hostility to politics of all sorts.

The last decades of the century, however, were happy as personal income soared, especially for those already prosperous. Government and business bureaucracies expanded and clean high-tech industries grew. Government in the 1980s and 1990s was mostly corruption-free and progressive, with abundant funding for education and for the environment. Women increasingly entered politics. Universities, claiming to be the engines of the new economy, especially flourished. As the century ended, optimism prevailed.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Argersinger, Jo Ann E. Toward a New Deal in Baltimore: People and Government in the Great Depression. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1988.

Baker, Jean H. The Politics of Continuity: Maryland Political Parties from 1858 to 1870. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1973. Brugger, Robert J. Maryland, A Middle Temperament, 1634–1980.

Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1988. A full and excellent history. Callcott, George H. Maryland and America, 1940 to 1980. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1985.

Carr, Lois Green, Russell R. Menard, and Louis Peddicord. Maryland—At the Beginning. Annapolis, Md.: Department of Economic Development, 1978.

Evitts, William J. A Matter of Allegiances: Maryland from 1850 to1861. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1974.

Fields, Barbara Jeanne, Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground:Maryland During the Nineteenth Century. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1985.

Hoffman, Ronald. Spirit of Dissension: Economics, Politics, and theRevolution in Maryland. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1973.

Kulikoff, Alan. Tobacco and Slaves: The Development of SouthernCultures in the Chesapeake. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1986.

Land, Aubrey C. Colonial Maryland: A History. Millwood, N.Y.: KTO Press, 1981.

Main, Gloria L. Tobacco Colony: Life in Early Maryland, 1650–1720. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1982.

George H.Callcott

See alsoChesapeake Colonies ; Know-Nothing Party ; Toleration Acts .

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Maryland

Maryland (mâr´ələnd), one of the Middle Atlantic states of the United States. It is bounded by Delaware and the Atlantic Ocean (E), the District of Columbia (S), Virginia and West Virginia, largely across the Potomac River (S, W), and Pennsylvania (N).

Facts and Figures

Area, 10,577 sq mi (27,394 sq km). Pop. (2010) 5,773,552, a 9% increase since the 2000 census. Capital, Annapolis. Largest city, Baltimore. Statehood, Apr. 28, 1788 (7th of the original 13 states to ratify the Constitution). Highest pt., Backbone Mt., 3,360 ft (1,025 m); lowest pt., sea level. Nickname, Old Line State. Motto,Fatti Maschii, Parole Femine [Manly Deeds, Womanly Words]. State bird, Baltimore oriole. State flower, black-eyed Susan. State tree, white oak. Abbr., Md.; MD

Geography

A seaboard state, E Maryland is divided by Chesapeake Bay, which runs almost to the northern border; thus the region of Maryland called the Eastern Shore is separated from the main part of the state and is dominated by the bay. For the most part, the erratic course of the Potomac River separates the main part of Maryland from Virginia (to the south) and the long, narrow western handle from West Virginia (to the south and west). The District of Columbia cuts a rectangular indentation into the state just below the falls of the Potomac.

The main part of the state is divided by the fall line, which runs between the upper end of Chesapeake Bay and Washington, D.C.; to the north and west is the rolling Piedmont, rising to the Blue Ridge and to the Pennsylvania hills. The heavily indented shores of Chesapeake Bay fringe the land with bays and estuaries, which helped in the development of a farm economy relying on water transport. Flourishing in the mild winters and hot summers of the coastal plains are typically southern trees, such as the loblolly pine and the magnolia, while the cooler uplands have woods of black and white oak and beech. Maryland has nearly 3 million acres (l.2 million hectares) of forest land.

Annapolis, with its well-preserved Colonial architecture and 18th-century waterfront, is the capital; it is also the site of the U.S. Naval Academy. Baltimore, with a large percentage of the state's population, is the dominant metropolis. Tourists are attracted to the Antietam National Battlefield and the National Cemetery at Sharpsburg (see National Parks and Monuments, table); the Fort McHenry National Monument, near Baltimore's inner harbor; and the historic towns of Frederick and St. Marys City. Racing enthusiasts attend the annual Preakness and Pimlico Cup horse races in Baltimore. There are several military establishments, including Fort George G. Meade and Andrews Air Force Base. The National Institutes of Health in Bethesda is a government establishment. The 12,000-acre (4,856-hectare) National Agricultural Research Center is located at Beltsville.

Economy

Although the fishing industry is declining, the catch of fish and shellfish, chiefly from Chesapeake Bay, yielded an income of over $67 million in 1998, and the state's annual catch of crabs is the largest in the nation. The coastal marshes abound in wildfowl. Stone, coal, and iron, mined chiefly in the west of Maryland, are much less significant than in the 19th cent.

Leading manufactures include electrical and electronic machinery, primary metals, food products, missiles, transportation equipment, and chemicals. Shipping (Baltimore is a major U.S. port), tourism (especially along Chesapeake Bay), biotechnology and information technology, and printing and publishing are also big industries. Service industries, finance, insurance, and real estate are all important. Many Marylanders work for the federal government, either in offices in Maryland or in neighboring Washington, D.C.

Although manufacturing well exceeds agriculture as a source of income, Maryland's farms yield various greenhouse items, corn, hay, tobacco, soybeans, and other crops. Income from livestock (especially broiler chickens) and livestock products, especially dairy goods, is almost twice that from crops. Maryland is also famous for breeding horses.

Government, Politics, and Higher Education

Maryland is governed under a constitution adopted in 1867. The general assembly consists of 47 senators and 141 delegates, all elected for four-year terms. The governor, also elected for a four-year term, may succeed him- or herself once. The state elects two U.S. senators and eight representatives. It has 10 electoral votes. Democrats traditionally dominate state government; William D. Schaefer was elected governor in 1986 and 1990, Parris Glendening in 1994 and 1998. In 2002, however, a Republican, Robert Ehrlich, Jr., was elected to the office. Ehrlich was defeated (2006) for reelection by Democrat Martin O'Malley; he defeated Ehrlich again in 2010. In 2014 Republican Larry Hogan was elected governor.

Maryland's medical, educational, and cultural institutions greatly benefited from philanthropic gifts in the late 19th cent. from Johns Hopkins, George Peabody, and Enoch Pratt. Institutions of higher learning in the state include Goucher College and Towson Univ., at Towson; the Johns Hopkins Univ., the Univ. of Baltimore, and the Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, at Baltimore; St. John's College, at Annapolis; the Univ. of Maryland, at College Park; and the Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County, at Catonsville (Baltimore County). See also Maryland, University System of.

History

Exploration and Colonization

Giovanni da Verrazano, an Italian navigator in the service of France, probably visited (1524) the Chesapeake region, which was certainly later explored (1574) by Pedro Menéndez Marqués, governor of Spanish Florida. In 1603 the region was visited by an Englishman, Bartholomew Gilbert, and it was charted (1608) by Capt. John Smith.

In 1632, Charles I granted a charter to George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore, yielding him feudal rights to the region between lat. 40°N and the Potomac River. Disagreement over the boundaries of the grant led to a long series of border disputes with Virginia that were not resolved until 1930. The states still dispute the use of the Potomac River. The territory was named Maryland in honor of Henrietta Maria, queen consort of Charles I. Before the great seal was affixed to the charter, George Calvert died, but his son Cecilius Calvert, 2d Baron Baltimore, undertook development of the colony as a haven for his persecuted fellow Catholics and also as a source of income. In 1634 the ships Ark and Dove brought settlers (both Catholic and Protestant) to the Western Shore, and a settlement called St. Mary's (see Saint Marys City) was set up. During the colonial period the Algonquian-speaking Native Americans withdrew from the area gradually and for the most part peacefully, sparing Maryland the conflicts other colonies experienced.

Religious Conflict and Economic Development

Religious conflict was strong in ensuing years as the Puritans, growing more numerous in the colony and supported by Puritans in England, set out to destroy the religious freedom guaranteed with the founding of the colony. A toleration act (1649) was passed in an attempt to save the Catholic settlers from persecution, but it was repealed (1654) after the Puritans seized control. A brief civil war ensued (1655), from which the Puritans emerged triumphant. Anti-Catholic activity persisted until the 19th cent., when in an unusual reversal of the prevailing pattern many Catholic immigrants came to Baltimore.

In 1694, when the capital was moved from St. Mary's to Annapolis, those were the only towns in the province, but the next century saw the emergence of commercially oriented Baltimore, which by 1800 had a population of more than 30,000 and a flourishing coastal trade. Tobacco became the basis of the economy by 1730. In 1767 the demarcation of the Mason-Dixon Line ended a long-standing boundary dispute with Pennsylvania.

The Revolution and a New Nation

Economic and religious grievances led Maryland to support the growing colonial agitation against England. At the time of the American Revolution most Marylanders were stalwart patriots and vigorous opponents of the British colonial policy. In 1776 Maryland adopted a declaration of rights and a state constitution and sent soldiers and supplies to aid the war for independence; supposedly the high quality of its regular "troops of the line" earned Maryland its nickname, the Old Line State. The U.S. Congress, meeting at Annapolis, ratified the Treaty of Paris ending the Revolutionary War in 1783. A party advocating states' rights, in which Luther Martin was prominent, was unsuccessful in opposing ratification of the Constitution, and in 1791 Maryland and Virginia contributed land and money for the new national capital in the District of Columbia.

Industry, already growing in conjunction with renewed commerce, was furthered by the skills of German immigrants. The War of 1812 was marked for Maryland by the British attack of 1814 on Baltimore and the defense of Fort McHenry, immortalized in Francis Scott Key's "Star-Spangled Banner." After the war the state entered a period of great commercial and industrial expansion. This was accelerated by the building of the National Road, which tapped the rich resources of the West; the opening of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal (1829); and the opening (1830) of the Baltimore & Ohio RR, the first railroad in the United States open for public traffic.

The Coming of the Civil War

Southern ways and sympathies persisted among the plantation owners of Maryland, and as the rift between North and South widened, the state was torn by conflicting interests and the intense internal struggles of the true border state. In 1860 there were 87,000 slaves in Maryland, but industrialists and businessmen had special interests in adhering to the Union, and despite the urgings of Southern sympathizers, made famous in J. R. Randall's song, "Maryland, My Maryland," the state remained in the Union.

At the beginning of the Civil War, President Lincoln suspended habeas corpus and sent troops to Maryland who imprisoned large numbers of secessionists. Nevertheless, Marylanders fought on both sides, and families were often split. General Lee's Army of Northern Virginia invaded Maryland in 1862 and was repulsed by Union forces at Antietam (see Antietam campaign). In 1863, Lee again invaded the North and marched across Maryland on the way to and from Gettysburg. Throughout the war Maryland was the scene of many minor battles and skirmishes.

Industrialization

With the end of the Civil War, industry quickly revived and became a dominant force in Maryland, both economically and politically. Senator Arthur P. Gorman, a Democrat and the president of the Baltimore & Ohio RR, ran the controlling political machine from 1869 to 1895, when two-party government was restored. New railroad lines traversed the state, making it more than ever a crossing point between North and South. Labor troubles hit Maryland with the Panic of 1873, and four years later railroad wage disputes resulted in large-scale rioting in Cumberland and Baltimore. During the 20th cent., however, Maryland became a leader in labor and other reform legislation. The administrations of governors Austin L. Crowthers (1908–12) and Albert C. Ritchie (1920–35) were noted for reform. Ritchie, a Democrat, became nationally known for his efforts to improve the efficiency and economy of state government.

The great influx of people into the state during World War I was repeated and accelerated in World War II as war workers poured into Baltimore, where vital shipbuilding and aircraft plants were in operation. In addition, military and other government employees moved into the area around Washington, D.C.

Growth since World War II

Since World War II, public-works legislation, particularly that concerning roads and other traffic arteries, has brought major changes. The opening of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in 1952 spurred significant industrial expansion on the Eastern Shore; a parallel bridge was opened in 1973. The Patapsco River tunnel under Baltimore harbor was completed in 1957, and the Francis Scott Key Bridge (1977), crosses the Patapsco. Other construction projects have included the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, formerly called Friendship International Airport (1950), south of Baltimore, and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway (1954). The state gained a different kind of attention in 1968 when its governor, Spiro T. Agnew was elected vice president.

Maryland experienced tremendous suburban growth in the 1980s, especially in the metropolitan Washington, D.C., area. This growth occurred in spite of a decline in government jobs, as service sector employment rose dramatically. Suburban Baltimore grew as well although the city proper lost 6.4% of its population during the 1980s. Baltimore undertook major revitalization projects in the 1980s and the early 1990s, including the construction of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, the new home of the Baltimore Orioles baseball team.

Maryland has become increasingly popular as a vacation area—Ocean City is a popular seashore resort, and both sides of Chesapeake Bay are lined with beaches and small fishing towns. The Chesapeake Bay Bridge has brought the culture of the Eastern Shore, formerly quite distinctive, into a more homogeneous unity with that of the rest of the state; the area, however, is still noted for its unique rural beauty and architecture, strongly reminiscent of the English countryside left behind by early settlers.

Bibliography

See J. T. Scharf, History of Maryland from the Earliest Period to the Present Day (1967); F. V. W. Mason, The Maryland Colony (1969); J. E. Dilisio, Maryland: A Geography (1983); E. L. Meyer, Maryland Lost and Found (1986); V. F. Rollo, Your Maryland (5th rev. ed. 1993); W. S. Dudley, Maritime Maryland: A History (2010).

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Maryland

Maryland

Sources

Proprietor. George Calvert was a favorite of King James I, who had knighted him and appointed him a secretary of state. Calverts interest in America began long before he had a colony of his own. He bought stock in the Virginia Company in 1609 and in 1620 an interest in a group planning to settle Newfoundland. A trip to Newfoundland changed his mind about the merits of that islands climate, and he petitioned the king in 1629 for a grant of land in Virginia. By that time Calverts life had changed: he had converted to Roman Catholicism in 1625, a move that had cost him his royal positions and precluded any other official duty. In friendship and as a mark of compensation, James I had granted him the Irish title of Lord Baltimore. James I also, against the protests of many in England and in Virginia, granted Calverts petition for land in what was then thought of as northern Virginia. Calvert left it up to Charles I to name this new grantMarys Land, after Queen Henrietta Maria. Calvert did not live long enough to see his new project actually begin; Marylands charter was signed on 20 June 1643, a month after he died. It awarded the proprietary to Calverts son and heir, Cecilius, second Baron of Baltimore. The Lords Baltimore thus received the first proprietary grant issued by the English for lands in America. They undoubtedly hoped to make money from their new estate. They also hoped to provide a place in America where Roman Catholics could freely practice their religion and enjoy other political and legal freedoms.

Earliest Settlements. It is difficult to know who were among the 150 who sailed on the Ark and the Dove, the first ships to Maryland. A few women, mades which wee brought along, were among them. Unlike any other colony, however, those first settlers included a few Roman Catholic laymen and two Jesuit priests. They arrived at Saint Clements Island on 25 March, Lady Day, the Feast of the Annunciation, and celebrated Mass. They then moved on to settle at Saint Marys. Within the next few years large land grants called hundreds were worked by both tenants and paid laborers. The suitability of Marylands land for tobacco set it on a course much like Virginias economy. Those with some capital or connections amassed large landholdings, usually on one of the many rivers that eventually reached Chesapeake Bay. Those without came to work for them, often as indentured servantslaborers who had contracted to work for a set number of years. Most of these settlers were young men. By 1648 the civil war in England, which had reduced migration, and the disease environment, which killed off many of the settlers, had kept Maryland down to a mere 350 people. But immigration and natural reproduction helped the colonys population grow. Even so, life expectancies in Maryland were far lower than in New England. By 1660 the colony had an estimated 2,500 people; in 1675, 13,000; and in 1701, when an official census was undertaken, 32,000. By 1760 population estimates had reached 162,000. Most of these people lived in scattered settlements or villages with only one significant town, Annapolis.

Ethnicity and Race. Marylands earliest settlers were English, but as in almost all of the proprietary colonies, the owners tried to recruit as many colonists as possible. By the 1730s Irish, German, and Welsh were granted lands along the northern border that the Lords Baltimore disputed with the Penn family. Scottish merchants came to live along the coast as they began to dominate the tobacco trade in the 1750s. On the eve of the American Revolution, Maryland attracted more immigrants, many of them artisans from various parts of England, than any other colony. The major change in Marylands population patterns took place, however, around 1700 when slave labor began replacing white indentured labor, especially on the larger tobacco plantations. By 1760, 46 percent of planters owned slaves, with half of these whites holding five or fewer. Few planters owned large holdings of more than one hundred slaves, and these men, women, and children lived on smaller holdings called quarters. In the 1750s approximately forty-five thousand black slaves lived in Maryland.

Religious Pluralism. Just as the proprietors welcomed various nationalities in order to gain settlers, so they also allowed various religions. Maryland was founded as a haven for Roman Catholics, although Catholics were never a majority, even on the Ark and the Dove. Lord Baltimore tried

to protect his coreligionists by asking that no Christian be troubled [or] molested and that such protection be made law. Jews and other non-Christians were excluded from these legal rights. Catholic immigration to Maryland was meager, but other religious groups took advantage of toleration. In the 1650s the Quakers found a welcome. Presbyterians, Independents, Baptists, and the Church of England all were represented by the 1670s. This early toleration did not last, and Catholics lost the right to hold political office and to vote in the twenty or so years after 1692. Dissenting Protestants like the Quakers fared better.

Sources

Bernard Bailyn, Voyagers to the West: A Passage in the Peopling of America on the Eve of the Revolution (New York: Vintage, 1986);

Patricia U. Bonomi, Under the Cope of Heaven (New York: Oxford University Press, 1986);

Aubrey C. Land, Colonial Maryland: A History (Millwood, N.Y.: KTO Press, 1981).

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Maryland

MARYLAND


Annapolis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307

Baltimore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319

The State in Brief

Nickname: Old Line State, Free State

Motto: Fatti maschii, parole femine (Manly deeds, womanly words)

Flower: Black-eyed susan

Bird: Baltimore oriole

Area: 12,407 square miles (2000; U.S. rank: 42nd)

Elevation: Ranges from sea level to 3,360 feet above sea level

Climate: Temperate, with mild winters and hot summers; cooler in mountains

Admitted to Union: April 28, 1788

Capital: Annapolis

Head Official: Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) (until 2007)

Population

1980: 4,217,000

1990: 4,781,468

2000: 5,296,486

2004 estimate: 5,558,058

Percent change, 19902000: 10.8%

U.S. rank in 2004: 19th

Percent of residents born in state: 49.3% (2000)

Density: 541.9 people per square mile (2000)

2002 FBI Crime Index Total: 259,120

Racial and Ethnic Characteristics (2000)

White: 3,391,308

Black or African American: 1,477,411

American Indian and Alaska Native: 15,423

Asian: 210,929

Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 2,303

Hispanic or Latino (may be of any race): 227,916

Other: 95,525

Age Characteristics (2000)

Population under 5 years old: 353,393

Population 5 to 19 years old: 1,139,572

Percent of population 65 years and over: 11.3%

Median age: 36 years (2000)

Vital Statistics

Total number of births (2003): 75,487

Total number of deaths (2003): 44,629 (infant deaths, 645)

AIDS cases reported through 2003: 12,911

Economy

Major industries: Electrical equipment, food products, transportation equipment, metals, tourism

Unemployment rate: 3.7% (December 2004)

Per capita income: $37,424 (2003; U.S. rank: 5th)

Median household income: $55,213 (3-year average, 2001-2003)

Percentage of persons below poverty level: 7.7% (3-year average, 2001-2003)

Income tax rate: Ranges from 2.0% to 4.75%

Sales tax rate: 5.0% (food and prescription drugs are exempt)

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Maryland

Maryland State in e USA, on the Atlantic Ocean; the capital is Annapolis. The largest city is Baltimore. The first settlements were founded in 1634. Maryland (one of the 13 original states) was active in the drive towards American independence. In 1791 it ceded an area of land on the Potomac River to create the District of Columbia, the site of the national capital. During the American Civil War, Maryland was one of the border states that did not secede from the Union, but its citizens served in both armies. The w half of the state is part of the Piedmont plateau region. Chesapeake Bay and its coastal marshlands dominate Maryland. The rearing of cattle and chickens is the most important farming activity. Maize, hay, tobacco, and soya beans are the chief crops. Industries: iron and steel, shipbuilding, primary metals, transport equipment, chemicals, electrical machinery, fishing. Area: 25,316sq km (9775sq mi). Pop. (2000) 5,296,486.

MARYLAND

Statehood :

April 28, 1788

Nickname :

Old Line State, Free State

State bird :

Baltimore oriole

State flower :

Black-eyed Susan

State tree :

White oak

State motto :

Manly deeds, womanly words

http://www.mec.state.md.us

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Maryland

MARYLAND


Maryland's natural harbor on Chesapeake Bay, its moderate climate, and its adaptability for agriculture made it a desirable place for settlement in colonial days. The manner of settlement was very different from places like Virginia or Massachusetts. Unlike many other colonies, Maryland was established with an almost feudal system in which the land was considered the property of the English lord who governed it a proprietary colony. Maryland also had a higher proportion of Catholic settlers than most other colonies and experienced a higher proportion of religious wrangling. Its position as a slaveholding state which did not secede from the Union also set it apart from southern states during the Civil War (186165). In modern times, the state has thrived by creating a diversified economy that includes industry, maritime interests, agriculture, and the service sector.

The first Europeans to penetrate into the land which later became Maryland were the Italian Giovanni da Verrazano (14801527) and the Spaniard Lucas Vazquez de Ayllon in the sixteenth century. The first explorer of Chesapeake Bay, an area that would become vital to the commerce of Maryland, was Captain John Smith (15801631), who was leader of the colony that was established in Jamestown, Virginia. Smith's map of the Chesapeake was used for many years and was an important tool in the settlement of the area. By the time the European explorers arrived, Native Americans had established permanent settlements in Maryland, where they cultivated corn (maize), vegetables, tobacco, and other crops.

The territory was given as a proprietorship by England's King Charles I (16001641) to George Calvert (15801632), a favorite of the English court. Lord Calvert had resigned his position at the court because his Catholic religion prevented him from holding public office in England. Since the colony of Virginia also wanted the land, it opposed the king's decision, but Calvert prevailed. Later he left the land to his son, Cecilius, who is better known as Lord Baltimore (16051675). He named the region Maryland after the queen consort of Charles I, Henrietta Maria of France. This land grant encompassed not only the area that later became Maryland, but also Delaware, part of Pennsylvania, and the valley between the north and south branches of the Potomac River.

As a sole proprietorship, the colony of Maryland was fully under the control of Lord Baltimore, who derived his income from the quitrents, which were money payments that took the place of feudal duties, like military service. The settlers paid them as a kind of rent for the land. Baltimore's financial obligations to the king were minimal. The colony's early years were marked by feuding between Puritans and Roman Catholics. The feuds were settled only when Benedict Leonard Calvert (16061647), the fourth Baron of Baltimore, embraced the Protestant faith and was granted proprietary rule.

Maryland was a somewhat reluctant participant in the American Revolution (17751783) but finally sent 20,000 soldiers to fight in the war. It was the seventh state to ratify the federal Constitution. Maryland provided the home for the Continental Congress in two cities, Baltimore and Annapolis, before the permanent capital was established in Washington, DC. Maryland's first state constitution favored owners of large rural estates over people who owned no property.

Tidewater and southern Maryland provided the state's main staple crop, tobacco. It was grown with the help of slave labor and indentured servants. German immigrants in western Maryland helped develop the wheat economy. The city of Baltimore was founded in 1729. The city prospered because of its magnificent harbor, which provided access to the import and export trade. Shipbuilding also grew rapidly in the Baltimore area. During the War of 1812 (18121814) many naval and military operations took place in the area, and Francis Scott Key wrote the Star-Spangled Banner during the British siege of Fort McHenry in Baltimore harbor

Baltimore harbor provided the first transportation access to Maryland; but other networks developed in due time. The first national highway was known as the National Road (now U.S. Route 40). The highway began at Cumberland in 1811, providing access to Ohio within seven years. The Delaware and Chesapeake Canal opened in 1829, linking Chesapeake Bay and the Delaware River. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad opened in 1828, soon providing the first passenger train to Washington, DC, and Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now in West Virginia). The line extended to St. Louis by 1857 and precipitated the growth of freight service, which helped Baltimore grow into a metropolis. The Pennsylvania Railroad began providing service to northern cities in the 1850s.

Maryland did not support secession in the Civil War but remained one of the border states that still harbored many southern supporters. In spite of its sympathy to the South, in 1864 the Maryland legislature voted to abolish slavery, which caused a problem after the war, since its economy had been based on slave labor. It was estimated that the value of Mary-land's slaves in 1860 approached $35 million. Tobacco plantations in Prince Georges and other southern counties were hit hard by abolition. Tobacco never made a full recovery as a staple crop. Truck farms grew instead, helped by the proximity to water and rail transportation. The Maryland legislature even resorted to an advertising campaign to help economic development. In 1867 it commissioned a pamphlet titled A Succinct Exposition of the Industrial Resources and Agricultural Advantages of the State of Maryland.

The economy did recover, and enabled Maryland to participate in the rebuilding of the south. The state's economic base shifted gradually from agriculture to industry, led by shipbuilding, steel-making, clothing manufacturing, and shoemaking. The state's economic success allowed for philanthropy. Millionaires who had made their fortunes between the Civil War and World War I (19141918) endowed cultural and educational institutions. Banker and financier Johns Hopkins (17951873) founded Johns Hopkins University. Merchant and banker George Peabody (17951869) financed the Peabody Conservatory of Music; and Enoch Pratt (18081896), a manufacturer and merchant, endowed the Pratt Free Library.

The city of Baltimore was the industrial center of the state. By 1890 its population had grown to 434,000, employing people in manufacturing and mechanical industries, trade, transportation, and personal and professional services. The city attracted a variety of ethnic groups, especially African American descendants of slaves. But there were a large proportion of Germans and Irish as well. Baltimore developed its ethnic neighborhoods like many other cities during the Gilded Age. The neighborhoods were filled with low-paid factory workers, who often worked in local sweatshops that manufactured men's clothing.

World War I provided another boost to Mary-land's economy; but soon the Great Depression of the 1930s brought hardship to many people. The depression spelled the end of the political career of longtime Democratic Governor Albert C. Ritchie (18761936). His successor Harry W. Nice was a Republican. However, Nice supported the New Deal program of Democratic President Franklin D. Roosevelt (19331945). Like most of the nation, Maryland was only brought out of the economic doldrums by the manufacturing boom created by World War II (19391945). The shipyards of BethlehemFairfield and Maryland Drydock in Baltimore had to hire an additional 12,000 employees in 1942 to keep up with war demands. The Martin Company, which manufactured aircraft, added 6,000 employees. People in search of good wages swarmed to the city, not only from Maryland itself, but from Appalachia and the South.

During the latter part of the Depression, Maryland became the site of an experiment in city planning. The experiment resulted in the creation of "New Towns." One of the towns was Greenbelt, Maryland, designed as a conveniently arranged, pleasant place to live, with proportional representation from all kinds of ethnic and religious groups. Later a developer named James Rouse (19141996) built the village of Cross Keys in northwest Baltimore along similar lines. He also began to plan for the city of Columbia in Howard County. Columbia, which was begun in the mid-1960s, was planned as a cluster of villages, each with a collection of shops and strategically placed schools. Businesses and industrial parks flanked the village centers. Life in Columbia was never as idyllic as its planner had imagined it, but despite some difficulties during the 1970s the city continued to thrive.

The state of Maryland grew by 13.4 percent during the 1980s, well over the national average of 9.8 percent. The expansion of U.S. government is in part responsible for the growth. Many federal workers have settled in Prince Georges and Montgomery counties, Maryland suburbs of Washington, DC. The headquarters of the Social Security Administration is located in Baltimore. The most significant economic improvements during the 1980s and 1990s, however, were undoubtedly related to the economic redevelopment of Baltimore. The Charles Center development, the renewed Inner Harbor, the World Trade Center, the National Aquarium, and the new Baltimore Oriole Park at Camden Yards created a boom in retailing and hotels. These improvements brought hundreds of thousands of people to the city. The state suffered somewhat from the recession of the 1980s but has increased employment in the service sector. That gave Maryland the fifth highest state income in the country during the mid-1990s. The state ranked sixth in per capita income in 1996.

See also: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Colony (Proprietary), National Road, Tidewater, Tobacco


FURTHER READING

Bode, Carl. Maryland: A Bicentennial History. New York: Norton, 1978.

Council of State Governments. The Book of the States, 19941995 Edition. Vol. 30. Lexington, KY: The Council of State Governments, 1994.

Dozer, Donald. Portrait of the Free State: A History of Maryland. Cambridge, MD: Tidewater, 1976.

Schmittroth, Linda, and Mary Kay Rosteck, eds. Cities of the United States. 2nd ed. Detroit: Gale Research, 1994.

Walsh, Richard, and William Lloyd Fox, eds. Maryland: A History. Baltimore: Maryland Hall of Records, 1983.

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Maryland

Marylandunironed, viand •prebend •beribboned, riband •husband • house husband •unquestioned • escutcheoned •brigand, ligand •legend •fecund, second, split-second •millisecond • nanosecond •microsecond • rubicund • jocund •Langland • garland • parkland •Cartland, heartland •headland • Shetland • Lakeland •mainland •eland, Leland, Wieland, Zealand, Zeeland •Greenland • heathland • Cleveland •Friesland • Queensland • midland •England • Finland • Maryland •dryland, highland, island •Iceland • Holland • dockland •Scotland •foreland, Westmorland •Auckland, Falkland •Portland • Northland •lowland, Poland, Roland •Oakland • Copland • Newfoundland •woodland • Buckland • upland •Jutland, Rutland •Ireland • moorland •Cumberland, Northumberland •Sunderland • Switzerland •Sutherland • Hammond •almond, Armand •Edmund, Redmond •Desmond, Esmond •Raymond • Grimond • Richmond •Sigmund • Sigismund • Osmond •Dortmund • unsummoned •diamond • gourmand • unopened •errand, gerund •reverend • Bertrand • dachshund •unchastened •old-fashioned, unimpassioned •unsanctioned •aforementioned, undermentioned, unmentioned •unconditioned • unsweetened •unenlightened • unleavened •self-governed • unseasoned •wizened • thousand

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Maryland

MARYLAND

MARYLAND , state on the E. coast of the U.S., one of the 13 original states. A one-crop tobacco economy and the existence of few major towns caused Jews, with rare exceptions, to avoid the colony during the first century and half after its establishment in 1634. David Fereira, a Jewish tobacco trader from New Amsterdam, appeared in Maryland as early as 1657 and later the same year colonial records mention a Jewish physician, Jacob Lumbrozo, who was also engaged in trade. Lumbrozo, a colorful figure who was often in conflict with his neighbors, was arrested in 1658 for blasphemy after offending Christians colonists during a conversation about religion. He was released before trial, however, due to the proclamation of a general amnesty. After the 1740s, with the growth of commerce in the colony, individual Jews appeared in Annapolis, Fredericktown (now Frederick), and a

few other towns, but a Jewish community with supporting institutions did not emerge until the period of the American Revolution, when Baltimore became one of the region's leading ports and attracted several Jewish families. By 1825, there were about 150 Jews in the new state. Although Baltimore Jews like Solomon *Etting and Jacob *I. Cohen, Jr., achieved a degree of prominence in the larger, non-Jewish community, the state constitution barred them from holding public office unless they would submit to a Christian oath. This requirement was finally removed with the passage of the 1826 "Jew Bill," which was championed by the non-Jewish legislator Thomas Kennedy.

Between 1830 and 1870 over 10,000 Jews, primarily from Germany and other areas of Central Europe, settled in the state. Eastern European Jews began to trickle into Maryland during the 1850s and arrived in large numbers from the 1880s. While the vast majority of Jewish immigrants were drawn to Baltimore, Jews also settled in smaller towns as peddlers and merchants. In 1853, the first congregation outside Baltimore was established in Cumberland, an important trading and transportation center in the western part of the state. By the time mass immigration ended in the mid-1920s, there also existed congregations in Frederick, Hagerstown, Annapolis, Frostburg, Brunswick, and Salisbury. Statewide, the Jewish population reached about 40,000 in 1900 and grew to 65,000 by the end of the immigrant period.

In the years following World War ii, Jews entered more fully into the life of the general community and were among the state's top officeholders. Marvin *Mandel, a Baltimore native, served as governor from 1969 to 1979. This period was one of great demographic change, with more than 50,000 Jews from Washington, d.c., settling in the nearby Maryland suburbs of Montgomery and Prince Georges counties. By 1998, this region was home to 104,500 Jews and had come to rival Baltimore and its surroundings (Jewish population 94,500) as the state's largest Jewish population center. Jews also increasingly established themselves in areas outside the Washington suburbs and Baltimore, with 10,000 residing in Howard County, almost 2,000 in Annapolis, and more than 1,000 in Frederick and in Harford County. Overall, the estimated Jewish population of Maryland in 2001 was 213,000 out of a total of 5,311,000.

bibliography:

E.L. Goldstein, Traders and Transports: The Jews of Colonial Maryland (1993); K. Falk and A. Decter, eds., We Call This Place Home: Jews in Maryland's Small Towns (2002); I.M. Fein, The Making of an American Jewish Community: The History of Baltimore Jewry from 1773 to 1920 (1971).

[Eric L. Goldstein (2nd ed.)]

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Maryland

Maryland

■ ALLEGANY COLLEGE OF MARYLAND F-4

12401 Willowbrook Rd., SE
Cumberland, MD 21502-2596

Tel: (301)784-5000
Fax: (301)784-5024

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.allegany.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Maryland State Community Colleges System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1961. Setting: 311-acre small town campus. Endowment: $5.2 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $5042. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3445 per student. Total enrollment: 3,666. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 2,098 applied, 99% were admitted. Full-time: 2,073 students, 67% women, 33% men. Part-time: 1,593 students, 71% women, 29% men. Students come from 21 states and territories, 42% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 8% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 35% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for allied health programs. Options: electronic application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2700 full-time, $90 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $5160 full-time, $172 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6060 full-time, $202 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $194 full-time, $8.30 per credit part-time, $41 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and location. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and location.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group. Social organizations: 24 open to all. Most popular organizations: SAHDA, Honors Club, EMT Club, Forestry Club. Major annual events: All College Awards Banquet, Welcome Back Picnic, Spring Fling Tension Breaker. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Allegany College of Maryland Library with 86,636 books, 7,737 microform titles, 313 serials, 3,395 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $563,784. 700 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE E-10

101 College Parkway
Arnold, MD 21012-1895

Tel: (410)647-7100
Admissions: (410)777-2240
Fax: (410)541-2245
Web Site: http://www.aacc.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1961. Setting: 230-acre suburban campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $2.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2836 per student. Total enrollment: 14,290. Full-time: 4,780 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 9,510 students, 66% women, 34% men. Students come from 12 states and territories, 19 other countries, 1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 12% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 43% 25 or older, 19% transferred in. Retention: 58% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for certain allied health programs. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Placement: SAT or ACT recommended. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $1992 full-time, $83 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3816 full-time, $159 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6768 full-time, $282 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $232 full-time, $8 per credit hour part-time, $20 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 45 open to all. Most popular organizations: Drama Club, student association, Black Student Union, International Student Association, Chemistry Club. Major annual events: Activities Fair, family performances, dramatic/theatrical performances. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Andrew G. Truxal Library with 144,694 books, 7,875 microform titles, 403 serials, 8,060 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $273,173. 250 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ BALTIMORE CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE D-10

2901 Liberty Heights Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21215-7893

Tel: (410)462-8300
Fax: (410)462-7677
Web Site: http://www.bccc.state.md.us/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1947. Setting: 19-acre urban campus. Endowment: $139,215. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3218 per student. Total enrollment: 7,095. 1,380 applied. Students come from 4 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 57% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for allied health programs. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Recommended: interview. Placement: SAT Subject Tests recommended. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/9. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. College housing not available. Bard Library with 72,413 books, 150 serials, 1,074 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page.

Community Environment:

See University of Baltimore.

■ BALTIMORE HEBREW UNIVERSITY D-10

5800 Park Heights Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21215-3996

Tel: (410)578-6900; 888-248-7420
Admissions: (410)578-6967
Fax: (410)578-6940

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bhu.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1919. Setting: 2-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 161. Full-time: 43 students, 47% women, 53% men. Part-time: 53 students, 81% women, 19% men. Students come from 2 other countries, 0% Native American, 0% Hispanic, 3% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 5% international, 90% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Baltimore Student Exchange Program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, interview. Required for some: 3 recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 3 open to all. Most popular organizations: Israeli Dance, Chug Ivri Club for Advanced Hebrew Speakers, Yiddish Club. Major annual events: Convocation, Commencement, Maurice A. Stiller Award for Literature lecture. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, guards on duty during class hours, patrols by security, well-lit parking lots. College housing not available. Joseph Meyerhoff Library with 70,000 books, 15,000 microform titles, 250 serials, 600 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 15 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The university is located in residential northwest Baltimore, the center of Jewish life in the city and county. Tree-lined streets, numerous apartment complexes, convenient parking, public transportation and nearby shopping make the area amenable. There are orthodox, conservative, reform and reconstructionist synagogues in the area, along with kosher restaurants, delicatessens and two community centers, including one located on the campus. Affordable housing can be found near the university. Colleges and institutions that offer cooperative programs are less than 30 minutes away, and field work assignments are often within walking distance of the campus. Baltimore offers a colorful inner harbor, national aquarium, symphony orchestra, baseball and football teams, theaters, opera, and numerous museums.

■ BALTIMORE INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE D-10

Commerce Exchange
17 Commerce St.
Baltimore, MD 21202-3230

Tel: (410)752-4710

Free: 800-624-9926
Fax: (410)752-3730
Web Site: http://www.bic.edu/

Description:

Independent, primarily 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, terminal associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1972. Setting: 6-acre urban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Endowment: $83,144. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8640 per student. Total enrollment: 516. Faculty: 32 (14 full-time, 18 part-time). Full-time: 486 students, 53% women, 47% men. Part-time: 30 students, 53% women, 47% men. Students come from 19 states and territories, 5 other countries, 12% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 52% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 24% 25 or older, 24% live on campus, 21% transferred in. Retention: 39% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic area with the most degrees conferred: personal and culinary services. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, double major, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Virginia Park Campus, County Cavan, Ireland. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early action, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Recommended: recommendations, interview. Required for some: essay, SAT or ACT, CPat or TOEFL. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 8/15.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $20,313 includes full-time tuition ($14,751), mandatory fees ($107), and college room and board ($5455). College room only: $3255. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: local fraternities, local sororities; 10% of eligible men and 10% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: American Culinary Federation, Beta Iota Kappa. Major annual events: trip to New York Hotel/Restaurant Trade Show, student mixers. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Option: coed housing available. George A. Piendak Library plus 1 other with 13,000 books, 200 serials, and 1,000 audiovisual materials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $407,400. 35 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ BOWIE STATE UNIVERSITY F-9

14000 Jericho Park Rd.
Bowie, MD 20715-9465

Tel: (301)860-4000; 877-772-6943
Admissions: (301)860-3427
Fax: (301)860-3510

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bowiestate.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of University System of Maryland. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1865. Setting: 312-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $3 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5105 per student. Total enrollment: 5,415. 2,766 applied, 53% were admitted. Full-time: 3,216 students, 63% women, 37% men. Part-time: 811 students, 67% women, 33% men. Students come from 33 states and territories, 47 other countries, 8% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 89% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 28% 25 or older, 34% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 70% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at other units of the University System of Maryland. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: recommendations. Required for some: recommendations. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: 4/1. Notification: continuous. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $5096 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,088 full-time. Mandatory fees: $1750 full-time. College room and board: $5219. College room only: $3859. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 52 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 2% of eligible men and 2% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: NSAP Student Leadership Institute, Honda Campus All-Star Challenge. Major annual events: Fall Convocation, Homecoming events, Honors Convocation. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,367 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Thurgood Marshall Library with 331,640 books, 6,674 microform titles, 3,152 serials, 4,475 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.9 million. 3,144 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

A suburban community with good transportation facilities. Baltimore-Washington Airport at Baltimore is 14 miles. Student employment is available in many commercial establishments and private homes. Bowie is near beaches and many recreation centers.

■ CAPITOL COLLEGE E-9

11301 Springfield Rd.
Laurel, MD 20708-9759

Tel: (301)369-2800

Free: 800-950-1992
Admissions: (301)953-3200

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.capitol-college.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1964. Setting: 52-acre suburban campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $3 million. Total enrollment: 801. 213 applied, 90% were admitted. Full-time: 319 students, 24% women, 76% men. Part-time: 311 students, 22% women, 78% men. Students come from 15 states and territories, 21 other countries, 14% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 37% black, 7% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 17% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.2 high school GPA, interview. Required for some: essay, 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Tuition: $17,688 full-time. College room only: $3869. Room charges vary according to housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 8 open to all. Most popular organizations: IEEE, NSDE, SWE. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: night security patrols. 120 college housing spaces available; 90 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Option: coed housing available. Puente Library with 10,000 books, 100 serials, 117 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $119,953. 42 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The town is in Prince George's County, a suburban area within easy reach of Washington, DC, and Baltimore, MD. Much of Washington's electronic industry is located in this area. The Capital Beltway is only four minutes from the school, providing easy access to the metropolitan area.

■ CARROLL COMMUNITY COLLEGE B-8

1601 Washington Rd.
Westminster, MD 21157

Tel: (410)386-8000
Admissions: (410)386-8430
Fax: (410)876-8855

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.carrollcc.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Maryland Higher Education Commission. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1993. Setting: 80-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore. Endowment: $1.2 million. Total enrollment: 3,115. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 711 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 1,327 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 1,788 students, 69% women, 31% men. Students come from 3 states and territories, 4 other countries, 1% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 3% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.2% international, 31% 25 or older. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: liberal arts/general studies; business/marketing; health professions and related sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters plus winter session. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: early admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $3234 full-time, $92 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $4476 full-time, $128 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6788 full-time, $195 per credit part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Most popular organizations: Student Government Organization, Carroll Community Chorus, Programming Board. Major annual events: Crab Feast, Health Fair. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Random House Learning Resources Center with 39,187 books, 3,400 microform titles, 318 serials, 3,151 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 674 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ CECIL COMMUNITY COLLEGE B-13

One Seahawk Dr.
North East, MD 21901-1999
Tel: (410)287-6060
Admissions: (410)287-1002
Fax: (410)287-1026
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cecilcc.edu/

Description:

County-supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates and transfer associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 100-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore. Total enrollment: 1,916. 481 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 687 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 1,229 students, 70% women, 30% men. Students come from 5 states and territories, 4 other countries, 9% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 7% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.3% international, 31% 25 or older, 1% transferred in. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: health professions and related sciences; liberal arts/general studies; visual and performing arts. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Area resident tuition: $2550 full-time, $85 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $5250 full-time, $175 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6600 full-time, $220 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 14 open to all; national fraternities. Most popular organizations: student government, Non-traditional Student Organization, Student Nurses Association, student newspaper. Major annual events: Welcome Back Event, Spring Fling, Chautaugua Festival. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Cecil County Veteran's Memorial Library with 35,575 books, 16 microform titles, 192 serials, 1,148 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 69 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

North East is approximately 5 miles west of Elkton, which is nestled in the valley where the Chesapeake Bay begins. It is within easy reach of the major cities on the East Coast with all forms of major commercial transportation available. Three interchanges on the John F. Kennedy Turnpike and super highways make New York or Washington, D.C., an easy two-hour drive. Elkton, rich in historical sites, has churches, health centers, and good shopping. The area offers hunting, fishing, camping, yachting, and racing and, with its beaches, parks, and marinas, is an ideal spot for vacationing.

■ CHESAPEAKE COLLEGE

PO Box 8
Wye Mills, MD 21679-0008

Tel: (410)822-5400
Fax: (410)827-9466
Web Site: http://www.chesapeake.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1965. Setting: 170-acre rural campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Total enrollment: 2,354. Full-time: 724 students, 62% women, 38% men. Part-time: 1,630 students, 74% women, 26% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 21% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.1% international, 45% 25 or older, 30% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for radiological technology, physical therapy assistant programs. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 6 open to all; 3% of eligible men and 5% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student government action teams, Phi Theta Kappa, UHURU, Chesapeake Players. Major annual events: Spring Fling, Fall Fest, Concert Series. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. Learning Resource Center plus 1 other with 44,049 books, 8,545 microform titles, 132 serials, 1,600 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $471,260.

■ COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAME OF MARYLAND D-10

4701 North Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21210-2476

Tel: (410)435-0100

Free: 800-435-0300
Admissions: (410)532-5330
Fax: (410)532-6287

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ndm.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic, comprehensive. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1873. Setting: 58-acre suburban campus. Total enrollment: 3,307. 450 applied, 72% were admitted. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 43% from top quarter, 80% from top half. Full-time: 607 students, 100% women. Part-time: 1,079 students, 90% women, 10% men. Students come from 26 states and territories, 15 other countries, 8% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 26% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 61% 25 or older, 57% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 86% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Loyola College, Johns Hopkins University, Towson University, Goucher College, Morgan State University, Coppin State College, Maryland Institute College of Art. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA, interview, resume. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 2/15, 12/3 for early action. Notification: continuous until 6/30, 1/1 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $29,600 includes full-time tuition ($21,100), mandatory fees ($500), and college room and board ($8000). Part-time tuition: $345 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $60 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 24 open to all. Most popular organizations: Black Student Association, Kymry, Commuter Association, Community Service Organization, campus ministry. Major annual events: Honors Convocation, Notre Dame Day, Tree Trim. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, emergency call boxes. 406 college housing spaces available; 360 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Option: women-only housing available. Loyola/Notre Dame Library with 400,000 books, 1,800 serials, 27,000 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 80 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Like Boston, Baltimore is a college town. There are nine nearby colleges and universities and over 60,000 students in the Baltimore metropolitan area which enhances academic and social opportunities. The Notre Dame campus is located 15 minutes from the nationally known Inner Harbor area where concerts, fairs and ethnic festivals are sponsored. Both mountains and ocean are only a few hours from Notre Dame, providing opportunities for skiing in the winter and relaxing on the beach in the summer. Annapolis, home of the U. S. Naval Academy, is about 45 minutes from Notre Dame, and Washington, D. C., with all of its resources, is less than an hour's drive from the college.

■ COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND H-8

8730 Mitchell Rd., PO Box 910
La Plata, MD 20646-0910

Tel: (301)934-2251

Free: 800-933-9177
Admissions: (301)934-7520
Fax: (301)934-5255

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.csmd.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1958. Setting: 175-acre rural campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3294 per student. Total enrollment: 7,546. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 9:1. 2,731 applied, 55% were admitted. Full-time: 2,599 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 4,947 students, 69% women, 31% men. Students come from 10 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 19% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 37% 25 or older, 45% transferred in. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Recommended: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2650 full-time, $110 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $4608 full-time, $192 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5789 full-time, $241 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $552 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 23 open to all. Most popular organizations: Spanish Club, Nursing Student Association, Science Club, Black Student Union, BACCHUS. Major annual events: Spring Fling Week, Fall Picnic. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. College housing not available. College of Southern Maryland Library with 44,896 books, 2,214 microform titles, 166 serials, 14,013 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $553,065. 130 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Southern Maryland is within a short distance of Washington, D.C. Community recreational activities include bowling, hunting, swimming, boating, camping, fishing, water sports, and fox hunting. Some of the special events are the annual county fair, and the Maryland Garden Tours.

■ COLUMBIA UNION COLLEGE F-8

7600 Flower Ave.
Takoma Park, MD 20912-7796

Tel: (301)891-4000

Free: 800-835-4212
Admissions: (301)891-4502
Fax: (301)891-4230
Web Site: http://www.cuc.edu/

Description:

Independent Seventh-day Adventist, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1904. Setting: 19-acre suburban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Endowment: $4.3 million. Total enrollment: 1,047. Faculty: 56 (53 full-time, 3 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 1,351 applied, 35% were admitted. Full-time: 730 students, 63% women, 37% men. Part-time: 288 students, 65% women, 35% men. Students come from 40 states and territories, 38 other countries, 44% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 8% Hispanic, 55% black, 6% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 20% 25 or older, 50% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 59% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: psychology; business/marketing; health professions and related sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at University of Maryland System. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.50 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: 8/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $23,536 includes full-time tuition ($16,514), mandatory fees ($1072), and college room and board ($5950). Part-time tuition: $688 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $670 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 9 open to all. Most popular organization: Student Association. Major annual events: Barn Party, Christmas Party, Valentine Banquet. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. 362 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Theofield G. Weis Library with 141,534 books, 9,000 serials, 7,500 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 50 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

A suburb of Washington, D.C., the residents of Takoma Park enjoy the cultural and recreational facilities of that city. There are many opportunities for part-time employment. Shopping facilities are excellent.

■ THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE COUNTY D-10

800 South Rolling Rd.
Baltimore, MD 21228-5381

Tel: (410)455-6050
Admissions: (410)455-4392
Fax: (410)719-6546
Web Site: http://www.ccbcmd.edu/

Description:

County-supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1957. Setting: 350-acre suburban campus. Total enrollment: 19,622. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. Full-time: 7,049 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 12,573 students, 67% women, 33% men. 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 30% black, 5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international. Calendar: semesters.

Costs Per Year:

Area resident tuition: $2610 full-time, $87 per hour part-time. State resident tuition: $4500 full-time, $150 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6150 full-time, $205 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $316 full-time, $316 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Student-run newspaper.

■ COPPIN STATE UNIVERSITY D-10

2500 West North Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21216-3698

Tel: (410)951-3000

Free: 800-635-3674
Admissions: (410)951-3600
Fax: (410)523-7238
Web Site: http://www.coppin.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of University System of Maryland. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1900. Setting: 33-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 4,003. 2,270 applied, 47% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 60% from top half. Students come from 20 states and territories, 19 other countries, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 95% black, 0.2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 50% 25 or older, 10% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, freshman honors college, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at 6 members of the Cooperative Education Program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.5 high school GPA, interview. Required for some: 2 recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 7/15. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $3527 full-time, $151 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,048 full-time, $347 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1352 full-time, $22 per credit hour part-time, $150 per term part-time. College room and board: $6239. College room only: $3881.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 45 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 5% of eligible men and 4% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: International Students Association, class government, Nursing Students' Association, Coppin Models Fashion Club, Student Honors Association. Major annual events: homecoming, athletic events. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. Option: coed housing available. Parlett L. Moore Library with 134,983 books, 665 serials, and an OPAC. 130 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of Baltimore.

■ DEVRY UNIVERSITY F-8

4550 Montgomery Ave.. Ste. 100 North
Bethesda, MD 20814-3304

Tel: (301)652-8477; (866)338-7934
Fax: (301)652-8577
Web Site: http://www.devry.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Part of DeVry University. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Total enrollment: 96. Faculty: 15 (2 full-time, 13 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 3:1. Full-time: 9 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 23 students, 52% women, 48% men. 0% Native American, 16% Hispanic, 56% black, 6% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international. Academic area with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. One-time mandatory fee: $40. Tuition: $13,060 full-time, $475 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $30 full-time, $30 per year part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available.

■ FREDERICK COMMUNITY COLLEGE C-6

7932 Opossumtown Pike
Frederick, MD 21702-2097

Tel: (301)846-2400
Admissions: (301)846-2432
Web Site: http://www.frederick.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1957. Setting: 125-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $4 million. Total enrollment: 4,822. Full-time: 1,855 students, 53% women, 47% men. Part-time: 2,967 students, 68% women, 32% men. Students come from 9 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 9% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 60% 25 or older, 56% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. Off campus study at Hood College, Mount Saint Mary's College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, some medical programs. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 9/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2088 full-time, $87 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $4560 full-time, $190 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6216 full-time, $259 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $300 full-time, $10.95 per credit hour part-time, $37 per year part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 15 open to all. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. College housing not available. FCC Library with 40,000 books, 2,400 microform titles, 5,150 serials, 1,400 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page.

Community Environment:

See Hood College.

■ FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY F-4

101 Braddock Rd.
Frostburg, MD 21532-1099

Tel: (301)687-4000
Admissions: (301)687-4201
Fax: (301)687-7074
Web Site: http://www.frostburg.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of University System of Maryland. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1898. Setting: 260-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $8.6 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5353 per student. Total enrollment: 5,041. Faculty: 351 (233 full-time, 118 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 3,430 applied, 76% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 32% from top quarter, 73% from top half. Full-time: 4,053 students, 49% women, 51% men. Part-time: 268 students, 49% women, 51% men. Students come from 23 states and territories, 27 other countries, 11% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 15% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 7% 25 or older, 35% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 71% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Cooperative Education Program. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: recommendations, interview. Required for some: essay. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $5224 full-time, $216 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $14,050 full-time, $396 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1392 full-time, $67 per credit hour part-time, $9 per term part-time. College room and board: $6442. College room only: $3132.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 80 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 10% of eligible men and 10% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Black Student Association, Campus Activities Board, Residence Hall Association. Major annual events: homecoming, Parents' Weekend, Greek Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, bicycle patrols. 1,800 college housing spaces available; 1,590 were occupied in 2003-04. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Lewis J. Ort Library with 261,712 books, 293,802 microform titles, 2,430 serials, 32,224 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $611,697. 577 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The state university, in the City of Frostburg (population 7,623) is located in the mountains of western Maryland at an elevation of 2,200 feet. There are nearby state parks and winter sports activities including ice skating, skiing, and sleighing.

■ GARRETT COLLEGE

687 Mosser Rd.
McHenry, MD 21541

Tel: (301)387-3000
Admissions: (301)387-3046
Fax: (301)387-3055

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.garrettcollege.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: 62-acre rural campus. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $19,371. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3638 per student. Total enrollment: 613. Full-time: 360 students, 52% women, 48% men. Part-time: 253 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 12 states and territories, 1 other country, 20% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 9% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 22% 25 or older, 8% live on campus, 48% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview. Placement: SAT or ACT recommended. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2340 full-time, $78 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $5460 full-time, $182 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6540 full-time, $218 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $570 full-time, $18 per credit hour part-time, $15. College room and board: $4970. College room only: $2550.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 3 open to all; national fraternities; 20% of men are members. Most popular organizations: Wildlife Club, Raiders of the Lost Arts, student government. Major annual events: Back to College Event, GCC/ACC basketball game, Orientation. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. 60 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. Learning Resource Center with 24,230 books, 7,969 microform titles, 87 serials, 2,151 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $254,723. 60 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Garrett County is a rural area of approximately 29,000 year-round inhabitants, most of whom are employed in small business, education, agriculture and tourism. It is also a four-season resort area with seasonal swells in population. The natural resources of the region are conducive to the college's three signature programs: Adventure sports, Agricultural Management, and Natural Resources and Wildlife Technology.

■ GEORGE MEANY CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES-THE NATIONAL LABOR COLLEGE E-8

10000 New Hampshire Ave.
Silver Spring, MD 20903

Tel: (301)431-6400

Free: 800-GMC-4CDP
Admissions: (301)431-5404
Fax: (301)431-5411

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.georgemeany.org/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Founded 1974.

■ GOUCHER COLLEGE D-10

1021 Dulaney Valley Rd.
Baltimore, MD 21204-2794

Tel: (410)337-6000

Free: 800-468-2437
Admissions: (410)337-6100
Fax: (410)337-6236

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.goucher.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1885. Setting: 287-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $155.8 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $12,100 per student. Total enrollment: 2,233. Faculty: 190 (112 full-time, 78 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 2,976 applied, 67% were admitted. 26% from top 10% of their high school class, 83% from top half. Full-time: 1,306 students, 66% women, 34% men. Part-time: 40 students, 73% women, 28% men. Students come from 40 states and territories, 8 other countries, 69% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 4% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 1% 25 or older, 80% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 83% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: psychology; visual and performing arts; English. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Johns Hopkins University, Morgan State University, Maryland Institute, College of Art, Loyola College, Towson University, Baltimore Hebrew University, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, Coppin State, Villa Julie College, University of Maryland Baltimore County, University of Baltimore. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 3 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.8 high school GPA, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 2/1, 12/15 for early action. Notification: 4/1, 2/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $37,000 includes full-time tuition ($27,100), mandatory fees ($425), and college room and board ($9475). College room only: $5625. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $950 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 38 open to all. Most popular organizations: CAUSE (Community Auxiliary for Service), Umoja: The African Alliance, Quindecim (newspaper), BGlad, Hillel. Major annual events: Pumpkin Bowl, Spring Gala, GIG. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, women-only housing available. Julia Rogers Library with 303,000 books, 24,800 microform titles, 22,000 serials, 4,278 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2 million. 150 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Goucher is located on 287 wooded acres in suburban Towson, seat of Baltimore County. The college is 20 minutes away from downtown Baltimore, an hour's drive from Washington, D.C., and 25 miles from the state capital of Annapolis, on the Chesapeake Bay. There are extensive walking, riding, and running trails that help create a small college atmosphere.

■ GRIGGS UNIVERSITY E-8

PO Box 4437, 12501 Old Columbia Pk
Silver Spring, MD 20914-4437

Tel: (301)680-6570
Admissions: (301)680-6579
Fax: (301)680-6577

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.griggs.edu/

Description:

Independent Seventh-day Adventist, 4-year, coed. Part of Seventh-day Adventist Parochial School System. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees (offers only external degree programs). Founded 1990. Setting: suburban campus with easy access to Washington D.C.. Total enrollment: 389. 28 applied, 100% were admitted. Core. Calendar: continuous. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Tuition: $7350 full-time, $245 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $70 full-time, $70 per year part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

College housing not available.

■ HAGERSTOWN BUSINESS COLLEGE A-5

18618 Crestwood Dr.
Hagerstown, MD 21742-2797

Tel: (301)739-2670

Free: 800-422-2670
Fax: (301)791-7661

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hagerstownbusinesscol.org/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of Kaplan Higher Education Corporation. Awards certificates and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1938. Setting: 8-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Total enrollment: 932. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. 64% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 10% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 55% 25 or older, 3% live on campus. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, summer session for credit, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 5 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Beta Lambda, Association of Legal Students, Health Information Technology Students Organization, Student Government Association, Caduceus Club. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. 36 college housing spaces available; 27 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. HBC library plus 1 other with 8,000 books, 528 microform titles, 70 serials, and 400 audiovisual materials. 207 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ HAGERSTOWN COMMUNITY COLLEGE A-5

11400 Robinwood Dr.
Hagerstown, MD 21742-6590

Tel: (301)790-2800
Fax: (301)739-0737

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hagerstowncc.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1946. Setting: 187-acre suburban campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $5.7 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3378 per student. Total enrollment: 3,521. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 1,373 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 1,204 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 2,317 students, 67% women, 33% men. Students come from 6 states and territories, 1 other country, 23% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 7% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 37% 25 or older, 5% transferred in. Retention: 62% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at HCC Valley Mall Center, Maryland Correctional Training Center.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing (RN), radiological technology and practical nursing (LPN) programs. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required for some: high school transcript, ACT composite score of 21, 1 lab chemistry and algebra for admission into nursing and radiography programs. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2670 full-time, $89 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $4260 full-time, $142 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5580 full-time, $186 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $280 full-time, $8 per credit hour part-time, $20. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 10 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Robinwood Players, Association of Nursing Students, Theta Lambda Upsilon, Art Club. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. William Brish Library with 45,705 books, 4,907 microform titles, 228 serials, 1,585 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $378,321. 500 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

In the heart of Cumberland Valley, Hagerstown is manufacturing city nestled at an intersection of highway interstates and rail transportation. All forms of commercial transportation are available. Recreational facilities are numerous. Points of interest are Antietam Battlefield, Old Ft. Frederick State Park, Hager House, and Washington County Museum of Fine Arts. Special events include the annual Halloween Mummer's Parade.

■ HARFORD COMMUNITY COLLEGE B-11

401 Thomas Run Rd.
Bel Air, MD 21015-1698

Tel: (410)836-4000
Admissions: (410)836-4379
Fax: (410)836-4197
Web Site: http://www.harford.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1957. Setting: 331-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore. Endowment: $4.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3681 per student. Total enrollment: 5,492. 1,197 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 2,157 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 3,335 students, 66% women, 34% men. Students come from 10 states and territories, 17 other countries, 1% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 11% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.5% international, 33% 25 or older, 60% transferred in. Retention: 66% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Placement: ACCUPLACER required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2250 full-time, $75 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $4500 full-time, $150 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6750 full-time, $225 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $225 full-time, $7.50 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 18 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Association, Paralegal Club, Multi-National Students Association, Student Nurses Association, Video Club. Major annual events: Welcome Picnic, Oktoberfest, Holiday Party. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Learning Resources Center with 74,731 books, 4,203 microform titles, 422 serials, 6,700 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.3 million. 267 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ HOOD COLLEGE C-6

401 Rosemont Ave.
Frederick, MD 21701-8575

Tel: (301)663-3131

Free: 800-922-1599
Admissions: (301)696-3400

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hood.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees (also offers adult program with significant enrollment not reflected in profile). Founded 1893. Setting: 50-acre suburban campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $50.5 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $356,475. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $11,051 per student. Total enrollment: 2,117. Faculty: 202 (81 full-time, 121 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 1,852 applied, 51% were admitted. 33% from top 10% of their high school class, 64% from top quarter, 96% from top half. 4 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,007 students, 76% women, 24% men. Part-time: 176 students, 66% women, 34% men. Students come from 28 states and territories, 27 other countries, 19% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 12% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 19% 25 or older, 53% live on campus, 12% transferred in. Retention: 87% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; psychology; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Washington Semester Program, Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN), Council of International Education Exchange (CIEE), Duke University Marine Science Consort Education (MSEC). Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, interview. Required for some: recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 2/15, 10/1 for early action. Notification: continuous, 10/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $30,085 includes full-time tuition ($22,000), mandatory fees ($335), and college room and board ($7750). College room only: $4050. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $635 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $105 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 59 open to all. Most popular organizations: Education Club, Black Student Union, Campus Activities Board, International Club, Hood Today (newspaper). Major annual events: Policies for Dollars, spring parties, Messiah Holiday Weekend. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, residence hall security. 640 college housing spaces available; 525 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, women-only housing available. Beneficial-Hodson Library and Information Technology Center with 182,786 books, 688,015 microform titles, 1,057 serials, 3,864 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $713,454. 277 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Hood College is located on almost 50 acres near downtown Frederick, Maryland, a community of approximately 49,000. The campus is 45 miles west of Baltimore and an equal distance northwest of Washington D.C. The proximity of the Hood campus to these major metropolitan areas increases the opportunities open to students to participate in social and cultural activities, to complete internships, and to explore prominent research facilities.

■ HOWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE D-9

10901 Little Patuxent Parkway
Columbia, MD 21044-3197

Tel: (410)772-4800
Admissions: (410)772-4856
Fax: (410)772-4589

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.howardcc.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: 122-acre suburban campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3657 per student. Total enrollment: 6,842. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. Students come from 4 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 21% black, 11% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 43% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, cardiovascular technology, Rouse scholars program, EMT-P. Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required for some: essay, high school transcript, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Area resident tuition: $3300 full-time, $110 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $5790 full-time, $193 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7140 full-time, $238 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $553 full-time, $18.43 per credit part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 16 open to all. Most popular organizations: Secretarial Club, Nursing Club, Black Leadership Organization, student newspaper, Student Government Association. Major annual events: Fall Cookout, Spring Fling, Weekly Block Time. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Howard Community College Library with 40,380 books, 1,201 serials, 6,253 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $550,260. 750 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Columbia, a planned city of 100,000, was designed as a community of village centers. Small lakes, parks, and bicycle paths add charm and access to the outdoors. Situated between two major cities, Baltimore and Washington, there is quick access to transportation facilities at airports and rail stations. The Columbia Mall provides major shopping facilities, and each village center complements the mall with supermarkets and convenience stores. The college serves as a cultural center in the county and hosts a variety of concerts, stage productions and cultural activities in its theatre.

■ ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE C-9

11301 Red Run Blvd.
Owings Mills, MD 21117
Admissions: (443)394-7115
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/

Description:

primarily 2-year, coed. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Recommended: recommendations. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

■ THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY D-10

3400 North Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218-2699

Tel: (410)516-8000
Admissions: (410)516-8341
Fax: (410)516-6025

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.jhu.edu/

Description:

Independent, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1876. Setting: 140-acre urban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Endowment: $2 billion. Total enrollment: 6,025. Faculty: 525 (451 full-time, 74 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 9:1. 11,274 applied, 35% were admitted. 78% from top 10% of their high school class, 96% from top quarter, 100% from top half. 33 National Merit Scholars. Full-time: 4,351 students, 46% women, 54% men. Part-time: 66 students, 52% women, 48% men. Students come from 51 states and territories, 52 other countries, 85% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 6% Hispanic, 5% black, 22% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 5% international, 0% 25 or older, 50% live on campus, 1% transferred in. Retention: 96% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: health professions and related sciences; engineering; social sciences. Calendar: 4-1-4. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Loyola College; Towson University; Morgan State University; College of Notre Dame of Maryland; Maryland Institute, College of Art; Goucher College; Baltimore Hebrew Academy. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview, SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT. Entrance: most difficult. Application deadlines: 1/1, 11/15 for early decision. Notification: 4/1, 12/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $60. Comprehensive fee: $45,022 includes full-time tuition ($33,900), mandatory fees ($500), and college room and board ($10,622). College room only: $6096. Part-time tuition: $1130 per credit.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 180 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 21% of eligible men and 17% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: The Outdoors Club, The Hopkins Organization for Programs, The Barn Stormers (theater group), Inter-Asian Council, Ole (Latino Student organization). Major annual events: Spring Fair, Homecoming, Family Weekend. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 2,123 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Milton S. Eisenhower Library plus 6 others with 3.5 million books, 4.2 million microform titles, 30,023 serials, 299,605 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 140 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of Baltimore.

■ LOYOLA COLLEGE IN MARYLAND D-10

4501 North Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21210-2699

Tel: (410)617-2000
Fax: (410)323-2768
Web Site: http://www.loyola.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic (Jesuit), comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1852. Setting: 89-acre urban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Endowment: $143.6 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $819,000. Total enrollment: 6,187. Faculty: 537 (305 full-time, 232 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 10,391 applied, 47% were admitted. 35% from top 10% of their high school class, 74% from top quarter, 97% from top half. Full-time: 3,501 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 55 students, 62% women, 38% men. Students come from 38 states and territories, 82% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 5% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 1% 25 or older, 79% live on campus, 1% transferred in. Retention: 90% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; communications/journalism; psychology. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Johns Hopkins University; College of Notre Dame of Maryland; Goucher College; Towson State University; Morgan State University; Peabody Conservatory of Music of The Johns Hopkins University; Maryland Institute, College of Art. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 1/15. Notification: 4/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $38,898 includes full-time tuition ($28,683), mandatory fees ($1000), and college room and board ($9215). College room only: $7215. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to student level. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $486 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $25 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 2,790 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Option: coed housing available. Loyola/Notre Dame Library with 293,639 books, 312,725 microform titles, 2,126 serials, 28,878 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.7 million. 292 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ MAPLE SPRINGS BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE AND SEMINARY L-4

4130 Belt Rd.
Capitol Heights, MD 20743

Tel: (301)736-3631
Fax: (301)735-6507

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.msbbcs.edu/

Description:

Independent Baptist, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1986. Setting: 1-acre suburban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $867 per student. Total enrollment: 151. 24 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 7 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 82 students, 55% women, 45% men. Students come from 4 states and territories, 50% from out-of-state, 90% 25 or older, 24% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, accelerated degree program, independent study, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, 3 recommendations, interview. Placement: Bible examination required. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 2 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, newsletter. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, part-time security personnel. College housing not available. 1,781 books, 37 serials, and 35 audiovisual materials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $4176.

■ MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART D-10

1300 Mount Royal Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21217

Tel: (410)669-9200
Admissions: (410)225-2222
Fax: (410)225-2337

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.mica.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1826. Setting: 12-acre urban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Endowment: $38.9 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $9493 per student. Total enrollment: 1,717. Faculty: 267 (118 full-time, 149 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 2,487 applied, 45% were admitted. 29% from top 10% of their high school class, 62% from top quarter, 91% from top half. 1 National Merit Scholar, 28 class presidents, 3 valedictorians, 64 student government officers. Full-time: 1,478 students, 62% women, 38% men. Part-time: 19 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 47 states and territories, 48 other countries, 80% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 5% Hispanic, 4% black, 8% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 5% international, 4% 25 or older, 88% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 86% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: visual and performing arts; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design, Johns Hopkins University, Goucher College, University of Baltimore, Loyola College, Notre Dame College, Peabody Conservatory of Music of the Johns Hopkins University. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, early decision, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, art portfolio, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA, 3 recommendations, interview. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 2/15, 11/15 for early decision, 1/15 for early action. Notification: 3/15, 12/15 for early decision, 1/30 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $34,450 includes full-time tuition ($26,140), mandatory fees ($780), and college room and board ($7530). College room only: $5500. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $1090 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $390 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 22 open to all. Most popular organizations: a Cappela, soccer teams, Black Student Union, Channel Organix, Knitting Club. Major annual events: bus trips to galleries and museums, dances, exhibition openings. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, self-defense education, 24-hour building security, safety awareness programs, campus patrols by city police. 630 college housing spaces available; 615 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Option: coed housing available. Decker Library plus 1 other with 55,000 books, 366 serials, 4,200 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $631,334. 305 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of Baltimore.

■ MCDANIEL COLLEGE B-8

2 College Hill
Westminster, MD 21157-4390

Tel: (410)848-7000

Free: 800-638-5005
Admissions: (410)857-2230
Fax: (410)857-2729

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.mcdaniel.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1867. Setting: 160-acre suburban campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $72.2 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $140,829. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8892 per student. Total enrollment: 3,524. Faculty: 190 (129 full-time, 61 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 2,256 applied, 79% were admitted. 26% from top 10% of their high school class, 55% from top quarter, 86% from top half. Full-time: 1,643 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 52 students, 56% women, 44% men. Students come from 30 states and territories, 9 other countries, 28% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 7% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 3% 25 or older, 80% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 80% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; business/marketing; psychology. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at American University, Drew University, Gallaudet University. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: recommendations, interview, SAT Subject Tests. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 2/1, 12/1 for early action. Notification: 4/1, 1/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $33,180 includes full-time tuition ($26,980), mandatory fees ($300), and college room and board ($5900). College room only: $3200. Part-time tuition: $843 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $150 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 128 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 16% of eligible men and 12% of eligible women are members. Major annual events: homecoming, Jazz Nights, Spring Fling. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,314 college housing spaces available; 1,250 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Hoover Library with 629,965 books, 1.4 million microform titles, 3,500 serials, 11,125 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.2 million. 171 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ MONTGOMERY COLLEGE E-7

900 Hungerford Dr.
Rockville, MD 20850

Tel: (301)279-5000
Admissions: (301)279-5034
Web Site: http://www.montgomerycollege.org/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Setting: suburban campus with easy access to Washington D.C.. Total enrollment: 21,805. Full-time: 7,748 students, 51% women, 49% men. Part-time: 14,057 students, 60% women, 40% men. Students come from 169 other countries, 3% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 14% Hispanic, 27% black, 13% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 8% international, 41% 25 or older, 40% transferred in. Calendar: semesters.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: Common Application. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available.

■ MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY D-10

1700 East Cold Spring Ln.
Baltimore, MD 21251

Tel: (443)885-3333

Free: 800-332-6674
Admissions: (443)885-3000

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.morgan.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1867. Setting: 143-acre urban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $14,500 per student. Total enrollment: 6,621. 11,387 applied, 34% were admitted. Full-time: 5,328 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 677 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 47 states and territories, 30 other countries, 38% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 0.5% Hispanic, 91% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 27% 25 or older, 30% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 71% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Towson University, Coppin State College, University of Maryland. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay. Required for some: 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 5/1. Notification: continuous until 6/30. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $4280 full-time, $194 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $11,690 full-time, $445 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1830 full-time, $55 per credit part-time. College room and board: $6990. College room only: $4430. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 20 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 10% of eligible men and 10% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, choir, band. Major annual event: homecoming. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 2,351 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Morris Soper Library with 333,101 books, 2,526 serials, and an OPAC. 285 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of Baltimore.

■ MOUNT ST. MARY'S UNIVERSITY A-6

16300 Old Emmitsburg Rd.
Emmitsburg, MD 21727-7799

Tel: (301)447-6122

Free: 800-448-4347
Admissions: (301)447-5214

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.msmary.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1808. Setting: 1,400-acre rural campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $33.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6772 per student. Total enrollment: 2,176. Faculty: 205 (105 full-time, 100 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 2,190 applied, 84% were admitted. 20% from top 10% of their high school class, 48% from top quarter, 81% from top half. 4 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,485 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 171 students, 75% women, 25% men. Students come from 26 states and territories, 11 other countries, 42% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 7% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 2% 25 or older, 80% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 84% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Frederick Community College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, early action, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: Rolling, 12/1 for early action. Notification: continuous, 12/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $32,720 includes full-time tuition ($23,630), mandatory fees ($400), and college room and board ($8690). College room only: $4380. Part-time tuition: $790 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $12 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 50 open to all. Most popular organizations: campus ministry, Rugby Team Club, Ice Hockey Club, Circle K, International Affairs Organization. Major annual events: Opening Picnic, Spring Fling, Mountapalooza. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,185 college housing spaces available; 1,112 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Option: coed housing available. Phillips Library with 210,359 books, 18,675 microform titles, 926 serials, 4,825 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $878,218. 150 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NER ISRAEL RABBINICAL COLLEGE D-10

400 Mount Wilson Ln.
Baltimore, MD 21208

Tel: (410)484-7200
Fax: (410)484-3060

Description:

Independent Jewish, comprehensive, men only. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1933. Setting: 54-acre suburban campus. Total enrollment: 577. 134 applied, 50% were admitted. Full-time: 353 students. Students come from 36 states and territories, 74% from out-of-state, 8% 25 or older, 12% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, honors program, summer session for credit, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: recommendations. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Student services: health clinic. On-campus residence required through senior year.

Community Environment:

See University of Baltimore.

■ PEABODY CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC OF THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY D-10

1 East Mount Vernon Place
Baltimore, MD 21202-2397

Tel: (410)659-8150

Free: 800-368-2521
Admissions: (410)659-8110
Web Site: http://www.peabody.jhu.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Administratively affiliated with Johns Hopkins University. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1857. Setting: 1-acre urban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Endowment: $75.5 million. Total enrollment: 647. Faculty: 165. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 4:1. 713 applied, 43% were admitted. Full-time: 311 students, 45% women, 55% men. Part-time: 12 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 37 states and territories, 12 other countries, 67% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 6% black, 9% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 16% international, 2% 25 or older, 3% transferred in. Retention: 88% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: visual and performing arts; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, double major, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Johns Hopkins University; Loyola College; Maryland Institute, College of Art.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: essay, high school transcript, 3 recommendations, interview, audition. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA. Required for some: SAT or ACT. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadline: 12/1. Notification: 4/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $60. Comprehensive fee: $39,490 includes full-time tuition ($29,630), mandatory fees ($360), and college room and board ($9500). Part-time tuition: $840 per semester hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group. Social organizations: 84 open to all. Major annual events: beginning of the year events, Relaxation Day, End of Year Party. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 180 college housing spaces available; 165 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, women-only housing available. Arthur Friedheim Library with 90,706 books, 199 microform titles, 223 serials, 24,585 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $469,818. 40 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ PRINCE GEORGE'S COMMUNITY COLLEGE L-5

301 Largo Rd.
Largo, MD 20774-2199

Tel: (301)336-6000
Admissions: (301)322-0801
Web Site: http://www.pgcc.edu/

Description:

County-supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1958. Setting: 150-acre suburban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5638 per student. Total enrollment: 12,564. 4,570 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 3,352 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 9,212 students, 69% women, 31% men. Students come from 20 states and territories, 98 other countries, 4% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 76% black, 4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 51% 25 or older, 13% transferred in. Retention: 58% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters plus 2 summer sessions. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: early admission. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA. Required for some: high school transcript. Placement: ACCUPLACER required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 40 open to all. Most popular organizations: Crusaders for Christ, Student Program Board, Union of Black Scholars, International Student Groups. Major annual events: International Festival, Bluebird Blues Jazz Festival, Jook Joint Saturday Night. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Accokeek Hall with 242,519 books, 226,390 microform titles, 750 serials, 16,645 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. 450 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE F-10

PO Box 2800
Annapolis, MD 21404

Tel: (410)263-2371

Free: 800-727-9238
Admissions: (410)626-2522

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.stjohnscollege.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1784. Setting: 36-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $56.9 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $13,479 per student. Total enrollment: 566. Faculty: 78 (71 full-time, 7 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 8:1. 494 applied, 76% were admitted. 40% from top 10% of their high school class, 69% from top quarter, 91% from top half. 8 National Merit Scholars. Full-time: 472 students, 46% women, 54% men. Part-time: 2 students, 100% women. Students come from 48 states and territories, 10 other countries, 85% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 1% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 2% 25 or older, 87% live on campus, 0% transferred in. Retention: 82% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic area with the most degrees conferred: liberal arts/general studies. Core. Calendar: semesters. Internships. Off campus study at St. John's College (NM).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 2 recommendations. Recommended: interview, SAT or ACT. Required for some: SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $40,451 includes full-time tuition ($32,375), mandatory fees ($200), and college room and board ($7876). Room and board charges vary according to board plan.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 35 open to all; 85% of eligible men and 85% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: King William Players, Project Politae, Political Forum, Student Committee on Instruction, Rowing Club. Major annual events: Collegium Musicum, King William Players' Production, Annapolis Cup Croquet Match. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 350 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: coed housing available. Greenfield Library plus 1 other with 102,400 books, 412 microform titles, 123 serials, 2,100 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $383,388. 16 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ST. MARY'S COLLEGE OF MARYLAND

18952 East Fisher Rd.
St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3001

Tel: (240)895-2000

Free: 800-492-7181
Admissions: (240)895-5000
Fax: (240)895-5001

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.smcm.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 4-year, coed. Part of Maryland State Colleges and Universities System. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1840. Setting: 319-acre rural campus. Endowment: $29.6 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $498,828. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8019 per student. Total enrollment: 1,964. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 2,200 applied, 68% were admitted. 34% from top 10% of their high school class, 70% from top quarter, 94% from top half. 22 National Merit Scholars, 23 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,849 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 115 students, 57% women, 43% men. Students come from 36 states and territories, 18% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 8% black, 4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 3% 25 or older, 84% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 89% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; psychology; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at National Student Exchange. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 1/15, 12/1 for early decision plan 1, 1/15 for early decision plan 2. Notification: 4/1, 1/1 for early decision plan 1, 2/15 for early decision plan 2.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $9770 full-time, $160 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $19,340 full-time, $160 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1940 full-time. College room and board: $8505. College room only: $4820.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 75 open to all. Most popular organizations: For Goodness Sake (community service), The Point News (student newspaper), FMLA (feminist group), Black Student Union, Dance Club. Major annual events: World Carnival, Christmas in April (community service), Cardboard Boat Races. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. College housing designed to accommodate 1,482 students; 1,522 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Baltimore Hall with 157,077 books, 44,816 microform titles, 1,343 serials, 16,463 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.8 million. 180 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SALISBURY UNIVERSITY I-15

1101 Camden Ave.
Salisbury, MD 21801-6837
Tel: (410)543-6000; 888-543-0148
Admissions: (410)543-6161
Fax: (410)548-2587
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ssu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of University System of Maryland. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1925. Setting: 144-acre small town campus. Endowment: $32.5 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.6 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4523 per student. Total enrollment: 7,009. Faculty: 494 (323 full-time, 171 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 5,296 applied, 57% were admitted. 18% from top 10% of their high school class, 50% from top quarter, 87% from top half. 3 National Merit Scholars, 7 valedictorians. Full-time: 5,798 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 639 students, 55% women, 45% men. Students come from 30 states and territories, 23 other countries, 14% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 9% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 8% 25 or older, 46% live on campus, 11% transferred in. Retention: 83% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; social sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at other units of the University System of Maryland. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 1/15, 12/1 for early action. Notification: 3/15, 1/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $4814 full-time, $200 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,492 full-time, $520 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1562 full-time, $50 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $6932. College room only: $3554. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 104 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 5% of eligible men and 5% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, campus radio station, Programming Board, Union of African-American Students. Major annual events: Welcome Week, Spring Fling, Family Weekend. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,704 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Blackwell Library plus 1 other with 254,151 books, 747,871 microform titles, 1,271 serials, 4,467 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.1 million. 275 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SOJOURNER-DOUGLASS COLLEGE D-10

500 North Caroline St.
Baltimore, MD 21205-1814

Tel: (410)276-0306
Fax: (410)675-1810
Web Site: http://sdc.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees (offers only evening and weekend programs). Founded 1980. Setting: 15-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 1,124. Full-time: 714 students, 85% women, 15% men. Part-time: 346 students, 82% women, 18% men. 0.1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 98% black, 95% 25 or older. Retention: 78% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: trimesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, 2 recommendations, interview, resume. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Tuition: $6540 full-time, $363 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $208 full-time, $104 per term part-time. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Student services: personal-psychological counseling. College housing not available. 10,000 books and 25 serials. 16 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The school is located in the heart of Baltimore, which is in the center of Maryland and accessible from every major state highway. The metropolitan area extends into five adjacent counties: Baltimore, Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, and Howard. The area has more than 1,000 different employers, primarily in the high technology and service industries. Recreational facilities are ample and can be found both on campus and in several public parks and indoor facilities.

■ TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (BALTIMORE) D-10

1520 South Caton Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21227-1063

Tel: (410)644-6400
Fax: (410)644-6481

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Founded 1956.

■ TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (BELTSVILLE) J-4

4600 Powder Mill Rd.
Beltsville, MD 20705

Tel: (301)937-8448
Fax: (301)937-5327

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Founded 1967.

■ TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (TOWSON) C-10

803 Glen Eagles Ct.
Towson, MD 21286-2201

Tel: (410)296-5350

Free: 800-48-TESST
Fax: (410)296-5356

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards terminal associate degrees. Founded 1992.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive.

Collegiate Environment:

Student-run newspaper.

■ TOWSON UNIVERSITY C-10

8000 York Rd.
Towson, MD 21252-0001

Tel: (410)704-2000; 888-4TOWSON
Admissions: (410)704-2113
Fax: (410)704-3030

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.towson.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Part of University System of Maryland. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1866. Setting: 321-acre suburban campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $4.5 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4204 per student. Total enrollment: 18,011. Faculty: 1,245 (663 full-time, 582 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 11,746 applied, 64% were admitted. 24% from top 10% of their high school class, 54% from top quarter, 91% from top half. Full-time: 12,812 students, 62% women, 38% men. Part-time: 1,683 students, 54% women, 46% men. Students come from 45 states and territories, 106 other countries, 18% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 11% black, 4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 12% 25 or older, 24% live on campus, 10% transferred in. Retention: 83% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; public administration and social services. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at all state colleges in Maryland, other institutions of higher education in the Baltimore metropolitan area, members of the National Student Exchange. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, minimum 2.75 high school GPA, recommendations, interview. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 2/15. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $5180 full-time, $225 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $14,114 full-time, $528 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1916 full-time, $74 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $6828. College room only: $3968. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 175 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 10% of eligible men and 7% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Black Student Union, Student Government Association, Habitat for Humanity, Circle K, University Residence Government. Major annual events: Homecoming Weekend, Welcome Week, Tiger Fest (spring festival). Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. College housing designed to accommodate 3,266 students; 3,347 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Option: coed housing available. Cook Library with 574,096 books, 880,434 microform titles, 4,154 serials, 16,413 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $5 million.

■ UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY F-10

121 Blake Rd.
Annapolis, MD 21402-5000

Tel: (410)293-1000
Admissions: (410)293-4361
Fax: (410)293-4348
Web Site: http://www.usna.edu/

Description:

Federally supported, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1845. Setting: 329-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $115.6 million. Total enrollment: 4,422. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 7:1. 11,259 applied, 13% were admitted. 54% from top 10% of their high school class, 81% from top quarter, 96% from top half. 135 class presidents, 135 student government officers. Full-time: 4,422 students, 18% women, 82% men. Students come from 54 states and territories, 21 other countries, 96% from out-of-state, 2% Native American, 9% Hispanic, 6% black, 5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 2% 25 or older, 100% live on campus, 0% transferred in. Retention: 96% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: engineering; social sciences; history. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, interview, authorized nomination, SAT or ACT. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadline: 1/31. Notification: 4/15.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run radio station. Social organizations: 75 open to all. Most popular organizations: Mountaineering Club, Semper Fi, Black Studies Club, Midshipmen Action Club, Martial Arts Club. Major annual events: Parents' Weekend, Army-Navy football game, Commissioning Week. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, front gate security. 4,500 college housing spaces available; 4,349 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: coed housing available. Nimitz Library plus 1 other with 800,000 books, 1,892 serials, and an OPAC. 6,100 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF BALTIMORE D-10

1420 North Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21201-5779

Tel: (410)837-4200; 877-APPLYUB
Admissions: (410)837-4777
Fax: (410)837-4793

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ubalt.edu/

Description:

State-supported, upper-level, coed. Part of University System of Maryland. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1925. Setting: 49-acre urban campus. Endowment: $18.9 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.8 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6369 per student. Total enrollment: 4,987. 1,001 applied, 82% were admitted. Full-time: 1,051 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 1,066 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 26 states and territories, 62 other countries, 7% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 33% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 61% 25 or older, 98% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at University of Maryland Baltimore County, Coppin State College, Morgan State University, Towson University, Bowie State College, Maryland Institute, College of Art. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $5324 full-time, $243 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $16,904 full-time, $704 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1469 full-time, $27 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, course load, and degree level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, course load, and degree level.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 65 open to all; 9% of eligible men and 9% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Psi Chi, APALSA, International Student Association, African Student Association, Forensics Student Association. Major annual events: Semi-Annual Block Party, Speaker Series. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Langsdale Library plus 1 other with 258,747 books, 368,607 microform titles, 10,738 serials, 883 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $4 million. 135 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Baltimore is an important industrial and educational center for the state of Maryland and the regional northeastern United States. The port has an active international market and foreign trade. Downtown Baltimore has become a popular tourist site; the Inner Harbor complex, including Harborplace and the National Aquarium, is recognized internationally. New stadiums to house the Baltimore Orioles and Baltimore Ravens have been completed at Camden Yards in downtown Baltimore. Pimlico Race Course is the home of the annual Preakness race. University of Baltimore is located in the cultural center of the city, adjacent to the Lyric Opera House, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall and the Maryland Institute of Art.

■ UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY D-10

1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250

Tel: (410)455-1000

Free: 800-862-2402
Admissions: (410)455-2291
Fax: (410)455-1210

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.umbc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Part of University System of Maryland. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1963. Setting: 530-acre suburban campus with easy access to Washington, D.C.. Endowment: $32.7 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $42.9 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8114 per student. Total enrollment: 11,650. Faculty: 753 (458 full-time, 295 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 5,229 applied, 71% were admitted. 30% from top 10% of their high school class, 59% from top quarter, 88% from top half. 5 National Merit Scholars. Full-time: 7,980 students, 46% women, 54% men. Part-time: 1,426 students, 49% women, 51% men. Students come from 43 states and territories, 91 other countries, 8% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 14% black, 20% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 16% 25 or older, 33% live on campus, 12% transferred in. Retention: 81% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: communication technologies; social sciences; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Johns Hopkins University, University System of Maryland. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 3 high school GPA, 2 recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 2/1, 11/1 for early action. Notification: continuous, 12/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. State resident tuition: $6484 full-time, $270 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $14,560 full-time, $606 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $2036 full-time, $5 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $8090. College room only: $4930.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 180 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 3% of eligible men and 3% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Student Events Board, Retriever Weekly, Resident Student Association, Black Student Union. Major annual events: Quadmania, Fall Frenzy, Homecoming. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 3,780 college housing spaces available; 3,183 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Option: coed housing available. Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery plus 1 other with 766,261 books, 1.1 million microform titles, 4,170 serials, 35,659 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $6.5 million. 762 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The ultramodern 500-acre campus is in an open-country setting in Catonsville, only minutes from the heart of Baltimore and less than an hour from the nation's capital. Baltimore, just six miles from the campus, is a rich resource for university students. Opportunities for musical, athletic, theatrical, and cultural events abound. The dynamic and dramatic Inner Harbor area features a convention center, the Maryland Science Center, Pier 7 Performing Arts Pavilion, the National Aquarium, and the lively collection of shops and restaurants called Harborplace. The Morris Mechanic Theatre brings Broadway to Baltimore, while the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and internationally acclaimed artists perform in the striking Meyerhoff Concert Hall. The Walters Art Gallery, the Enoch Pratt Library, and Oriole Park at Camden Yards are also part of the city's rich tradition. Washington, only 32 miles from the campus, offers the student a wealth of academic, cultural, political, and leisure activities.

■ UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK K-4

College Park, MD 20742
Tel: (301)405-1000

Free: 800-422-5867
Admissions: (301)314-8385
Fax: (301)314-9693

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.maryland.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Part of University System of Maryland. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1856. Setting: 3,688-acre suburban campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $329.4 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $372 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $10,834 per student. Total enrollment: 35,300. Faculty: 2,070 (1,508 full-time, 562 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 22,428 applied, 49% were admitted. 50% from top 10% of their high school class, 83% from top quarter, 99% from top half. 112 National Merit Scholars. Full-time: 23,226 students, 49% women, 51% men. Part-time: 2,147 students, 46% women, 54% men. Students come from 54 states and territories, 159 other countries, 24% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 6% Hispanic, 13% black, 14% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 7% 25 or older, 39% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 93% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; business/marketing; engineering. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at 140 members of the National Student Exchange. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval (c), Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, early action, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: 2 recommendations. Required for some: resume of activities, auditions. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 1/20, 12/1 for early action. Notification: continuous until 4/1, 2/15 for early action. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $55. State resident tuition: $6566 full-time, $273 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $18,890 full-time, $787 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1255 full-time, $288 per term part-time. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $8075. College room only: $4784. Room and board charges vary according to board plan.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 515 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 9% of eligible men and 11% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Residence Hall Association, Black Student Union, Asian-American Student Union/Jewish Student Union, Commuter Students Association. Major annual events: First Look Fair, All-Niter, Art Attack. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, campus police, video camera surveillance. 10,771 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: coed, women-only housing available. McKeldin Library plus 6 others with 3 million books, 541,175 microform titles, 34,091 serials, 244,911 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $21.3 million. 773 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE J-14

Princess Anne, MD 21853-1299

Tel: (410)651-2200
Admissions: (410)651-8410
Fax: (410)651-7922
Web Site: http://www.umes.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Part of University System of Maryland. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1886. Setting: 700-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 3,762. 3,714 applied, 58% were admitted. Full-time: 2,902 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 424 students, 54% women, 46% men. Students come from 30 states and territories, 50 other countries, 28% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 76% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 11% international, 13% 25 or older, 60% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 69% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Salisbury State University.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT, ACCUPLACER. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 7/15, 11/15 for early action. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $4112 full-time, $171 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,268 full-time, $371 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1696 full-time, $40 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $6130. College room only: $3430. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 25% of eligible men and 30% of eligible women are members. Major annual events: homecoming, Spring Fest, Spring Convocation. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 2,200 college housing spaces available; 1,900 were occupied in 2003-04. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Frederick Douglass Library with 150,000 books, 1,260 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 120 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE K-4

3501 University Blvd. East
Adelphi, MD 20783

Tel: (301)985-7000
Fax: (301)985-7678
Web Site: http://www.umuc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of University System of Maryland. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees (offers primarily part-time evening and weekend degree programs at more than 30 off-campus locations in Maryland and the Washington, DC area, and more than 180 military communities in Europe and Asia with military enrollment not reflected in this profile; associate of arts program available to military students only). Founded 1947. Setting: suburban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Total enrollment: 28,374. 950 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 2,779 students, 62% women, 38% men. Part-time: 17,078 students, 57% women, 43% men. Students come from 54 states and territories, 41 other countries, 33% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 5% Hispanic, 34% black, 5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 83% 25 or older, 24% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. Off campus study.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $5520 full-time, $230 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,152 full-time, $423 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $120 full-time, $5 per semester hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Information and Library Services plus 1 other with 5,807 books, 31 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 375 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The administrative site is located at College Park, a small town of 25,000. Programs are offered at more than 30 locations throughout Maryland, Northern Virginia, and the Washington, D.C. area.

■ UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-MARYLAND CAMPUS D-9

8830 Stanford Blvd., Ste. 100
Columbia, MD 21045-5424

Tel: (410)872-9001

Free: 800-228-7240
Admissions: (480)557-1712
Web Site: http://www.phoenix.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Setting: urban campus. Total enrollment: 2,028. Faculty: 218 (9 full-time, 209 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 11:1. 98 applied. Full-time: 1,586 students, 60% women, 40% men. 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 14% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 19% international, 94% 25 or older. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; computer and information sciences. Core. Calendar: continuous. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, graduate courses open to undergrads.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: 1 recommendation. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $110. Tuition: $11,950 full-time, $398 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time, $70 per course part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program.

Collegiate Environment:

College housing not available. University Library with 444 books, 666 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. System-wide operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.2 million.

■ VILLA JULIE COLLEGE

Green Spring Valley Rd.
Stevenson, MD 21153

Tel: (410)486-7000; 877-468-3852
Admissions: (410)486-7001

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vjc.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1952. Setting: 60-acre suburban campus with easy access to Baltimore. Total enrollment: 2,956. Faculty: 349 (93 full-time, 256 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 2,166 applied, 70% were admitted. 17% from top 10% of their high school class, 42% from top quarter, 78% from top half. 3 valedictorians. Full-time: 2,304 students, 70% women, 30% men. Part-time: 503 students, 78% women, 22% men. Students come from 13 states and territories, 9 other countries, 4% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 15% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.3% international, 19% 25 or older, 26% live on campus, 7% transferred in. Retention: 79% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: health professions and related sciences; business/marketing; computer and information sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Chesapeake Community College, Anne Arundel Community College, Howard Community College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 3/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $25,222 includes full-time tuition ($14,674), mandatory fees ($1000), and college room and board ($9548). College room only: $6550. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $415 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $75 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 30 open to all; national sororities; 2% of women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Wilderness Club, Black Student Union, National Student Nurses Association, Phi Sigma. Major annual events: Welcome Picnic, SGA Haunted Trail and Bonfire, BSU Latin Dance. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, patrols by trained security personnel during campus hours. College housing designed to accommodate 548 students; 550 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Villa Julie College Library with 64,930 books, 147,735 microform titles, 15,503 serials, 2,603 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 300 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in the open countryside of Baltimore County, 20 minutes from the center of urban Baltimore, the college offers a country setting with city conveniences.

■ WASHINGTON BIBLE COLLEGE

6511 Princess Garden Parkway
Lanham, MD 20706-3599

Tel: (301)552-1400; 877-793-7227
Fax: (301)552-2775

E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bible.edu/

Description:

Independent nondenominational, 4-year, coed. Administratively affiliated with Capital Bible Seminary. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1938. Setting: 63-acre suburban campus with easy access to Washington, DC. Total enrollment: 331. 167 applied, 65% were admitted. Students come from 14 states and territories, 9 other countries, 24% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 39% black, 8% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 63% 25 or older, 28% live on campus. Retention: 70% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at New Antioch Baptist Church, Randallstown, MD.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, 2 recommendations, Christian testimony, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 1/9. Notification: continuous until 8/15.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $22,690 includes full-time tuition ($16,000), mandatory fees ($450), and college room and board ($6240). College room only: $3000. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and location. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $350 per credit. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and location.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Most popular organizations: Student Missions Fellowship, school choir and ensemble, Korean Student Fellowship. Major annual events: homecoming, Christmas banquet. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, secured campus entrances, trained guards on duty. 250 college housing spaces available; 120 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Oyer Memorial Library plus 1 other with 78,000 books, 4,640 microform titles, 525 serials, 3,824 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 25 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Washington Bible College is 25 minutes outside of Washington, D.C., and within 30 minutes of historic Annapolis and Baltimore's Inner Harbor, making metropolitan recreational and cultural facilities easily accessible.

■ WASHINGTON COLLEGE D-12

300 Washington Ave.
Chestertown, MD 21620-1197

Tel: (410)778-2800

Free: 800-422-1782
Admissions: (410)778-7700
Fax: (410)778-7287

E-mail: [email protected]ll.edu
Web Site: http://www.washcoll.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1782. Setting: 120-acre small town campus with easy access to Baltimore and Washington, DC. Endowment: $125.5 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8519 per student. Total enrollment: 1,412. Faculty: 144 (93 full-time, 51 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 2,223 applied, 59% were admitted. 28% from top 10% of their high school class, 66% from top quarter, 93% from top half. Full-time: 1,312 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 29 students, 83% women, 17% men. Students come from 36 states and territories, 40 other countries, 56% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 4% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 2% 25 or older, 80% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 84% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; business/marketing; English. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, part-time degree program, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early decision, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 3/1, 11/15 for early decision, 12/1 for early action. Notification: continuous, 12/15 for early decision, 12/20 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. Comprehensive fee: $34,990 includes full-time tuition ($28,230), mandatory fees ($560), and college room and board ($6200). College room only: $3000. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program and reciprocity agreements. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $4705 per course. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 50 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 25% of eligible men and 25% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Writers Union, Student Government Association, Hands Out, Omicron Delta Kappa, Dale Adams Society. Major annual events: Fall Weekend, Birthday Ball, May Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,004 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only housing available. Clifton M. Miller Library with 243,030 books, 247,626 microform titles, 4,667 serials, 6,114 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.3 million. 150 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Chestertown is on the eastern shore of Maryland, 40 miles from Chesapeake Bay Bridge. The community facilities include churches and numerous civic and service organizations. Boating, fishing and hunting are some of the outdoor sports of the area.

■ WOR-WIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE I-15

32000 Campus Dr.
Salisbury, MD 21804

Tel: (410)334-2800
Admissions: (410)334-2895
Web Site: http://www.worwic.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Maryland State Community Colleges System. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1976. Setting: 202-acre small town campus. Endowment: $4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2987 per student. Total enrollment: 3,043. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. 1,075 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 970 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 2,073 students, 70% women, 30% men. Students come from 15 states and territories, 2% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 25% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 47% 25 or older, 8% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for emergency medical services, nursing and radiologic technology programs. Option: early admission. Recommended: high school transcript. Required for some: ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2250 full-time, $75 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $5700 full-time, $190 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6630 full-time, $221 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $86 full-time, $2 per credit hour part-time, $13 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 9 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Arts Club, Bioneer Club, Future Educators of America Club, student newspaper. Major annual events: Fall Fest, Dolphin Days, Wellness Day. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service, patrols by trained security personnel 9 a.m. to midnight. College housing not available. Patricia M. Hazel Media Center plus 2 others with 25 books, 37 serials, 272 audiovisual materials, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $258,015. 478 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ YESHIVA COLLEGE OF THE NATION'S CAPITAL E-8

1216 Arcola Ave.
Silver Spring, MD 20902

Tel: (301)593-2534
Fax: (301)949-7040

Description:

Independent Jewish, 4-year.

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Maryland

Maryland

ALLEGANY COLLEGE OF MARYLAND

12401 Willowbrook Rd., SE
Cumberland, MD 21502-2596
Tel: (301)784-5000
Fax: (301)784-5024
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.allegany.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Donald L. Alexander
Registrar: Gloria Brooks-Broadwater
Admissions: Cathy Nolan
Financial Aid: Cindy Harbel
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Maryland State Community Colleges System Scores: 68% SAT V 400+; 65% SAT M 400+; 62% ACT 18-23; 6% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For Dislocated Workers Program: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2700 full-time, $90 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $5160 full-time, $172 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6060 full-time, $202 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $194 full-time, $8.30 per credit part-time, $41 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and location. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and location. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,073, PT 1,593 Faculty: FT 111, PT 119 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: ACT Library Holdings: 86,636 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ADA, AOTA, APTA, CARC, JRCERT, NAACLS, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

101 College Parkway
Arnold, MD 21012-1895
Tel: (410)647-7100
Admissions: (410)777-2240
Fax: (410)541-2245
Web Site: http://www.aacc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Martha A. Smith
Registrar: Judith A. Coughlin
Admissions: Thomas McGinn
Financial Aid: Richard Heath
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For except for certain allied health programs: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $1992 full-time, $83 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3816 full-time, $159 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6768 full-time, $282 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $232 full-time, $8 per credit hour part-time, $20 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,780, PT 9,510 Faculty: FT 236, PT 591 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 144,694 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ACF, APTA, JRCERT, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Lacrosse M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Volleyball W

BALTIMORE CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

2901 Liberty Heights Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21215-7893
Tel: (410)462-8300
Fax: (410)462-7677
Web Site: http://www.bccc.state.md.us/
Registrar: Kathy Styles
Admissions: Scheherazade Forman
Financial Aid: Ronald H. Smith
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $10.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 121, PT 315 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I and SAT II or ACT, SAT II Library Holdings: 72,413 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: ARCEST, ADA, AHIMA, APTA, ACBSP, CARC, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Track and Field M & W

BALTIMORE HEBREW UNIVERSITY

5800 Park Heights Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21215-3996
Tel: (410)578-6900; 888-248-7420
Admissions: (410)578-6967
Fax: (410)578-6940
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bhu.edu/
President/CEO: Diane Kempler
Registrar: Zelda Rachbach
Admissions: Essie Keyser
Financial Aid: Yelena Feldman
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 43, PT 53, Grad 65 Faculty: FT 10, PT 20 Student-Faculty Ratio: 4:1 % Receiving Financial Aid: 93 Library Holdings: 70,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates; 120 credits, Bachelors

BALTIMORE INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE

Commerce Exchange
17 Commerce St.
Baltimore, MD 21202-3230
Tel: (410)752-4710
Free: 800-624-9926
Fax: (410)752-3730
Web Site: http://www.bic.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Roger Chylinski
Registrar: Elizabeth Rogers
Admissions: Marti Hackett
Financial Aid: Lesley Otterbein
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $20,313 includes full-time tuition ($14,751), mandatory fees ($107), and college room and board ($5455). College room only: $3255. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 486, PT 30 Faculty: FT 14, PT 18 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 24 Library Holdings: 13,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates; 120 credits, Bachelors

BOWIE STATE UNIVERSITY

14000 Jericho Park Rd.
Bowie, MD 20715-9465
Tel: (301)860-4000; 877-772-6943
Admissions: (301)860-3427
Fax: (301)860-3510
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bowiestate.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Calvin W. Lowe
Registrar: Carlene Wilson
Admissions: Don Kiah
Financial Aid: Veronica Pickett
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: University System of Maryland Scores: 81% SAT V 400+; 78% SAT M 400 + Admission Plans: Preferred Admission Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $5096 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,088 full-time. Mandatory fees: $1750 full-time. College room and board: $5219. College room only: $3859. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,216, PT 811, Grad 1,388 Faculty: FT 191, PT 160 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 55 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 33 Library Holdings: 331,640 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACBSP, CSWE, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Bowling W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Softball W; Tennis W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

CAPITOL COLLEGE

11301 Springfield Rd.
Laurel, MD 20708-9759
Tel: (301)369-2800
Free: 800-950-1992
Admissions: (301)953-3200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.capitol-college.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Michael T. Wood
Registrar: Sallie McKevitt
Admissions: Darnell Edwards
Financial Aid: Suzanne Thompson
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 81% SAT V 400+; 88% SAT M 400 + Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Tuition: $17,688 full-time. College room only: $3869. Room charges vary according to housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 319, PT 311, Grad 171 Faculty: FT 15, PT 39 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 76 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 17 Library Holdings: 10,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates; 122 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ABET

CARROLL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

1601 Washington Rd.
Westminster, MD 21157
Tel: (410)386-8000
Admissions: (410)386-8430
Fax: (410)876-8855
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.carrollcc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Faye Pappalardo
Registrar: Robert Koermer
Admissions: Candace Edwards
Financial Aid: Robert Koermer
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Maryland Higher Education Commission % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $3234 full-time, $92 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $4476 full-time, $128 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6788 full-time, $195 per credit part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,327, PT 1,788 Faculty: FT 60, PT 150 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Library Holdings: 39,187 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: APTA

CECIL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

One Seahawk Dr.
North East, MD 21901-1999
Tel: (410)287-6060
Admissions: (410)287-1002
Fax: (410)287-1026
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cecilcc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Stephen Pannill
Registrar: Sandra Rajaski
Admissions: Dr. Diane Lane
Financial Aid: Kate Lockhart
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Area resident tuition: $2550 full-time, $85 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $5250 full-time, $175 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6600 full-time, $220 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 687, PT 1,229 Faculty: FT 41, PT 151 Library Holdings: 35,575 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading W; Softball W; Volleyball W

CHESAPEAKE COLLEGE

PO Box 8
Wye Mills, MD 21679-0008
Tel: (410)822-5400
Fax: (410)827-9466
Web Site: http://www.chesapeake.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Stuart M. Bounds
Registrar: Claudia Jewell
Admissions: Kathy Petrichenko
Financial Aid: Dr. Richard Midcap
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 724, PT 1,630 Faculty: FT 47, PT 90 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Library Holdings: 44,049 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 63 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: APTA, JRCERT Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAME OF MARYLAND

4701 North Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21210-2476
Tel: (410)435-0100
Free: 800-435-0300
Admissions: (410)532-5330
Fax: (410)532-6287
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ndm.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Mary Pat Seurkamp
Registrar: Sharon Bogdan
Admissions: Dr. Jennifer Blair
Financial Aid: James Otterbein
Type: Comprehensive Affiliation: Roman Catholic Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 95% SAT M 400 + Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $29,600 includes full-time tuition ($21,100), mandatory fees ($500), and college room and board ($8000). Part-time tuition: $345 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $60 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 607, PT 1,079, Grad 1,621 Faculty: FT 79, PT 9 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 74 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 57 Library Holdings: 400,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball W; Field Hockey W; Lacrosse W; Soccer W; Swimming and Diving W; Tennis W; Volleyball W

COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND

8730 Mitchell Rd., PO Box 910
La Plata, MD 20646-0910
Tel: (301)934-2251
Free: 800-933-9177
Admissions: (301)934-7520
Fax: (301)934-5255
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.csmd.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Elaine Ryan
Registrar: Carol Harrison
Admissions: Julia Pitman
Financial Aid: Chad Norcross
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed % Accepted: 55 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For nursing program: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2650 full-time, $110 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $4608 full-time, $192 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5789 full-time, $241 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $552 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,599, PT 4,947 Faculty: FT 122, PT 311 Student-Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Library Holdings: 44,896 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: APTA, ACBSP, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

COLUMBIA UNION COLLEGE

7600 Flower Ave.
Takoma Park, MD 20912-7796
Tel: (301)891-4000
Free: 800-835-4212
Admissions: (301)891-4502
Fax: (301)891-4230
Web Site: http://www.cuc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Randal Wisbey
Registrar: Dr. Anthony Futcher
Admissions: Emil John
Financial Aid: Elaine Oliver
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Seventh-day Adventist Scores: 66.9% SAT V 400+; 61.7% SAT M 400+; 52.7% ACT 18-23; 10.5% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 35 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $23,536 includes full-time tuition ($16,514), mandatory fees ($1072), and college room and board ($5950). Part-time tuition: $688 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $670 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 730, PT 288, Grad 29 Faculty: FT 53, PT 3 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 50 Library Holdings: 141,534 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: CARC, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Track and Field M & W

THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE COUNTY

800 South Rolling Rd.
Baltimore, MD 21228-5381
Tel: (410)455-6050
Admissions: (410)455-4392
Fax: (410)719-6546
Web Site: http://www.ccbcmd.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Irving Pressley McPhail
Admissions: Diane Drake
Financial Aid: M. Pat Mohr
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Costs Per Year: Area resident tuition: $2610 full-time, $87 per hour part-time. State resident tuition: $4500 full-time, $150 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6150 full-time, $205 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $316 full-time, $316 per term part-time. Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 7,049, PT 12,573 Faculty: FT 355, PT 731 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Professional Accreditation: ABFSE, AOTA, CARC, JRCERT, NASM, NAST, NLN

COPPIN STATE UNIVERSITY

2500 West North Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21216-3698
Tel: (410)951-3000
Free: 800-635-3674
Admissions: (410)951-3600
Fax: (410)523-7238
Web Site: http://www.coppin.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Stanley F. Battle
Registrar: Margaret Turner
Admissions: Michelle Gross
Financial Aid: Lady Jenkins
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: University System of Maryland Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $3527 full-time, $151 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,048 full-time, $347 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1352 full-time, $22 per credit hour part-time, $150 per term part-time. College room and board: $6239. College room only: $3881. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 110, PT 92 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 78 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 10 Library Holdings: 134,983 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: CORE, CSWE, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Rugby M; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Weight Lifting M & W; Wrestling M

DEVRY UNIVERSITY

4550 Montgomery Ave.. Ste. 100 North
Bethesda, MD 20814-3304
Tel: (301)652-8477; (866)338-7934
Fax: (301)652-8577
Web Site: http://www.devry.edu/
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: DeVry University Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. One-time mandatory fee: $40. Tuition: $13,060 full-time, $475 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $30 full-time, $30 per year part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 9, PT 23, Grad 64 Faculty: FT 2, PT 13 Student-Faculty Ratio: 3:1 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 122 credits, Bachelors

FREDERICK COMMUNITY COLLEGE

7932 Opossumtown Pike
Frederick, MD 21702-2097
Tel: (301)846-2400
Admissions: (301)846-2432
Web Site: http://www.frederick.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Patricia Stanley
Registrar: Kathy Frawley
Admissions: Kathy Frawley
Financial Aid: Brenda Dayhoff
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: September 01 Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2088 full-time, $87 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $4560 full-time, $190 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6216 full-time, $259 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $300 full-time, $10.95 per credit hour part-time, $37 per year part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,855, PT 2,967 Faculty: FT 79, PT 299 Library Holdings: 40,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ARCEST, CARC Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Volleyball W

FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY

101 Braddock Rd.
Frostburg, MD 21532-1099
Tel: (301)687-4000
Admissions: (301)687-4201
Fax: (301)687-7074
Web Site: http://www.frostburg.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Catherine R. Gira
Registrar: Morris Willey
Admissions: Trish Gregory
Financial Aid: Angela Hovatter
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: University System of Maryland Scores: 93% SAT V 400+; 84% SAT M 400+; 51% ACT 18-23; 17% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 76 Admission Plans: Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $5224 full-time, $216 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $14,050 full-time, $396 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1392 full-time, $67 per credit hour part-time, $9 per term part-time. College room and board: $6442. College room only: $3132. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,053, PT 268, Grad 720 Faculty: FT 233, PT 118 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 48 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 35 Library Holdings: 261,712 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: CSWE, NCATE, NRPA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M; Lacrosse W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

GARRETT COLLEGE

687 Mosser Rd.
McHenry, MD 21541
Tel: (301)387-3000
Admissions: (301)387-3046
Fax: (301)387-3055
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.garrettcollege.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Stephen J. Herman
Registrar: Kimberly DeGiovanni
Admissions: Dr. Nancy Priselac
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2340 full-time, $78 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $5460 full-time, $182 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6540 full-time, $218 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $570 full-time, $18 per credit hour part-time, $15. College room and board: $4970. College room only: $2550. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 360, PT 253 Faculty: FT 18, PT 31 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 8 Library Holdings: 24,230 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Golf M; Skiing (Downhill) M & W; Volleyball W

GEORGE MEANY CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES-THE NATIONAL LABOR COLLEGE

10000 New Hampshire Ave.
Silver Spring, MD 20903
Tel: (301)431-6400
Free: 800-GMC-4CDP
Admissions: (301)431-5404
Fax: (301)431-5411
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.georgemeany.org/
President/CEO: Dr. Susan J. Schurman
Registrar: Eve Dauer
Admissions: Carrie Spruill
Financial Aid: Carrie Spruill
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Calendar System: Quarter Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools

GOUCHER COLLEGE

1021 Dulaney Valley Rd.
Baltimore, MD 21204-2794
Tel: (410)337-6000
Free: 800-468-2437
Admissions: (410)337-6100
Fax: (410)337-6236
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.goucher.edu/
President/CEO: Sanford J. Ungar
Registrar: Patricia Kelly
Admissions: Carlton E. Surbeck, III
Financial Aid: Sharon Hassan
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 36% ACT 18-23; 51% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 67 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $37,000 includes full-time tuition ($27,100), mandatory fees ($425), and college room and board ($9475). College room only: $5625. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $950 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 1,306, PT 40, Grad 887 Faculty: FT 112, PT 78 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 60 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 80 Library Holdings: 303,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Field Hockey W; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

GRIGGS UNIVERSITY

PO Box 4437, 12501 Old Columbia Pk
Silver Spring, MD 20914-4437
Tel: (301)680-6570
Admissions: (301)680-6579
Fax: (301)680-6577
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.griggs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Joseph E. Gurubatham
Registrar: Anita L. Jacobs
Admissions: Anita L. Jacobs
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Seventh-day Adventist; Seventh-day Adventist Parochial School System Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. Tuition: $7350 full-time, $245 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $70 full-time, $70 per year part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Calendar System: Continuous, Summer Session Available Faculty: PT 38 Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates; 120 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: DETC

HAGERSTOWN BUSINESS COLLEGE

18618 Crestwood Dr.
Hagerstown, MD 21742-2797
Tel: (301)739-2670
Free: 800-422-2670
Fax: (301)791-7661
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hagerstownbusinesscol.org/
President/CEO: W. Chrisopher Motz
Registrar: Lisa Copenhaver
Admissions: Jim Klein
Financial Aid: John Huffman
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Kaplan Higher Education Corporation Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 770, PT 162 Faculty: FT 20, PT 45 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 3 Library Holdings: 8,000 Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AHIMA

HAGERSTOWN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

11400 Robinwood Dr.
Hagerstown, MD 21742-6590
Tel: (301)790-2800
Fax: (301)739-0737
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hagerstowncc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Guy Altieri
Registrar: Jacqueline L. Baldwin
Admissions: Jennifer Fisher
Financial Aid: Carolyn S. Cox
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2670 full-time, $89 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $4260 full-time, $142 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5580 full-time, $186 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $280 full-time, $8 per credit hour part-time, $20. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,204, PT 2,317 Faculty: FT 69, PT 158 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Library Holdings: 45,705 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: JRCERT Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

HARFORD COMMUNITY COLLEGE

401 Thomas Run Rd.
Bel Air, MD 21015-1698
Tel: (410)836-4000
Admissions: (410)836-4379
Fax: (410)836-4197
Web Site: http://www.harford.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Claudia E. Chiesi
Registrar: Lynne LaCalle
Admissions: Nanette Reckart
Financial Aid: Lynn Lee
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2250 full-time, $75 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $4500 full-time, $150 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6750 full-time, $225 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $225 full-time, $7.50 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,157, PT 3,335 Faculty: FT 99, PT 194 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 74,731 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NAACLS, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W

HOOD COLLEGE

401 Rosemont Ave.
Frederick, MD 21701-8575
Tel: (301)663-3131
Free: 800-922-1599
Admissions: (301)696-3400
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hood.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Ronald J. Volpe
Registrar: Nanette Markey
Admissions: Glen Thomas
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400+; 53% ACT 18-23; 29% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 51 Admission Plans: Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 15 Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $30,085 includes full-time tuition ($22,000), mandatory fees ($335), and college room and board ($7750). College room only: $4050. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $635 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $105 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,007, PT 176, Grad 934 Faculty: FT 81, PT 121 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 77 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 53 Library Holdings: 182,786 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: CSWE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

HOWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE

10901 Little Patuxent Parkway
Columbia, MD 21044-3197
Tel: (410)772-4800
Admissions: (410)772-4856
Fax: (410)772-4589
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.howardcc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Mary Ellen Duncan
Registrar: Judith C. Bulliner
Admissions: Barbara Greenfeld
Financial Aid: Stephanie Pina
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Area resident tuition: $3300 full-time, $110 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $5790 full-time, $193 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7140 full-time, $238 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $553 full-time, $18.43 per credit part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,636, PT 4,206 Faculty: FT 115, PT 372 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 40,380 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Lacrosse M; Soccer M & W; Te nnis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

11301 Red Run Blvd.
Owings Mills, MD 21117
Admissions: (443)394-7115
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/
Admissions: Shaher Shanti
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Calendar System: Quarter Exams: Other

THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

3400 North Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218-2699
Tel: (410)516-8000
Admissions: (410)516-8341
Fax: (410)516-6025
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.jhu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. William R. Brody
Registrar: Hedy Schaedel
Admissions: John Latting
Financial Aid: Ellen Frishberg
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 5% ACT 18-23; 36% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 35 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: January 01 Application Fee: $60.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $60. Comprehensive fee: $45,022 includes full-time tuition ($33,900), mandatory fees ($500), and college room and board ($10,622). College room only: $6096. Part-time tuition: $1130 per credit. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,351, PT 66, Grad 1,608 Faculty: FT 451, PT 74 Student-Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT I and SAT II or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 49 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 50 Library Holdings: 3,509,413 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ABET, ARCMI, ACEHSA, AACN, ADtA, APA, AClPE, CEPH, LCMEAMA, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Fencing M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Water Polo M; Wrestling M

LOYOLA COLLEGE IN MARYLAND

4501 North Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21210-2699
Tel: (410)617-2000
Fax: (410)323-2768
Web Site: http://www.loyola.edu/
President/CEO: Rev. Harold Ridley, SJ
Registrar: Rita Steiner
Admissions: William Bossemeyer
Financial Aid: Mark Lindenmeyer
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic (Jesuit) Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 23% ACT 18-23; 66% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 47 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: January 15 Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $38,898 includes full-time tuition ($28,683), mandatory fees ($1000), and college room and board ($9215). College room only: $7215. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to student level. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $486 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $25 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,501, PT 55, Grad 2,631 Faculty: FT 305, PT 232 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 44 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 79 Library Holdings: 293,639 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACA, APA, ASLHA, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

MAPLE SPRINGS BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE AND SEMINARY

4130 Belt Rd.
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Tel: (301)736-3631
Fax: (301)735-6507
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.msbbcs.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Larry W. Jordan
Admissions: Rev. Percy Coker
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Baptist Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 7, PT 82, Grad 62 Faculty: FT 5, PT 25 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 1,781 Credit Hours For Degree: 66 credit hours, Associates; 132 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: TACCS

MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART

1300 Mount Royal Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21217
Tel: (410)669-9200
Admissions: (410)225-2222
Fax: (410)225-2337
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.mica.edu/
President/CEO: Fred Lazarus, IV
Registrar: Christine Peterson
Admissions: Theresa Lynch Bedoya
Financial Aid: Diane Prengaman
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 45 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 15 Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $34,450 includes full-time tuition ($26,140), mandatory fees ($780), and college room and board ($7530). College room only: $5500. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $1090 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $390 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,478, PT 19, Grad 220 Faculty: FT 118, PT 149 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 88 Library Holdings: 55,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 126 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: NASAD

MCDANIEL COLLEGE

2 College Hill
Westminster, MD 21157-4390
Tel: (410)848-7000
Free: 800-638-5005
Admissions: (410)857-2230
Fax: (410)857-2729
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.mcdaniel.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Joan Develin Coley
Registrar: Jan Kiphart
Admissions: M. O'Connell
Financial Aid: Patricia M. Williams
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 98% SAT V 400+; 98% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 79 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. Comprehensive fee: $33,180 includes full-time tuition ($26,980), mandatory fees ($300), and college room and board ($5900). College room only: $3200. Part-time tuition: $843 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $150 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,643, PT 52, Grad 1,829 Faculty: FT 129, PT 61 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT II % Receiving Financial Aid: 62 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 80 Library Holdings: 629,965 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: CSWE, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

MONTGOMERY COLLEGE

900 Hungerford Dr.
Rockville, MD 20850
Tel: (301)279-5000
Admissions: (301)279-5034
Web Site: http://www.montgomerycollege.org/
President/CEO: Dr. Charlene Nunley
Admissions: Sherman Helberg
Financial Aid: Judith M. Taylor
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Application Fee: $25.00 Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 7,748, PT 14,057 Faculty: FT 435, PT 873 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Professional Accreditation: ARCEST, AHIMA, APTA, NASM Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M & W; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

1700 East Cold Spring Ln.
Baltimore, MD 21251
Tel: (443)885-3333
Free: 800-332-6674
Admissions: (443)885-3000
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.morgan.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Earl Richardson
Registrar: Dr. D. Jason De Sousa
Admissions: Edwin T. Johnson
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 85% SAT V 400+; 81% SAT M 400+; 12% ACT 18-23; 9% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $4280 full-time, $194 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $11,690 full-time, $445 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1830 full-time, $55 per credit part-time. College room and board: $6990. College room only: $4430. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 5,328, PT 677, Grad 616 Faculty: FT 364, PT 94 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 30 Library Holdings: 333,101 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACSP, ASLA, CEPH, CSWE, NAACLS, NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Bowling W; Cheerleading W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

MOUNT ST. MARY'S UNIVERSITY

16300 Old Emmitsburg Rd.
Emmitsburg, MD 21727-7799
Tel: (301)447-6122
Free: 800-448-4347
Admissions: (301)447-5214
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.msmary.edu/
President/CEO: Thomas H. Powell, EdD
Registrar: John Gill
Admissions: Stephen Neitz
Financial Aid: David C. Reeder
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 84 Admission Plans: Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $32,720 includes full-time tuition ($23,630), mandatory fees ($400), and college room and board ($8690). College room only: $4380. Part-time tuition: $790 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $12 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,485, PT 171, Grad 405 Faculty: FT 105, PT 100 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 61 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 80 Library Holdings: 210,359 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ATS Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Golf M & W; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W

NER ISRAEL RABBINICAL COLLEGE

400 Mount Wilson Ln.
Baltimore, MD 21208
Tel: (410)484-7200
Fax: (410)484-3060
President/CEO: Rabbi Herman Neuberger
Registrar: Rabbi C. D. Lapidus
Admissions: Rabbi Berel Weisbord
Financial Aid: Moshe Pelberg
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Men Affiliation: Jewish Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 353, Grad 210 Faculty: FT 22, PT 0 Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credits, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AARTS

PEABODY CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC OF THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

1 East Mount Vernon Place
Baltimore, MD 21202-2397
Tel: (410)659-8150
Free: 800-368-2521
Admissions: (410)659-8110
Web Site: http://www.peabody.jhu.edu/
Admissions: David Lane
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University Scores: 95.59% SAT V 400+; 95.59% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 43 Application Deadline: December 01 Application Fee: $60.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $60. Comprehensive fee: $39,490 includes full-time tuition ($29,630), mandatory fees ($360), and college room and board ($9500). Part-time tuition: $840 per semester hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 311, PT 12, Grad 324 Student-Faculty Ratio: 4:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 55 Library Holdings: 90,706 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 149 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: NASM

PRINCE GEORGE'S COMMUNITY COLLEGE

301 Largo Rd.
Largo, MD 20774-2199
Tel: (301)336-6000
Admissions: (301)322-0801
Web Site: http://www.pgcc.edu/
President/CEO: Ronald A. Williams
Registrar: Vera Bagley
Admissions: Vera Bagley
Financial Aid: Nancy Pat Weaver
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For nursing, allied health programs: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,352, PT 9,212 Faculty: FT 249, PT 390 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 242,519 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credits, Associates ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ABET, AHIMA, CARC, JRCERT, JRCNMT, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling M & W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE

PO Box 2800
Annapolis, MD 21404
Tel: (410)263-2371
Free: 800-727-9238
Admissions: (410)626-2522
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.stjohnscollege.edu/
President/CEO: Christopher B. Nelson
Registrar: Noreen Craven
Admissions: John Christensen
Financial Aid: Caroline Christensen
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 76 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $40,451 includes full-time tuition ($32,375), mandatory fees ($200), and college room and board ($7876). Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 472, PT 2, Grad 92 Faculty: FT 71, PT 7 Student-Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 56 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 87 Library Holdings: 102,400 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 132 credits, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Crew M & W; Fencing M & W

ST. MARY'S COLLEGE OF MARYLAND

18952 East Fisher Rd.
St. Mary's City, MD 20686-3001
Tel: (240)895-2000
Free: 800-492-7181
Admissions: (240)895-5000
Fax: (240)895-5001
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.smcm.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Jane Margaret O'Brien
Registrar: Mark W. Heidrich
Admissions: Dr. Wesley P. Jordan
Financial Aid: Timothy A. Wolfe
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Maryland State Colleges and Universities System Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 68 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan Application Deadline: January 15 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $9770 full-time, $160 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $19,340 full-time, $160 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1940 full-time. College room and board: $8505. College room only: $4820. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,849, PT 115 Faculty: FT 128, PT 81 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 46 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 84 Library Holdings: 157,077 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 credits, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Crew M & W; Fencing M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M & W; Sailing M & W; Soccer M & W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Ultimate Frisbee M & W; Volleyball M & W

SALISBURY UNIVERSITY

1101 Camden Ave.
Salisbury, MD 21801-6837
Tel: (410)543-6000; 888-543-0148
Admissions: (410)543-6161
Fax: (410)548-2587
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ssu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Janet Dudley-Eshbach
Registrar: Jacqueline Maisel
Admissions: Jane Dane
Financial Aid: Beverly A. Horner
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: University System of Maryland Scores: 98% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 57 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action Application Deadline: January 15 Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $4814 full-time, $200 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,492 full-time, $520 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1562 full-time, $50 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $6932. College room only: $3554. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 5,798, PT 639, Grad 572 Faculty: FT 323, PT 171 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 42 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 46 Library Holdings: 254,151 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, AACN, CARC, CSWE, JRCEPAT, NAACLS, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: BaseballM; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

SOJOURNER-DOUGLASS COLLEGE

500 North Caroline St.
Baltimore, MD 21205-1814
Tel: (410)276-0306
Fax: (410)675-1810
Web Site: http://sdc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Charles W. Simmons
Registrar: Inetta McNeill
Admissions: Diana Samuels
Financial Aid: Rebecca Chalk
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Deferred Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Tuition: $6540 full-time, $363 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $208 full-time, $104 per term part-time. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Trimester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 714, PT 346, Grad 64 Faculty: FT 35, PT 101 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 % Receiving Financial Aid: 64 Library Holdings: 10,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 132 credits, Bachelors

TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (BALTIMORE)

1520 South Caton Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21227-1063
Tel: (410)644-6400
Fax: (410)644-6481
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/
President/CEO: Sue Sherwood
Admissions: Susan Sherwood
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Quarter Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (BELTSVILLE)

4600 Powder Mill Rd.
Beltsville, MD 20705
Tel: (301)937-8448
Fax: (301)937-5327
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/
President/CEO: Reginald Morton
Admissions: Mary Colling
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Quarter Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (TOWSON)

803 Glen Eagles Ct.
Towson, MD 21286-2201
Tel: (410)296-5350
Free: 800-48-TESST
Fax: (410)296-5356
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/
President/CEO: Ray Joll
Admissions: Diane McRae
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Quarter Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

TOWSON UNIVERSITY

8000 York Rd.
Towson, MD 21252-0001
Tel: (410)704-2000; 888-4TOWSON
Admissions: (410)704-2113
Fax: (410)704-3030
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.towson.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Robert Caret
Admissions: Louise Shulack
Financial Aid: Vincent Pecora
Type: University Sex: Coed Affiliation: University System of Maryland Scores: 96.6% SAT V 400+; 97.1% SAT M 400+; 60.98% ACT 18-23;32.2% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 64 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 15 Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $5180 full-time, $225 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $14,114 full-time, $528 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1916 full-time, $74 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $6828. College room only: $3968. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 12,812, PT 1,683, Grad 3,516 Faculty: FT 663, PT 582 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 30 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 23 Library Holdings: 574,096 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, AACN, AOTA, APA, ASLHA, JRCEPAT, NASD, NASM, NAST, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M; Gymnastics W; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W

UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY

121 Blake Rd.
Annapolis, MD 21402-5000
Tel: (410)293-1000
Admissions: (410)293-4361
Fax: (410)293-4348
Web Site: http://www.usna.edu/
President/CEO: Vice Adm. Rodney P. Rempt
Registrar: Dr. Richard L. Davis
Admissions: Col. David Vetter
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 13 Application Deadline: January 31 Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,422 Faculty: FT 530, PT 56 Student-Faculty Ratio: 7:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 100 Library Holdings: 800,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 139 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ABET Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M; Gymnastics M & W; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M & W; Riflery M & W; Rugby M & W; Sailing M & W; Skiing (Downhill) M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Squash M; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W; Water Polo M; Weight Lifting M & W; Wrestling M

UNIVERSITY OF BALTIMORE

1420 North Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21201-5779
Tel: (410)837-4200; 877-APPLYUB
Admissions: (410)837-4777
Fax: (410)837-4793
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ubalt.edu/
President/CEO: Robert Bogemolny
Admissions: Dawn Griffith
Financial Aid: Barbara Miller
Type: Two-Year Upper Division Sex: Coed Affiliation: University System of Maryland Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $35.00 Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $5324 full-time, $243 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $16,904 full-time, $704 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $1469 full-time, $27 per credit part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, course load, and degree level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time, course load, and degree level. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,051, PT 1,066, Grad 1,793 Faculty: FT 159, PT 172 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 % Receiving Financial Aid: 64 Library Holdings: 258,747 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABA, AALS, NASPAA

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250
Tel: (410)455-1000
Free: 800-862-2402
Admissions: (410)455-2291
Fax: (410)455-1210
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.umbc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski
Registrar: Dave Hollander
Admissions: Dale Bittinger
Type: University Sex: Coed Affiliation: University System of Maryland Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 30.9% ACT 18-23; 52.4% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 71 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. State resident tuition: $6484 full-time, $270 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $14,560 full-time, $606 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $2036 full-time, $5 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $8090. College room only: $4930. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 7,980, PT 1,426, Grad 2,244 Faculty: FT 458, PT 295 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 46 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 33 Library Holdings: 766,261 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ABET, APA, CSWE, JRCEMT, NASPAA, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling M & W; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Fencing M & W; FieldHockeyW; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M & W; Sailing M & W; Skiing (Downhill) M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Ultimate Frisbee M & W; Volleyball M & W; Wrestling M

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK

College Park, MD 20742
Tel: (301)405-1000
Free: 800-422-5867
Admissions: (301)314-8385
Fax: (301)314-9693
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.maryland.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. C.D. Mote, Jr.
Registrar: David D. Robb
Admissions: Barbara Gill
Financial Aid: William McLean
Type: University Sex: Coed Affiliation: University System of Maryland Scores: 99.49% SAT V 400+; 99.52% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 49 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Early Action Application Deadline: January 20 Application Fee: $55.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $55. State resident tuition: $6566 full-time, $273 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $18,890 full-time, $787 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1255 full-time, $288 per term part-time. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $8075. College room only: $4784. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 23,226, PT 2,147, Grad 9,813 Faculty: FT 1,508, PT 562 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 40 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 39 Library Holdings: 3,016,940 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEJMC, AAMFT, ACA, ADtA, ACSP, ALA, APA, ASLA, ASLHA, AVMA, CEPH, CORE, NASM, NASPAA, NAST, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Football M; Golf M & W; Gymnastics W; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Water Polo W; Wrestling M

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

Princess Anne, MD 21853-1299
Tel: (410)651-2200
Admissions: (410)651-8410
Fax: (410)651-7922
Web Site: http://www.umes.edu/
President/CEO: Thelma B. Thompson
Registrar: Cheryl Holden-Duffy
Admissions: Edwina Morse
Financial Aid: James Kellam
Type: University Sex: Coed Affiliation: University System of Maryland Scores: 66.2% SAT V 400+; 60.2% SAT M 400+; 2.8% ACT 18-23 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $4112 full-time, $171 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,268 full-time, $371 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1696 full-time, $40 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $6130. College room only: $3430. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,902, PT 424, Grad 436 Faculty: FT 181, PT 53 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 65 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 60 Library Holdings: 150,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 122 credits, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AAFCS, ACCE, ADtA, APTA, CORE, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

3501 University Blvd. East
Adelphi, MD 20783
Tel: (301)985-7000
Fax: (301)985-7678
Web Site: http://www.umuc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Gerald Heeger
Registrar: J. Matthew Gaglione
Admissions: Anne Rahill
Financial Aid: Dawn Mosisa
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: University System of Maryland Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $5520 full-time, $230 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,152 full-time, $423 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $120 full-time, $5 per semester hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,779, PT 17,078, Grad 8,517 Faculty: FT 189, PT 1,152 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 % Receiving Financial Aid: 50 Library Holdings: 5,807 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates; 120 semester hours, Bachelors

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-MARYLAND CAMPUS

8830 Stanford Blvd., Ste. 100
Columbia, MD 21045-5424
Tel: (410)872-9001
Free: 800-228-7240
Admissions: (480)557-1712
Web Site: http://www.phoenix.edu/
President/CEO: Tim Moscato
Admissions: Nina Omelchanko
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $110.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $110. Tuition: $11,950 full-time, $398 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time, $70 per course part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Continuous, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 1,586, Grad 442 Faculty: FT 9, PT 209 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Library Holdings: 444 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates; 120 credits, Bachelors

VILLA JULIE COLLEGE

Green Spring Valley Rd.
Stevenson, MD 21153
Tel: (410)486-7000; 877-468-3852
Admissions: (410)486-7001
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.vjc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Kevin J. Manning
Registrar: Tracy Bolt
Admissions: Mark Hergan
Financial Aid: Debra Bottomms
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 95% SAT V 400+; 96% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 70 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: March 01 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $25,222 includes full-time tuition ($14,674), mandatory fees ($1000), and college room and board ($9548). College room only: $6550. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $415 per credit. part-time mandatory fees: $75 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,304, PT 503, Grad 149 Faculty: FT 93, PT 256 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 56 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 26 Library Holdings: 64,930 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates; 120 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: NAACLS, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Field Hockey W; Golf M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

WASHINGTON BIBLE COLLEGE

6511 Princess Garden Parkway
Lanham, MD 20706-3599
Tel: (301)552-1400; 877-793-7227
Fax: (301)552-2775
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bible.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Homer Heater, Jr.
Registrar: Dr. Neil A. Holliker
Admissions: Mark D. Johnson
Financial Aid: Nancy Minton
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: nondenominational; Capital Bible Seminary Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $22,690 includes full-time tuition ($16,000), mandatory fees ($450), and college room and board ($6240). College room only: $3000. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and location. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $350 per credit. part-time tuition varies according to course load and location. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 187, PT 144 Faculty: FT 14, PT 0 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 80 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 28 Library Holdings: 78,000 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 120 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AABC Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Soccer M & W; Volleyball W

WASHINGTON COLLEGE

300 Washington Ave.
Chestertown, MD 21620-1197
Tel: (410)778-2800
Free: 800-422-1782
Admissions: (410)778-7700
Fax: (410)778-7287
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.washcoll.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Baird Tipson
Registrar: Jen Bershon
Admissions: Kevin Coveney
Financial Aid: Jean M. Narcum
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 47% ACT 18-23; 53% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 59 Admission Plans: Early Action; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: March 01 Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. Comprehensive fee: $34,990 includes full-time tuition ($28,230), mandatory fees ($560), and college room and board ($6200). College room only: $3000. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program and reciprocity agreements. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $4705 per course. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 1,312, PT 29, Grad 71 Faculty: FT 93, PT 51 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 44 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 80 Library Holdings: 243,030 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 credits, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Crew M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Fencing M & W; Field Hockey W; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M & W; Sailing M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Table Tennis M & W; Tennis M & W; Ultimate Frisbee M & W; Volleyball W

WOR-WIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE

32000 Campus Dr.
Salisbury, MD 21804
Tel: (410)334-2800
Admissions: (410)334-2895
Web Site: http://www.worwic.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Murray K. Hoy
Registrar: Amanda Trego
Admissions: Richard Webster
Financial Aid: Deborah E. Jenkins
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Maryland State Community Colleges System % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2250 full-time, $75 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $5700 full-time, $190 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6630 full-time, $221 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $86 full-time, $2 per credit hour part-time, $13 per term part-time. Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 970, PT 2,073 Faculty: FT 56, PT 112 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: ACT Library Holdings: 25 Regional Accreditation: Middle State Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: JRCERT

YESHIVA COLLEGE OF THE NATION'S CAPITAL

1216 Arcola Ave.
Silver Spring, MD 20902
Tel: (301)593-2534
Fax: (301)949-7040
Type: Four-Year College Affiliation: Jewish Professional Accreditation: AARTS

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Maryland

Maryland

ALLEGANY COLLEGE OF MARYLAND

Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Assistant, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Communications Technology/Technician, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Cosmetology and Related Personal Grooming Arts, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Culinary Arts/Chef Training, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Forest Management/Forest Resources Management, A

Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences, A

Hospitality Administration/Management, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Occupational Therapist Assistant, A

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

Psychiatric/Mental Health Services Technician, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

American/United States Studies/Civilization, A

Applied Art, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Astronomy, A

Behavioral Sciences, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Botany/Plant Biology, A

Broadcast Journalism, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business/Managerial Economics, A

Chemistry, A

Cinematography and Film/Video Production, A

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Communications Technology/Technician, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Science, A

Consumer Merchandising/Retailing Management, A

Corrections, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Economics, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering Technology, A

English Language and Literature, A

Environmental Studies, A

European Studies/Civilization, A

Food Technology and Processing, A

Health Teacher Education, A

Horticultural Science, A

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, A

Human Services, A

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, A

Industrial Radiologic Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Landscape Architecture, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Marine Science/Merchant Marine Officer, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, A

Mathematics, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Mental Health/Rehabilitation, A

Music, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Photography, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Public Administration, A

Public Policy Analysis, A

Real Estate, A

Social Sciences, A

System Administration/Administrator, A

Telecommunications Technology/Technician, A

BALTIMORE CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer Graphics, A

Computer Science, A

Corrections, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Dietetics/Dieticians, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering, A

Fashion Merchandising, A

Fashion/Apparel Design, A

Gerontology, A

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, A

Hospitality Administration/Management, A

Human Services, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

Word Processing, A

BALTIMORE HEBREW UNIVERSITY

Ancient Near Eastern and Biblical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, AB

Archeology, AB

Bible/Biblical Studies, AB

Central/Middle and Eastern European Studies, AB

Computer Typography and Composition Equipment Operator, AB

Education, AB

Ethnic and Cultural Studies, AB

Hebrew Language and Literature, AB

Hebrew Studies, MD

Jewish/Judaic Studies, AB

Near and Middle Eastern Studies, AB

Philosophy, AB

Rabbinical Studies, AB

Religion/Religious Studies, AB

Religious Education, AB

BALTIMORE INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE

Baking and Pastry Arts/Baker/Pastry Chef, A

Culinary Arts/Chef Training, A

Hospitality Administration/Management, AB

Restaurant, Culinary, and Catering Management/Manager, B

BOWIE STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Applied Mathematics, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Graphics, B

Computer Science, M

Corporate and Organizational Communication, MO

Counseling Psychology, M

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Creative Writing, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Economics, B

Education, BM

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, D

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

History, B

Human Resources Development, M

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Management Information Systems and Services, MO

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Nursing, M

Nursing - Advanced Practice, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nursing Administration, M

Nursing Education, M

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Public Administration, M

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

CAPITOL COLLEGE

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Computer Engineering, B

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, AB

Computer Science, M

Electrical Engineering, M

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, AB

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Information Science/Studies, M

Laser and Optical Technology/Technician, A

Management Information Systems and Services, BM

Telecommunications Management, M

Telecommunications Technology/Technician, AB

CARROLL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Graphics, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Drafting/Design Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

General Studies, A

Human Services, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Music, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

Public Health (MPH, DPH), A

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, A

CECIL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Air Traffic Controller, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Carpentry/Carpenter, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Graphics, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

General Studies, A

Health and Medical Laboratory Technologies, A

Hydrology and Water Resources Science, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Information Technology, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mathematics, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Photography, A

Physical Sciences, A

Physics, A

Pipefitting/Pipefitter and Sprinkler Fitter, A

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, A

Transportation and Materials Moving, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

CHESAPEAKE COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Science, A

Corrections, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Health Teacher Education, A

Human Services, A

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mathematics, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Music, A

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Sciences, A

Social Sciences, A

Sociology, A

COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAME OF MARYLAND

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Communication and Media Studies, M

Computer Science, B

Economics, B

Education, BM

Educational Leadership and Administration, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering Science, B

English as a Second Language, M

English Language and Literature, B

Gerontology, M

History, B

Human Services, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Liberal Studies, M

Management, M

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Modern Languages, B

Music, B

Non-Profit/Public/Organizational Management, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Physics, B

Physiological Psychology/Psychobiology, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND

Accounting, A

Agribusiness, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

BioTechnology, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

English Language and Literature, A

Fire Protection and Safety Technology/Technician, A

History, A

Human Services, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Journalism, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Massage Therapy/Therapeutic Massage, A

Music, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

Social Sciences, A

COLUMBIA UNION COLLEGE

Accounting, AB

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, AB

Counseling Psychology, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, A

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

General Studies, AB

Health and Physical Education, B

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

History, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Journalism, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religious Education, B

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, AB

Special Education and Teaching, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

COPPIN STATE UNIVERSITY

Adult and Continuing Education and Teaching, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminology, M

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Education, BM

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

History, B

Human Services, M

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mathematics, B

Natural Sciences, B

Nursing, MO

Nursing - Advanced Practice, O

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Therapy/Therapist, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Psychology, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Rehabilitation Counseling, M

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling, M

DEVRY UNIVERSITY

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, BM

Computer and Information Sciences, B

FREDERICK COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Building/Construction Finishing, Management, and Inspection, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Chemistry, A

Child Development, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Science, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering, A

English Language and Literature, A

Finance, A

Fire Science/Firefighting, A

General Studies, A

Health and Medical Laboratory Technologies, A

Human Services, A

Information Technology, A

International Business/Trade/Commerce, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, A

Mathematics, A

Mathematics Teacher Education, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Music Teacher Education, A

Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Sciences, A

Political Science and Government, A

Psychology, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Spanish Language Teacher Education, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Chemistry, B

City/Urban, Community and Regional Planning, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, M

Conservation Biology, M

Counseling Psychology, M

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminal Justice/Police Science, B

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Dance, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Ecology, M

Economics, B

Education, M

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

Fish, Game and Wildlife Management, M

Foreign Languages and Literatures, B

Geography, B

History, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, M

International Relations and Affairs, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mechanical Engineering, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Natural Resources and Conservation, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physical Sciences, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BM

Reading Teacher Education, M

Recreation and Park Management, M

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Special Education and Teaching, M

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Visual and Performing Arts, B

GARRETT COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Mechanization, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Behavioral Sciences, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Education, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

General Studies, A

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mathematics, A

Music, A

Natural Resources Management/Development and Policy, A

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, A

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Psychology, A

Social Sciences, A

Sociology, A

Wildlife and Wildlands Science and Management, A

Wildlife Biology, A

GOUCHER COLLEGE

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Arts Management, M

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, O

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Dance, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, BM

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

French Language and Literature, B

Historic Preservation and Conservation, BM

History, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution, B

Philosophy, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Russian Language and Literature, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Women's Studies, B

Writing, M

GRIGGS UNIVERSITY

Business Administration and Management, B

Religion/Religious Studies, AB

Religious Education, B

Theology/Theological Studies, AB

HAGERSTOWN BUSINESS COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer and Information Systems Security, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

HAGERSTOWN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping, A

Animation, Interactive Technology, Video Graphics and Special Effects, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business/Commerce, A

Child Care and Support Services Management, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, A

Education, A

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering, A

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Psychiatric/Mental Health Services Technician, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

HARFORD COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Audio Engineering, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business/Commerce, A

Child Care and Support Services Management, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Communications Technologies/Technicians and Support Services, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Education, A

Electroneurodiagnostic/Electroencephalographic Technology/Technologist, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Engineering, A

Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, A

Health and Medical Laboratory Technologies, A

Interior Design, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Philosophy, A

Political Science and Government, A

Psychology, A

Science Technologies/Technicians, A

Security and Loss Prevention Services, A

HOOD COLLEGE

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biochemistry, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MO

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Ceramic Arts and Ceramics, O

Chemistry, B

Communication and Media Studies, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, M

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Economics, B

Education, MO

Educational Leadership and Administration, M

Engineering, B

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Biology, M

Environmental Studies, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, O

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, B

Human Development, M

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, M

Information Science/Studies, M

Latin American Studies, B

Law and Legal Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, O

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Philosophy, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BMO

Reading Teacher Education, O

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Romance Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Systems Science and Theory, M

Thanatology, MO

HOWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Applied Art, A

Architecture, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Biomedical Technology/Technician, A

BioTechnology, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Cardiovascular Technology/Technologist, A

Child Development, A

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Graphics, A

Computer Science, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, A

Consumer Merchandising/Retailing Management, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering, A

Environmental Studies, A

Fashion Merchandising, A

Financial Planning and Services, A

General Studies, A

Health Teacher Education, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Information Technology, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Music, A

Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Office Management and Supervision, A

Ophthalmic/Optometric Services, A

Photography, A

Physical Sciences, A

Pre-Dentistry Studies, A

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, A

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, A

Pre-Veterinary Studies, A

Psychology, A

Secondary Education and Teaching, A

Social Sciences, A

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, A

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling, A

Technical Theatre/Theatre Design and Technology, A

Telecommunications Technology/Technician, A

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

CAD/CADD Drafting and/or Design Technology/Technician, A

Computer and Information Systems Security, B

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, B

E-Commerce/Electronic Commerce, B

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, AB

System, Networking, and LAN/WAN Management/Manager, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, A

THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

Allopathic Medicine, PO

Anatomy, D

Anthropology, BD

Applied Economics, M

Applied Mathematics, BMD

Applied Physics, M

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, BMD

Astronomy, D

Behavioral Sciences, B

Biochemistry, MD

Bioengineering, MD

Bioinformatics, M

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MDO

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biomedical Engineering, MD

Biomedical/Medical Engineering, B

Biophysics, BMD

Biostatistics, MD

BioTechnology, M

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MO

Business/Commerce, B

Cell Biology and Anatomy, D

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BMD

Civil Engineering, BMD

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, BMD

Clinical Research, MD

Cognitive Psychology and Psycholinguistics, B

Cognitive Sciences, D

Communication and Media Studies, M

Community Health Nursing, MO

Comparative Literature, BD

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering, BMD

Computer Science, MD

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MDO

Creative Writing, B

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Developmental Biology and Embryology, D

Disability Studies, O

East Asian Studies, B

Economics, BD

Education, MDO

Education/Teaching of the Gifted and Talented, O

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Educational Leadership and Administration, MDO

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, MO

Electrical Engineering, MD

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Electroneurodiagnostic/Electroencephalographic Technology/Technologist, B

Electronic Commerce, O

Elementary Education and Teaching, M

Engineering, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MD

Engineering Mechanics, B

English, D

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental and Occupational Health, D

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, MD

Environmental Policy, M

Environmental Sciences, M

Environmental Studies, B

Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering, B

Epidemiology, MD

Evolutionary Biology, D

Experimental Psychology, D

Film/Cinema Studies, B

Finance and Banking, M

French Language and Literature, BD

Genetic Counseling/Counselor, M

Genetics, MD

Geochemistry, MD

Geography, BMD

Geology/Earth Science, BMD

Geophysics and Seismology, MD

German Language and Literature, BD

Health Services Administration, MDO

Health Services Research, M

History, BD

History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, B

History of Science and Technology, D

Human Genetics, DO

Human Resources Development, M

Immunology, MD

Industrial Engineering, B

Infectious Diseases, MD

Information Science/Studies, M

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

International Affairs, MDO

International Business/Trade/Commerce, O

International Public Health/International Health, MD

International Relations and Affairs, B

Investment Management, O

Italian Language and Literature, BD

Latin American Studies, B

Law Enforcement, M

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Liberal Studies, M

Management, M

Management Information Systems and Services, MO

Management of Technology, M

Marketing, M

Materials Engineering, BMD

Materials Sciences, BMD

Mathematics, BD

Mechanical Engineering, BMD

Medical Illustration and Informatics, M

Microbiology, MD

Molecular Biology, MDO

Molecular Medicine, D

Music, BMDO

Natural Sciences, B

Near and Middle Eastern Studies, BD

Neuroscience, BD

Nursing, MDO

Nursing - Advanced Practice, MO

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nursing Administration, M

Nutritional Sciences, MD

Oceanography, Chemical and Physical, MD

Operations Research, MD

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, O

Pathobiology, D

Pathology/Experimental Pathology, D

Pharmacology, D

Philosophy, BMD

Physics, BD

Physiological Psychology/Psychobiology, B

Physiology, D

Planetary Astronomy and Science, MD

Political Science and Government, BMD

Psychology, BD

Public Health, MDO

Public Health (MPH, DPH), B

Public Policy Analysis, M

Reading Teacher Education, MO

Real Estate, M

Reproductive Biology, MD

Romance Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, D

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, O

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Social Sciences, BMD

Sociology, BD

Spanish Language and Literature, BD

Special Education and Teaching, MDO

Statistics, MD

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling, O

Systems Engineering, M

Technical and Business Writing, M

Toxicology, D

Water Resources, MD

Writing, M

LOYOLA COLLEGE IN MARYLAND

Accounting, B

Applied Mathematics, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business/Commerce, B

Chemistry, B

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Clinical Psychology, MDO

Communication Disorders, MO

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Counseling Psychology, MO

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MO

Creative Writing, B

Curriculum and Instruction, MO

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, MO

Economics, BM

Education, BMO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, M

English Language and Literature, B

Finance, B

Finance and Banking, M

Foundations and Philosophy of Education, MO

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, BM

International Business/Trade/Commerce, BM

Management, M

Marketing, M

Mathematics, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, MDO

Philosophy, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BMDO

Quantitative Analysis, M

Reading Teacher Education, MO

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BMO

Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling, O

MAPLE SPRINGS BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE AND SEMINARY

Bible/Biblical Studies, AB

Computer Education, M

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, M

Theology and Religious Vocations, MDPO

MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART

Art Education, M

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Ceramic Arts and Ceramics, B

Computer Art and Design, M

Drawing, B

Fiber, Textile and Weaving Arts, B

Film/Video and Photographic Arts, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, MO

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Graphic Design, BM

Illustration, B

Interior Design, B

Intermedia/Multimedia, B

Painting, BM

Photography, BM

Printmaking, B

Sculpture, BM

Visual and Performing Arts, B

MCDANIEL COLLEGE

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, M

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Sciences, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, B

Human Resources Development, M

Human Services, M

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Studies, M

Library Science, M

Mathematics, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, M

MONTGOMERY COLLEGE

Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping, A

Applied Horticulture/Horticultural Operations, A

Architectural Drafting and Architectural CAD/CADD, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Building/Construction Finishing, Management, and Inspection, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business/Commerce, A

Child Care and Support Services Management, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Commercial Photography, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Technology/Computer Systems Technology, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Diagnostic Medical Sonography/Sonographer and Ultrasound Technician, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology, A

Engineering, A

Fire Protection and Safety Technology/Technician, A

General Studies, A

Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator Production, A

Health Information/Medical Records Technology/Technician, A

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

African Studies, B

African-American/Black Studies, BM

Architecture, M

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Behavioral Sciences, B

Bioinformatics, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MD

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Civil Engineering, BMD

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, B

Community College Education, D

Computer Science, B

Dietetics/Dieticians, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, BM

Education, BMD

Educational Administration and Supervision, MD

Educational Leadership and Administration, D

Electrical Engineering, MD

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

Engineering, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MD

Engineering Physics, B

English, MD

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Biology, D

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Finance, B

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

Health Teacher Education, B

Higher Education/Higher Education Administration, D

History, BMD

Hospitality Administration/Management, B

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, B

Industrial Engineering, B

Industrial/Management Engineering, MD

Information Science/Studies, B

International Affairs, M

Landscape Architecture, M

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, BM

Mathematics Teacher Education, MD

Mental Health/Rehabilitation, B

Middle School Education, M

Music, BM

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Psychology, B

Public Health, MD

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, MD

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Work, BM

Sociology, BM

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Telecommunications Management, M

Telecommunications Technology/Technician, B

Transportation and Highway Engineering, M

Transportation/Transportation Management, M

Urban and Regional Planning, M

MOUNT ST. MARY'S UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business/Commerce, B

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Economics, B

Education, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, B

Information Resources Management/CIO Training, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Mathematics, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Philosophy, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, MP

NER ISRAEL RABBINICAL COLLEGE

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Jewish/Judaic Studies, B

Rabbinical Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, MD

PEABODY CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC OF THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

Audio Engineering, B

Jazz/Jazz Studies, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Piano and Organ, B

Violin, Viola, Guitar and Other Stringed Instruments, B

Voice and Opera, B

Wind and Percussion Instruments, B

PRINCE GEORGE'S COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business Teacher Education, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Science, A

Computer Typography and Composition Equipment Operator, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering, A

Forensic Science and Technology, A

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, A

Health Teacher Education, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Medical Office Management/Administration, A

Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE

European Studies/Civilization, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Liberal Studies, M

ST. MARY'S COLLEGE OF MARYLAND

Anthropology, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biochemistry, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Chemistry, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

English Language and Literature, B

Foreign Languages and Literatures, B

History, B

Mathematics, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Philosophy, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Public Policy Analysis, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Sociology, B

SALISBURY UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Art Education, M

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Education, M

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Economics, B

Education, BM

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English, M

English as a Second Language, M

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Health, B

Finance, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, M

French Language and Literature, B

Geography, B

Health and Physical Education, B

Health Teacher Education, B

Health/Medical Preparatory Programs, B

History, BM

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Management Science, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, M

Nursing, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Physiology, M

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Studies Teacher Education, M

Social Work, BM

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Writing, M

SOJOURNER-DOUGLASS COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Behavioral Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

City/Urban, Community and Regional Planning, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Economics, B

Gerontology, B

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

Hospitality Administration/Management, B

Human Development and Family Studies, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Human Services, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Psychology, B

Public Administration, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Urban Studies/Affairs, B

TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (TOWSON)

CAD/CADD Drafting and/or Design Technology/Technician, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Computer Technology/Computer Systems Technology, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Electrician, A

Graphic Design, A

Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology/Technician, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Pharmacy Technician/Assistant, A

Telecommunications Technology/Technician, A

TOWSON UNIVERSITY

Accounting, BM

Advertising and Public Relations, O

Allied Health and Medical Assisting Services, M

Applied Mathematics, M

Art Education, M

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, BM

Chemistry, B

Clinical Psychology, M

Communication and Media Studies, MO

Communication Disorders, MD

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Composition, M

Computer Science, M

Corporate and Organizational Communication, M

Dance, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, BM

Economics, B

Education, BM

Educational Leadership and Administration, O

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, MD

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental and Occupational Health, D

Environmental Sciences, MO

Environmental Studies, M

Experimental Psychology, M

Family Systems, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Forensic Science and Technology, B

French Language and Literature, B

Geography, BM

Geology/Earth Science, B

German Language and Literature, B

Gerontology, BMO

Health and Physical Education/Fitness, B

Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences, B

Health Services Administration, O

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

History, B

Human Resources Development, MO

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, M

Information Science/Studies, BO

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Internet and Interactive Multimedia, O

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Studies, M

Management Information Systems and Services, MDO

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, BMO

Nursing, MO

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, BM

Organizational Behavior Studies, O

Performance, M

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physician Assistant, M

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Reading Teacher Education, MO

Religion/Religious Studies, B

School Psychology, MO

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Social Sciences, BM

Software Engineering, O

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Theater, M

Women's Studies, BM

Writing, M

UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY

Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering, B

Chemistry, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, B

Econometrics and Quantitative Economics, B

Economics, B

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Engineering, B

English Language and Literature, B

History, B

Mathematics, B

Mechanical Engineering, B

Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, B

Ocean Engineering, B

Oceanography, Chemical and Physical, B

Physical Sciences, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Systems Engineering, B

UNIVERSITY OF BALTIMORE

Accounting, BM

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MO

Communication and Media Studies, MD

Community Organization and Advocacy, B

Comparative Literature, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Art and Design, M

Conflict Resolution and Mediation/Peace Studies, M

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminology, MO

Digital Communication and Media/Multimedia, B

Economics, B

English Language and Literature, B

Ethics, M

Finance, B

Finance and Banking, M

Forensic Science and Technology, B

Graphic Design, M

Health and Medical Administrative Services, B

Health Services Administration, M

History, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Human Services, BM

Human-Computer Interaction, M

Information Science/Studies, BMD

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

Journalism, B

Law and Legal Studies, BMPO

Legal and Justice Studies, M

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management Information Systems and Services, BM

Marketing, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Non-Profit/Public/Organizational Management, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BM

Public Affairs, MDO

Publishing, M

Sales, Distribution and Marketing Operations, B

Taxation, M

Technical and Business Writing, B

Writing, M

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

African Studies, B

African-American/Black Studies, B

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Ancient Studies/Civilization, B

Anthropology, B

Applied Mathematics, BMD

Applied Physics, MD

Area, Ethnic, Cultural, and Gender Studies, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology, MD

Biochemical Engineering, MDO

Biochemistry, D

Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, B

Bioinformatics, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MD

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Cell Biology and Anatomy, D

Chemical Engineering, BMDO

Chemistry, BMD

Civil Engineering, MD

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Cognitive Sciences, D

Communication and Media Studies, M

Computer Education, O

Computer Engineering, BMD

Computer Science, BMD

Dance, B

Developmental Psychology, D

Distance Education Development, O

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Economics, BM

Education, MO

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, MO

Electrical Engineering, MD

Elementary Education and Teaching, M

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MDO

Engineering Management, M

Engineering Science, B

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, MD

Environmental Sciences, BMD

Environmental Studies, B

Epidemiology, M

Film/Cinema Studies, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

French Language and Literature, BM

Geography, B

German Language and Literature, BM

Gerontology, MD

Health Education, M

Health Services Administration, M

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

History, BM

Human Services, MD

Information Science/Studies, BMDO

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Linguistics, BM

Management Information Systems and Services, MD

Marine Sciences, MD

Mathematics, B

Mechanical Engineering, BMDO

Modern Languages, B

Molecular Biology, BMD

Multilingual and Multicultural Education, MD

Music, BO

Neuroscience, D

Non-Profit/Public/Organizational Management, O

Optics/Optical Sciences, MD

Philosophy, B

Photography, B

Physics, BMD

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, BMD

Public Health (MPH, DPH), B

Public Policy Analysis, MD

Russian Language and Literature, BM

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Social Work, B

Sociology, BMO

Spanish Language and Literature, BM

Statistics, BMD

Systems Engineering, O

Visual and Performing Arts, B

Women's Studies, O

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK

Accounting, B

Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering, BMD

African-American/Black Studies, B

Agricultural Economics, BMD

Agricultural Engineering, MD

Agricultural Sciences, MDP

Agricultural/Biological Engineering and Bioengineering, B

Agriculture, B

Agriculture, Agriculture Operations and Related Sciences, B

Agronomy and Crop Science, B

Agronomy and Soil Sciences, MD

American/United States Studies/Civilization, BMD

Analytical Chemistry, MD

Animal Sciences, BMD

Anthropology, BM

Applied Mathematics, MD

Architecture, BMO

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, BMD

Art Teacher Education, B

Astronomy, BMD

Biochemistry, BMD

Bioengineering, MD

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MD

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biophysics, D

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MO

Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, B

Business/Commerce, B

Cell Biology and Anatomy, MD

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BMD

Child and Family Studies, MD

Chinese Language and Literature, B

Civil Engineering, BMD

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, BM

Clinical Psychology, D

Cognitive Sciences, D

Communication and Media Studies, MD

Communication Disorders, MD

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Comparative Literature, MD

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering, BMD

Computer Science, MD

Conservation Biology, M

Counseling Psychology, D

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MDO

Criminology, BMDO

Curriculum and Instruction, MDO

Dance, BM

Developmental Psychology, D

Dietetics/Dieticians, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, MD

Ecology, BMD

Economics, MD

Education, BMDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MD

Educational Leadership and Administration, MDO

Educational Measurement and Evaluation, MD

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, MD

Educational Psychology, MD

Electrical Engineering, MD

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MDO

English, MD

English as a Second Language, M

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Entomology, MD

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, MD

Environmental Sciences, MD

Ethnomusicology, M

Evolutionary Biology, MD

Experimental Psychology, D

Family and Community Services, B

Finance, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fire Protection Engineering, M

Food Science, B

Food Science and Technology, MD

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, BM

Foreign Languages and Literatures, B

Foundations and Philosophy of Education, MDO

French Language and Literature, BMD

Geography, BMDO

Geology/Earth Science, BMD

German Language and Literature, BMD

Health Education, MD

Health Teacher Education, B

Historic Preservation and Conservation, MO

History, BMDO

Horticultural Science, BD

Human Development, MD

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Industrial and Organizational Psychology, MD

Information Science/Studies, BMDO

Inorganic Chemistry, MD

Interdisciplinary Studies, DO

Italian Language and Literature, B

Japanese Language and Literature, B

Jewish/Judaic Studies, B

Journalism, BMD

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Movement Studies, MD

Landscape Architecture, B

Latin Language and Literature, B

Law and Legal Studies, O

Library Science, O

Linguistics, BMD

Management, MD

Management Science, B

Manufacturing Engineering, MD

Marine Sciences, MD

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Marriage and Family Therapy/Counseling, M

Mass Communication/Media Studies, D

Materials Engineering, BMD

Materials Sciences, MD

Mathematics, BMD

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Mechanical Engineering, BMD

Mechanics, MD

Media Studies, D

Medical Microbiology and Bacteriology, B

Meteorology, MD

Microbiology, MD

Molecular Biology, D

Molecular Genetics, MD

Music, BMD

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, BMD

Natural Resources and Conservation, BMD

Neuroscience, D

Nuclear Engineering, MD

Nutritional Sciences, MD

Organic Chemistry, MD

Philosophy, BMD

Physical Chemistry, MD

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Sciences, B

Physics, BMD

Plant Biology, MD

Plant Sciences, B

Political Science and Government, BD

Poultry Science, MD

Psychology, BMD

Public Administration, MO

Public Health, MD

Public Policy Analysis, MDO

Reading Teacher Education, MDO

Rehabilitation Counseling, M

Reliability Engineering, MD

Russian Language and Literature, BM

Russian Studies, B

School Psychology, MD

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BMDO

Social Psychology, D

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Sociology, BMD

Software Engineering, M

Spanish Language and Literature, BMD

Special Education and Teaching, BMDO

Speech and Interpersonal Communication, MD

Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Statistics, MD

Student Personnel Services, MDO

Survey Methodology, MD

Sustainable Development, M

Systems Engineering, M

Telecommunications, M

Theater, MD

Toxicology, MD

Urban and Regional Planning, MDO

Veterinary Medicine, P

Veterinary Sciences, MD

Visual and Performing Arts, B

Water Resources Engineering, MD

Women's Studies, BMD

Writing, MD

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

Accounting, B

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Agricultural Sciences, MD

Agricultural Teacher Education, B

Agriculture, B

Air Traffic Controller, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Building/Construction Finishing, Management, and Inspection, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Child Development, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, B

Computer Science, BM

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminology, M

Dietetics/Dieticians, B

Ecology, B

Education, BM

Educational Leadership and Administration, D

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering Technology, B

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Sciences, MD

Environmental Studies, B

Family and Consumer Economics and Related Services, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Fashion Merchandising, B

Fashion/Apparel Design, B

Food Science and Technology, MD

History, B

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, B

Industrial Radiologic Technology/Technician, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography, B

Marine Sciences, MD

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Organizational Management, D

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Therapy/Therapist, BD

Poultry Science, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Rehabilitation Counseling, M

Rehabilitation Sciences, M

Rehabilitation Therapy, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Special Products Marketing Operations, B

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, B

Toxicology, MD

Vocational and Technical Education, M

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Accounting, BMO

BioTechnology, MO

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Distance Education Development, MO

Education, M

Electronic Commerce, MO

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Policy and Resource Management, MO

Environmental Studies, B

Finance and Banking, MO

Fire Science/Firefighting, B

Health Services Administration, MO

History, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Information Science/Studies, BMO

International Business/Trade/Commerce, MO

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, B

Management, MDO

Management Information Systems and Services, MO

Management of Technology, MO

Management Science, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Social Sciences, B

Software Engineering, MO

Telecommunications Management, MO

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-MARYLAND CAMPUS

Accounting, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Electronic Commerce, M

Information Science/Studies, M

International Business/Trade/Commerce, M

Management, M

Management Information Systems and Services, M

Management of Technology, M

Organizational Management, M

VILLA JULIE COLLEGE

Accounting, AB

Applied Art, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, AB

Biology Technician/BioTechnology Laboratory Technician, AB

Biology/Biological Sciences, AB

Business Administration and Management, AB

Chemistry, AB

Child Development, A

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer and Information Sciences, AB

Computer Graphics, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Court Reporting/Court Reporter, A

Design and Visual Communications, B

Developmental and Child Psychology, AB

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Electronic Commerce, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, AB

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

Family and Community Services, B

Film/Video and Photographic Arts, B

Health and Medical Laboratory Technologies, A

History, A

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Information Science/Studies, ABM

Interdisciplinary Studies, AB

Journalism, A

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Law and Legal Studies, B

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, AB

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Management Information Systems and Services, BM

Management of Technology, M

Mass Communication/Media Studies, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Photography, A

Physical Sciences, A

Political Science and Government, A

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, AB

Public/Applied History and Archival Administration, B

Social Sciences, A

Sociology, A

WASHINGTON BIBLE COLLEGE

Bible/Biblical Studies, AB

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Religion/Religious Studies, AB

Religious Education, AB

Theology/Theological Studies, AB

WASHINGTON COLLEGE

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Anthropology, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Ecology, B

Economics, B

English, M

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

Foreign Languages and Literatures, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, BM

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Latin American Studies, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mathematics, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Philosophy, B

Physics, B

Physiological Psychology/Psychobiology, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, BM

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

WOR-WIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business/Commerce, A

Child Care and Support Services Management, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Systems Analysis/Analyst, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Hospitality Administration/Management, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling, A

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Maryland

MARYLAND

STATE EDUCATION OFFICE

James Ferrant, Lead Coordinator
Division of Career Technology and Adult Learning
State Dept. of Education
200 W. Baltimore St.
Baltimore, MD 21201-2595
(410)767-0158

STATE REGULATORY INFORMATION

The Maryland State Department of Education has been designated as the sole agency for all federal vocational funds provided under the Carl D. Perkins Act. These funds are distributed on both an annual basis by a formula allocation and on a special project basis to the 18 publicly tax-supported community colleges located throughout the state. In addition to public postsecondary community colleges, vocational-technical education is provided by two year independent colleges and independent postsecondary schools.
Under statutory authority established in 1976, the Maryland State Board for Higher Education (SBHE) prescribes rules and regulations for approval and accreditation of all public and private schools offering postsecondary education. Nontransferable Certificates of Approval are issued to independent postsecondary schools for a specified period of time or until revoked by formal board action. Certificates of Approval are issued to any applicant operating an independent postsecondary school whose conditions of entrance, scholarship, educational qualifications, standards, and facilities are adequate for the program, training, and courses to be given.
No independent postsecondary schools, except those formally approved by SBHE action, may permit a sales representative or solicitor to solicit students without first securing an identification card issued by the board. Additional requirements are promulgated under approved regulations.

ARNOLD

Anne Arundel Community College

101 College Pkwy, Arnold, MD 21012-1895. Two-Year College. Founded 1961. Contact: Martha A. Smith, Ph.D., Pres., (410)777-2222, Fax: (410)777-4831, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.aacc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $83/per credit hour Anne Arundel Cnty residents; $159 other Maryland counties; $282 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 14,421. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; CAAHEP; JRCERT; APTA; ABA; AAPA; ACF. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Accounting, Junior; Architectural Design Technology; Architectural Technology; Biomedical Technology; Business Administration; Business Management; Chef Training; Computer Aided Drafting; Computer Applications; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Computer Repair; Computer Science; Construction Management; Crime Scene Technology; Culinary Arts; Culinary Occupations; Dance; Dental Hygiene; Dietetic Technology; Drug & Alcohol Counseling; Early Childhood Education; Electronics Technology; Emergency Medical Technology; Environmental Technology; Fine Arts; Food Service & Management; Graphic Design; Health Aide; Health Technology; Hospitality; Hotel & Motel Management; Hotel & Restaurant Management; Human Services; Internet Technologies; Interior Design; Investigation; Law Enforcement; Massage Therapy; Mathematics; Media Technology; Medical Assistant; Medical Office Management; Medical Technology; Medical Transcription; Microcomputers; Microsoft Certified Specialist; Motion Pictures; Music; Nurses Aide; Nursing, Practical; Nursing, R.N.; Paralegal; Personal Computing; Photography; Physical Education; Physical Therapy Aide; Physicians Assistant; Plant Science; Police Science; Radiologic Technology; Real Estate Appraisal; Real Estate Broker; Real Estate Sales License; Telecommunications Technology; Theatre Arts; Video Production; Visual Communications

BALTIMORE

All-State Career School, Baltimore Campus

2200 Broening Hwy, Ste. 160, Baltimore, MD 21224. Trade and Technical. Founded 1984. Contact: Donald Summers, (410)631-1818, 800-TRA-IN18, Web Site: http://www.allstatecareer.edu; Web Site: http://www.allstatecareer.edu/contact.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $1,600-$6,630. Enrollment: Total 200. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Tractor Trailer Operators Training; Truck Driving

Avara's Academy of Hair Design

16 N. Dundalk Ave., Baltimore, MD 21222. Barber. Founded 1970. Contact: Ella A. Bryant, (410)285-7820, Fax: (410)566-2732. Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $4,020. Enrollment: men 45, women 43. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Barbering (1200 Hr)

Baltimore City Community College

2901 Liberty Hts. Ave., Baltimore, MD 21215-7893. Two-Year College. Founded 1947. Contact: Richard Turner, Interim president, (410)462-8000, (410)462-8300, Web Site: http://www.bccc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,340 in-state; $5,040 out-of-state; $550 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 7,318. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: MSA; ADA; ADtA; APTA; NLNAC. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Business Management; Computer Information Science; Culinary Arts; Health Occupations; Legal Assistant

Baltimore International College

Commerce Exchange, 17 Commerce St., Baltimore, MD 21202-3230. Other. Founded 1972. Contact: Kristin Ciarlo, Dir. of Admissions, (410)752-4710, 800-624-9926, Fax: (410)752-3730, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bic.edu; Web Site: http://www.bic.edu/displayForm.asp?id=19. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $20,990; $1,500 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 556. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: MSA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Baking (1-2 Yr); Cooking, Commercial (1-2 Yr); Culinary Arts (1-2 Yr); Food Service & Management (2 Yr); Hotel & Motel Management (2 Yr); Hotel & Restaurant Management (4 Yr)

Baltimore Studio of Hair Design

318 N. Howard St., Baltimore, MD 21201-3444. Cosmetology, Barber. Contact: Maxine Sisserman, Administrator, (410)539-1935, E-mail: [email protected] baltimorestudio.net, Web Site: http://www.baltimorestudio.net. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $1,600 - $9,150; $800 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 130. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 hr); Nail Technology (250 hr)

Broadcasting Institute of Maryland

7200 Harford Rd., Baltimore, MD 21234. Trade and Technical. Founded 1969. Contact: Paul Mittermeier, Admissions Dir., (410)254-2770, 800-942-9246, Fax: (410)254-5357, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bim.org; John Perry, Business Manager, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $11,400. Enrollment: men 40, women 30. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Broadcasting, Nontechnical (600 Hr); Radio & Television (600 Hr)

Community College of Baltimore County, Essex campus

7201 Rossville Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21237. Two-Year College. Founded 1957. Contact: Marcia Amaimo, Dir. of Admissions, (410)780-6313, 800-832-0262, Fax: (410)238-4635, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ccbcmd.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2600/year. Enrollment: men 4,410, women 6,357. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: CAAHEP; NASM; NLNAC; MSA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Animal Science, General (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Computer Aided Design (1 Yr); Computer Aided Drafting (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Computer Science (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Drug Abuse Counseling (1 Yr); Drug & Alcohol Counseling (1 Yr); Early Childhood Specialist (1 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); Engineering (2 Yr); Health Care & Management (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Marketing Management (2 Yr); Mathematics (2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Mental Health Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Personnel Management (2 Yr); Physicians Assistant (2 Yr); Radiation Therapy Technology (2 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Small Business Management (1 Yr); Theatre Arts (2 Yr); Veterinary Technology (2 Yr)

Greater Baltimore Medical Center School of Radiography

6701 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21204. Allied Medical. Founded 1968. Contact: Brenda Schuette, (443)849-2463, Fax: (443)849-2866. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $2,500 per year. Enrollment: Total 12. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: JRCERT. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology (23 Mo)

Harbor Hospital Center

3001 S. Hanover St., Baltimore, MD 21225. Allied Medical. Founded 1954. Contact: Marion Kerns, Dir. of Nursing, (410)350-3200, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.harborhospital.org. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Year. Enrollment: men 3, women 15. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology (24 Mo)

Harrison Career Institute-Baltimore

1040 Park Ave., Ste. 100, Baltimore, MD 21201. Trade and Technical, Allied Medical.(410)962-0303, 877-HCI-5700, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://hci.edu; Web Site: http://hci.edu/info.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $9,066 - $9,084; $718 - $986 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 163. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cardiovascular Technology (900 Hr); Medical Administrative Assistant (904 Hr); Medical Assistant (748 Hr)

International Academy of Hair Design & Technology

1500 W. Pratt St., Baltimore, MD 21223. Barber. Founded 1960. Contact: Ella A. Bryant, (410)566-2420, (410)566-2421, Fax: (410)566-4088, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $5,216 plus tools. Enrollment: Total 98. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Barbering (8 Mo)

Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center

4940 Eastern Ave., Baltimore, MD 21224. Allied Medical. Founded 1984. Contact: Marge Rodgers, Dir. of Rehabilitation, (410)550-0100, Fax: (410)550-1390, Web Site: http://www.jhbmc.jhu.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Term: Varies with Program. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology

Maryland General Hospital, School of Radiologic Technology

827 Linden Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201. Allied Medical. Founded 1962. Contact: Francis E. Potts, Program Director, (410)225-8750, (410)225-8082, Fax: (410)669-8710, Web Site: http://www.marylandgeneral.org. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $2,500 per year (plus books and uniforms). Enrollment: Total 15. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology (2 Yr)

North American Trade Schools

6901 Security Blvd., Ste. 16, Baltimore, MD 21244-8419. Trade and Technical. Founded 1972. Contact: F.C. Bud Poland, (410)298-4844, 800-638-5490, Fax: (301)895-4453, Web Site: http://www.natradeschools.com; Web Site: http://www.natradeschools.com/request-information.htm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $9,131; $1,083 books and supplies. Enrollment: men 57, women 2. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Building Construction Technology (39 Wk); Diesel Technology (9 Mo); Electrical Technology (39 Wk); Mechanics, Diesel (1008 Hr); Truck Driving (320 Hr)

TESST College of Technology (Baltimore)

1520 S. Caton Ave., Baltimore, MD 21227. Trade and Technical. Founded 1956. Contact: Susan Sherwood, Exec.Dir, (410)644-6400, 800-48-TESST, Fax: (410)644-6481, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tesst.com; Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/contact_us_regular.htm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 710, women 90. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (1 Yr); Computer Networking (2 Yr); Drafting, Engineering (2 Yr); Electronics & Communication (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Engineering Technology, Electronic (48 Wk); Information Technology; Medical Assistant; Refrigeration Technology; Telecommunications Technology (2 Yr)

UMBC Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program

1450 South Rolling Rd., Baltimore, MD 21227. Allied Medical. Founded 1975. Contact: Monica J. Guzman, Program Dir., (443)543-5400, Fax: (443)543-5410, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.umbc.edu; Web Site: http://www.umbc.edu/trainctr/contact/inquire.php. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Year. Tuition: $10,500. Enrollment: Total 35. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: CAAHEP; IACBE. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Ultrasonography (14 Mo)

BEL AIR

Harford Community College

401 Thomas Run Rd., Bel Air, MD 21015. Two-Year College. Founded 1957. Contact: Lynne A. Weller, Associate Dean for Enrollment Services, (410)836-4000, Fax: (410)836-4169, Web Site: http://www.harford.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $75/credit Harford county resident; $150/credit other MD counties; $225/credit out-of-state. Enrollment: men 2,115, women 3,423. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; MSA; NAACLS; ABA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Automotive Technology; Biological Technology; Business Administration; Business Management; Chemical Technology; Communications Technology; Computer Aided Design; Computer Information Science; Computer Science; Criminal Justice; Early Childhood Education; Engineering; Environmental Technology; Fine Arts; Human Services; Information Sciences Technology; Interior Design; Laboratory Technology; Manufacturing Technology; Mathematics; Medical Laboratory Technology; Mental Health Technology; Music; Nursing, Practical; Nursing, R.N.; Paralegal; Photography; Retail Management; Teacher Assistant; Visual Communications

International Beauty School of Bel Air

227 Archer St., Bel Air, MD 21014-3639. Cosmetology. Founded 1965. Contact: Dee Polek, (410)838-0845, (410)879-7477, Fax: (410)838-1022, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $9,095 plus $600 books and supplies for cosmetology; $2,038 plus $462 books and supplies for nail technology. Enrollment: men 3, women 53. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Manicurist (250 Hr)

BELTSVILLE

TESST College of Technology (Beltsville)

4600 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD 20705. Trade and Technical. Contact: Dianne McRae, President, (301)937-8448, 800-48-TESST, Web Site: http://www.tesst.com; Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/contact_us_regular.htm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 696. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Networking; Drafting & Design Technology; Electrician; Information Technology; Telecommunications Technology

BETHESDA

L'Academie de Cuisine

5021 Wilson Ln., Bethesda, MD 20814. Trade and Technical. Founded 1976. Contact: Chris Herrmann, Managing Dir., (301)986-9490, Fax: (301)652-7970, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.lacademie.com; Marina Ross, Asst. Manager. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 75, women 81. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCET. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Culinary Arts (12 Mo)

Corinne Phelps Robertston School of Dance

5600 Wyngate Dr., Bethesda, MD 20817. Art. Founded 1951. Contact: Corinne P. Robertson, Owner, (301)515-1841. Private. Coed. Term: Semester. Tuition: $10 per class hour. Enrollment: Total 220. Curriculum: Dance, Ballet; Dance, Jazz; Dance, Tap

Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences

1 Cloister Ct., Bethesda, MD 20814-1460. Other. Founded 1950. Contact: Krishna Balakrishnan, Dir., (301)496-7976, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.faes.org; Web Site: http://www.faes.org/faespost.htm. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Curriculum: Biological Technology; Medical Technology

Washington School of Photography

4850 Rugby Ave., Bethesda, MD 20814. Trade and Technical. Founded 1977. Contact: Missy Loewe, Academic Dean/Instructor, (301)654-1998, Fax: (301)654-8228, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.wspphoto.com; Ruth Bergin, Dir.. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $4,430; $770 electives; $300 supplies. Enrollment: Total 100. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Photography (13 Mo)

BLADENSBURG

Bladensburg Barber School

4810 Annapolis Rd., Bladensburg, MD 20710. Barber. Founded 1958. Contact: G. Maisonneuve, (301)277-8913. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,945. Enrollment: men 55, women 10. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: NABS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Barbering (1200 Hr); Hair Styling (300 Hr)

CALIFORNIA

Blades School of Hair Design

22576-316 MacCarthur Blvd., PO Box 226, California, MD 20619. Cosmetology. Founded 1986. Contact: Wanda Paduano, (301)862-9797, Fax: (301)862-3315, E-mail: [email protected] Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $10,100 plus $595 books and supplies. Enrollment: men 0, women 56. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

CAMP SPRINGS

Adorned Nails Institute

6303 Allentown Rd., Camp Springs, MD 20748. Cosmetology. Contact: Olivia Nixon, (301)702-2423, (301)702-2431. Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Hour. Tuition: Varies with program. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Manicurist

CATONSVILLE

Community College of Baltimore County, Catonsville Campus

800 S. Rolling Rd., Catonsville, MD 21228. Two-Year College. Founded 1957. Contact: Hope Davis, Dir. of Media Relations, (410)869-1212, (410)455-6991, Fax: (410)869-1265, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ccbcmd.edu; Diane Drake, Dir. of Admissions, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,600/year. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: ABFSE; AOTA; MSA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Administrative Assistant (1 Yr); Advertising (2 Yr); Aircraft Flight Instruction (2 Yr); Airline Operations (2 Yr); Airline Personnel Training (2 Yr); Air Traffic Control (2 Yr); Architectural Design Technology (2 Yr); Art (2 Yr); Art, Advertising - Commercial (2 Yr); Automotive Service (2 Yr); Automotive Specialist (1 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Chemical Technology (1 Yr); Civil Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Clerk, Typist (1 Yr); Communications, Disorders (2 Yr); Communications Technology (1 Yr); Computer Aided Design (1 Yr); Computer Aided Drafting (1 Yr); Computer Aided Manufacturing (1 Yr); Computer Graphics (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Computer Operator (1 Yr); Computer Programming, Business (2 Yr); Computer Science (2 Yr); Construction Technology (2 Yr); Correctional Science (1 Yr); Data Processing (1 Yr); Deaf Education (1 Yr); Desktop Publishing (1 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (1 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Electronics & Communication (1 Yr); Electronics, Industrial (1 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Engineering (2 Yr); Executive Assistant (1 Yr); Fire Protection Technology (2 Yr); Fire Science (1 Yr); Geology (2 Yr); Health Care & Management (2 Yr); Health Occupations (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Instructional Aide (2 Yr); Landscape Architecture (1 Yr); Law Enforcement (1 Yr); Maintenance Technology (1 Yr); Marketing Management (1 Yr); Mental Health Technology (1 Yr); Metrology (2 Yr); Mortuary Science (1 Yr); Music (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Occupational Therapy Assistant (2 Yr); Office Technology (1 Yr); Photography (1 Yr); Police Science (1 Yr); Quality Control (1 Yr); Real Estate, Basic (1 Yr); Real Estate Broker (1 Yr); Recreation Leadership (2 Yr); Robotics (2 Yr); Safety Technology (2 Yr); Sculpture (1 Yr); Secretarial, Executive (1 Yr); Secretarial, General (1 Yr); Secretarial, Legal (1 Yr); Secretarial, Medical (1 Yr); Security Training (1 Yr); Surveying (2 Yr); Systems Analyst (1 Yr); Television Electronics (1 Yr); Television Servicing, Maintenance & Repair (1 Yr); Travel & Transportation Management (1 Yr); Word Processing (1 Yr)

COLUMBIA

Howard Community College

10901 Little Patuxent Pkwy., Columbia, MD 21044. Two-Year College. Founded 1970. Contact: Laura C. Cannon, Admissions Counselor, (410)772-4856, (410)772-4800, Fax: (410)772-4589, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.howardcc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,882 in-county; $4,874 in-state; $5,954 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 6,711. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; MSA; CAAHEP; JRCERT; COMTA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Architectural Design Technology (2 Yr); Architectural Technology (2 Yr); Art (2 Yr); Athletic Trainer (2 Yr); Biomedical Technology (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business, International; Business Management (2 Yr); Computer Aided Design (2 Yr); Computer Networking (2 Yr); Computer Operations (2 Yr); Computer Programming (2 Yr); Computer Science (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Dance (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Education (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); Engineering (2 Yr); Environmental Technology (2 Yr); Fashion Design & Merchandising (2 Yr); Financial Planning (2 Yr); Horticulture (2 Yr); Hotel & Restaurant Management (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Information Systems (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Journalism (2 Yr); Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Legal Assistant (2 Yr); Liberal Arts (2 Yr); Mass Communications (2 Yr); Mathematics (2 Yr); Medical Assistant (2 Yr); Medical Technology - Cardiology (1 Yr); Microcomputers (2 Yr); Music (2 Yr); Nursing, L.P.N. (2 Yr); Office, General (2 Yr); Office Management (2 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Photography (2 Yr); Photonics Technology (2 Yr); Physical Fitness (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy; Retail Management (2 Yr); Surgical Technology; Telecommunications Technology (2 Yr)

CUMBERLAND

Allegany College of Maryland

12401 Willowbrook Rd., SE, Cumberland, MD 21502-2596. Two-Year College. Founded 1961. Contact: Dr. Gene Hall, VP of Instructional Affairs, (301)784-5000, (301)784-5005, Fax: (301)784-5025, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.allegany.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $90/credit Allegany County resident; $172/credit out-of-county MD resident; $202 non-MD resident. Enrollment: men 980, women 1,899. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: JRCRTE; ADA; APTA; CAAHEP; NAACLS; MSA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Communications Technology (2 Yr); Computer Science (2 Yr); Computer Technology (1 Yr); Criminal Justice (1 Yr); Culinary Arts (2 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Engineering (2 Yr); Forestry Technology (2 Yr); Health Care & Management (1 Yr); Hospitality (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Massage Therapy (1 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Occupational Therapy Assistant (2 Yr); Office Technology (1 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide (2 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Travel & Tourism (1 Yr)

ELLICOTT CITY

Bennett School of Travel

8659 Baltimore National Pike, Ste. G, Ellicott City, MD 21043. Trade and Technical. Founded 1987. Contact: Pete Adams, CTC, MCC, DS, (410)465-8555, Fax: (410)750-8850, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Trisemester. Tuition: $750. Enrollment: Total 12. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Travel Agents (10 Wk)

ESSEX

Maryland Beauty Academy of Essex

505 Eastern Blvd., Essex, MD 21221. Cosmetology. Founded 1985. Contact: Maxine Sisserman, (410)686-4477, Fax: (410)686-0786, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.baltimorestudio.net. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $1,600 - $9,150; $800 books and supplies. Enrollment: men 1, women 84. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Manicurist (250 Hr)

FREDERICK

AccuTech Career Institute

5310 Spectrum Dr., Frederick, MD 21703. Business, Trade and Technical, Allied Medical, Other. Founded 1978. Contact: Lori Custer, (301)694-0211, 800-434-0160, Fax: (301)696-0421, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.accutech.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Month. Tuition: $7,995 - $9,945; $1,050 books and supplies. Enrollment: men 33, women 73. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business Technology (720 Hr); Computer Support Technology (720 Hr); Massage Therapy (630 Hr); Medical Assistant (720 Hr)

Frederick Community College

7932 Opossumtown Pike, Frederick, MD 21702. Two-Year College. Founded 1957. Contact: Dr. Elizabeth Zoltan, VP Learning/College Provost, (301)846-2400, (301)846-2431, Fax: (301)624-2799, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.frederick.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $114 in-county; $216 out-of-county; $283 out-of-state. Enrollment: men 1,673, women 2,974. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: FAA; MSA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Art; Business Administration; Business, General Office; Computer Technology; Data Processing; Emergency Management; General Studies; Laboratory Technology; Legal Assistant; Nursing, Practical; Nursing, R.N.; Office Technology; Respiratory Therapy (70 Credits); Surgical Technology (34-66 Cr)

GAITHERSBURG

L'Academie de Cuisine

16006 Industrial Dr., Gaithersburg, MD 20877. Trade and Technical. Founded 1976. Contact: Brian Ross, Dir., (301)670-8670, 800-664-CHEF, Fax: (301)670-0450, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.lacademie.com; Allyson Lara, Admissions Rep., E-mail: [email protected], [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $22,260; $810 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 91. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCET. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Culinary Arts (50 Wk); Culinary Arts - Pastry (30 Wk)

Aesthetics Institute of Cosmetology

15958c Shady Grove Rd., Gaithersburg, MD 20877. Cosmetology. Contact: Laila Hamdan, Dir., (301)330-9252. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $1,100 - $9,000; $600 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 57. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Esthetician (600 Hr); Makeup Facial Treatment (40 Hr); Nail Technology (250 Hr)

Long & Foster Institute of Real Estate

201 Perry Parkway, Gaithersburg, MD 20877. Other. Founded 1981. Contact: Lee Busby, (301)417-7100, 800-543-3365, Fax: (301)975-1035, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.longandfoster.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $254 (includes registration and books). Enrollment: Total 2,300. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Real Estate, Basic (60 Hr)

GERMANTOWN

Montgomery College - Germantown Campus

20200 Observation Dr., Germantown, MD 20876. Two-Year College. Founded 1978. Contact: Dr. Hercules Pinkney, VP and Provost, (301)353-7700, (301)353-7817, Fax: (301)353-7818, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.montgomerycollege.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $155/credit hr (incl. fees) in-county; $191/credit hour (incl. fees) in-state; $257/credit hr (incl. fees) out-of-state. Enrollment: men 1,305, women 1,878. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: MSA; APTA; CAAHEP; JRCERT; NASM; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Advertising; Business, General Office (2 Yr); Computer Science - Terminal Operation; Correctional Science; Criminal Justice; Dental Assisting; Dental Laboratory Technology; Design; Engineering Technology; Engineering Technology, Architectural; Engineering Technology, Electronic; Engineering Technology, Mechanical; Fire Science; Food Service & Management; Hotel & Motel Management; Instructional Aide; Law Enforcement; Medical Assistant; Medical Laboratory Technology; Mental Health Technology; Nursing, Practical; Nursing, R.N.; Printing Technology; Radiologic Technology; Recreation Leadership; Secretarial, Electronics; Secretarial, Executive (2 Yr); Secretarial, Legal; Secretarial, Medical; Television & Radio Production

GLEN BURNIE

Maryland Bartending Academy

209 New Jersey Ave., NE, Glen Burnie, MD 21060. Other, Trade and Technical. Founded 1980. Contact: Mark Russell, (410)787-0020, Fax: (410)787-0402, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.marylandbartending.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Week. Tuition: $640. Enrollment: Total 16. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Bartending (45 Hr)

HAGERSTOWN

Award Beauty School, Inc.

26 E. Antietam St., Hagerstown, MD 21740. Cosmetology. Founded 1955. Contact: Beverly J. Wallace, Dir., (301)733-4520, (301)733-4521, Fax: (301)733-8115, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://hairacademymd.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $6,525. Enrollment: women 14. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Manicurist (250 Hr)

Hagerstown Business College

18618 Crestwood Dr., Hagerstown, MD 21742. Two-Year College. Founded 1938. Contact: W. Christopher Motz, Executive Dir., (301)739-2670, 800-422-2670, Fax: (301)791-7661, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hagerstownbusinesscol.org; Web Site: http://www.hagerstownbusinesscol.edu/contact.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $8,349; $1,250 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 906. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: ACICS; CAAHEP; NAACLS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (103 Cred); Business Administration (101.5 Cred); Computer Applications (93 Cred); Computer Networking (58.5 Cred); Computer Programming (105 Cred); Computer Technology (102 Cred); Criminal Justice (102 Cred); Criminology - Identification Technology (103.5 Cred); Graphic Design (105 Cred); Health Information Technology (104 Cred); Legal Assistant (97.5 Cred); Medical Assistant (54 Cred); Medical Insurance Specialist (54.5 Cred); Medical Technology - Phlebotomy (42 Cred); Medical Transcription (64.5 Cred); Secretarial, Administrative (90 Cred); Secretarial, Legal (63 Cred); Secretarial, Medical (97.5 Cred)

Hagerstown Community College

11400 Robinwood Dr., Hagerstown, MD 21742-6590. Two-Year College. Founded 1946. Contact: Dr. Donna Rudy, Dean of Student Services, (301)790-2800, Fax: (301)791-9165, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hagerstowncc.edu; E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,950 in-district; $4,540 in-state; $5,860 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 3,528. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: MSA; JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting & Business Administration (2 Yr); Biological Technology; Business Administration (2 Yr); Chemical Technology; Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Computer Science; Correctional Science (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education; Electrical Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Energy Management (2 Yr); Engineering Technology (1 Yr); Engineering Technology, Mechanical (2 Yr); Finance; Human Services (2 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Marketing Management (1 Yr); Mathematics; Merchandising (2 Yr); Microcomputers (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Paralegal (1 Yr); Paramedic; Police Science (2 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Secretarial, Executive (2 Yr)

HYATTSVILLE

Fame School of Nail Design

3501 Hamilton St., Ste. 200, Hyattsville, MD 20782-3937. Other. Founded 1989. Contact: Iris Baker, Pres./Dir./Instructor, (301)927-3263, Fax: (301)927-8626, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.fameschoolofnaildesign.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $2,213 (includes materials and fees). Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Nail Technology (250 Hr)

LA PLATA

College of Southern Maryland (La Plata)

8730 Mitchell Rd., PO Box 910, La Plata, MD 20646-0910. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Elaine Ryan, Pres., (301)934-2251, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.csmd.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,650 in-district; $4,608 in-state; $5,789 out-of-state; $1,000 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 7,411. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: MSA; APTA; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (4 Sm); Computer Programming (4 Sm); Criminal Justice (4 Sm); Dental Hygiene (4 Sm); Early Childhood Specialist (4 Sm); Education (4 Sm); Electronics Technology (4 Sm); Engineering Technology (4 Sm); Information Sciences Technology (4 Sm); Management Development (4 Sm); Massage Therapy (4 Sm); Nursing, Practical (4 Sm); Nursing, R.N. (4 Sm); Office Technology (4 Sm); Paralegal (4 Sm); Web Development (4 Sm)

LANDOVER

Harmon's Beauty School

7760 Landover Rd., Landover, MD 20785. Cosmetology. Founded 1970. Contact: G. McCollum, (301)772-2244, (301)772-2245, Fax: (301)772-2245. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $4,000. Enrollment: Total 36. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

Ultrasound Diagnostic School

8401 Corporate Dr., Ste. 500, Landover, MD 20785-2287. Allied Medical. Founded 1977. Contact: Lynn Johnson, (301)588-0786, Fax: (301)588-3559. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Year. Tuition: $11,495. Enrollment: Total 15. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ABHES. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Ultrasonography (13 Mo)

LARGO

Prince George's Community College

301 Largo Rd., Largo, MD 20774-2199. Two-Year College. Founded 1958. Contact: Vera L. Bagley, Dir. of Admissions, (301)336-6000, (301)322-0801, Fax: (301)322-0119, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.pgcc.edu; Web Site: http://www.pgcc.edu/contact_us.html. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,978 per year, in-county; $4,682 in-state; $6,794 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 12,459. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: ABET; CAAHEP; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (1-2 Yr); Administrative Assistant (1 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Management (1-2 Yr); Computer Networking (2 Yr); Computer Programming (2 Yr); Computer Science (2 Yr); Computer Servicing - Theory & Systems (1 Yr); Construction Management (1-2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Criminology - Identification Technology (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (1-2 Yr); Education (2 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); Engineering; Engineering Technology (1 Yr); Engineering Technology, Electronic (2 Yr); Health Information Technology (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (1 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr); Medical Transcription (1 Yr); Microcomputers (2 Yr); Nuclear Medical Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, Vocational (1-2 Yr); Paralegal (1-2 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Theatre Arts (1 Yr); Visual Communications (1-2 Yr); Web Development (2 Yr)

LAUREL

Aspen Beauty Academy (Laurel)

3535 Ft. Meade Rd., Laurel, MD 20724. Cosmetology. Founded 1988. Contact: Lisa Heyman, (301)490-8580, Fax: (301)490-8580. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $6,450. Enrollment: men 7, women 60. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

Capitol College

11301 Springfield Rd., Laurel, MD 20708. Other. Founded 1927. Contact: Darnell Edwards, Dir. of Admissions, (301)369-2800, (301)953-0060, 800-950-1992, Fax: (301)953-3876, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.capitol-college.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,048/semester full-time; $580/credit part-time. Enrollment: men 583, women 154. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: ABET; MSA; IACBE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Aircraft Mechanics (12 Credits); Computer Information Science (12 Credits); Electronic Engineering Technology (65-66 Cr); Electronics & Communication (64-65 Cr); Engineering Technology, Electronic (64-65 Cr); Information Technology (12 Credits); Network Security (12 Credits); Telecommunications Technology (64-65 Cr); Web Development (12 Credits)

LEONARDTOWN

College of Southern Maryland (Leonardtown)

22950 Hollywood Rd, Leonardtown, MD 20650-1758. Two-Year College. Founded 1997. Contact: Elaine Ryan, Pres., (240)725-5300, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.csmd.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,650 in-district; $4,608 in-state; $5,789 out-of-state; $1,000 books and supplies. Enrollment: men 1,856, women 3,663. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: MSA; APTA; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (4 Sm); Computer Programming (4 Sm); Criminal Justice (4 Sm); Dental Hygiene (4 Sm); Early Childhood Specialist (4 Sm); Education (4 Sm); Electronics Technology (4 Sm); Engineering Technology (4 Sm); Information Sciences Technology (4 Sm); Management Development (4 Sm); Massage Therapy (4 Sm); Nursing, Practical (4 Sm); Nursing, R.N. (4 Sm); Office Technology (4 Sm); Paralegal (4 Sm); Web Development (4 Sm)

LINTHICUM

Baltimore School of Massage

517 Progress Dr., Stes. A-L, Linthicum, MD 21090. Trade and Technical. Founded 1981. Contact: Angela Dentterder, (410)636-7929, 888-636-7929, Fax: (410)636-7857, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://steinered.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies by program. Enrollment: men 95, women 299. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT; COMTA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Esthetician; Massage Therapy (637 Hr); Shiatsu (795 Hr)

LUTHERVILLE

Maryland Center for Montessori Studies

10807 Tony Dr., Lutherville, MD 21093. Other. Founded 1991. Contact: Chandra Fernando, (410)321-8555, (410)321-8556, Fax: (410)321-8566, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://montessori-mscm.org. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $5,700 toddler program; $7,000 primary; $9,950 extended day/intermediate; $11,500 elementary. Enrollment: Total 15. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: MSA. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Early Childhood Education (980 Hr)

MCHENRY

Garrett College

687 Mosser Rd., McHenry, MD 21541. Two-Year College. Founded 1971. Contact: Dr. Paul Dauphinais, Pres., (301)387-3000, (301)387-3044, Fax: (301)387-3038, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://garrettcollege.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $78-$218 per credit, depending on residency. Enrollment: Total 635. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Adventure Sports Management (1-2 Yr); Agribusiness (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Technology (1-2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Education (2 Yr); Fine Arts (2 Yr); General Studies (2 Yr); Juvenile Justice (1-2 Yr); Liberal Arts (2 Yr); Mathematics (2 Yr); Natural Resources Technology (1 Yr); Network Security (1 Yr); Physical Education (1-2 Yr); Wild Life Management (2 Yr)

MILLERSVILLE

Maryland Institute of Criminal Justice

8424 Veteran's Hwy., Ste. 3, Millersville, MD 21108-0458. Trade and Technical. Founded 1971. Contact: B. Thompson, (410)987-6665, (410)987-8181, 800-493-8181, Fax: (410)987-4808, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.micj.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $4,350. Enrollment: Total 15. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Polygraph (320 Hr)

NEW CARROLLTON

Hair Academy

8435 Annapolis Rd., New Carrollton, MD 20784. Cosmetology. Contact: Laura Gordon, Dir., (301)459-2509, (301)459-1776, Fax: (301)557-3479, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hairacademymd.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $11,550; $695 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 190. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Manicurist (250 Hr)

NORTH EAST

Cecil Community College

One Seahawk Dr., North East, MD 21901-1999. Two-Year College. Contact: Stephen Pannill, President, (410)287-1000, (410)287-1002, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.cecilcc.edu; Web Site: http://www.cecilcc.edu/admissions/information/request-information.asp. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Cecil Country resident $80 per credit; other Maryland resident: $170 per credit; out-of-state resident: $215 per credit. Enrollment: Total 1,781. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: MSA; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (68 Credits); Air Conditioning (30-60 Hr); Air Traffic Control (34-65 Cr); Aviation Management (34-65 Cr); Business Administration (67 Credits); Business Management (18-67 Cr); Computer Information Systems (15-64 Cr); Computer Repair (37 Credits); Driver Training Instructor (6-36 Hr); Emergency Medical Technology (28-63 Cr); Financial Planning (18-67 Cr); Health Occupations (30-80 Hr); Logistics; Medical Assistant (62 Hr); Medical Transcription (30-72 Hr); Nurse, Assistant (140 Hr); Nursing, L.P.N. (35 Credits); Nursing, R.N. (68 Credits); Photography (15-16 Cr); Public Relations (15-64 Cr); Video Production (66-67 Cr); Yacht Design (29-67 Cr)

OWINGS MILLS

Empire Beauty School (Owings Mills)

9616 Reisterstown Rd, Owings Mills, MD 21117. Cosmetology.(410)358-4500, 800-223-3271, Web Site: http://www.empire.edu. Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Tuition: $17,595. Enrollment: Total 91. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology; Cosmetology Instructor; Manicurist

ITT Technical Institute (Owings Mills)

11301 Red Run Blvd., Owings Mills, MD 21117. Trade and Technical. (443)394-7115, 877-411-6782, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits); Software Development/Engineering (96 Credits); Web Development (96 Credits)

PHOENIX

Sheffield Institute for the Recording Arts

13816 Sunnybrook Rd., Phoenix, MD 21131. Trade and Technical. Founded 1996. Contact: Lee Stein Bridge, Dir. of Admissions, (410)628-7260, 800-355-6613, Fax: (410)628-1977, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.sheffieldav.com; Angela Hohman, Admissions Rep., E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.sheffieldav.com/form4.htm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $11 to $12,000. Enrollment: Total 100. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Audio Technology (292 Hr); Broadcasting, Nontechnical (304 Hr); Radio Communications (304 Hr); Technical Communication (380 Hr); Video Production (264 Hr)

PIKESVILLE

Von Lee International School of Aesthetics

309 Reisterstown Rd., Pikesville, MD 21208-5313. Cosmetology, Other. Founded 1978.(410)653-1966, 800-437-5140, Fax: (410)653-8447, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.von-lee.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $8,201 (skin care), $1,268 (make-up). Enrollment: Total 120. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Makeup Facial Treatment (40 Hr); Skin Care (600 Hr)

PINEY POINT

Harry Lundeberg Seamanship School Inc.

45353 St. George's Avenue, Piney Point, MD 20674. Contact: Donald Nolan, Vice president, (301)994-0010. Private. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $0. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

PRINCE FREDERICK

College of Southern Maryland (Prince Frederick)

115 Williams Rd., PO Box 3709, Prince Frederick, MD 20678-3709. Two-Year College. Founded 2005. Contact: Elaine Ryan, Pres., (443)550-6000, Fax: (443)550-6100, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.csmd.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Tuition: $2,650 in-district; $4,608 in-state; $5,789 out-of-state; $1,000 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: MSA; APTA; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (4 Sm); Computer Programming (4 Sm); Criminal Justice (4 Sm); Dental Hygiene (4 Sm); Early Childhood Specialist (4 Sm); Education (4 Sm); Electronics Technology (4 Sm); Engineering Technology (4 Sm); Information Sciences Technology (4 Sm); Management Development (4 Sm); Massage Therapy (4 Sm); Nursing, Practical (4 Sm); Nursing, R.N. (4 Sm); Office Technology (4 Sm); Paralegal (4 Sm); Web Development (4 Sm)

REISTERSTOWN

Maryland Beauty Academy

Chartley Park Shopping Center, 152 Chartley Dr., Reisterstown, MD 21136. Cosmetology. Founded 1972. Contact: Jaime Sisserman, (410)517-0442, Fax: (410)517-2513, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.baltimorestudio.net. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $1,600 - $9,150; $800 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 50. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Nail Technology (250 Hr)

ROCKVILLE

Montgomery College - Rockville Campus

51 Mannakee St., Rockville, MD 20850. Two-Year College. Founded 1965. Contact: Judy E. Ackerman, Ph.D., VP and Provost, (301)279-5345, Web Site: http://www.montgomerycollege.edu/; James E. Daniels, Dean of Student Development. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $155/credit hr (incl. fees) in-county; $191/credit hour (incl. fees) in-state; $257/credit hr (incl. fees) out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 14,000. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: ABET; APTA; NASM; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Architectural Technology (2 Yr); Art, Advertising - Commercial (2 Yr); Automotive Technology (1 Yr); Broadcasting Technology (2 Yr); Business, General Office (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (2 Yr); Civil Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Computer Operator (2 Yr); Computer Technology (1 Yr); Construction Technology (2 Yr); Correctional Science (1 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Fire Science (1 Yr); Food Service & Management; Hotel & Motel Management (2 Yr); Illustration (2 Yr); Interior Design (2 Yr); Law Enforcement (2 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr); Photography (2 Yr); Printing Technology (2 Yr); Radio (2 Yr); Television (2 Yr)

Montgomery Montessori Institute

10500 Darnestown Rd., Rockville, MD 20850. Other. Founded 1993. Contact: Pamela W. Trumble, Head of Schools, (301)279-2799, Fax: (301)762-4544, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.montessori-mmi.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Year. Tuition: $6,150 includes application and professional fees. Enrollment: Total 10. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: MACTE. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Montessori Teacher (1 Yr)

Omega Studios' School of Applied Recording Arts and Sciences

5609 Fishers Ln., Rockville, MD 20852. Trade and Technical. Founded 1975. Contact: Bill Terry, Dir. of Admissions, (301)230-9100, 800-936-6342, Fax: (301)230-9103, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.omegastudios.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 180. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Audio Production, Music; Audio Technology; Engineering Technology, Audio; Music, Business; Music & Recording Technology

SALISBURY

Del-Mar-Va Beauty Academy, Inc.

111 Milford St., Salisbury, MD 21804. Cosmetology. Founded 1960. Contact: C. Evans, (410)742-7929, (410)742-9324, Fax: (410)749-0363, Web Site: http://www.delmarvabeautyacademy.com; Clark Lankford, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.delmarvabeautyacademy.com/Request_Information.htm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $2,350 - $9,350; $1,048 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 96. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Manicurist (250 Hr)

Wor-Wic Community College

32000 Campus Dr., Salisbury, MD 21804. Two-Year College. Founded 1975. Contact: Richard C. Webster, Dir. of Admissions, (410)334-2800, Fax: (410)334-2954, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.worwic.edu/; Nancy C. Shwed, Admissions Rep., E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $75/credit Somerset resident; $190/credit out-of-county; $221/credit out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 3,110. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: MSA; JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (68-70 Cr); Building Construction Technology (31 Credits); Business Management (69 Cr); Computer Information Science (33 Credits); Computer Programming (33 Credits); Correctional Science (32-34 Cr); Criminal Justice (32-34 Cr); Early Childhood Education (32-33 Cr); Electrical Engineering Technology (31 Credits); Emergency Medical Technology (15-33 Cr); Hotel & Motel Management (32-76 Cr); Nursing, R.N. (41-70 Cr); Office Technology (63-65 Cr); Radiologic Technology (30-70 Cr)

SEVERNA PARK

Champion Institute of Real Estate

541 B Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd., Severna Park, MD 21146. Other. Founded 1987. Contact: Linda Doherty, Training Dir., (410)544-6004, 800-640-0630, Fax: (410)544-0137, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.championrealty.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Month. Tuition: $145, books $50. Enrollment: Total 420. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Real Estate Sales License (60 Hr)

SILVER SPRING

Holy Cross Hospital School of Radiologic Technology

1500 Forest Glen Rd., Silver Spring, MD 20910. Trade and Technical. Founded 1988. Contact: Staci M. Maier, (301)754-7367, (301)754-7889, Fax: (301)754-7371, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.holycrosshealth.org. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $2,000; $700 books; $200 uniforms. Enrollment: Total 20. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: JRCERT. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology

International Fabricare Institute

12251 Tech Rd., Silver Spring, MD 20904. Trade and Technical. Founded 1972. Contact: Susan Bale, (301)622-1900, 800-638-2627, Fax: (240)295-0685, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ifi.org. Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Week. Tuition: Varies $450-$1,250 (members); $695-$1,995 (nonmembers). Enrollment: Total 116. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Dry Cleaning & Laundry (3 Wk)

Maryland School of Dog Grooming

8025 13th St., Silver Spring, MD 20910. Trade and Technical. Founded 1973. Contact: Lancaster Tim Wray, Pres., (301)585-4311, 800-543-3228, Fax: (301)585-7683, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.mdschoolofdoggrooming.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $3599 7 wk. poodle course; $5149 14 wk. all-breed course. Enrollment: Total 12. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Placement service available. Curriculum: Pet Grooming (14 Wk); Kennel Management (12 Wk)

Montgomery Beauty School

8736 Arliss St., Silver Spring, MD 20901. Cosmetology. Contact: James Bileny, President, (301)588-3570, (301)588-7666, Fax: (301)408-2367, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hairacademymd.com. Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $10,550. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Manicurist (250 Hr)

School of Art and Design at Montgomery College

10500 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20902. Art. Founded 1957. Contact: Maggie Noss, Interim Dir., (301)649-4454, 888-543-6223, Fax: (301)649-2940, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.mcadmd.org; Nicole Evans, Recruiter, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $93 per credit in county; $191 in-state; $257 out-of-state. Enrollment: men 51, women 41. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: NASAD; MSA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Commercial Art (2 Yr); Fine Arts (2 Yr); Graphic Design (2 Yr); Visual Communications (2 Yr)

SUITLAND

New Creations Academy of Hair Design

3930 Bexley Place, Suitland, MD 20746. Cosmetology. Founded 1988. Contact: Carla Robinson, Dir., (301)899-9100, Fax: (301)899-2317, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.newcreationsacademy.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $9,400; $600 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 33. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

TAKOMA PARK

Columbia Union College

7600 Flower Ave., Takoma Park, MD 20912. Other. Founded 1904. Contact: Robert Young, VP Academic Administration, (301)891-4000, 800-835-4212, Fax: (301)270-1618, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.cuc.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $16,433. Enrollment: Total 785. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: JRCRTE; MSA; NLNAC; CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Engineering (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr)

Montgomery College - Takoma Park Campus

7600 Takoma Ave., Takoma Park, MD 20912. Two-Year College. Founded 1946. Contact: Larry Thomas, Admissions, (301)650-1500, Fax: (301)650-1497, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.montgomerycollege.edu; Jennie Wells, Dean of Student Dev.. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $155/credit hr (incl. fees) in-county; $191/credit hour (incl. fees) in-state; $257/credit hr (incl. fees) out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 4,500. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: MSA; APTA; CAAHEP; JRCERT; NASM; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business, General Office; Business Management; Child Care & Guidance; Computer Science - Terminal Operation; Legal Assistant; Medical Technology; Mental Health Technology; Nursing, Vocational; Office Technology; Physical Therapy Aide; Radiologic Technology

Washington Adventist Hospital School of Radiography

7600 Carroll Ave., Takoma Park, MD 20912. Allied Medical. Founded 1965. Contact: Kristin Mitas, (301)891-6556, Fax: (301)891-6558, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.adventisthealthcare.com/wah/services/radiology/school/. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $850 per year. Enrollment: Total 15. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology (2 Yr)

TIMONIUM

Robert Paul Academy of Cosmetology Arts & Sciences

1811-B York Rd., Timonium, MD 21093. Cosmetology. Founded 1969. Contact: Robert P. Hamlin, (410)252-4481, (410)252-4244, Fax: (410)252-4342, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.robertpaulacademy.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $11,195 cosmetology; $2,100 manicuring. Enrollment: men 3, women 42. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Manicurist (14 Wk)

TOWSON

Medix Schools

700 York Rd., Towson, MD 21204-9840. Allied Medical. Founded 1969. Contact: Sean London, Dir., (410)337-5155, Fax: (410)337-5104, Web Site: http://medixschooltowson.edu; Web Site: http://medixschooltowson.edu/contact/default.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $9,042; $460 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 615. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Dental Assisting (760-1030Hr); Medical Administrative Assistant (1000 Hr); Medical Assistant (1000 Hr)

TESST College of Technology (Towson)

803 Glen Eagles Court, Towson, MD 21286-2201. Trade and Technical. Founded 1956. Contact: Raymond L. Joll, (410)296-5350, 800-48-TESST, Fax: (410)296-5356, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tesst.com; Web Site: http://www.tesst.com/contact_us_regular.htm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 233, women 117. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Applications (900 Hr); Computer Networking (1200 Hr); Computer Operations (600 Hr); Criminal Justice; Electronics Technology (720 Hr); Information Sciences Technology (864 Hr); Medical Assistant; Pharmacy Technician; Telecommunications Technology (1800 Hr)

WALDORF

Aaron's Academy of Beauty

11690 Doolittle Dr., Waldorf, MD 20602. Cosmetology. Founded 1969. Contact: Jack Church, Owner, (301)645-3681, Fax: (301)645-3681. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $10,000 cosmetology; $1,950 nail technology. Enrollment: men 2, women 49. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Nail Technology (250 Hr)

WESTMINSTER

Carroll Community College

1601 Washington Rd., Westminster, MD 21157. Two-Year College, Allied Medical. Founded 1993. Contact: Dr. Faye Pappalardo, Pres., (410)386-8430, (410)386-8000, 888-221-9748, Fax: (410)386-8446, Web Site: http://www.carrollcc.edu; Alan M. Schuman, VP Administration. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $54 county resident; $75/credit out-of-county; $113 out-of-state. Enrollment: men 1,075, women 1,997. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: MSA; APTA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (1-2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Cardiovascular Technology (1-2 Yr); Computer Aided Design (1 Yr); Computer Graphics (1 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (1-2 Yr); Dental Hygiene (1 Yr); Early Childhood Education (1-2 Yr); Education (1-2 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (1-2 Yr); Forensic Science (2 Yr); General Studies (2 Yr); Graphic Design (1-2 Yr); Health Aide (2 Yr); Law Enforcement (1-2 Yr); Medical Transcription (1 Yr); Multimedia Design (1-2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Office Technology (1 Yr); Paralegal (2 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide (2 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (1-2 Yr); Web Development (1-2 Yr)

WHEATON

Academy of Professional Barber-Stylists

2401 Blueridge Ave., Wheaton, MD 20902. Barber. Founded 1963. Contact: John Brice, (301)942-2260, Fax: (301)942-2254, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.academyofbarbers.biz. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $6,400 including tools and application fee. Enrollment: Total 30. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Barbering (1200 Hr)

Guardian Security Training Academy

2411 Blueridge Ave., 2nd Fl., Wheaton, MD 20902. Trade and Technical. Founded 1970. Contact: Michael Katz, (301)949-4676, Fax: (301)933-9037, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://guardiansecuritytraining.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Hour. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 25. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Security Training (72 Hr)

WYE MILLS

Chesapeake College

Rtes 50 and 213, PO Box 8, Wye Mills, MD 21679. Two-Year College. Founded 1965. Contact: Kathleen J. Petrichenko, Dir. of Admission, (410)822-5400, (410)758-1537, Fax: (410)827-5875, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.chesapeake.edu; Debbie Garrett, Admissions Specialist, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $84 county resident; $147 out-of-county: $219 out-of-state. Enrollment: men 767, women 1,789. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: APTA; MSA; NLNAC; JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Advanced; Accounting, General; Business Administration; Business Management; Computer Information Science; Computer Science; Criminal Justice; Early Childhood Education; Emergency Medical Technology; Engineering Technology; Hotel & Restaurant Management; Human Services; Law Enforcement; Massage Therapy; Medical Laboratory Technology; Medical Technology Phlebotomy; Nursing, Practical; Nursing, R.N.; Paralegal; Physical Fitness; Physical Therapy Aide; Radiologic Technology; Travel & Tourism

Macqueen Gibbs Willis School of Nursing

PO Box 8, Wye Mills, MD 21679. Nursing. Founded 1907. Contact: Judith Stetson, Director, (410)827-5917, Fax: (410)770-3764. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $7,064 Nursing only; $8,329 under 27 college credits. Enrollment: Total 100. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Nursing, R.N. (3 Yr)

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Maryland

Maryland

1 Location and Size

2 Topography

3 Climate

4 Plants and Animals

5 Environmental Protection

6 Population

7 Ethnic Groups

8 Languages

9 Religions

10 Transportation

11 History

12 State Government

13 Political Parties

14 Local Government

15 Judicial System

16 Migration

17 Economy

18 Income

19 Industry

20 Labor

21 Agriculture

22 Domesticated Animals

23 Fishing

24 Forestry

25 Mining

26 Energy and Power

27 Commerce

28 Public Finance

29 Taxation

30 Health

31 Housing

32 Education

33 Arts

34 Libraries and Museums

35 Communications

36 Press

37 Tourism, Travel & Recreation

38 Sports

39 Famous Marylanders

40 Bibliography

State of Maryland

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Named for Henrietta Maria, queen consort of King Charles I of England.

NICKNAME : The Old Line State and the Free State.

CAPITAL: Annapolis.

ENTERED UNION: 28 April 1788 (7th).

OFFICIAL SEAL: reverse: A shield bearing the arms of the Calverts and Crosslands is surmounted by an earl’s coronet and a helmet and supported by a farmer and fisherman. The state motto (originally that of the Calverts) appears on a scroll below. The circle is surrounded by the Latin legend Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ; coronasti nos, meaning “With the shield of thy favor hast thou compassed us”; and “1632,” the date of Maryland’s first charter. obverse: Lord Baltimore is seen as a knight in armor on a charger. The surrounding inscription, in Latin, means “Cecilius, Absolute Lord of Maryland and Avalon New Foundland, Baron of Baltimore.”

FLAG: Bears the quartered arms of the Calvert and Crossland families (the paternal and maternal families of the founders of Maryland).

MOTTO: Fatti maschii, parole femine (Manly deeds, womanly words).

SONG: “Maryland, My Maryland.”

FLOWER: Black-eyed Susan.

TREE: White oak.

CRUSTACEAN: Blue crab.

BIRD: Baltimore oriole.

FISH: Rockfish.

INSECT: Baltimore checkerspot butterfly.

REPTILE: Diamondback terrapin.

DOG: Chesapeake Bay retriever.

BEVERAGE: Milk.

SPORT: Jousting.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year’s Day, 1 January; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Presidents’ day, 3rd Monday in February; Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Columbus Day, 12 October; Veterans’ Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving Day, 4th Thursday in November plus one day; Christmas Day, 25 December.

TIME: 7 AM EST = noon GMT.

1 Location and Size

Located on the eastern seaboard of the United States in the South Atlantic region, Maryland ranks 42nd in size among the 50 states. The state’s total area is 10,460 square miles (27,092 square kilometers), including 9,837 square miles (25,478 square kilometers) of land and 623 square miles (1,614 square kilometers) of inland water. The state extends 199 miles (320 kilometers) east-west and 126 miles (203 kilometers) north-south. The total boundary length of Maryland is 842 miles (1,355 kilometers), including a coastline of 31 miles (50 kilometers). Important islands in Chesapeake Bay, off Maryland’s Eastern Shore (part of the Delmarva Peninsula), include Kent, Bloodsworth, South Marsh, and Smith.

2 Topography

Three distinct regions characterize Maryland’s terrain. The first and major area is the coastal plain, which is divided by the Chesapeake Bay into Eastern and Western shores. The Piedmont Plateau to the west is a broad, rolling upland with several deep gorges. Farther west is the Appalachian Mountain region, containing the state’s highest hills. Backbone Mountain in westernmost Maryland is the state’s highest point, at 3,360 feet (1,024 meters).

A few small islands lie in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland’s dominant waterway. Principal rivers include the Potomac, the Patapsco, the Patuxent, and the Susquehanna. The state has 23 rivers and other bays, as well as many lakes and creeks, none of any great size.

3 Climate

Despite its small size, Maryland has a diverse climate. Temperatures vary from an annual average of 48°f (9°c) in the extreme western uplands to 59°f (15°c) in the southeast, where the climate is moderated by Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. The mean temperature for Baltimore ranges from 33°f (1°c) in January to 78°f (25°c)

Maryland Population Profile

Total population estimate in 2006:5,615,727
Population change, 2000–06:6.0%
Hispanic or Latino†:5.8%
Population by race
One race:98.3%
White:61.5%
Black or African American:28.7%
American Indian /Alaska Native:0.3%
Asian:4.7%
Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander:0.0%
Some other race:3.1%
Two or more races:1.7%

Population by Age Group

Major Cities by Population
City Population % change 2000–05
Notes: †A person of Hispanic or Latino origin may be of any race. NA indicates that data are not available.
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey and Population Estimates. www.census.gov/ (accessed March 2007).
Baltimore635,815-2.4
Frederick57,9079.7
Gaithersburg57,6989.7
Rockville57,40221.1
Bowie53,8787.2
Hagerstown38,3264.5
Annapolis36,3001.3
Salisbury26,29510.7
College Park25,1712.1
Greenbelt22,2423.7

in July. The record high temperature for the state is 109°f (43°c), set on 10 July 1936 in Cumberland and Frederick counties. The record low is -40°f (–40°c), set on 13 January 1912 at Oakland.

Annual precipitation averages 49 inches (124 centimeters) in the southeast, but only 36 inches (91 centimeters) in the Cumberland areas west of the Appalachians. As much as 100 inches (254 centimeters) of snow falls in western Garrett County, while 8–10 inches (20–25 centimeters) is the average annual snowfall for the Eastern Shore.

4 Plants and Animals

Maryland’s three life zones (coastal plain, piedmont, and Appalachian) mingle wildlife characteristics of both the North and South. Most of the state lies within a hardwood belt in which red and white oaks, yellow poplar, and beech are represented. Shortleaf and loblolly pines are the leading softwoods. Honeysuckle, Virginia creeper, and wild raspberry are also common. Wooded hillsides are rich with such wildflowers as trailing arbutus, early blue violet, and wild rose. Seven plant species were listed as threatened or endangered in 2006, including Canby’s dropwort, sandplain gerardia, northeastern bulrush, and harperella.

The white-tailed (Virginia) deer, eastern cottontail, and raccoon, among others, are native to Maryland, although urbanization has sharply reduced their habitat. Common small mammals are the woodchuck, eastern chipmunk, and gray squirrel. Birds include the cardinal, chestnut-sided warbler, and rose-breasted grosbeak. Among saltwater species, shellfish—especially oysters, clams, and crabs—have the greatest economic importance. As of 2006, 18 Maryland animal species were listed as threatened or endangered, including the Indiana bat, Maryland darter, bald eagle, Delmarva Peninsula fox squirrel, three species of whale, and five species of turtle.

5 Environmental Protection

The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) serves as the state’s primary environmental protection agency. MDE has broad regulatory, planning, and management responsibility for water quality, air quality, solid and hazardous waste management. MDE also plays a pivotal role in Maryland’s initiatives to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay.

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is responsible for the management, enhancement, and preservation of the state’s living and natural resources. Utilizing an ecosystem approach to land, waterway, and species management, DNR programs and services support the health of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries, sustainable populations of fishery and wildlife species, and an integrated network of public lands and open space. The Maryland Environmental Service, a quasi-public agency, contracts with local governments to design, construct, finance, and operate wastewater treatment plants, water supply systems, and recycling facilities.

In 2003, Maryland had 168 hazardous waste sites listed in the Environmental Protection Agency’s database, 17 of which were on the National Priorities List as of 2006.

Maryland Population by Race

Census 2000 was the first national census in which the instructions to respondents said, “Mark one or more races.” This table shows the number of people who are of one, two, or three or more races. For those claiming two races, the number of people belonging to the various categories is listed. The U.S. government conducts a census of the population every ten years.

 Number Percent
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Census 2000: Redistricting Data. Press release issued by the Redistricting Data Office. Washington, D.C., March, 2001. A dash (—) indicates that the percent is less than 0.1.
Total population5,296,486100.0
One race5,192,89998.0
Two races95,2621.8
White and Black or African American19,2700.4
White and American Indian/Alaska Native10,3880.2
White and Asian15,6600.3
White and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander793
White and some other race20,8120.4
Black or African American and American Indian/Alaska Native6,4880.1
Black or African American and Asian3,3300.1
Black or African American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander840
Black or African American and some other race10,9200.2
American Indian/Alaska Native and Asian855
American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander70
American Indian/Alaska Native and some other race796
Asian and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander930
Asian and some other race3,8270.1
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and some other race283
Three or more races8,3250.2

6 Population

In 2005, Maryland ranked 19th in population in the United States with an estimated total of 5,615,727 residents. It is projected that the population will reach 6.2 million by 2015 and 6.7 million by 2025. The population density in 2004 was 572.3 persons per square mile (220.9 persons per square kilometer), the fifth highest among the states. The median age in 2004 was 36.8. In 2005, about 11% of all residents were 65 or older while 26% were 18 or younger.

Baltimore is the state’s only major city, with a 2005 estimated population of 635,815. The next-largest city is Frederick, with a 2005 population of 57,907.

7 Ethnic Groups

According to the 2000 census, the largest racial minority in the state was the black Americans, with about 1,477,411 residents. Nearly one-third of all black Marylanders lived in the city of Baltimore. Hispanics and Latinos, mostly from Puerto Rico and Central America, numbered 227,000. The total Asian population was estimated at 210,929 and included 39,155 Koreans, 49,400 Chinese, 26,608 Filipinos, 6,620 Japanese, and 16,744 Vietnamese. Pacific Islanders numbered 2,303.

Foreign-born residents numbered 518,315, representing about 9.8% of the total population. Native Americans, including Eskimos and Aleuts, were estimated at 15,423.

8 Languages

The state’s diverse terrain has contributed to unusual diversity in its basic speech. Proximity to Virginia and access to southeastern and central Pennsylvania helped to create a language mixture that now is dominantly Midland and yet reflects earlier ties to Southern English. Regional features occur as well. Special terms in the northeast are pavement (sidewalk) and baby coach (baby carriage). In the north and west are poke (bag) and sick on the stomach. In the southern portion are found light bread (white bread) and curtain (shade). East of Chesapeake Bay are mosquito hawks (dragonflies) and paled fences (picket fences).

In 2000, 4,322,329 residents, or 87% of the population five years old or older, spoke only English at home. Other languages spoken at home, with the number of speakers, included Spanish, 230,829; French, 42,838; Chinese, 41,883; and Korean, 32,937.

9 Religions

Maryland was founded as a haven for Roman Catholics; but in 1692, Anglicanism (now the Episcopal Church) became the official religion of the colony. The state constitution of 1776, however, placed all Christian faiths on an equal footing.

As of 2000, there were 952,389 Roman Catholics in Maryland. Adherents of the major Protestant denominations (with 2000 data) included United Methodists, 297,729; Southern Baptists, 142,401; Evangelical Lutherans, 103,644; and Episcopalians, 81,061. In 2000, there were an estimated 216,000 Jews and about 52,867 Muslims. The same year, there were about 32 Buddhist congregations and 26 Hindu congregations. Over 3 million people (about 56.7% of the population) were not counted as members of any religious organization.

10 Transportation

Maryland’s first railroad, the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O), was started in 1828. In 1835, it provided the first passenger train service to Washington, DC, and Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia). By 1857, the line was extended to St. Louis and its freight capacity helped build Baltimore into a major center of commerce.

Today CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern are the Class I railroads operating in the state, along with one regional, five Local, and two switching and terminal railroads. As of 2003, total rail miles in Maryland amounted to 1,153 miles (1,856 kilometers). The Maryland Transportation Department’s Railroad Administration subsidizes four commuter lines in western Maryland and on the Eastern Shore. As of 2006, Amtrak operated six stations.

The Maryland Mass Transit Administration inaugurated Baltimore’s first subway line on 21 November 1983. In 1984, the Washington, DC, mass transit system was extended to the Maryland suburbs, including Bethesda and Rockville.

As of 2004, there were 30,809 miles (49,602 kilometers) of public roadway. The major toll road is the John F. Kennedy Memorial Highway (I-95), linking Baltimore with Wilmington, Delaware, and the New Jersey Turnpike. There were 3,594,251 licensed drivers and some

4,150,000 motor vehicles registered in Maryland in 2004.

The Delaware and Chesapeake Canal, linking Chesapeake Bay and the Delaware River, opened in 1829. In 2006, the major port was at Baltimore. There are 145 airports in Maryland. The Department of Transportation operates Baltimore-Washington International (BWI) Airport, the major air terminal in the state, which also serves the Washington, DC, area. Another 76 airfields (69 heliports, 1 STOLport—Short Take-Off and Landing, and 6 seaplane bases) also served the state in 2005.

11 History

The Indian tribes living in the region that was to become Maryland were Algonkian-speakers, including the Accomac, Susquehannock, and Piscataway. Although the Algonkian tribes hunted for much of their food, many (including the Susquehannock) also had permanent settlements where they cultivated corn (maize) and other crops. European penetration of the Chesapeake region began early in the 16th century, with the expeditions of Giovanni da Verrazano of Florence and the Spaniard Lucas Vázquez de Ayllón. Captain John Smith was the first English explorer of Chesapeake Bay (1608) and produced a map of the area that was used for years.

Twenty years later, George Calvert received from King Charles I a land grant that embraced not only present-day Maryland but also the present State of Delaware, a large part of Pennsylvania, and the valley between the north

and south branches of the Potomac River. When he died in 1632, the title passed to his son, Cecilius Calvert, Second Baron Baltimore, who named the region Maryland after Charles I’s queen, Henrietta Maria. Calvert established the first settlement two years later as a refuge for persecuted Roman Catholics.

In 1689, with Protestants in power both in England and Maryland, the British crown took control of the province away from the Catholic Calverts, and in 1692, the Church of England became Maryland’s established religion. The Fourth Baron Baltimore regained full hereditary rights—but only because he had embraced the Protestant faith. Rule by the Calvert family through their legitimate heirs continued until the eve of the American Revolution.

Statehood After some initial hesitancy, Maryland cast its lot with the Revolution and sent approximately 20,000 soldiers to fight in the war. On 28 April 1788, it became the seventh state to ratify the federal Constitution. By the early 19th century, Baltimore, founded in 1729, was already the state’s major center of commerce and industry. The city and harbor were the site of extended military operations during the War of 1812. It was during the bombardment of Ft. McHenry in 1814 that Francis Scott Key, detained on the British frigate, composed “The Star-Spangled Banner,” which became the US national anthem in March 1931.

After the War of 1812, Maryland history was marked by the continued growth of Baltimore and increasing division over immigration, slavery, and secession, which the Maryland house of delegates rejected in 1861. Throughout the Civil War, Maryland was largely occupied by Union troops because of its strategic location. Marylanders fought on both sides during the war, and one major battle took place on Maryland soil—the Battle of Antietam (1862), during which a Union army thwarted a Confederate thrust toward the north, but at an enormous cost to both sides.

The state’s economic activity increased during Reconstruction, as Maryland, and especially Baltimore, played a major role in rebuilding the South. Maryland’s economic base gradually shifted from agriculture to industry, with shipbuilding, steelmaking, and the manufacture of clothing and shoes leading the way. The decades between the Civil War and World War I were also notable for the philanthropic activities of such wealthy businessmen as Johns Hopkins and George Peabody, who endowed some of the state’s most prestigious cultural and educational institutions. Democrat Albert C. Ritchie won election to the governorship in 1919 and served in that office until 1935, stressing local issues, states’ rights, and opposition to prohibition.

Post-War Period The decades since World War II have been marked by significant population growth. The state has witnessed the passage of open housing and equal opportunity laws to protect Maryland’s black citizens. It has also been rocked by political scandal. Perhaps the most significant occurrence was the redevelopment of Baltimore, which, though still the hub of the state’s economy, had fallen into decay. Much of Baltimore’s downtown area and harbor were revitalized by urban renewal projects in the late 1970s and 1980s. Although Maryland’s economy declined less than those of other states during the recession of the late 1980s and early 1990s, the state suffered from reductions in the defense and technology industries.

Nevertheless, service industry employment, primarily in the Baltimore-Washington, DC corridor, gave Maryland the fifth-highest state income in the country as of the mid-1990s. Federal government and high-tech employment accounted for many of these jobs. As of 2004, Maryland had the third-highest median household income among the states. Maryland had the sixth-lowest poverty rate in the nation in 2004.

Maryland’s 370-year history of tobacco farming appeared to be drawing to a close in 2000. The crop that had settled the Chesapeake had become risky, with the tobacco industry under attack for the health hazards of its products. The state had by 2003 implemented a tobacco buyout program, whereby the state agreed to pay farmers $1 per pound of tobacco that they would sell for the following 10 years. Farmers agreed to plant alternative crops instead of tobacco.

The environmental cleanup of Chesapeake Bay, begun in the mid-1980s, continued into the 21st century. The Bay was threatened by an April 2000 oil spill into the Patuxent River, which flows into the Chesapeake. The cleanup continued into the mid-2000s.

12 State Government

The general assembly, Maryland’s legislative body, consists of two branches: a 47-member senate and a 141-member house of delegates. All legislators serve four-year terms. Executives elected statewide are the governor and lieutenant governor (who run jointly), the comptroller of

Maryland Governors: 1775–2007

Democratic Republican – Dem-Rep
Union Democrat – Union-Dem
Union Republican – Union-Rep
1775–1777Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer 
1777–1779Thomas Johnson 
1779–1782Thomas S. Lee 
1782–1785William Paca 
1785–1788William Smallwood 
1788–1791John Eager HowardFederalist
1791–1792George PlaterFederalist
1792James BriceFederalist
1792–1794Thomas Sim LeeFederalist
1794–1797John Hoskins StoneFederalist
1797–1798John HenryFederalist
1798–1801Benjamin OgleFederalist
1801–1803John Francis MercerDem-Rep
1803–1806Robert BowieDem-Rep
1806–1809Robert WrightDem-Rep
1809James ButcherDem-Rep
1809–1811Edward LloydDem-Rep
1811–1812Robert BowieDem-Rep
1812–1816Levin WinderFederalist
1816–1819Charles Carnan RidgelyFederalist
1819Charles GoldsboroughFederalist
1819–1922Samuel SpriggDem-Rep
1822–1826Samuel Stevens, Jr.Dem-Rep
1826–1829Joseph KentDem-Rep
1829–1830Daniel MartinAnti–Jacksonian
1830–1831Thomas King CarrollJacksonian
1831Daniel MartinAnti–Jacksonian
1831–1833George HowardAnti–Jacksonian
1833–1836James ThomasAnti–Jacksonian
1836–1839Thomas Ward VeazeyWhig
1839–1842William GrasonDemocrat
1842–1845Francis ThomasDemocrat
1845–1848Thomas George PrattWhig
1848–1851Philip Francis ThomasDemocrat
1851–1854Enoch Louis LoweDemocrat
1854–1858Thomas Watkins LigonDemocrat
1858–1862Thomas Holliday HicksAmerican
1862–1866Augustus Williamson BradfordUnion-Rep
1866–1869Thomas SwannUnion-Dem
1869–1872Oden BowieDemocrat
1872–1874William Pinkney WhyteDemocrat
1874–1876James Black GroomeDemocrat
1876–1880John Lee CarrollDemocrat
1880–1884William Thomas HamiltonDemocrat
1884–1885Robert Milligan McLaneDemocrat
1885–1888Henry LloydDemocrat
1888–1892Elihu Emory JacksonDemocrat
1892–1896Frank BrownDemocrat
1896–1900Lloyd Lowndes, Jr.Republican
1900–1904John Walter SmithDemocrat
1904–1908Edwin WarfieldDemocrat
1908–1912Austin Lane CrothersDemocrat
1912–1916Phillips Lee GoldsboroughRepublican
1916–1920Emerson Columbus HarringtonDemocrat
1920–1935Albert Cabell RitchieDemocrat
1935–1939Harry Whinna NiceRepublican
1939–1947Herbert Romulus O’ConorDemocrat
1947–1951William Preston Lane, Jr.Democrat
1951–1959Theodore Roosevelt McKeldinRepublican
1959–1967John Millard TawesDemocrat
1967–1969Spiro Theodore AgnewRepublican
1969–1977Marvin MandelDemocrat
1977–1979Lee Blair IIIDemocrat
1979Marvin MandelDemocrat
1979–1987Harry R. HughesDemocrat
1987–1995William Donald SchaeferDemocrat
1995–2002Parris N. GlendeningDemocrat
2002–2006Robert EhrlichRepublican
2006–Martin O’MalleyDemocrat

the Treasury, and the attorney general. All serve four-year terms.

Bills passed by majority vote of both houses of the assembly become law when signed by the governor, or if left unsigned for six days while the legislature is in session or for 30 days if the legislature has adjourned. The only exception is the budget bill, which becomes effective immediately upon legislative passage. The governor’s vetoes may be overridden by three-fifths votes in both houses.

The governor’s salary as of December 2004 was $135,000 and the legislative salary was $31,509.

13 Political Parties

In 2004 there were 3,105,000 registered voters. In 1998, 58% of registered voters were Democratic,

Maryland Presidential Vote by Political Parties, 1948–2004

YEAR MARYLAND WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN PROGRESSIVE DEMOCRAT STATE’S RIGHTS SOCIALIST
* Won US presidential election.
1948Dewey (R)286,521294,8149,9832,4672,941
1952*Eisenhower (R)395,337499,4247,313
1956*Eisenhower (R)372,613559,738
1960*Kennedy (D)565,808489,538
1964*Johnson (D)730,912385,495
    AMERICAN IND.   
1968Humphrey (D)538,310517,995178,734
    AMERICAN   
1972*Nixon (R)505,781829,30518,726
1976*Carter (D)759,612672,661
     LIBERTARIAN  
1980Carter (D)726,161680,60614,192
1984*Reagan (R)787,935879,9185,721
1988*Bush (R)826,304876,1675,1156,748
      IND. (PEROT)
1992*Clinton (D)988,571707,0942,7864,715281,414
1996*Clinton (D)966,207681,5308,765115,812
     LIBERTARIAN REFORM
2000Gore (D)1,144,088813,82753,7685,3104,248
2004Kerry (D)1,334,4931,024,7036,094

20% Republican, and 12% unaffiliated or members of other parties. Maryland was one of the few states carried by President Jimmy Carter in the November 1980 presidential election, but four years later the state went for President Ronald Reagan in the national Republican landslide. In 2000, Maryland gave 57% of its vote to Democrat Al Gore and 40% to Republican George W. Bush. In 2004, Democratic challenger John Kerry won 55.7% of the vote to incumbent President Bush’s 44.6%.

Revelations of corruption afflicted both major parties during the 1970s. In 1973, Republican Spiro T. Agnew, then vice president of the United States, was accused of taking bribes while he was Baltimore County executive and then governor. Agnew resigned from the vice-presidency on 10 October 1973. His gubernatorial successor, Democrat Marvin Mandel, was convicted of mail fraud and racketeering in 1977. He served 20 months of a 36-month prison sentence before receiving a presidential pardon in 1981.

In 1994, the governor’s race was one of the closest in Maryland history. Democrat Parris N. Glendening, three-term Prince George’s county executive, defeated Ellen R. Sauerbrey, Republican leader of the Maryland House, by a mere 5,993 votes. Glendening was reelected by a comfortable margin in 1998. Republican Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was elected in 2002. Ehrlich was defeated by Democrat Martin O’Malley in 2006. Democrat Barbara Mikulski was reelected US senator in 2004, and Democrat Ben Cardin was elected senator in 2006, replacing the seat formerly held by Paul Sarbanes, who decided not to run for a sixth term. His son, John Sarbanes, won the seat for Maryland’s third congressional district in 2006, the district that Paul Sarbanes represented prior to his election as senator.

As of the November 2006 elections, Maryland’s congressional delegation consisted of six Democrats and two Republicans. Following the 2006 elections, there were 33 Democrats and 14 Republicans in the state senate, and 106 Democrats and 35 Republicans in the state house. Sixty-seven women were elected to the state legislature in 2006, or 35.6%, the highest percentage in the nation.

14 Local Government

As of 2005 there were 24 counties and 157 municipal governments in Maryland. Most counties had charter governments, with (in most cases) elected executives and county councils, and other rural counties had elected boards of county commissioners.

Baltimore is the only city in Maryland not contained within a county. It provides the same services as a county, and shares in state aid according to the same allocation formulas. The city (not to be confused with Baltimore County, which surrounds the city of Baltimore but has its county seat at Towson) is governed by a mayor and city council. Other cities and towns are each governed by a mayor and a council, town commissioners, or council and a manager, depending on the local charter. In 2005, Maryland had 25 public school systems.

15 Judicial System

The court of appeals, the state’s highest court, comprises a chief judge and six associate judges. Most criminal appeals are decided by the court of special appeals, consisting of a chief judge and 12 associate judges. District courts handle all criminal, civil, and traffic cases. Appeals are taken to one of eight judicial circuit courts. According to the FBI Crime Index for 2004, Maryland had a violent crime rate (murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault) of 700.5 reported incidents per 100,000 population (third highest in the nation). Crimes against property (burglary, larceny/theft, and motor vehicle theft) totaled 3,640.2 reported incidents per 100,000 people. There were 23,285 prisoners in state and federal prisons as of 31 December 2004. Maryland has a death penalty, with eight persons being held under the sentence of death as of 1 January 2006.

16 Migration

During the 19th century, Baltimore ranked second only to New York as a port of entry for European immigrants. First to come were the Germans, followed by the Irish, Poles, East European Jews, and Italians. A significant number of Czechs settled in Cecil County during the 1860s. After the Civil War, many blacks migrated to Baltimore, both from rural Maryland and from southern states.

Since World War II, both the Baltimore metropolitan area and the Maryland part of the metropolitan Washington, DC, area have experienced rapid growth while the inner cities have lost population. Between 1990 and 1998, Maryland had a net loss of 49,000 in domestic migration and a net gain of 118,000 in international migration. In the period 2000–05, net international migration was 108,972 and net internal migration was 9,752, for a net gain of 118,724 people.

17 Economy

Although manufacturing output continues to rise, the biggest growth areas in Maryland’s economy are government, construction, trade, and services. Maryland employees are the best educated in the nation, with more than one-third of those over age 25 possessing a bachelor’s degree in 2000. Manufacturing has shifted towards high technology, information, and health-related products. With the expansion of federal employment in the Washington metropolitan area during the 1960s and 1970s, many US government workers settled in suburban Maryland, primarily Prince George’s and Montgomery counties. Construction and services in those areas expanded accordingly. Between 1982 and 1992, the number of jobs grew 24% in Maryland, somewhat above the national average of 21% for that period. However, from 1992 to 2000, Maryland lost 17% of its federal employment in Washington, DC.

Fishing and agriculture (primarily dairy and poultry farming) on the Eastern Shore and coal mining in Garrett and Allegheny counties are also important areas of the economy. Although manufacturing output grew from 1997 to 2001, its share of gross state product declined. In contrast, services and wholesale and retail trade grew as a percentage of gross state product (GSP).

As of 2004, real estate accounted for the largest portion of GSP at 15.2%, followed by professional and technical services (9.9%), and health and social services (7.3%). The GSP that year was $227.9 billion.

18 Income

In 2005, Maryland had a gross state product (GSP) of $245 billion, the 15th highest nationwide. In 2004, Maryland had a per capita (per person) income of $39,631, fifth highest in the nation. The three-year average median household income for 2002–04 was $56,763, compared to the national average of $44,473. During the same period, an estimated 8.6% of the state’s residents lived below the federal poverty level, compared with 12.4% among the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

19 Industry

Baltimore is an important manufacturer of automobiles and parts, steel, and instruments. Manufacturing is led by the printing and publishing industry, the food industry, the machinery industry, and the chemical industry. Value of shipments by manufacturers in 2004 was $36.48 billion. About one-third of all manufacturing activity takes place in the city of Baltimore, followed by Baltimore County, Montgomery County, and Prince George’s County. Maryland is the headquarters of Lockheed Martin (aerospace), Marriott International (hospitality), Black and Decker (tools), and Giant Food.

20 Labor

As of April 2006, the civilian labor force in Maryland numbered 2,997,700, with approximately 105,700 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 3.5%, compared to the national average of 4.7% for the same period. In 2006, 7.3% of the labor force was employed in construction; 5.3% in manufacturing; 18.4% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 6.2% in financial activities; 15% in business and professional services; 14% in education and health services; 9% in leisure and hospitality services; and 18.2% in government.

The Baltimore Federation of Labor was formed in 1889 and by 1900, the coal mines had been organized by the United Mine Workers. In 1902, Maryland passed the first workers’ compensation law in the United States. It was declared unconstitutional in 1904 but was subsequently revived.

In 2005, some 337,000 of Maryland’s 2,530,000 employed wage and salary workers were members of unions. This represented 13.3% of those so employed. The national average was 12%.

21 Agriculture

Maryland ranked 36th among the 50 states in agricultural income in 2005, with estimated receipts of $1.66 billion, about 41% of that in crops. In 2004, the state had about 12,100 farms covering 2,050,000 acres (830,000 hectares).

Until the Revolutionary War, tobacco was the state’s only cash crop. In 2004, Maryland produced an estimated 1.87 million pounds (848,218 kilograms) of tobacco. Corn and cereal grains are grown mainly in southern Maryland. Main crops include soybeans, wheat, and barley. Commercial vegetables, cultivated primarily on the Eastern Shore, were valued at $36.6 million in 2004. Fruits are also cultivated.

22 Domesticated Animals

The Eastern Shore is an important dairy and poultry region. Cattle are raised in north-central and western Maryland, while the central region is notable for horse breeding. In 2003, poultry farmers produced an estimated 6.4 million pounds (2.9 million kilograms) of chickens and 1.37 billion pounds (0.63 billion kilograms) of broilers for around $494.7 million. Also in 2003, Maryland farmers produced an estimated 813 million eggs worth around $46.2 million.

An estimated 1.2 billion pounds (0.6 billion kilograms) of milk was produced in 2003 from 78,000 dairy cows. Maryland farms and ranches had an estimated 235,000 cattle and calves worth around $237 million in 2005. In 2004, there were an estimated 26,000 hogs and pigs, worth $2.6 million.

23 Fishing

In 2004, Maryland had a total commercial catch of 49.5 million pounds (22.5 million kilograms), valued at $49.2 million. Maryland is a leading source of oysters, clams, and crabs. About 19% of the nation’s supply of hard blue crabs comes from Maryland. Ocean City is the state’s leading fishing port.

In 2003, the state had 17 processing and 58 wholesale plants with a total of about 1,417 employees. In 2001, the commercial fleet had at least 32 vessels.

The Fisheries Administration of the Department of Natural Resources monitors fish populations and breeds and implants oysters. It also stocks inland waterways with finfish. The state has five cold water and four warm water hatcheries. Maryland had 362,181 licensed sport anglers in 2004.

24 Forestry

Maryland’s 2,566,000 acres (1,139,000 hectares) of forestland covers about 40% of the state’s land area. More than 90% of that (2,372,000 acres/961,570 hectares) was classified as commercial forest and 90% of it was privately owned. Hardwoods predominate, with red and white oaks and yellow poplar among the leading hardwood varieties. Lumber production in 2004 was 272 million board feet.

Forest management and improvement lie within the jurisdiction of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Forest Service.

25 Mining

The estimated value of nonfuel mineral production in Maryland in 2003 was $382 million. Maryland ranked 33rd among the states in national nonfuel mineral production value. Crushed stone, cement (portland and masonry), and crushed sand and gravel together accounted for over 95% of the state’s total nonfuel mineral value.

According to preliminary figures in 2003, portland cement was the leading nonfuel mineral commodity, totaling 1.9 million tons (valued at $143 million), followed by crushed stone (output 21.8 million metric tons, valued at $138 million), and construction sand and gravel (11.4 million metric tons, $78.1 million). Maryland also produces significant quantities of dimension stone.

26 Energy and Power

In 2003, Maryland’s installed electrical capacity (utility and nonutility) was 12.47 million kilowatts. Production of electricity exceeded 52.24 billion kilowatt hours in the same year. More than 99% of the generating capacity was privately owned and about 57.3% of the state’s electricity was produced by coal-fired plants. Maryland has one nuclear power generating facility, the Calvert Cliffs nuclear plant in Lusby. In 2003 it produced about 18.9% of the state’s electricity. In 2000, Maryland’s total per capita energy consumption was 287 million Btu (72.3 million kilocalories), ranking it 40th among the 50 states.

Coal, Maryland’s lone fossil fuel resource, is mined in Allegheny and Garrett counties, along the Pennsylvania border. Recoverable coal reserves in 2001 were estimated at 17 million tons. The 2004 output of 19 coal mines totaled 5.2 million tons. Marketed production of natural gas totaled 48 million cubic feet (1.36 million cubic meters) in 2003.

27 Commerce

Maryland had 2002 wholesale sales of $60.6 billion; retail sales totaled $60.0 billion. Most of the state’s retail facilities are located in the Baltimore metropolitan area and Montgomery and Prince George’s counties surrounding Washington, DC. Foreign exports of Maryland products totaled $7.1 billion in 2005. While most exports still go to such markets as Canada and Europe, strong inroads have been made in targeted trade areas of Latin America and Asia.

28 Public Finance

The state budget is prepared by the Department of Budget and Management and is submitted annually by the governor to the general assembly for amendment and approval. The fiscal year runs from 1 July to 30 June.

The estimated revenues for the fiscal year 2004 were $28.39 billion and expenditures were $25.34 billion. The largest general expenditures were for education ($7.36 billion), public welfare ($5.49 billion), and highways ($1.65 billion). The outstanding state debt exceeded $13.6 billion, or $2,445.74 per capita (per person).

29 Taxation

As of 1 January 2006, individual income taxes in Maryland ranged from 2% to 4.75% on a four-bracket schedule. The corporate income tax rate was 7%. The state general sales and use tax was 5% with exemptions for food and other basic items. No local sales taxes are permitted. The state also imposes a full array of excise taxes covering motor fuels, tobacco products, insurance premiums, public utilities, alcoholic beverages, amusements, pari-mutuels, and other selected items. Maryland has enacted its own estate tax at a maximum rate of 10%. Other state taxes include property taxes including a motor vehicle use tax, various license and franchise fees, and stamp taxes.

All county and some local governments levy property taxes. The counties also tax personal income. Local income tax rates have a cap of 3.1%. In 2002, localities collected 43.6% of total state and local taxes.

The state collected $13.49 billion in taxes in 2005, of which 41.9% came from individual income taxes, 21.4% from the general sales tax, 17.7% from selective sales taxes, 6% from corporate income taxes, 3.9% from property taxes, and 9% from other taxes. In 2005, Maryland ranked 14th among the states in terms of state and local tax burden.

As of October 2005, the infant mortality rate was 8.2 per 1,000 live births. The overall death rate was 8.1per 1,000 population in 2003. The leading causes of death were heart disease, cancer, and cerebrovascular diseases. Death from diabetes mellitus and HIV were higher than the national rates in 2000. The death rate from HIV infection was 11.2 per 100,000 people, the second-highest rate in the country, after the District of Columbia. In 2004, the reported AIDS case rate was about 26.1 per 100,000 people, the fourth-highest rate in the nation. Among persons ages 18 and older, 19.5% were smokers in 2004.

Maryland’s 51 community hospitals had about 11,600 beds in 2003. The average expense for community hospital care was $1,571 per inpatient day in 2003. There were 389 doctors per 100,000 people in 2004, and 875 nurses per 100,000 in 2005. The state had 4,169 dentists in 2004. In 2004, approximately 14% of the population was uninsured.

Maryland’s two medical schools are at Johns Hopkins University, which operates in connection with the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and at the University of Maryland, both located in Baltimore. Federal health centers located in Bethesda include the National Institutes of Health and the National Naval Medical Center.

31 Housing

Maryland has sought to preserve many of its historic houses, especially in Annapolis, which has several ornate mansions. Block upon block of two-story brick row houses fill the older parts of Baltimore, and stone cottages built to withstand rough winters are still found in the western counties.

There were an estimated 2,250,339 housing units in Maryland in 2004, of which 2,077,900 were occupied; 69.5% were owner-occupied. About 51.9% of all units are single-family, detached homes. Most units rely on utility gas and electricity for heating. It was estimated that 61,901 units lacked telephone service, 6,034 lacked complete plumbing facilities, and 5,885 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household size was 2.61 people.

In 2004, 27,400 privately owned units were authorized for construction. The median home value was $216,529. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $1,406. Renters paid a median of $837 per month.

32 Education

As of 2004, 87.4% of all Marylanders had completed high school and 35.2% had at least four years of college, far surpassing the national average of 26%. Maryland students must pass state competency exams in order to graduate from high school.

Total public school enrollment was estimated at 867,000 in fall 2002 and is expected to drop to 858,000 by fall 2014. Enrollment in nonpublic schools in fall 2003 was 149,253. Expenditures for public education in 2003/04 were estimated at $8.7 billion.

As of fall 2002, there were 300,269 students enrolled in college or graduate school. In the same year. Maryland had 63 degree-granting institutions in 2005. The state’s public four-year institutions include the University of Maryland System, Morgan State University, and St. Mary’s College of Maryland. The 16 community colleges are two-year, open-admission institutions with courses and programs leading to certificates and associate degrees, as well as career-oriented and continuing education/community service programs. The state provides funding to independent colleges and universities in Maryland under a statutory formula.

St. John’s College in Annapolis is known for its unique program that includes study of the ancient Greek and Latin classics in their original languages. The US Naval Academy is also in Annapolis.

Private career schools in Maryland provide job preparatory training for students in a wide variety of fields, including business, computers, travel, truck driving, mechanics, electronics, allied health, cosmetology, and barbering.

33 Arts

Although close to the arts centers of Washington, DC, Maryland has its own cultural attractions. Center Stage in Baltimore is the designated state theater of Maryland and the Olney Theatre in Montgomery County is the official state summer theater.

The state’s leading orchestra is the Baltimore Symphony. Baltimore is also the home of the Baltimore Opera Company and its jazz clubs were the launching pads for such musical notables as Eubie Blake, Ella Fitzgerald, and Cab Calloway. Annapolis hosts a symphony, an opera

company, and the Ballet Theatre of Maryland. The National Ballet (est. 1948) is the oldest professional ballet company in the state. One of the newest additions to the arts community is the Maryland Symphony Orchestra in Hagerstown, established in 1982. The Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore is one of the nation’s most distinguished music schools. Both the Maryland Ballet Company and Maryland Dance Theater are nationally known.

The Maryland State Arts Council was established in 1967. The Maryland Humanities Council (MHC) was founded in 1973. Ongoing programs of the MHC include Family Matters, a family-oriented reading and discussion group, and History Matters!, which promotes heritage tourism. The state makes arts education available to nearly 170,000 schoolchildren. There are about 1,000 state and 25 local arts associations in Maryland.

34 Libraries and Museums

In 2001, Maryland had 24 public library systems and 175 libraries, of which 158 were branches. The system also had 19 bookmobiles and over 15.3 million volumes and a combined circulation of over 46.59 million. The center of the state library network is the Enoch Pratt Free Library in the city of Baltimore, founded in 1886. Each county also has its own library system. The largest academic libraries are those of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and the University of Maryland at College Park. Maryland is also the site of several federal libraries, including the National Agricultural Library, the National Library of Medicine, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Library.

Of the approximately 147 museums and historic sites in the state, major institutions include the US Naval Academy Museum in Annapolis and Baltimore’s Museum of Art and Maritime Museum. The latter’s Peale Museum is the oldest museum building in the United States. Important historic sites include Ft. McHenry National Monument and Shrine in Baltimore (inspiration for “The Star-Spangled Banner”) and Antietam National Battlefield Site near Sharpsburg.

35 Communications

In 2004, some 93.4% of Maryland’s occupied housing units had telephones. Additionally, by June of that year, there were 3,575,747 mobile telephone subscribers. In 2003, 66% of Maryland households had a computer and 59.2% had Internet access. The state had 12 major AM and 35 major FM radio stations in 2005. Maryland has 13 major television stations, including public broadcasting stations in Annapolis, Baltimore, Frederick, Hagerstown, Oakland, and Salisbury. Maryland also receives the signals of many Washington, DC, broadcast stations. The Baltimore area had almost one million television households, 68% of which received cable.

36 Press

The Baltimore Sun, founded in 1837, reached its heyday after 1906, when H. L. Mencken (1880–1956) became a staff writer. Mencken, who was also an important editor and critic, helped found the American Mercury magazine in 1924. As of 2005, Maryland had 10 morning and 3 afternoon dailies, and 9 Sunday papers. The most influential newspaper published in Baltimore is the Sun (daily, 280,717; Sunday, 454,045). The Washington Post is also widely read in Maryland.

37 Tourism, Travel & Recreation

In 2004, the state hosted over 21 million travelers. Total travel expenditures for 2001 were about $8.5 billion, which included support for about 105,400 travel-related jobs.

Attractions include parks, historical sites, and a national seashore (Assateague Island). Annapolis, the state capital, is the site of the US Naval Academy. On Baltimore’s waterfront are monuments to Francis Scott Key and Edgar Allan Poe, historic Ft. McHenry, and many restaurants serving the city’s famed crab cakes and other seafood specialties. Ocean City is the state’s major seaside resort and there are many resort towns along Chesapeake Bay. The Office of Tourism promotes such historical attractions as the Civil War, War of 1812, and National Road. It also is expanding investment in multi-cultural tourism, sports marketing, and nature tourism. There are 19 state parks with camping facilities and 10 recreation areas.

38 Sports

Maryland has two major league professional sports teams: the Baltimore Orioles of Major League Baseball and the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League. The Ravens (formerly the Browns) moved from Cleveland after the 1995 season and play in a downtown stadium near Oriole Park at Camden Yards. The

NFL’s Washington Redskins play in the Jack Kent Cooke Stadium in Landover, but are still considered to be a team from the District of Columbia.

There are several minor league baseball teams in the state, including teams in Bowie, Frederick, Delmarva, and Hagerstown.

Ever since 1750, when the first Arabian thoroughbred horse was imported by a Maryland breeder, horse racing has been a popular state pastime. The major tracks are Pimlico (Baltimore), Bowie, and Laurel. Pimlico is the site of the Preakness Stakes, the second leg of racing’s Triple Crown. Harness racing is held at Ocean Downs in Ocean City. Quarter horse racing takes place at several tracks throughout the state; and several steeplechase events, including the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup, are held annually.

In collegiate basketball, the University of Maryland won the NCAA Championship in 2002 and the National Invitation Tournament in 1972. The Maryland women’s basketball team won the National Championship in 2006. Morgan State University took the NCAA Division II title in 1974. Another major sport is lacrosse. Johns Hopkins University, the Naval Academy, and the University of Maryland all have performed well in intercollegiate competition.

Every weekend from April to October, Marylanders compete in jousting tournaments held in four classes throughout the state. In modern jousting, designated as the official state sport, horseback riders attempt to pick up small rings with long, lancelike poles. The state championship is held in October.

Babe Ruth was one of many star athletes to be born in the state.

39 Famous Marylanders

Maryland has produced no US presidents; its lone vice president was Spiro Theodore Agnew (1918–1996), who served as governor of Maryland before being elected as Richard Nixon’s vice-president in 1968. Reelected with Nixon in 1972, Agnew resigned the vice-presidency in October 1973 after a federal indictment had been filed against him.

Roger Brooke Taney (1777–1864) was US chief justice when the Supreme Court heard the Dred Scott case in 1856, ruling that Congress could not exclude slavery from any territory. As counsel for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Thurgood Marshall (1908–1993) argued the landmark Brown v. Board of Education school desegregation case before the Supreme Court in 1954. President Lyndon Johnson appointed him to the Court 13 years later.

Lawyer and poet Francis Scott Key (1779–1843) wrote “The Star-Spangled Banner”—now the national anthem—in 1814. The prominent abolitionists Frederick Douglass (Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, 1817?–1895) and Harriet Tubman (1820?–1913) were born in Maryland. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton (b.New York, 1774–1821), canonized by the Roman Catholic Church in 1975, was the first native-born American saint.

Benjamin Banneker (1731–1806), a free black, assisted in surveying the new District of Columbia and published almanacs from 1792 to 1797. Financier-philanthropist Johns Hopkins (1795–1873) was a Marylander. Peyton Rous (1879–1970) won the 1966 Nobel Prize for physiology-medicine.

Maryland’s best-known modern writer was H(enry) L(ouis) Mencken (1880–1956), a Baltimore newspaper reporter who was also a gifted social commentator, political wit, and student of the American language. Edgar Allan Poe (b.Massachusetts, 1809–1849), known for his poems and eerie short stories, died in Baltimore. Novelist-reformer Upton Sinclair (1878–1968) was born there, as was Emily Price Post (1873–1960), who wrote about social etiquette. Other writers associated with Maryland include Leon Uris (1924–2003) and John Barth (b.1930). Most notable among Maryland actors are Edwin Booth (1833–1893) and his brother John Wilkes Booth (1838–1865), notorious as the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln.

George Herman “Babe” Ruth (1895–1948), arguably the greatest baseball player of all time, was born in Baltimore. Other prominent ballplayers include Robert Moses “Lefty” Grove (1900–1975) and Cal Ripken Jr. (Calvin Edwin Ripken Jr., b.1960).

40 Bibliography

BOOKS

Bristow, M. J. State Songs of America. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2000.

Brown, Jonatha A. Maryland. Milwaukee, WI: Gareth Stevens, 2006.

Cohen, Richard M., and Jules Witcover. A Heartbeat Away: The Investigation and Resignation of Vice President Spiro T. Agnew. New York: Viking, 1974.

Coleman, Brooke. The Colony of Maryland. New York: PowerKids Press, 1999.

DuBois, Muriel L. Maryland Facts and Symbols. Rev. ed. Mankato, MN: Capstone Press, 2003.

Lough, Loree. Lord Baltimore: English Politician and Colonist. Philadelphia: Chelsea House, 2000.

Murray, Julie. Maryland. Edina, MN: Abdo Publishing, 2006.

Rauth, Leslie. Maryland. New York: Benchmark Books, 2000.

WEB SITES

Government of the State Maryland. maryland.gov/portal/server.pt? (accessed March 1, 2007).

Maryland Office of Tourism. www.mdisfun.org (accessed March 1, 2007).

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Maryland

Maryland

Maryland officially joined the Union on April 28, 1788, as the seventh state. Located on the eastern seaboard in the South Atlantic region, it is bordered by Virginia , West Virginia , Pennsylvania , Delaware , and the Atlantic Ocean. Maryland is the eighth-smallest state in the United States, with a total area of 10,460 square miles (27,092 square kilometers).

Maryland was home to several Native American tribes, including the Accomac, Susquehannock, and Piscataway. The first European visitors to the region came from Italy and Spain in the early sixteenth century. Captain John Smith (c. 1580–1631) was the first English explorer of Chesapeake Bay (1608).

In 1689, the British took control of the region that would become Maryland, Delaware, and a large part of Pennsylvania. Approximately twenty thousand Maryland soldiers fought in the American Revolution (1775–83). During the War of 1812 (1812–15), Fort McHenry in Baltimore was bombarded. During the attack, Francis Scott Key (1779–1843) found himself stuck on a British frigate, and there he composed the poem that later became the national anthem, the “Star-Spangled Banner.”

Marylanders fought on both sides during the American Civil War (1861–65). One of the major battles—the Battle of Antietam in 1862—took place in Maryland. After the war, the state played an important part in rebuilding the South. Shipbuilding, steelmaking, and the manufacture of clothing and shoes turned the agrarian economy into an industrial one.

Maryland's population in 2006 was more than 5.6 million. Whites comprised 61.5 percent of the population, African Americans another 28.7 percent. Although Annapolis is the capital city, Baltimore is by far the most densely populated city in the state. Nearly one-third of all African Americans in the state reside in Baltimore.

In recent years, most of the growth in the state's economy has been in government, construction, trade, and services. Maryland's employees are the best educated in the nation, with more than one-third of residents over the age of twenty-five possessing a bachelor's degree at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Industry, fishing, dairy, and poultry farming are important to the state's economy. Tobacco used to be the state's only cash crop, but now soybeans, wheat, barley, and various fruits and vegetables add to the state's gross national product.

Baltimore is home to Johns Hopkins University, which includes a highly regarded medical school, and Annapolis boasts the U.S. Naval Academy.

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Maryland

MARYLAND

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Maryland

Maryland

Fatti maschii, parole femine (Manly deeds, womanly words).

At a Glance

Name: Maryland was named in honor of Henrietta Maria, queen consort of King Charles I of England.

Nicknames: Free State, Old Line State

Capital: Annapolis

Size: 12,297 sq. mi. (31,972 sq km)

Population: 5,296,486

Statehood: Maryland became the seventh state on April 28, 1788.

Electoral votes: 10 (2004)

U.S. representatives: 8 (until 2003)

State tree: white oak

State flower: black-eyed Susan

State bird: Baltimore oriole

Highest point: Backbone Mountain, 3,360 ft. (1,024 m)

The Place

Maryland is located in the northeastern corner of the southern states. Maryland's northern border runs along the Mason-Dixon Line, the traditional boundary between the North and the South. Maryland is split by the Chesapeake Bay, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean. Maryland has several ports along the bay, including Baltimore, the state's largest city, and Annapolis, the capital.

The portion of Maryland east of the Chesapeake Bay is known as the Eastern Shore, and the part west of the bay is called the Western Shore. Both coastlines are generally low and flat, but much of the Western Shore is hilly to mountainous, with some fertile valleys. Most of Maryland's soil in the west, except for areas along the shoreline, is good for farming. About 40 percent of the state is forested. Maryland has several lakes, all of which are man-made.

Maryland experiences humid weather conditions, with hot summers and generally mild winters. The state's mountainous northwest can be considerably cooler than shore areas. Rain is frequent throughout the state, and more snow falls in the mountains than elsewhere.

Maryland produces large amounts of crushed stone, which is used in construction. The state also has several coal, natural gas, limestone, and marble deposits.

The Past

Native Americans have lived in Maryland for more than 10,000 years. When Spanish and English explorers first sailed into the Chesapeake Bay 400 years ago, they found several different Algonquian tribes there. Colonists began to settle in the area in 1631, when the first trading post was opened.

In 1632, King Charles I of England gave most of Maryland to Cecilius Calvert, Lord Baltimore. The Calvert family governed the area until the Revolutionary War, except for a brief few years. Tobacco was a valuable crop, and the colony's population grew rapidly. Maryland was also known for its religious tolerance.

Maryland: Facts and Firsts

  1. In 1696, King Williams School, the first free school in the United States, opened in Annapolis.
  2. The Maryland State House is the oldest state capitol building still in legislative use.
  3. In 1791, Maryland gave up land for the nation's capital—Washington, D.C.
  4. According to legend, Francis Scott Key, a Maryland lawyer, wrote "The Star-Spangled Banner" as he watched the British bombardment of Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor in September 1814.
  5. In 1902, Maryland became the first state to enact a workers' compensation law to support people injured on the job.

During the American Revolution, Maryland residents built cannons and ships in Baltimore for General George Washington's Continental army. Maryland approved the Constitution on April 28, 1788, and became the seventh state of the Union. In 1791, Maryland donated land for the new nation's permanent capital. The capital was looted and burned by the British during the War of 1812. During the Civil War, Maryland remained in the Union even though it was a slaveholding state. Many of Maryland's residents, however, chose to fight for the Confederate cause.

After the war's end, Baltimore's commercial importance grew and it became known as one of the cultural centers of the nation. Maryland factories and shipyards flourished throughout most of the 20th century, although the state, like the rest of the nation, suffered economically during the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Maryland: State Smart

The Peabody Conservatory of Music, founded in Maryland in 1857, is the oldest music school in the United States.

During World War II, manufacturing activity increased greatly in Maryland. Baltimore and other cities drew large numbers of workers from nearby states, the population began to expand quickly, and the state became increasingly urban. By the 1960s, the quality of Maryland's roads, transportation systems, schools, and housing had declined. During the 1960s and 1970s, however, many new bridges, roads, airports, houses, and schools were built to meet the growing needs of the state. In 1985, Maryland began an ongoing project to clean up pollution in the Chesapeake Bay.

The Present

Maryland's location on the Chesapeake Bay has helped it to become and remain one of the most important commercial and shipping states in the nation. Manufacturing is strongest in the Baltimore and Washington, D.C., areas, where industries such as food processing and chemical production flourish.

Maryland is the site of several government bureaus and offices, including the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis and Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.

Maryland is not only a manufacturing and industrial state. Approximately one-third of Maryland is farmland. Many of the state's approximately 13,000 farms produce broilers, or young chickens, which are Maryland's most valuable farm product. Dairy farms are also important to the state's agricultural economy. Maryland's other farms grow ornamental shrubs and flowers, soybeans, corn, wheat, and many other crops.

Born in Maryland

  1. John Wilkes Booth , actor and assassin of Abraham Lincoln
  2. Tom Clancy , author
  3. Frederick Douglass , abolitionist
  4. Philip Glass , composer
  5. Billie Holiday , jazz-blues singer
  6. Johns Hopkins , financier
  7. Francis Scott Key , author of the national anthem
  8. Thurgood Marshall , jurist
  9. H.L. Mencken , author
  10. Charles Willson Peale , painter
  11. Frank Perdue , farmer and businessman
  12. Babe Ruth , baseball player
  13. Upton Sinclair , author
  14. Harriet Tubman , abolitionist
  15. Frank Zappa , singer

Maryland has a thriving fishing industry. Valuable catches include blue crab, bluefish, catfish, clams, flounder, mackerel, striped bass, and white perch.

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Maryland

MARYLAND

Founded as a refuge for Catholics in 1632, Maryland was one of the oldest English colonies in America. By the 1750s, however, many Marylanders had grown tired of British rule. The British practice, instituted in 1717, of transporting convicts deeply angered the colonists by establishing one convict for every ten adult males in Maryland by 1757. Partly as a result, Maryland strongly supported the Revolution and played an integral role in the hostilities. During the war, Maryland privateers severely crippled British commerce. The captured supplies of powder, arms, and clothing greatly helped the American forces. Congress moved to Baltimore for the winter of 1776–1777 when the British threatened Philadelphia. On 28 April 1788 Maryland became the seventh state to ratify the new Constitution, and the colony seemed poised for prosperity. Over the next four decades, the state's white population grew and its slave population declined steadily. Suffrage was expanded, and the state became increasing involved in the market economy.

In the federal census of 1790, Maryland had a population of 319,728. In 1800 the population rose to 341,548 despite Maryland's 1791 gift of territory to form the federal District of Columbia. The state's population continued to increase, with 380,546 people in 1810; 407,350 in 1820; and 447,040 in 1830. The state's major city, Baltimore, was the fourth-largest urban area in the nation in 1790, with 13,500 people. Baltimore's population, consisting of German Americans, French Acadian refugees, Anglo-Americans, and African Americans, continued to grow over the succeeding decades. Western and northern portions of Maryland grew modestly.

Maryland's growth is deceptive. Although much of the state expanded, in the national era the counties with the highest number of slaves steadily lost population. When land no longer supported a planter's family and slaves, many Marylanders left the state rather than lose their status as slave owners. Other planters facing economic ruin sought out-of-state buyers for their slaves. Such sales were common enough that bills were introduced in the state assembly to prevent the breakup of black families, but none of the legislation ever became law. Giving freedom to slaves also proved a popular way for slave owners to escape financial burdens. In 1796 Maryland permitted voluntary slave emancipation while also forbidding the import of slaves for sale. The legislation dramatically affected the black population. In 1790 Maryland had almost thirteen times as many slaves as free blacks. By 1810 the ratio was about three to one as the number of free blacks swelled to thirty thousand. In 1830 Maryland had nearly fifty thousand free blacks.

As the numbers of free blacks rose, fearful whites attempted to maintain control by reducing the rights accorded to blacks. After 1796 free African Americans could not testify in court cases involving the question of blacks being free or slave. A later law permitted slaves to testify against free blacks. In 1806 the Maryland Assembly revealed white fears of slave uprisings by restricting the rights of free blacks to assemble and by requiring African Americans to obtain a permit to own a firearm or a dog.

As blacks lost rights, poor white men and Jews gained privileges. In 1802 the Assembly approved a state constitutional amendment removing property qualifications for adult white males voting in local and state elections. In 1810 the state extended the ballot to federal elections and abolished property qualifications for would-be state officeholders. Jews were permitted to hold public office with legislation passed in 1826.

Maryland also experienced economic changes. By 1815 most farmers had abandoned tobacco as a cash crop because its repeated cultivation had depleted necessary nutrients from the soil. Additionally, European conflicts had made the market unpredictable. Many of the tobacco farmers switched to wheat, but attacks by the Hessian fly consumed thousands of baskets of grain and prompted major importers of Maryland wheat to close their docks to Maryland products.

The poor state of the agricultural economy prompted Maryland to focus more on trade and industry. In 1790 the Bank of Maryland formed to issue paper money and make capital available for investment. Some of these investments went into transportation. After five years of construction, the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal opened in 1829. Eager to profit from western trade, Maryland chartered the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 1827. State leaders thought that railroads would overtake canals as the preferred routes to the western markets. By 1830 Maryland was shifting its focus away from agriculture to commerce.

See alsoAgriculture: Overview; Constitution, Ratification of; Currency and Coinage; Emancipation and Manumission; Mid-Atlantic States; Plantation, The; Railroads; Slavery: Overview; Slavery: Slave Insurrections; Transportation: Canals and Waterways .

bibliography

Brugger, Robert J., with Cynthia Horsburgh Requardt, Robert I. Cottom, Jr., and Mary Ellen Hayward. Maryland: A Middle Temperament, 1634–1980. Edited by Robert G. Merrick. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1988.

Walsh, Richard, and William Lloyd Fox. Maryland: A History, 1632–1974. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1974.

Caryn E. Neumann

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Maryland

Maryland

ALLEGANY COLLEGE OF MARYLAND F-4
ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE E-10
BALTIMORE CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE D-10
BALTIMORE HEBREW UNIVERSITY D-10
BALTIMORE INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE D-10
BOWIE STATE UNIVERSITY F-9
CAPITOL COLLEGE E-9
CARROLL COMMUNITY COLLEGE B-8
CECIL COMMUNITY COLLEGE B-13
CHESAPEAKE COLLEGE
COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAME OF MARYLAND D-10
COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND H-8
COLUMBIA UNION COLLEGE F-8
THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE COUNTY D-10
COPPIN STATE UNIVERSITY D-10
DEVRY UNIVERSITY F-8
FREDERICK COMMUNITY COLLEGE C-6
FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY F-4
GARRETT COLLEGE
GEORGE MEANY CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES-THE NATIONAL LABOR COLLEGE E-8
GOUCHER COLLEGE D-10
GRIGGS UNIVERSITY E-8
HAGERSTOWN BUSINESS COLLEGE A-5
HAGERSTOWN COMMUNITY COLLEGE A-5
HARFORD COMMUNITY COLLEGE B-11
HOOD COLLEGE C-6
HOWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE D-9
THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY D-10
LOYOLA COLLEGE IN MARYLAND D-10
MAPLE SPRINGS BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE AND SEMINARY L-4
MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART D-10
MCDANIEL COLLEGE B-8
MONTGOMERY COLLEGE E-7
MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY D-10
MOUNT ST. MARY'S UNIVERSITY A-6
NER ISRAEL RABBINICAL COLLEGE D-10
PEABODY CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC OF THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY D-10
PRINCE GEORGE'S COMMUNITY COLLEGE L-5
ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE F-10
ST. MARY'S COLLEGE OF MARYLAND
SALISBURY UNIVERSITY I-15
SOJOURNER-DOUGLASS COLLEGE D-10
TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (BALTIMORE) D-10
TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (BELTSVILLE) J-4
TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (TOWSON) C-10
TOWSON UNIVERSITY C-10
UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY F-10
UNIVERSITY OF BALTIMORE D-10
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY D-10
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK K-4
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE J-14
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE K-4
UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-MARYLAND CAMPUS D-9
VILLA JULIE COLLEGE
WASHINGTON BIBLE COLLEGE
WASHINGTON COLLEGE D-12
WOR-WIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE I-15
YESHIVA COLLEGE OF THE NATION'S CAPITAL E-8

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Maryland

Maryland

ALLEGANY COLLEGE OF MARYLAND
ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
BALTIMORE CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
BALTIMORE HEBREW UNIVERSITY
BALTIMORE INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE
BOWIE STATE UNIVERSITY
CAPITOL COLLEGE
CARROLL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
CECIL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
CHESAPEAKE COLLEGE
COLLEGE OF NOTRE DAME OF MARYLAND
COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND
COLUMBIA UNION COLLEGE
THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF BALTIMORE COUNTY
COPPIN STATE UNIVERSITY
DEVRY UNIVERSITY
FREDERICK COMMUNITY COLLEGE
FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY
GARRETT COLLEGE
GEORGE MEANY CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES-THE NATIONAL LABOR COLLEGE
GOUCHER COLLEGE
GRIGGS UNIVERSITY
HAGERSTOWN BUSINESS COLLEGE
HAGERSTOWN COMMUNITY COLLEGE
HARFORD COMMUNITY COLLEGE
HOOD COLLEGE
HOWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE
THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
LOYOLA COLLEGE IN MARYLAND
MAPLE SPRINGS BAPTIST BIBLE COLLEGE AND SEMINARY
MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART
MCDANIEL COLLEGE
MONTGOMERY COLLEGE
MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
MOUNT ST. MARY'S UNIVERSITY
NER ISRAEL RABBINICAL COLLEGE
PEABODY CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC OF THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
PRINCE GEORGE'S COMMUNITY COLLEGE
ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE
ST. MARY'S COLLEGE OF MARYLAND
SALISBURY UNIVERSITY
SOJOURNER-DOUGLASS COLLEGE
TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (BALTIMORE)
TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (BELTSVILLE)
TESST COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY (TOWSON)
TOWSON UNIVERSITY
UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY
UNIVERSITY OF BALTIMORE
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-MARYLAND CAMPUS
VILLA JULIE COLLEGE
WASHINGTON BIBLE COLLEGE
WASHINGTON COLLEGE
WOR-WIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE
YESHIVA COLLEGE OF THE NATION'S CAPITAL

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Maryland

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Maryland

Maryland

Annapolis
Baltimore
Cresap's Fort Site
Fort Cumberland
Fort Frederick
Head of Elk
Mason and Dixon Line
Port Tobacco
St. Marys City
Smallwood's Retreat
Whitehall

There may be several hundred colonial houses still standing in Maryland, a large number being in the Annapolis Historic District. A remarkable archaeological site from the earliest colonial period is at St. Marys. Maryland contributed a number of outstanding Patriot leaders during the Revolution and was famous for the quality of its troops in the Continental army.

The fugitive Continental Congress suffered through a few months of temporary accommodations in Baltimore. Columns of troops came through en route to Virginia and the Carolinas; Washington spent one night in the Hollingsworth Tavern, now an office building in Elkton, and nearby Head of Elk was a point of debarkation and embarkation.

Although Maryland has experienced significant population growth over the last two decades, some of the state remains agricultural. Tourist literature points to a number of oldest-in-continuous-operation places (churches, businesses, ferries, mills, and so on).

General sources of information are the Maryland Office of Tourism, 217 East Redwood Street, Baltimore, Md. 21202; website: www.visitmaryland.org; phone: (888) 639-3526; and the Maryland Historical Society, 201 West Monument Street, Baltimore, Md. 21201; website: www.mdhs.org; phone: (410) 685-3750.

Annapolis

Annapolis, Chesapeake Bay and Severn River. Anne Arundel Town became the Maryland capital in 1694, was renamed Annapolis (for Princess Anne) the next year, and was chartered as a city in 1708. One of the United States oldest cities, it has the oldest state house still in daily use. For about nine months it was the capitol of the United States (27 November 1783 to 13 August 1784).

Colonial Annapolis Historic District, a Registered National Historic Landmark since 1965, has more colonial brick buildings than any other United States city. Much of the original town, one of America's first planned cities, is within the historic district. The preservation effort, due primarily to the Historic Annapolis Foundation, has been exemplary. As pointed out by the National Survey, however, the buildings historic value relate primarily to architecture and to the development of commerce and industry. Several guided walking tours are offered by the Historic Annapolis Foundation. The Foundation has also embarked on a Historical Building Markers endeavor to further aid interested spectators in viewing colonial sites. The Historic Annapolis Foundation is located on 18 Pinkney Street; website: www.annapolis.org; phone: (410) 267-7619.

During the Revolution, Annapolis was a port of embarkation for troops and heavy matériel moving down the Chesapeake for operations in Virginia and the Carolinas. In early March 1781 Lafayette reached Annapolis from Head of Elk with about 1,200 Continentals en route to Virginia, where Benedict Arnold was then ravaging the Old Dominion with a force of British raiders. Lafayette was supposed to link up in the Chesapeake with a French naval expedition under Admiral Destouches, but the latter withdrew to Newport, Rhode Island, after being beaten off the Virginia Capes by a pursuing British fleet. (Lafayette continued to Virginia on foot via Baltimore.) In mid-September 1781 the combined armies of Washington and Rochambeau moved toward Yorktown by ship from Head of Elk, Baltimore, and Annapolis.

This was about the only large-scale military activity in Annapolis during the Revolution, though a great number of ships involved in the war effort moved in and out of its busy port. Two museums devote some attention to this naval activity. The best known is the United States Naval Academy Museum in Preble Hall just inside the Maryland Avenue gate of the Naval Academy. This museum is open to the public Monday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: (410) 293-2108; website: http://www.usna.edu/Museum/. The Annapolis Maritime Museum was heavily damaged by Hurricane Isabel in 2003, so it is best to verify hours and events beforehand. Phone: (410) 295-0104; website: http://www.annapolismaritimemuseum.org/.

The following places are of special significance from the standpoint of Revolutionary War associations:

The John Paul Jones Crypt. This heads the list because it is likely to be ignored in the conventional tourist guides. Located in the chapel of the United States Naval Academy, it allegedly contains the remains of the great naval hero. He died in Paris at the age of forty-two in 1792 and was buried in the old St. Louis Cemetery for foreign Protestants. About half a century later a proposal to rebury him in the United States was blocked by his relatives in Scotland. When Horace Porter was ambassador to France around the turn of the century he undertook a six-year search for the body in the cemetery, which had been covered by houses. In 1905 he found the remains that have been identified as those of John Paul Jones, although Porter's proof is still disputed. The remains were escorted back to the United States by a naval squadron in 1905 and in 1913 placed in their present location, with Horace Porter making the oration at the dedication. (General Porter, a long-time aide to General Ulysses S. Grant, had performed the same function at Grant's Tomb in New York after presiding over the movement to have this monument erected.) Public viewing hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday.

The Maryland State House. Located at State Circle, this large brick structure was started in early 1772, when the last royal governor officiated at the cornerstone laying. The name of the architect and completion date are unknown. A massive octagonal dome is the most distinctive feature of this historic building in which the Treaty of Paris was ratified, ending the Revolutionary War, and where Washington officially resigned as commander in chief. In 1786 the Annapolis Convention met in the statehouse and took the decisive step toward formulation of a federal government. (This led to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia the next year.) The Maryland State House was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960. Guided tours of the building, its grounds, memorials, and historical paintings are provided from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays and from 10 p.m. to 4 p.m. on weekends. Visitors should note that intense security procedures are in place and proper identification will be required. Phone: (410) 974-3400.

The Old Treasury Building (1735). This one-story brick structure in State Circle is the oldest public building in Maryland. Open by appointment only. Phone: (410) 267-7619.

St. John's College. The campus covers a large area a few blocks north on College Avenue. The Charles Carroll the Barrister House (1722–1723) on King George Street is a two-story house where the barrister was born. (There were many in this prominent family of the same name, the most famous being Charles Carroll of Carrolton. See baltimore.) Now containing the admissions offices, the house was moved to this location in 1955. It is open to the public. McDowell Hall, now used for classrooms and offices, was started in 1744 as the mansion for colonial governor Thomas Bladen but not finished until 1789. The College had been founded in 1696 as King William's School, was chartered in 1784, and moved into McDowell Hall a year later. Until 1999 an ancient tulip poplar, the Liberty Tree, grew on the campus. It is said to be where the Sons of Liberty met, and a plaque at the tree's base listed its age to be over six hundred years old, although many experts believe it to have been closer to four hundred. The magnificent tree went down during Hurricane Floyd.

Chase-Lloyd (1769) and Hammond-Harwood (1774)Houses. Of exceptional architectural merit, these houses are located at 22 and 19 Maryland Avenue (King George Street intersection). Both are attributed to architect William Buckland, the former house was the home of signer Samuel Chase. The latter is one of the finest Georgian houses in America, beautifully preserved with original interior woodwork and much original furniture. Both are National Historic Landmarks and open to the public.

The Brice House. This outstanding example of Georgian architecture at Prince George and East Streets was begun in 1766 and is virtually unaltered. Its thirty-five rooms are notable for individual distinction in a harmonious relationship. Built of oversize brick on a fieldstone foundation, the house is 186 feet long with 90-foot chimneys rising above a steep-pitched roof. It was acquired in 1953 by a private owner who has restored it with great fidelity and care. Some authorities believe the architect was William Buckland. Although omitted from most tourist guides because it is not open to the public, Brice House meets most of the criteria for registration as a National Historic Landmark. Dominating its present neighborhood, the elegant old giant can be seen from the street. It underwent another renovation in 1999 and serves as a private library.

The Quynn-Brewer House (1734). The house, at 26 West Street, is restored and furnished in the Queen Anne period.

Baltimore

Baltimore. Founded in 1729 and an important point in the primitive network of early American transportation, Baltimore was a place of no charm when the Continental Congress was forced to take up temporary working facilities here after fleeing Philadelphia in mid-December 1776. "This dirty boggy hole beggars all description," wrote one delegate. "The weather was rainy, and the streets the muddiest I ever saw," John Adams jotted in his diary on 7 February 1778. "This is the dirtiest place in the world."

Industrial achievement has not enhanced Baltimore's allure in the succeeding two centuries, the traffic and air pollution being a questionable exchange for the elimination of muddy streets. But Baltimore is trying hard to be attractive to visitors and in the 1990s undertook and successfully completed considerable urban renewal. The Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance maintains a service called the Baltimore Fun Guide that serves as a good information source for local sites. Website: www.baltimorefunguide.com; phone: (410) 821-3055.

Baltimore was on the line of march and water movement of Continental troops to Virginia and the Carolinas from the North. Lafayette marched his column through here from Annapolis, and frigates took some of the Allied troops of Washington and Rochambeau from Baltimore to Virginia in the Yorktown campaign. During one of the darkest periods of the Revolution, when the British had overrun much of New York and most of New Jersey, the Continental Congress carried on from Baltimore (20 December 1776 to 4 March 1777). Not more than twenty-five delegates actually appeared for business. Their rented meeting place was the three-story brick house of Henry Fite that stood near today's Baltimore Street at Liberty Street. Many privateers were fitted out in Baltimore during the Revolution and the War of 1812. Fortifications were built where Fort McHenry now stands.

Fells Point Historic District contains many houses left when the town incorporated into Baltimore in 1773. Most date from the maritime prosperity that came after the Revolution.

The Carroll Mansion (about 1812), 800 Lombard Street at Front and Lombard Streets, was the last home of Charles Carroll of Carrolton. He lived there for about ten years before his death in 1832, "envied by many as the wealthiest citizen of the United States and revered by every one as the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence" (Dictionary of American Biography). Some authorities date the house from 1812; the National Survey concludes it was erected in 1823 on land given by Carroll to his daughter Mary and her husband. The three-and-a-half-story brick mansion has exceptional trim inside and out. It is now a museum owned and operated by Carroll Museums Incorporated. Phone: (410) 605-2964.

Mount Claire (1754), in Carroll Park, is Baltimore's only mansion of the pre-Revolutionary period. It was the elegant plantation house of Charles Carroll the Barrister (see annapolis). Wings have been added, but the house is otherwise unaltered. Many of the furnishings are original, and portraits of the Carrolls by Charles Willson Peale are in the drawing room. The house museum is open to the public from Tuesday through Saturday, although calling before visiting is recommended. Phone: (410) 837-3262.

The attractive Flag House and Star-Spangled Banner Museum, 844 East Pratt Street, is the birthplace and home (1973) of Mary Young Pickersgill, the lady who made the 30-foot by 42-foot flag seen "by the dawn's early light" by Francis Scott Key on 14 September 1814. The house museum includes a portrait of Colonel Benjamin Flower, who commanded one of the Continental army's only two regiments of artificers (soldier mechanics who supported the artillery and engineers). The portrait, believed to be by Charles Willson Peale, has in the background a rare view of the Revolutionary War fort just outside Carlisle, Pennsylvania. The Flag House is located in Baltimore's Little Italy section and is open to the public from Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone: (410) 837-1793.

The frigate Constellation (1797) and Fort McHenry National Monument are historic landmarks of the period immediately following the Revolution. Important museums are operated by the Maryland Historical Society.

Cresap's Fort Site

Cresap's Fort Site, Oldtown, Potomac River, Alleghany County. Appearing on many colonial maps, Thomas Cresap's stockaded house and trading post was established in 1740 at Shawanese Oldtown. It was on the old Indian trail between the Iroquois country in the north and the Cherokee country in the Carolinas. Cresap was the first white settler in the region, but it was not long until his place was closely associated with the westward route of white exploration and land speculation. Young George Washington spent four days here in 1748, when he was surveying for Lord Fairfax. Braddock's expedition came through in 1755 on the way to disaster at the Forks of the Ohio. Indian marauders killed settlers in the vicinity during Pontiac's Rebellion in 1763. Meanwhile, the name Cresap had become known from Canada to the Carolinas, and from Annapolis far into the Old Northwest.

Thomas Cresap was a Yorkshireman who had come to Maryland around 1717 at the age of fifteen. Two years after his marriage, about ten years later, he moved from the Havre de Grace area into the disputed territory around what is now Wrightsville, Pennsylvania. Here he became the leader of Maryland militia in a bloody and losing war with Pennsylvanians claiming title to the region. The dispute ended with Captain Cresap's being burned out, quite literally, in November 1736. Four years later he was Maryland's westernmost pioneer, the role for which he is remembered in history.

Before long he was a valuable intermediary between the Maryland government and the warring Iroquois and Cherokee. A charter member of the Ohio Company (1749), Cresap and his Indian friend Nemacolin marked and improved the 60 miles of trail from Fort Cumberland to the Monongahela at the site of Redstone Old Fort (today's Brownsville, Pennsylvania on U.S. 40). Cresap was a commissary during the Seven Years' War. His son Michael (1742–1775) was blamed for the Logan Massacre (see under west virginia) that touched off Dunmore's War of 1774. During the Revolution, Colonel Thomas Cresap was active on the home front, even though he was in his early seventies when the war started.

Michael Cresap had a commission from Virginia in 1774 and took part in the war he was accused of starting—it was called Cresap's War by some. Seriously ill in the following winter, he recovered enough to accept a commission from Maryland to raise a company of riflemen to join Washington's army around Boston. Young Cresap marched his command 550 miles in twenty-two days. Two months later he started home from Boston, hoping to recover his health, but died en route in New York City.

The ruins of a stone chimney mark the site of Cresap's Fort, which the National Survey of Historic Sites and Buildings puts in the category of "Sites Also Noted."

Fort Cumberland

Fort Cumberland (lost site), Potomac River at Wills Creek, Alleghany County. In the present city of Cumberland the probable site of Washington's Fort Mount Pleasant (1754) and its successor on the same spot, Fort Cumberland (1755), is on a hill overlooking Washington and Green Streets.

This historic spot of the colonial period was commonly known as "the post at Wills Creek." It was established in 1750 by the Ohio Company. Washington built the first fort on returning from his defeat at Fort Necessity, now in Pennsylvania. Colonel James Inness expanded and renamed the fort the next year. Here Braddock assembled two thousand men before marching to his famous defeat in 1755. Washington was commander at Fort Cumberland for about two years during the Seven Years' War that followed, but the place was never attacked, and in 1765 it was abandoned. In the Whiskey Rebellion, Fort Cumberland was briefly reoccupied, Washington making his final visit to review troops here in 1794. Meanwhile, a town had been laid out in 1785 near the long-abandoned one. First called Washington Town, it was renamed Cumberland in 1787. It became the eastern terminus of the National Road, authorized in 1806 and started in 1811. Cumberland prospered as construction pushed westward and settlers came through from Baltimore and Pennsylvania. Delay in completion of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, of which Cumberland was a terminus, deprived the town of greater prosperity; the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad arrived about eight years before the canal. Cumberland lost its significance as a critical point in the western movement.

Fort Frederick

Fort Frederick, Potomac River near Clear Spring, Washington County. Braddock's defeat inspired a certain amount of new military construction on the frontier. In the spring of 1756 the Maryland assembly provided for the construction of Fort Frederick, a stone quadrangle with corner bastions erected that year. It was named for Frederick Calvert, sixth Lord of Baltimore. It was garrisoned until 1763, the end of the Seven Years' War, but had no major role. During the Revolution it was used as a prison camp, and it was garrisoned in the Civil War. The state of Maryland acquired it, conducted archaeological research, and reconstructed or restored the walls and other features as part of a 279-acre park with a museum and recreational facilities. It is off U.S. 40, 5 miles south of Clear Spring at 11100 Fort Frederick Road. Phone: (301) 842-2155.

Head of Elk

Head of Elk. So called because it was at the head of navigation on the Elk River, this place was of strategic importance because it was the closest point in the Chesapeake Bay for amphibious operations directed against Philadelphia by the British. It was also the closest point from which Patriot forces in the central states could debark for water movement down the Chesapeake. In August 1777 a large British expedition from Staten Island landed at Head of Elk, and four militia companies posted to oppose the expected debarkation scattered without firing a shot. After observing the invasion force from a nearby hill, Washington concentrated his army along White Clay Creek in the vicinity of modern Newark, Delaware. After the action at Cooch's Bridge, Delaware, the Patriots withdrew to defensive positions in Pennsylvania along the Brandywine.

The British used Head of Elk as their port of debarkation for about three months until the Delaware River forts could be reduced and a new line of communications opened up the Delaware to Philadelphia. When American troops started moving south to oppose British operations there, Head of Elk became an embarkation point. General Kalb's Continentals came through in April 1780, Lafayette led his column through Head of Elk about a year later, and the combined American-French expedition of Washington and Rochambeau marched to this place en route to Yorktown.

The historic area is a short distance south of today's Elkton. It is in open country, surrounded by farm and dairy country, but unmarked and difficult to visit without trespassing on private land.

Mason and Dixon Line

Mason and Dixon Line, boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania. Although the fortieth parallel apparently was intended to be the boundary between the grants to the Baltimores (1632) and the Penns (1681), a protracted dispute grew. This ended with a boundary survey by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon between 1763 and 1767. Marking stones were erected every mile, each fifth one bearing the arms of Baltimore and Penn on opposite sides. Most are still in place. Although the names of the English surveyors are commonly associated only with the Maryland-Pennsylvania boundary, they also marked the Delaware line.

Port Tobacco

Port Tobacco, Port Tobacco River, Charles County. "Potobac" is the name of the site on Captain John Smith's map of 1612. Before the Revolution, Port Tobacco covered 60 acres and was an important port and trading center. By 1800 the harbor was silting up, and for various other economic reasons, Port Tobacco gradually faded away. The 2000 census listed twenty residents in the town, although it is featured on several heritage and scenic driving tours. Its courthouse was reconstructed, and there are also four eighteenth-century homes in the area. The Port Tobacco Courthouse phone number is (301) 934-4313.

Within a few miles are several surviving colonial houses. One is the home built about 1760 by Dr. James Craik (1730–1814), chief physician of the Continental army and long-time associate of George Washington. It is noted for fireplaces with large mantels in each room, a solid walnut stairway, and massive locks. Another is the home of John Hanson (1721–1783), active Patriot in the events leading to the Revolution and first president of the Congress of the Confederation (for a one-year term starting 5 November 1781). Other landmarks are the Stag House (1732), Chimney House (1765), and Boswell-Compton House (1770). The Society for the Restoration of Port Tobacco (available at the courthouse phone number) started a fund-raising program of annual house tours in 1968 and remains active.

St. Marys City

St. Marys City, St. Marys River, St. Marys County. The history of Maryland starts here, as might be suspected from the names. In November 1633, the year after Charles I granted the charter to George Calvert, first Lord Baltimore, Leonard Calvert established this settlement. (George Calvert died before the charter had passed the great seal, but it was then issued to his eldest son, Cecilius. Leonard, a younger son, was made governor of the new province.)

Maryland's proprietor was a Catholic. He wanted to establish the province as a haven for persecuted Catholics, but he also wanted Protestant colonists, so from the beginning he promised religious tolerance. St. Marys consequently became famous for adoption in 1649 of the historic Toleration Act, although this was limited to Trinitarian Christians. In 1694 the capital was moved from this first settlement to Annapolis.

A replica was built in 1934 of the old state house of 1676. Bricks of the original structure were used to build Trinity Church in 1829. The Leonard Calvert Monument is on the site of Leonard Calvert's negotiations with King Yaocomico for purchase of the colony's land. At Church Point is the site of the town laid out by Leonard Calvert.

The entire area has been designated a historic district, where the foundations of about sixty structures of the seventeenth century have survived undisturbed. This is probably the only site of a major seventeenth-century town in North America that possesses such archaeological importance other than Jamestown, in Virginia.

The site has been developed into Historic St. Mary's City, an interactive living history museum with costumed interpreters engaging visitors into the past of Maryland's first capital city. It features exhibits of the many archaeological finds, and also has a visitors' center and a gift shop. The site is open from mid-March until November and one can take a virtual tour via internet through its website, www.stmaryscity.org. Phone: (800) 762-1634.

Smallwood's Retreat

Smallwood's Retreat, Potomac River, Charles County. One of the most distinguished military units of the Revolution was Smallwood's Maryland Regiment. "Men of honor, family, and fortune," as their major, Mordecai Gist, put it, they sported fine uniforms and equipment. But they quickly became famous for fighting. Hardly seven months after it was raised, Gist commanded the regiment in the heroic defense of the Patriot right flank in the Battle of Long Island. Under a grubby Brooklyn street today is the mass grave of Marylanders killed there, and in nearby Prospect Park is their monument. (See cortelyou house and prospect park under Brooklyn, New York.) Maintaining their outstanding combat record, Smallwood's Regiment went south when the major fighting ended up north. As part of General Nathanael Greene's army they accumulated additional honors in the Carolinas.

General William Smallwood (1732–1792) is remembered more for his contribution to the war as a recruiter and administrator. He was absent on court-martial duty when his troops distinguished themselves on Long Island, although he did rush over from Manhattan to play an important role in covering the American retreat. He was wounded in leading the regiment at White Plains, New York. While recovering, he missed the campaign in New Jersey. In 1780 he marched south with General Kalb's column into the Carolinas, succeeding him as a division commander after the Battle of Camden, South Carolina, and being promoted to major general.

But when the Maryland aristocrat found himself temporarily subordinated to General von Steuben after General Gates was recalled, he refused to serve under a foreigner. Washington and Congress were willing to accept his resignation, but General Greene—Gates's successor—solved the problem by sending Smallwood home to recruit and raise supplies. Remaining in uniform until the end of 1783, he was elected governor in 1785 and served three consecutive one-year terms.

The old bachelor's home, which was coined "Smallwood's Retreat" (probably what the general himself named it) in the National Survey, has been restored in the 628-acre Smallwood State Park. It is open to the public on Sundays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., May through September. The park offers hiking, fishing, camping, and a boat marina. Phone: (301) 743-7613. On Md. 224 west of Pisgah and southwest of Mason Springs, the park is east of the United States Naval Proving Grounds.

Whitehall

Whitehall, off St. Margaret's Road on the outskirts of Annapolis, Anne Arundel County. About ten years after coming to America as governor of Maryland (1753–1769), the bachelor Horatio Sharpe built a retreat and entertainment pavilion overlooking Chesapeake Bay. Shortly thereafter he enlarged this into a five-part brick house of Palladian style almost 200 feet in length. "Superlatives become Whitehall," says the 1964 report of the National Survey, "not alone for its distinction of being the first colonial dwelling with temple-type portico, and as an exemplar of eighteenth-century 'country life' in America, but also as an embodiment of a great many composite factors that contribute luster to a building and a site" (Colonials and Patriots, p. 89). Whitehall's exterior was restored in 1957 on the basis of careful scholarship.

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