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South Carolina

South Carolina

State of South Carolina

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Named in honor of King Charles I of England.

NICKNAME: The Palmetto State.

CAPITAL: Columbia.

ENTERED UNION: 23 May 1788 (8th).

SONG: "Carolina;" "South Carolina on My Mind."

MOTTO: Animis opibusque parati (Prepared in mind and resources); Dum spiro spero (While I breathe, I hope).

COAT OF ARMS: A palmetto stands erect, with a ravaged oak (representing the British fleet) at its base; 12 spears, symbolizing the first 12 states, are bound crosswise to the palmetto's trunk by a band bearing the inscription "Quis separabit" (Who shall separate?). Two shields bearing the inscriptions "March 26" (the date in 1776 when South Carolina established its first independent government) and "July 4," respectively, hang from the tree. Under the oak are the words "Meliorem lapsa locavit" (Having fallen, it has set up a better one) and the year "1776." The words "South Carolina" and the motto Animis opibusque parati surround the whole.

FLAG: Blue field with a white palmetto in the center and a white crescent at the union.

OFFICIAL SEAL: The official seal consists of two ovals showing the original designs for the obverse and the reverse of South Carolina's great seal of 1777. left (obverse): same as the coat of arms. right (reverse): as the sun rises over the seashore, Hope, holding a laurel branch, walks over swords and daggers. The motto Dum spiro spero is above her, the word "Spes" (Hope) below.

BIRD: Carolina wren; wild turkey (wild game bird).

FISH: Striped bass.

FLOWER: Yellow jessamine.

TREE: Palmetto.

GEM: Amethyst.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year's Day, 1 January; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Washington's Birthday/Presidents' Day, 3rd Monday in February; Confederate Memorial Day, 10 May; National Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Veterans' Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving Day, 4th Thursday in November; Christmas Eve, 24 December, when declared by the governor; Christmas Day, 25 December and the day following.

TIME: 7 AM EST = noon GMT.

LOCATION, SIZE, AND EXTENT

Situated in the southeastern United States, South Carolina ranks 40th in size among the 50 states.

The state's total area is 31,113 sq mi (80,583 sq km), of which land takes up 30,203 sq mi (78,226 sq km) and inland water 910 sq mi (2,357 sq km). South Carolina extends 273 mi (439 km) e-w; its maximum n-s extension is 210 mi (338 km).

South Carolina is bounded on the n and ne by North Carolina; on the se by the Atlantic Ocean; and on the sw and w by Georgia (with the line passing through the Savannah and Chattooga rivers).

Among the 13 major Sea Islands in the Atlantic off South Carolina are Bull, Sullivans, Kiawah, Edisto, Hunting, and Hilton Head, the largest island (42 sq mi109 sq km) on the Atlantic seaboard between New Jersey and Florida. The total boundary length of South Carolina is 824 mi (1,326 km), including a general coastline of 187 mi (301 km); the tidal shoreline extends 2,876 mi (4,628 km). The state's geographic center is located in Richland County, 13 mi (21 km) se of Columbia.

TOPOGRAPHY

South Carolina is divided into two major regions by the fall line that runs through the center of the state from Augusta, Georgia, to Columbia and thence to Cheraw, near the North Carolina border. The area northwest of the line, known as the upcountry, lies within the Piedmont Plateau; the region to the southeast, called the low country, forms part of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The rise of the land from ocean to the fall line is very gradual: Columbia, 120 mi (193 km) inland, is only 135 ft (41 m) above sea level. In the extreme northwest, the Blue Ridge Mountains cover about 500 sq mi (1,300 sq km); the highest elevation, at 3,560 ft (1,086 m), is Sassafras Mountain. The mean elevation of the state is approximately 350 ft (107 m).

Among the many artificial lakes, mostly associated with electric power plants, is Lake Marion, the state's largest, covering 173 sq mi (48 sq km). Three river systemsthe Pee Dee, Santee, and Savannahdrain most of the state. No rivers are navigable above the fall line.

CLIMATE

South Carolina has a humid, subtropical climate. Average temperatures range from 68°f (20°c) on the coast to 58°f (14°c) in the northwest, with colder temperatures in the mountains. Summers are hot: in the central part of the state, temperatures often exceed 90°f (32°c), with a record of 111°f (44°c) set at Camden on 28 June 1954. In the northwest, temperatures of 32°f (0°c) or less occur from 50 to 70 days a year; the record low for the state is 20°f (29°c), set at Caesars Head Mountain on 18 January 1977. The daily average temperature at Columbia is 45°f (7°c) in January and 82°f (27°c) in July.

Rainfall is ample throughout the state, averaging 48.7 in (123 cm) annually at Columbia and ranging from 38 in (97 cm) in the central region to 52 in (132 cm) in the upper piedmont. Snow and sleet (averaging 2 in/5 cm a year at Columbia) occur about three times annually, but more frequently and heavily in the mountains.

FLORA AND FAUNA

Principal trees of South Carolina include palmetto (the state tree), balsam fir, beech, yellow birch, pitch pine, cypress, and several types of maple, ash, hickory, and oak; longleaf pine grows mainly south of the fall line. Rocky areas of the piedmont contain a wide mixture of moss and lichens. The coastal plain has a diversity of land formationsswamp, prairie, savannah, marsh, dunesand, accordingly, a great number of different grasses, shrubs, and vines. Azaleas and camellias, not native to the state, have been planted profusely in private and pubic gardens. Nineteen plant species were listed as threatened or endangered in April 2006, including smooth coneflower, Schweinitz's sunflower, black spored quillwort, pondberry, and persistent trillium.

South Carolina mammals include white-tailed deer (the state animal), black bear, opossum, gray and red foxes, cottontail and marsh rabbits, mink, and woodchuck. Three varieties of raccoon are indigenous, one of them unique to Hilton Head Island. The state is also home to Bachman's shrew, originally identified in South Carolina by John Bachman, one of John J. Audubon's collaborators. Common birds include the mockingbird and Carolina wren (the state bird). Nineteen animal species (vertebrates and invertebrates) were listed as threatened or endangered in South Carolina in April 2006, including the Indiana bat, Carolina heel-splitter, bald eagle, five species of sea turtle, wood stork, and short-nose sturgeon.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

The Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), established in 1973, is South Carolina's primary environmental protection agency. The agency's responsibilities were broadened in 1993 by government restructuring, which brought all natural resources permitting under the DHEC umbrella. The former Land Resources Commission and Water Resources Commission were dissolved by restructuring. The DHEC's areas of responsibility include all programs dealing with surface and groundwater protection; air quality; solid, hazardous, infectious and nuclear waste; mining; dam safety; public drinking water protection; shellfish; public swimming pool inspection; and environmental laboratory certification, among other things. In 2002, more than 99% of the state's 1,520 federally defined public water systems had complied with drinking water regulatory requirements.

The state has implemented an innovative river basin planning program for the modeling, permitting and protection of its surface water resources. South Carolina's five major river basins are to be studied, modeled, and subsequent permits renewed on a five-year rotating basis. The state's goal is to use the environmental permitting process to assess and control the overall health of the basin systems. About 25% of the state is covered with wetlands, most of which are forested and of freshwater.

In 2002 DHEC implemented programs to help citizens minimize risk of contracting West Nile virus, transmitted by mosquitoes.

South Carolina, as the rest of the nation, is preparing to implement an aggressive air quality permitting program. The state has in place an industrial fee system to support the air program which will include both stationary and mobile source activities.

In 1992, South Carolina passed the Solid Waste Management and Policy Act requiring county and regional solid waste planning to be in conformance with the State Solid Waste Management Plan. The state has in place innovative programs for source reduction, waste minimization, and recycling. Regulations have been approved for municipal and industrial waste land disposal systems, incineration, construction, and land clearing debris and other solid waste activities.

South Carolina has implemented aggressive regulatory reform. Coupled with "streamlined permitting," customer-friendly programs promote economic development without sacrificing environmental protection.

In 2003, 83.7 million lb of toxic chemicals were released in the state. In 2003, South Carolina had 194 hazardous waste sites listed in the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) database, 26 of which were on the National Priorities List as of 2006, including the Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot. In 2005, the EPA spent over $4.8 million through the Superfund program for the cleanup of hazardous waste sites in the state. The same year, federal EPA grants awarded to the state included $11 million for the clean water state revolving fund and $8 million for the drinking water revolving fund.

POPULATION

South Carolina ranked 25th in population in the United States with an estimated total of 4,255,083 in 2005, an increase of 6.1% since 2000. Between 1990 and 2000, South Carolina's population grew from 3,486,703 to 4,012,012, an increase of 15.1%. The population is projected to reach 4.6 million by 2015 and 4.98 million by 2025. In 2004, the median age for South Carolinians was 36.9. In the same year, 24.4% of the populace was under age 18 while 12.4% was age 65 or older. The population density in 2004 was 139.4 persons per sq mi.

In 2004, Columbia was the largest city proper, with 116,331 residents. Other cities with large population concentrations include Charleston (104,883), Greenville, and Spartanburg. In 2004, the Columbia metropolitan area had an estimated 679,456 residents and the Charleston metropolitan area had 583,434.

ETHNIC GROUPS

The white population of South Carolina is mainly of Northern European stock; the great migratory wave from Southern and Eastern Europe during the late 19th century left South Carolina virtually untouched. As of 2000, 115,978, or 2.9%, of South Carolinians were foreign born (up from 1.4% in 1990).

In 2000, the black population was 1,185,216, or 29.5% of the state's population (the third-highest percentage in the nation). In 2004, that percentage had dropped only slightly, to 29.4%. In the coastal regions and offshore islands there still can be found some vestiges of African heritage, notably the Gullah dialect. South Carolina has always had an urban black elite, much of it of mixed racial heritage. After 1954, racial integration proceeded relatively peacefully, with careful planning by both black and white leaders.

The 2000 census counted 13,718 American Indians, up from 8,000 in 1990. In 2004, 0.4% of the population was American Indian. In 1983, a federal appeals court upheld the Indians' claim that 144,000 acres (58,275 hectares) of disputed land still belonged to the Catawba tribe, who numbered an estimated 1,597 in 1995. In 2000, there were 95,076 Hispanics and Latinos (2.4% of the total population), nearly double the 1990 figure of 50,000 (1.3%). In 2004, 3.1% of the population was of Hispanic or Latino origin. In 2000, the census reported 52,871 Mexicans and 12.211 Puerto Ricans (up from 4,282 in 1990) in South Carolina. In the same year, South Carolina had 36,014 Asians, including 6,423 Filipinos, 2,448 Japanese, and 3,665 Koreans. Pacific Islanders numbered 1,628. In 2004, 1.1% of the population was Asian and 0.1% Pacific Islander. That year, 0.8% of the population reported origin of two or more races.

LANGUAGES

English settlers in the 17th century encountered first the Yamasee Indians and then the Catawba, both having languages of the Hokan-Siouan family. Few Indians remain today, and a bare handful of their place-names persist: Cherokee Falls, Santee, Saluda.

South Carolina English is marked by a division between the South Midland of the upcountry and the plantation Southern of the coastal plain, where dominant Charleston speech has extensive cultural influence even in rural areas. Many upcountry speakers of Scotch-Irish background retain /r/ after a vowel, as in hard, a feature now gaining acceptance among younger speakers in Charleston. At the same time, a longtime distinctive Charleston feature, a centering glide after a long vowel, so that date and eight sound like /day-uht/ and /ay-uht/, is losing ground among younger speakers. Along the coast and on the Sea Islands, some blacks still use the Gullah dialect, based on a Creole mixture of pre-Revolutionary English and African speech. The dialect is rapidly dying in South Carolina, though its influence on local pronunciations persists.

In 2000, 94.8% of all state residents five years of age and older reported speaking English at home, up from 96.5% in 1990.

The following table gives selected statistics from the 2000 Census for language spoken at home by persons five years old and over.

LANGUAGE NUMBER PERGENT
Population 5 years and over 3,748,669 100.0
  Speak only English 3,552,240 94.8
  Speak a language other than English 196,429 5.2
Speak a language other than English 196,429 5.2
  Spanish or Spanish Creole 110,030 2.9
  French (incl. Patois, Cajun) 19,110 0.5
  German 15,195 0.4
  Chinese 5,648 0.2
  Tagalog 4,496 0.1
  Vietnamese 3,772 0.1
  Korean 3,294 0.1
  Italian 3,091 0.1
  Japanese 2,807 0.1
  Greek 2,566 0.1
  Arabic 2,440 0.1
  Gujarathi 2,101 0.1
  Russian 1,618 0.0

RELIGIONS

Evangelical Protestants account for a majority of the religiously active residents in the state. The largest single Christian de-nomination in 2000 was the Southern Baptist Convention with 928,341 adherents; there were 16,802 newly baptized members in 2002. The next largest of the Evangelical denominations were the Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee) with 56,612 adherents and the Pentecostal Holiness Church with 33,820 adherents. The largest Mainline Protestant denomination is the United Methodist Church, which had 241,680 members in 2004. Other de-nominations (with 2000 figures) include the Presbyterian Church USA, 103,883; and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, 61,380. The Episcopal Church had great influence during colonial times, but in 2000 it had only 52,486 members. In 2004, there were 152,413 Roman Catholics in the state. In 2000, there were an estimated 11,000 Jews, 17,586 adherents to the Baha'i faith, and 5,761 Muslims. About 2.1 million people (52.4% of the population) were not counted as members of any religious organization.

TRANSPORTATION

Since the Revolutionary War, South Carolina has been concerned with expanding the transport of goods between the upcountry and the port of Charleston and the Midwestern United States. Several canals were constructed north of the fall line, and the 136-mi (219-km) railroad completed from Charleston to Hamburg (across the Savannah River from Augusta, Georgia) in 1833 was the longest in the world at that time. Three years earlier, the Best Friend of Charleston had become the first American steam loco-motive built for public railway passenger service; by the time the Charleston-Hamburg railway was completed, however, the Best Friend had blown up, and a new engine, the Phoenix, had replaced it. Many other efforts were made to connect Charleston to the interior by railway, but tunnels through the mountains were never completed. As of 2003, there were 2,423 rail mi (3,901 km) of track, utilized by two Class I, seven local, and four switching and terminal railroads. Lumber and wood products were the top commodities originating within the state that were carried by the railroads. Coal was the top commodity terminating in the state that was carried by the railroads. As of 2006, Amtrak provided north-south passenger train service to 11 cities in the state via its Crescent, Silver Services and Palmetto trains.

The public road network in 2004 was made up of 66,250 mi (106,662 km) of roads. Highway I-26, running northwest-southeast from the upcountry to the Atlantic, intersects I-85 at Spartanburg, I-20 at Columbia, and I-95 on its way toward Charleston. In 2004, there were some 1.912 million automobiles, approximately 1.290 million trucks of all types, and around 5,000 buses registered in the state, while the number of licensed drivers totaled 2,972,369 for that same year. City bus service is most heavily used in the Charleston and Columbia systems.

The state has three deepwater seaports. Charleston is one of the major ports on the Atlantic, handling 24.739 million tons of cargo in 2004, and the harbors of Georgetown and Port Royal also handle significant waterborne trade. The Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, crossing the state slightly inward form the Atlantic Ocean, is a major thoroughfare. In 2003, waterborne shipments totaled 27.811 million tons. In 2004, South Carolina had 482 mi (776 km) of navigable inland waterways.

In 2005, South Carolina had a total of 193 public and privateuse aviation-related facilities. This included 162 airports, 29 heliports, and two seaplane bases. Charleston International is the state's main airport. In 2004, Charleston had 909,084 passenger enplanements. Other major state airports were Greenville-Spartanburg International, Myrtle Beach International, and Columbia Metropolitan.

HISTORY

Prior to European settlement, the region now called South Carolina was populated by several Indian groups. Indians of Iroquoian stock, including the Cherokee, inhabited the northwestern section, while those of the Siouan stockof whom the Catawba were the most numerousoccupied the northern and eastern regions. Indians of Muskogean stock lived in the south.

In the early 1500s, long before the English claimed the Carolinas, Spanish sea captains explored the coast. The Spaniards made an unsuccessful attempt to establish a settlement in 1526 at Winyah Bay, near the present city of Georgetown. Thirty-six years later, a group of French Huguenots under Jean Ribault landed at a site near Parris Island, but the colony failed after Ribault returned to France. The English established the first permanent settlement in 1670 under the supervision of the eight lords proprietors who had been granted "Carolana" by King Charles II. At first the colonists settled at Albemarle Point on the Ashley River: 10 years later, they moved across the river to the present site of Charleston.

Rice cultivation began in the coastal swamps, and black slaves were imported as field hands. The colony flourished, and by the mid-1700s, new areas were developing inland. Germans, Scots-Irish, and Welsh, who differed markedly from the original aristocratic settlers of the Charleston area, migrated to the southern part of the new province. Although the upcountry was developing and was taxed, it was not until 1770 that the settlers there were represented in the government. For the most part, the colonists had friendly relations with the Indians. In 1715, however, the Yamasee were incited by Spanish colonists at St. Augustine, Fla., to attack the South Carolina settlements. The settlers successfully resisted, with no help from the proprietors.

The original royal grant had made South Carolina a very large colony, but eventually the separate provinces of North Carolina and Georgia were established, two moves that destined South Carolina to be a small state. The colonists were successful in having the proprietors overthrown in 1719 and the government transferred to royal rule by 1721.

Skirmishes with the French, Spanish, Indians, and pirates, as well as a slave uprising in 1739, marked the pre-Revolutionary period. South Carolina opposed the Stamp Act of 1765 and took an active part in the American Revolution. The first British property seized by American Revolutionary forces was Ft. Charlotte in McCormick County in 1775. Among the many battles fought in South Carolina were major Patriot victories at Ft. Moultrie in Charleston (1776), Kings Mountain (1780), and Cowpens (1781), the last two among the war's most important engagements. Delegates from South Carolina, notably Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, were leaders at the federal constitutional convention of 1787. On 23 May 1788, South Carolina became the eighth state to ratify the Constitution.

Between the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, two issues dominated South Carolinians' political thinking: tariffs and slavery. Senator John C. Calhoun took an active part in developing the nullification theory by which a state claimed the right to abrogate unpopular federal laws. Open conflict over tariffs during the early 1830s was narrowly averted by a compromise on the rates, but in 1860, on the issue of slavery, no compromise was possible. At the time of secession, on 20 December 1860, more than half the state's population consisted of black slaves. The first battle of the Civil War took place at Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor on 12 April 1861. Federal forces soon captured the Sea Islands, but Charleston withstood a long siege until February 1865. In the closing months of the war, Union troops under General William Tecumseh Sherman burned Columbia and caused widespread destruction elsewhere. South Carolina contributed about 63,000 soldiers to the Confederacy out of a white population of some 291,000. Casualties were high: nearly 14,00 men were killed in battle or died after capture.

Federal troops occupied South Carolina after the war. During Reconstruction, as white South Carolinians saw it, illiterates, carpetbaggers, and scalawags raided the treasury, plunging the state into debt. The constitution was revised in 1868 by a convention in which blacks outnumbered whites by 76 to 48; given the franchise, blacks attained the offices of lieutenant governor and US representative. In 1876, bands of white militants called Red Shirts, supporting the gubernatorial candidacy of former Confederate General Wade Hampton, rode through the countryside urging whites to vote and intimidating potential black voters. Hampton, a Democrat, won the election, but was not permitted by the Republican incumbent to take office until President Rutherford B. Hayes declared an end to Reconstruction and withdrew federal troops from the state in April 1877.

For the next 100 years, South Carolina suffered through political turmoil, crop failures, and recessions. A major political change came in the 1880s with a large population increase upcountry and the migration of poor whites to cities. These trends gave farmers and industrial workers a majority of votes, and they found their leader in Benjamin Ryan "Pitchfork Ben" Tillman, a populist who stirred up class and racial hatreds by attacking the "Charleston ring." Tillman was influential in wresting control of the state Democratic Party from the coastal aristocrats; he served as governor from 1890 to 1894 and then as US senator until his death in 1918. However, his success inaugurated a period of political and racial demagoguery that saw the gradual (though not total) disfranchisement of black voters.

The main economic transformation after 1890 was the replacement of rice and cotton growing by tobacco and soybean cultivation and truck farming, along with the movement of tenant farmers, or sharecroppers, from the land to the cities. There they found jobs in textile mills, and textiles became the state's leading industry after 1900. With the devastation of the cotton crop by the boll weevil in the 1920s, farmers were compelled to diversify their crops, and some turned to raising cattle. Labor shortages in the North during and after World War II drew many thousands of African Americans from South Carolina to Philadelphia, Washington, DC, New York, and other cities.

In the postwar period, industry took over the dominant role formerly held by agriculture in South Carolina's economy, and the focus of textile production shifted from cotton to synthetic fabrics. In the 1990s the major industries were textiles and chemicals, and foreign investment played a major role in the state's economy. BMW, the German automobile company, established their North American plant in Greenville. Tourism also played a role, with the coastal areas drawing visitors from around the nation. In the early 2000s, South Carolina, along with other tobacco-producing states, was in the midst of a transition away from tobacco production.

Public school desegregation after the Brown vs. Board of Education ruling of 1954 proceeded peaceably, but very slowly, and blacks were gradually accepted alongside whites in the textile mills and other industries. In 1983, for the first time in 95 years, a black state senator was elected; the following year, four blacks were elected to the reapportioned Senate. Despite these changes, most white South Carolinians remained staunchly conservative in political and social matters, as witnessed by the 19992000 firestorm over the display of the Confederate flag on the dome of the State House. The controversy prompted the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) to call for a tourism boycott of the state. A January 2000 protest drew nearly 50,000 demonstrators, black and white, against the flag. Legislators brokered a compromise that moved the flag, viewed as a symbol of oppression by African Americans, to a spot in front of the capitol, where it flies from a 30-ft pole. The "solution," though favored by most South Carolinians who were polled, did not satisfy most of the black community. Tourism officials called for the NAACP to lift its boycott, but the organization refused to do so, maintaining the flag's only place is in a museum of history. The issue was raised by presidential candidate Al Sharpton in the 2004 presidential campaign.

In the postwar period, the Democrats' traditional control of the state weakened, and, beginning with Barry Goldwater, Republican presidential candidates have carried the state in every election except that of 1976, in which Southerner Jimmy Carter prevailed. Well-known conservative Republican J. Strom Thurmond represented South Carolina in the US Senate from 1954 to 2003, when he died at age 100. But his Democratic counterpart, Ernest Hollings (also a former governor) served in the Senate from 1966 to 2005.

In 1989, Hurricane Hugo struck South Carolina, packing 135-mph (217-kph) winds. Ripping roofs off buildings and sweeping boats onto city streets, the storm killed 37 people and produced over $700 million worth of property damage. Seven South Carolina counties were declared disaster areas. In 1993, flooding, followed by a record-breaking drought, caused an estimated $226 million in crop damage.

In response to a Supreme Court ruling, The Citadel (in Charleston), one of only two state-supported military schools in the country, admitted its first female cadet, Shannon Faulkner, in 1995. Faulkner left the institution after only six days. In 1997 two of four women attending the institution quit, alleging hazing and sexual harassment by their male peers. In May 1999 the institution graduated its first female cadet. By the following August, there were 75 female cadets enrolled at the Citadel, as the school fought a sexual harassment lawsuit of a former cadet.

In 1999 a settlement was reached in the worst oil spill in the state's history. A record $7-million fine was to be paid by a national pipeline company that admitted its negligence caused nearly one million gallons of diesel fuel to pollute the Upstate River.

South Carolina finished fiscal year 2003 with a $68.8 million budget deficit, down from the $248.8 million deficit at the end of fiscal year 2002. In 2003, Republican Governor Mark Sanford, elected in 2002, urged state legislators to reform the way the government conducts its business, from allowing state officials to hire and fire employees more easily, to funding schools with block grants rather than line items. The 200506 budget was $5.3 billion, and the state was struggling with a deficit of some $300-$500 million. South Carolina was among the 10 states in the nation with the lowest per capita personal incomes and the highest poverty rates.

STATE GOVERNMENT

South Carolina has had seven constitutions, dating from 1776, 1778, 1790, 1861, 1865, 1868, and 1895, respectively. Beginning in 1970, most articles of the 1895 constitution were rewritten. The present document had been amended 485 times as of January 2005.

The General Assembly consists of a Senate of 46 members, elected for four-year terms, and a House of Representatives of 124 members, elected for two-year terms. Senators must be 25 years old, representatives 21; all legislators must be residents of the districts they represent. The legislative salary was $10,400 in 2004, unchanged from 1999.

Officials elected statewide are the governor and lieutenant governor (elected separately), attorney general, secretary of state, comptroller general, treasurer, adjutant general, secretary of agriculture, secretary of banking, and superintendent of education, all elected to four-year terms in odd-numbered years following presidential elections. The governor is limited to serving two consecutive terms. Eligibility requirements for the governor include a minimum age of 30, US and state citizenship for at least five years, and a five-year state residency. As of December 2004, the governor's salary was $106,078, unchanged from 1999.

Legislative sessions are held biennially, beginning in January; there is no limit to regular sessions. Special sessions can be called by a vote of two-thirds of the members of each house; there is no limit to special sessions. Bills may be introduced in either house, except for revenue measures, which are reserved to the House of Representatives. The governor has a regular veto, which may be overridden by a two-thirds vote of the elected members in each house of the legislature. Bills automatically become law after five days if the governor takes no action. The constitution may be amended by a two-thirds vote of each house of the General Assembly and by a majority of those casting ballots at the next general election. To take effect, however, the amendment must then be ratified by a majority vote of the next General Assembly.

US citizens 18 years old and older who are residents of the state are eligible to vote. Restrictions apply to convicted felons and those declared mentally incompetent by the court.

POLITICAL PARTIES

South Carolina's major political organizations are the Democratic and Republican parties. From the end of Reconstruction, the Democratic Party dominated state politics. Dissatisfaction with the national party's position on civil rights in 1948 led to the formation of the States' Rights Democrat faction, whose candidate, South Carolina Governor J. Strom Thurmond, carried the state in 1948. Thurmond's subsequent switch to the Republicans while in the US Senate was a big boost for the state's Republican Party, which since 1964 has captured South Carolina's eight electoral votes in ten of the eleven presidential elections. In 2000, Republican George W. Bush received 57% of the vote to Democrat Al Gore's 41%. In 2004, Bush won 58% to 41% for Democrat John Kerry.

South Carolina's US senators are Republican James DeMint, who won the seat vacated by Democrat Ernest F. Hollings, who announced in August 2003 that he would retire at the end of his term, and Republican Lindsey Graham, elected in 2002. Republican Strom Thurmond, who was reelected in 1996 at the age of 93was the oldest senator in the country's history. Thurmond died in June 2003 at the age of 100. As of 2005, there were two Democrats and four Republicans serving as US representatives. As on 2005, the state Senate had 19 Democrats and 27 Republicans; while in the state House there were 74 Republicans and 50 Democrats. In 2002 voters elected a Republican, Mark Sanford, to the governor's office.

Voters do not register according to political party in South Carolina. Instead, at primary elections, they simply take an oath that they have not participated in another primary. In 2004 there were 2,315,000 registered voters and the state held eight electoral votes for the 2004 presidential election.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

As of 2005, South Carolina had 46 counties, 269 municipal governments, 90 public school districts, and 301 special districts of various types. Ten regional councils provide a broad range of technical and advisory services to county and municipal governments.

Under legislation enacted in 1975, all counties and municipalities have the same powers, regardless of size. Most municipalities operate under the mayor-council or city manager system; more than half the counties have a county administrator or manager. Customarily, each county has a council or commission, attorney, auditor, clerk of court, coroner, tax collector, treasurer, and sheriff. Many of these county officials are elected, but the only municipal officers elected are the mayor and the members of the council.

South Carolina Presidential Vote by Political Parties, 19482004
YEAR ELECTORAL VOTE SOUTH CAROLINA WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN STATES RIGHTS DEMOCRAT LIBERTARIAN
*Won US presidential election.
**CONSTITUTION Party candidate Michael Peroutka received 5,317 votes.
1948 8 Thurmond (SRD) 34,423 5,386 102,607
1952 8 Stevenson (D) 172,957 168,043
UNPLEDGED
1956 8 Stevenson (D) 136,278 75,634 88,509
1960 8 *Kennedy (D) 198,121 188,558
1964 8 Goldwater (R) 215,723 309,048
AMERICAN IND
1968 8 *Nixon (R) 197,486 254,062 215,430
AMERICAN
1972 8 *Nixon (R) 1,868,824 477,044 10,075
1976 8 *Carter (D) 450,807 346,149 2,996
LIBERTARIAN
1980 8 *Reagan (R) 430,385 441,841 4,975
1984 8 *Reagan (R) 344,459 615,539 4,359
1988 8 *Bush (R) 370,554 606,443 4,935
IND. (Perot)
1992 8 Bush (R) 479,514 577,507 138,872 2,719
1996 8 Dole (R) 506,283 573,458 64,386 4,271
UNITED CITIZENS
2000 8 *Bush, G, W. (R) 565,561 785,937 20,200 4,876
IND. (Nader)
2004** 8 *Bush, G. W.(R) 661,699 937,974 5,520 3,608

While the state shares revenues from many different sources with the counties and, municipalities, these local units derive virtually all their direct revenue from the property tax. The state's school districts have rapidly increased their own property tax levies, squeezing the counties' and municipalities' revenue base.

In 2005, local government accounted for about 167,783 fulltime (or equivalent) employment positions.

STATE SERVICES

To address the continuing threat of terrorism and to work with the federal Department of Homeland Security, homeland security in South Carolina operates under state statute; a state police superintendent is appointed to oversee the state's homeland security activities.

The State Ethics Commission establishes rules covering possible conflicts of interest, oversees election campaign practices, and provides for officeholders' financial disclosure.

The Department of Education administers state and federal aid to the public schools, while the State Commission on Higher Education oversees the public colleges and universities, and the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education is responsible for postsecondary technical training schools. The state also runs special schools for the deaf and blind. Complementing both public and higher education is a state educational television network, under the jurisdiction of the South Carolina Educational Television Commission. Transportation services are provided by the Department of Transportation, which maintains most major roads, issues drivers' licenses, and has jurisdiction over the High-way Patrol. The Department of Public Safety regulates traffic, motor vehicles, and commercial vehicles. The Department of Commerce Division of Aeronautics oversees airport development.

Through a variety of agencies, South Carolina offers a broad array of human services in the fields of mental health, developmental disabilities, vocational rehabilitation, veterans' affairs, care of the blind, and adoptions. An ombudsman for the aging handles complaints about nursing homes, which are licensed by the state. The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division provides technical aid to county sheriffs and municipal police departments. Emergency situations are handled by the Emergency Management Division and the National Guard.

The State Housing Finance and Development Authority is authorized to subsidize interest rates on mortgages for middle- and low-income families. The Employment Security Commission oversees unemployment compensation and job placement, while the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation offers arbitration and mediation services and enforces health and safety standards. The Human Affairs Commission looks into unfair labor practices based on sex, race, or age.

JUDICIAL SYSTEM

South Carolina's unified judicial system is headed by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, who, along with four associate justices, is elected by the General Assembly to a 10-year term. The state's Supreme Court is the final court of appeal. A five-member intermediate court of appeals for criminal cases was established in 1979, but legal questions (specifically, about the election of General Assembly members to four of the five seats) prevented the court from convening until 1981. The court became a permanent constitutional court in 1984.

Sixteen circuit courts hear major criminal and civil cases. As of 1999 there were 154 circuit court judges, all of them elected by the General Assembly to six-year terms. The state also has a system of family courts for domestic and juvenile cases. In addition, there are magistrates' courts (justices of the peace) in all counties, municipal courts, and county probate judges.

The state penal system is rapidly becoming centralized under the state Department of Corrections. There is also a separate state system for juvenile offenders.

As of 31 December 2004, a total of 23,428 prisoners were held in South Carolina's state and federal prisons, a decrease from 23,719 of 1.2% from the previous year. As of year-end 2004, a total of 1,562 inmates were female, down from 1,576 or 0.9% from the year before. Among sentenced prisoners (one year or more), South Carolina had an incarceration rate of 539 per 100,000 population in 2004.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, South Carolina in 2004, had a violent crime rate (murder/nonnegligent manslaughter; forcible rape; robbery; aggravated assault) of 784.2 reported incidents per 100,000 population (the highest of any state) or a total of 32,922 reported incidents. Crimes against property (burglary; larceny/theft; and motor vehicle theft) in that same year totaled 189,113 reported incidents or 4,504.8 reported incidents per 100,000 people. South Carolina has a death penalty, of which prisoners are allowed to choose between lethal injection or electrocution. From 1976 through 5 May 2006, the state has carried out 35 executions, of which three in 2005 were the most recent (as of 5 May 2006). As of 1 January 2006, South Carolina had 74 inmates on death row.

In 2003, South Carolina spent $101,287,819 on homeland security, an average of $25 per state resident.

ARMED FORCES

In 2004, there were 38,213 active duty military personnel and 9,382 civilian personnel stationed in South Carolina. Ft. Jackson, in Columbia, is the largest and most active Initial Entry Training Center in the US Army, training 34% of all Soldiers and 69% of the women entering the Army each year. Air Force bases at Charleston and Sumter are major installations. Parris Island has long been one of the country's chief Marine Corps training bases. South Carolina firms received more than $1.59 billion in defense contract awards during 2004. In addition, there was another $3.3 billion in payroll outlays, including retired military pay, by the Department of Defense.

Veterans in South Carolina in 2003 totaled 413,551, including 45,135 from World War II; 39,518 from the Korean conflict; 122,974 who served during the Vietnam era; and 76,461 who served during in the Gulf War. In 2004, the Veterans Administration expended more than $1.2 billion in pensions, medical assistance, and other major veterans' benefits.

As of 31 October 2004, the South Carolina Highway Patrol employed 829 full-time sworn officers.

MIGRATION

The original European migration into South Carolina consisted mostly of German, Welsh, and Scotch-Irish settlers. During the 19th century, many of the original settlers emigrated westward to Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas. In the 20th century, many blacks left the state for cities in the North. Between 1940 and 1970, South Carolina's net loss from migration was 601,000. During 197080, however, the state enjoyed a net gain of 210,000; in the 1980s, the net gain from migration was nearly 200,000. Between 1990 and 1998, the state had net gains of 119,000 in domestic migration and 16,000 in international migration. In 1998, 2,125 foreign immigrants arrived in South Carolina. The state's overall population increased 10% between 1990 and 1998. In the period 200005, international migration was 36,401 and net internal migration was 115,084, for a net gain of 151,485 people.

INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERATION

The South Carolina Interstate Cooperation Commission represents the state before the Council of State Governments. South Carolina also participates in the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, Southeastern Forest Fire Protection Compact, Southern Growth Policies Board, Southern States Energy Board, Appalachian Regional Commission, Interstate Mining Compact Commission, and Southern Regional Education Board. In fiscal year 2005, the state received $4.918 billion in federal grants, an estimated $4.843 billion in fiscal year 2006, and an estimated $4.972 billion in fiscal year 2007.

ECONOMY

During its early days, South Carolina was one of the country's richest areas. Its economy depended on foreign commerce and agriculture, especially indigo, rice, and later cotton. After the Civil War, the state suffered severe economic depression. Not until the 1880s did the textile industrytoday the state's major employerbegin to develop.

Textiles and farming completely dominated the economy until after World War II, when efforts toward economic diversification attracted paper, chemical, and other industries to the state. During the postwar period, the state spent sizable amounts to improve its three ports, especially the harbor facilities of Charleston.

By 1999, manufacturing had become the most important sector in the South Carolina economy. Almost 25% of the labor force worked in manufacturing, well above the national average of 17%. The top ten manufacturers in the state employed over 40,000 workers. The Westinghouse Savannah River Site military base accounts for a significant portion of the state's manufacturing base. Employment at those facilities grew significantly during the 1980s when the Reagan administration increased military expenditures. In the 1990s, however, the federal government began cutting staff at the bases and considered phasing them out. Rising foreign and domestic investment, coupled with an abundance of first-class tourist facilities along the coast, contributed to the continuing growth of South Carolina's economy in the 1980s and were only temporarily hurt by the national recession of the early nineties. The state economy's annual growth rate, averaging 5.5% 1998 to 2000, dropped to 2.6% in the national recession of 2001. Manufacturing output, nearly flat from 1997 to 2001, dropped as a share of total state output from 24.5% to 20%. The strongest output growth was in the transportation and public utilities sector (up 41.9% 1997 to 2001). General services, including health, business, tourist, personal and educational services were up 30.3%, while financial services, including insurance and real estate were up 28%, and government services were up 25.7%.

In 2004, South Carolina's gross state product (GSP) was $136.125 billion, of which manufacturing (durable and nondurable goods) contributed $26.265 billion or 19.3% of GSP, followed by the real estate sector at $15.185 billion (11.1% of GSP), and construction at $7.670 billion (5.6% of GSP). In that same year, there were an estimated 312,108 small businesses in South Carolina. Of the 92,940 businesses that had employees, an estimated total of 90,416 or 97.3% were small companies. An estimated 11,745 new businesses were established in the state in 2004, up 9.2% from the year before. Business terminations that same year came to 10,975, up 2.5% from 2003. There were 175 business bankruptcies in 2004, up 23.2% from the previous year. In 2005, the state's personal bankruptcy (Chapter 7 and Chapter 13) filing rate was 391 filings per 100,000 people, ranking South Carolina as the 39th highest in the nation.

INCOME

In 2005 South Carolina had a gross state product (GSP) of $140 billion which accounted for 1.1% of the nation's gross domestic product and placed the state at number 28 in highest GSP among the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, in 2004 South Carolina had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $27,185. This ranked 45th in the United States and was 82% of the national average of $33,050. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of PCPI was 4.0%. South Carolina had a total personal income (TPI) of $114,121,015,000, which ranked 26th in the United States and reflected an increase of 6.0% from 2003. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of TPI was 5.3%. Earnings of persons employed in South Carolina increased from $79,528,714,000 in 2003 to $84,052,494,000 in 2004, an increase of 5.7%. The 200304 national change was 6.3%.

The US Census Bureau reports that the three-year average median household income for 200204 in 2004 dollars was $39,326 compared to a national average of $44,473. During the same period an estimated 14.0% of the population was below the poverty line as compared to 12.4% nationwide.

LABOR

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), in April 2006 the seasonally adjusted civilian labor force in South Carolina 2,123,800, with approximately 139,900 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 6.6%, compared to the national average of 4.7% for the same period. Preliminary data for the same period placed nonfarm employment at 1,907,100. Since the beginning of the BLS data series in 1976, the highest unemployment rate recorded in South Carolina was 11.4% in January 1983. The historical low was 3.1% in March 1998. Preliminary nonfarm employment data by occupation for April 2006 showed that approximately 6.4% of the labor force was employed in construction; 13.7% in manufacturing; 19.3% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 5.3% in financial activities; 10% in education and health services; 10.7% in leisure and hospitality services; and 17.5% in government. Data was unavailable for professional and business services.

South Carolina has one of the lowest work stoppage rates in the nation and only a small percentage of the total labor force is organized. Textile, clothing, and ladies' garment workers' unions make up the bulk of the membership, followed by transportation and electrical workers. Several large textile companies have made major efforts to prevent their workers from organizing unions. Conflicts between management and workers have continued for years, but without serious violence.

The BLS reported that in 2005, a total of 40,000 of South Carolina's 1,739,000 employed wage and salary workers were formal members of a union. This represented 2.3% of those so employed, down from 3% in 2004, well below the national average of 12% and the lowest rate of all states. Overall in 2005, a total of 58,000 workers (3.3%) in South Carolina were covered by a union or employee association contract, which includes those workers who reported no union affiliation. South Carolina is one of 22 states with a right-to-work law.

As of 1 March 2006, South Carolina did not have a state-mandated minimum wage law. Employees in that state however, were covered under federal minimum wage statutes. In 2004, women in the state accounted for 48.1% of the employed civilian labor force.

AGRICULTURE

Agriculture is an integral part of the state's economy. The total cash receipts for agriculture were about $1.75 billion in 2004, but that figure represents only a fraction of the impact of agriculture and agribusiness in the state. Agriculture (food and fiber) along with forestry and forestry products contribute about 25% to the gross state product (GSP). Some 18% of all jobs in South Carolina are from agriculture and agribusiness. As of 2004 there were about 24,400 farms in the state, occupying 4.8 million acres (1.9 million hectares) with an average size of 199 acres (80 hectares). Agriculture in South Carolina supplies not only food for consumption, but also cotton for clothing and soybean oil for newsprint ink.

The main farming area is a 50-mi (80-km) band across the upper coastal plain. The Pee Dee region in the east is the center for tobacco production. Cotton is grown mostly south of the fall line, and feed crops thrive in the coastal and sand hill counties. Tobacco is the leading crop by value; in 2004, farmers in the state produced 60.75 million lb (27.61 million kg) of tobacco on 27,000 acres (10,900 hectares). Soybean and cotton production in that year were 14.8 million bushels and 390,000 bales, respectively. Peach production in 2004 was 70 million lb (31.8 million kg). Greenhouse and nursery products contributed 15.6% to total farm receipts in 2004.

South Carolina farmers and agribusinesses also produce apples, barley, beans, berries, canola, corn, cucumbers, hay, kiwifruit, mushrooms, oats, peanuts, pecans, popcorn, rye, sorghum, sweet potatoes, tea, turf grasses, tomatoes, ornamental trees, and wheat. As more people relocate and retire to the state, demand for agricultural products is increasing in order to supply restaurant, hotel, and landscaping businesses. The South Carolina Department of Agriculture operates three state farmers' markets in Columbia, Florence, and Greenville.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

In 2005, there were an estimated 435,000 cattle and calves, worth $339.3 million. During 2004, there were around 300,000 hogs and pigs, valued at $27 million. Dairy farmers produced around 318 million lb (144.5 million kg) of milk from 19,000 milk cows in 2003. Poultry farmers produced 1.4 billion eggs, worth some $87.9 million in the same year, and 14.8 million lb (6.7 million kg) of chicken, 1.14 billion lb (518 million kg) of broilers, and 494 million lb (224.5 million kg) of turkey.

FISHING

The state's oceanfront saltwater inlets and freshwater rivers and lakes provide ample fishing opportunities. Major commercial fishing is restricted to saltwater species of fish and shellfish, mainly shrimp, crabs, clams, and oysters. In 2004, the commercial catch totaled 12.4 million lb (5.6 million kg), valued at $18.5 million. In 2003, there were two processing plants in the state. In 2002, the commercial fleet had 556 vessels.

In 2004, the state issued 498,088 sport fishing licenses. There are two national fish hatcheries in the state (Orangeberg and Bears Bluff), stocking more than 5 million fish annually. In 2004, there were nine catfish farms covering 90 acres (36 hectares).

FORESTRY

South Carolina had 12,415,000 acres (5,024,000 hectares) of forestland in 2004about two-thirds of the state's area and 1.7% of all US forests. The state's two national forests, Francis Marion and Sumter, comprised 5% of the forested area. Nearly all of South Carolina's forests are classified as commercial timberland, about 90% of it privately owned. Several varieties of pine, loblolly, long-leaf, and shortleaf, are the major source of timber and of pulp for the paper industry. Total lumber production in 2004 was 1.57 billion board ft, 90% soft wood.

MINING

According to preliminary data from the US Geological Survey (USGS), the estimated value of nonfuel mineral production by South Carolina in 2003 was $474 million, an increase from 2002 of 3%. The USGS data ranked South Carolina as 27th among the 50 states by the total value of its nonfuel mineral production, accounting for over 1% of total US output.

According to the preliminary data for 2003, portland cement was the state's leading nonfuel mineral commodity by value, and was followed by crushed stone, construction sand and gravel, kaolin, industrial sand and gravel, and vermiculite. Collectively, the initial three commodities accounted for 91% of all nonfuel mineral output, by value. By volume, South Carolina in 2003 ranked first in the production of vermiculite (out of two states), and was the nation's second leading producer of fire clay. It was third in masonry cement and kaolin, and ninth in common clays.

Preliminary data showed that production of portland cement in 2003 totaled 2.5 million metric tons, and was worth an estimated $183 million. It was followed by crushed stone, of which 26.3 million metric tons were produced, with a value of $171 million. Masonry cement output in 2003 totaled 425,000 metric tons and was worth an estimated $40.4 million, Construction sand and gravel production for that same year totaled 10.3 million metric tons and was valued at $36.1 million.

ENERGY AND POWER

As of 2003, South Carolina had 47 electrical power service providers, of which 22 were publicly owned and 21 were cooperatives. Of the remainder, four were investor owned. As of that same year there were 2,177,474 retail customers. Of that total, 1,235,618 received their power from investor-owned service providers. Cooperatives accounted for 645,551 customers, while publicly owned providers had 296,305 customers.

Total net summer generating capability by the state's electrical generating plants in 2003 stood at 20.658 million kW, with total production that same year at 93.772 billion kWh. Of the total amount generated, 97.6% came from electric utilities, with the remainder coming from independent producers and combined heat and power service providers. The largest portion of all electric power generated, 50.417 billion kWh (53.8%), came from nuclear power generation, with coal-fired plants in second place at 37.432 billion kWh (39.9%). Other renewable power sources, petroleum and natural gas fueled plants, hydroelectric and pumped storage facilities accounted for the remaining power generated.

Although it lacks fossil fuel resources, South Carolina produces more electricity than it consumes. South Carolina is heavily engaged in nuclear energy and is one of the nation's largest generators of nuclear power. As of 2006, the state had seven nuclear reactors in operation, two at the Catawba plant (the state's largest), three at the Oconee facility near Greenville, one at the H. B. Robinson plant near Hartsville, and one at the Virgil C. Summer plant near Jenkinsville. The vast Savannah River plant in Aiken County produces most of the plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons; Chem-Nuclear Systems in Barnwell County stores about half of the country's low-level nuclear wastes; and a Westinghouse plant in Richland County makes fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors.

South Carolina has no proven reserves or production of crude oil or natural gas. There are no refineries in the state.

INDUSTRY

South Carolina's principal industry beginning in the 1880s was textiles, but many textile mills were closed during the 1970s and early 1980s because of the importation of cheaper textiles from abroad. The economic slack was made up, however, by the establishment of new industries, especially paper and chemical manufactures, and by increasing foreign investment in the state. Principal overseas investment came from Switzerland, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Japan. South Carolina's major manufacturing centers are concentrated north of the fall line and in the piedmont.

According to the US Census Bureau's Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) for 2004, South Carolina's manufacturing sector covered some 18 product subsectors. The shipment value of all products manufactured in the state that same year was $81.630 billion. Of that total, transportation equipment manufacturing accounted for the largest share at $15.251 billion. It was followed by chemical manufacturing at $12.722 billion; machinery manufacturing at $6.735 billion; textile mills at $6.445 billion; and plastics and rubber products manufacturing at $6.296 billion.

In 2004, a total of 258,222 people in South Carolina were employed in the state's manufacturing sector, according to the ASM. Of that total, 194,712 were actual production workers. In terms of total employment, the textile mill industry accounted for the largest portion of all manufacturing employees at 32,183, with 27,591 actual production workers. It was followed by chemical manufacturing at 29,896 employees (16,550 actual production workers); transportation equipment manufacturing at 29,655 employees (22,290 actual production workers); fabricated metal product manufacturing at 25,664 employees (19,819 actual production workers); and plastics and rubber products manufacturing with 20,292 employees (16,001 actual production workers).

ASM data for 2004 showed that South Carolina's manufacturing sector paid $10.293 billion in wages. Of that amount, the chemical manufacturing sector accounted for the largest share at $1.696 billion. It was followed by transport equipment manufacturing at $1.356 billion; textile mills at $958.880 million; fabricated metal product manufacturing at $929.957 million; and plastics and rubber products manufacturing at $877.816 million.

COMMERCE

According to the 2002 Census of Wholesale Trade, South Carolina's wholesale trade sector had sales that year totaling $32.9 billion from 4,917 establishments. Wholesalers of durable goods accounted for 3,031 establishments, followed by nondurable goods wholesalers at 1,559 and electronic markets, agents, and brokers accounting for 327 establishments. Sales by durable goods wholesalers in 2002 totaled $16.3 billion, while wholesalers of nondurable goods saw sales of $12.8 billion. Electronic markets, agents, and brokers in the wholesale trade industry had sales of $3.8 billion. Tobacco wholesale markets and warehouses are centered in the Pee Dee region, while soybean sales and storage facilities cluster around the port of Charleston. Truck crops, fruits, and melons are sold in large quantities at the state farmers' market in Columbia.

In the 2002 Census of Retail Trade, South Carolina was listed as having 18,416 retail establishments with sales of $40.6 billion. The leading types of retail businesses by number of establishments were: clothing and clothing accessories stores (2,647); gasoline stations (2,476); motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers (2,237); and miscellaneous store retailers (2,131). In terms of sales, motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers accounted for the largest share of retail sales at $10.4 billion, followed by general merchandise stores at $6.2 billion; food and beverage stores at $6.03 billion; and gasoline stations at $4.6 billion. A total of 212,926 people were employed by the retail sector in South Carolina that year.

In 2005, foreign exports were valued at $13.9 billion. Exports, mostly machinery, transportation equipment, and electronics; went primarily to Canada, Mexico, and Germany.

CONSUMER PROTECTION

The South Carolina Department of Consumer Affairs, established in 1974, has the authority to take, process, and investigate consumer complaints for probable basis and merit, represent the public at regulatory proceedings, and enforce consumer credit laws and consumer-related licensing laws. The Department is organized into five divisions: Administration; Consumer Services; Consumer Advocacy; Public Information and Education; and the Legal Division.

The Department is also responsible for the licensing and registration of pawnbrokers, motor clubs, physical fitness service organizations, mortgage loan brokers, athletic agents, prescription drug cards, continuing care retirement communities and prepaid legal representatives.

The state's Office of the Ombudsman, which is under the Governor's Office, also provides consumer services to the state's citizens on questions involving complaints, concerns and questions over the activities of the state government.

When dealing with consumer protection issues, the state's Attorney General's Office can initiate only limited civil, and only when permitted, criminal proceedings. It can represent the state before state and federal regulatory agencies, but cannot administer consumer protection and education programs. Formal consumer complaints can only be handled on a limited basis because of the authority granted to the Department of Consumer Affairs. The Attorney General's Office in consumer issues has limited subpoena powers. In antitrust actions, the Attorney General's Office can act on behalf of those consumers who are incapable of acting on their own; initiate damage actions on behalf of the state in state courts; initiate criminal proceedings; and represent counties, cities and other governmental entities in recovering civil damages under state or federal law.

The offices of the South Carolina Department of Consumer Affairs, the Office of the Attorney General and the State Ombudsman are located in Columbia.

BANKING

As of June 2005, South Carolina had 96 insured banks, savings and loans, and saving banks, plus 18 state-chartered and 69 federally chartered credit unions (CUs). Excluding the CUs, the Charleston-Gastonia-Concord market area accounted for the largest portion of the state's financial institutions and deposits in 2004, with 43 institutions and $90.216 billion in deposits. As of June 2005, CUs accounted for 11.9% of all assets held by all financial institutions in the state, or some $6.399 billion. Banks, savings and loans, and savings banks collectively accounted for the remaining 88.1% or $47.240 billion in assets held.

The median net interest margin (the difference between the lower rates offered to savers and the higher rates charged on loans) for the state's insured institutions as of fourth quarter 2005 stood at 4.21%, up from 4.02% in 2004 and 4.06% in 2003. The median percentage of past-due/nonaccrual loans to total loans in fourth quarter 2005 was 1.42%, up from 1.35% in 2004, but down from 1.67% in 2003.

Regulation of South Carolina's state-chartered banks and other financial institutions is the responsibility of the state's Board of Financial Institutions.

INSURANCE

The South Carolina Department of Insurance licenses and supervises the insurance companies doing business in the state. Most of these represent national insurance organizations. In 2004, over 3.5 million individual life insurance policies worth $163.9 billion were in force in South Carolina; total value for all categories of life insurance (individual, group, and credit) was $256.3 billion. The average coverage amount is $46,400 per policy holder. Death benefits paid that year totaled $874 million.

As of 2003, there were 32 property and casualty and 12 life and health insurance companies domiciled in the state. In 2004, direct premiums for property and casualty insurance totaled over $5.7 billion. That year, there were 148,301 flood insurance policies in force in the state, with a total value of $28.7 billion. There were also 21,440 beach and windstorm insurance policies against hurricane and other windstorm damage in force, with a total value of $6 billion.

In 2003, there were over 3.3 million auto insurance policies in effect for private passenger cars. Required minimum coverage includes bodily injury liability of up to $15,000 per individual and $30,000 for all persons injured in an accident, as well as property damage liability of $10,000. Uninsured motorist coverage is also required. In 2003, the average expenditure per vehicle for insurance coverage was $744.79.

In 2004, 51% of state residents held employment-based health insurance policies, 4% held individual policies, and 28% were covered under Medicare and Medicaid; 15% of residents were uninsured. In 2003, employee contributions for employment-based health coverage averaged at 20% for single coverage and 29% for family coverage. The state offers a six-month health benefits expansion program for small-firm employees in connection with the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA, 1986), a health insurance program for those who lose employment-based coverage due to termination or reduction of work hours.

SECURITIES

There are no securities exchanges in South Carolina. In 2005, there were 1,060 personal financial advisers employed in the state and 1,700 securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents. In 2004, there were over 64 publicly traded companies within the state, with over 18 NASDAQ companies, 8 NYSE listings, and 4 AMEX listings. In 2006, the state had one Fortune 500 company; SCANA, based in Columbia and listed on the NYSE, ranked 447th in the nation with revenues of over $4.7 billion. Sonoco Products (NYSE), Bowater (NYSE), and ScanSource (NASDAQ) were all listed in the Fortune 1,000.

Enforcement of the state Securities Act is vested in the securities commissioner within the Office of the Attorney General.

PUBLIC FINANCE

South Carolina's governor submits the annual budget to the General Assembly in January as the basis for enactment of an appropriation bill, effective for the fiscal year beginning July 1.

The state constitution requires that budget appropriations not exceed expected revenues. A General Reserve Fund (equaling 3% of General Fund revenues) is maintained to cover operating deficits. In addition, approximately 25% of projected revenue growth is set-aside and may be used as a surplus at the end of the fiscal year. Many tax revenues are earmarked for specific purposes and are deposited in accounts other than the general fund: all gasoline taxes and related charges are designated for highways, and a portion of the sales tax goes directly to public education. In addition, public education accounts for more than half of all general fund expenditures. The state shares tax collections with its subdivisions (counties and municipalities), which determine how their share of the money will be spent.

Fiscal year 2006 general funds were estimated at $6.4 billion for resources and $5.7 billion for expenditures. In fiscal year 2004, federal government grants to South Carolina were $6.1 billion.

TAXATION

In 2005, South Carolina collected $7,318 million in tax revenues or $1,720 per capita, which placed it 43rd among the 50 states in per capita tax burden. The national average was $2,192 per capita. Property taxes accounted for 0.1% of the total; sales taxes, 39.7%; selective sales taxes, 13.4%; individual income taxes, 36.8%; corporate income taxes, 3.4%; and other taxes 6.7%.

As of 1 January 2006, South Carolina had six individual income tax brackets ranging from 2.5% to 7.0%. The state taxes corporations at a flat rate of 5.0%.

In 2004, state and local property taxes amounted to $3,704,419,000 or $882 per capita. The per capita amount ranks the state 33rd highest nationally. Local governments collected $3,692,822,000 of the total and the state government $11,597,000.

South Carolina taxes retail sales at a rate of 5%. In addition to the state tax, local taxes on retail sales can reach as much as 2%, making for a potential total tax on retail sales of 7%. Food purchased for consumption off-premises is taxable. The tax on cigarettes is 7 cents per pack, which ranks 51st among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. South Carolina taxes gasoline at 16 cents per gallon. This is in addition to the 18.4 cents per gallon federal tax on gasoline.

According to the Tax Foundation, for every federal tax dollar sent to Washington in 2004, South Carolina citizens received $1.38 in federal spending.

ECONOMIC POLICY

The Department of Commerce seeks to encourage economic growth and to attract new industries; it has been successful in at-

South CarolinaState Government Finances
(Dollar amounts in thousands. Per capita amounts in dollars.)
AMOUNT PER CAPITA
Abbreviations and symbols:zero or rounds to zero; (NA) not available; (X) not applicable.
source: U.S. Census Bureau, Governments Division, 2004 Survey of State Government Finances, January 2006.
Total Revenue 21,241,956 5,060.02
  General revenue 16,836,232 4,010.54
    Intergovernmental revenue 6,229,053 1,483.81
    Taxes 6,803,568 1,620.67
    General sales 2,726,657 649.51
    Selective sales 963,329 229.47
    License taxes 383,505 91.35
    Individual income tax 2,438,712 580.92
    Corporate income tax 196,510 46.81
    Other taxes 94,855 22.60
    Current charges 2,593,732 617.85
    Miscellaneous general revenue 1,209,879 288.20
  Utility revenue 1,047,934 249.63
  Liquor store revenue - -
  Insurance trust revenue 3,357,790 799.85
Total expenditure 21,427,748 5,104.28
  Intergovernmental expenditure 4,159,942 990.93
  Direct expenditure 17,267,806 4,113.34
    Current operation 11,898,782 2,834.39
    Capital outlay 1,771,527 421.99
    Insurance benefits and repayment 2,293,201 546.26
    Assistance and subsidies 695,601 165.70
    Interest on debt 608,695 145.00
Exhibit: Salaries and wages 2,736,968 651.97
Total expenditure 21,427,748 5,104.28
  General expenditure 17,960,507 4,278.35
    Intergovernmental expenditure 4,159,942 990.93
    Direct expenditure 13,800,565 3,287.41
  General expenditures, by function:
    Education 6,091,352 1,451.01
    Public welfare 4,936,352 1,175.88
    Hospitals 978,551 233.10
    Health 677,607 161.41
    Highways 1,412,728 336.52
    Police protection 182,727 43.53
    Correction 419,758 99.99
    Natural resources 201,047 47.89
    Parks and recreation 68,284 16.27
    Government administration 759,380 180.89
    Interest on general debt 453,179 107.95
    Other and unallocable 1,779,542 423.90
  Utility expenditure 1,174,040 279.67
  Liquor store expenditure - -
  Insurance trust expenditure 2,293,201 546.26
Debt at end of fiscal year 11,162,865 2,659.09
Cash and security holdings 30,436,285 7,250.19

tracting foreign companies, especially to the Piedmont. The Community and Rural Development Division strengthens and improves the leadership capacity and education of local community leaders. The division offers technical assistance to all South Carolina communities.

The state exempts all new industrial construction from local property taxes (except the school tax) for five years. Moreover, industrial properties are assessed very leniently for tax purposes. State and local governments have cooperated in building necessary roads to industrial sites, providing water and sewer services, and helping industries to meet environmental standards. Counties are authorized to issue industrial bonds at low interest rates. Generally conservative state fiscal policies, relatively low wage rates, and an anti-union climate also serve as magnets for industry.

HEALTH

The infant mortality rate in October 2005 was estimated at 8.4 per 1,000 live births. The birth rate in 2003 was 13.4 per 1,000 population. The abortion rate stood at 9.3 per 1,000 women in 2000. In 2003, about 77.5% of pregnant woman received prenatal care beginning in the first trimester. In 2004, approximately 80% of children received routine immunizations before the age of three.

The crude death rate in 2003 was 9.2 deaths per 1,000 population. As of 2002, the death rates for major causes of death (per 100,000 resident population) were: heart disease, 235.2; cancer, 202.9; cerebrovascular diseases, 68.7; chronic lower respiratory diseases, 46; and diabetes, 27.1. The mortality rate from HIV infection was 7.3 per 100,000 population. In 2004, the reported AIDS case rate was at about 18.1 per 100,000 population. In 2002, about 59.3% of the population was considered overweight or obese. As of 2004, about 24.3% of state residents were smokers.

In 2003, South Carolina had 61 community hospitals with about 11,100 beds. There were about 506,000 patient admissions that year and 7.4 million outpatient visits. The average daily inpatient census was about 8,100 patients. The average cost per day for hospital care was $1,355. Also in 2003, there were about 178 certified nursing facilities in the state with 18,306 beds and an overall occupancy rate of about 88.6%. In 2004, it was estimated that about 68.7% of all state residents had received some type of dental care within the year. South Carolina had 231 physicians per 100,000 resident population in 2004 and 732 nurses per 100,000 in 2005. In 2004, there was a total of 1,949 dentists in the state.

About 24% of state residents were enrolled in Medicaid programs in 2003; 15% were enrolled in Medicare programs in 2004. Approximately 15% of the state population was uninsured in 2004. In 2003, state health care expenditures totaled $5.5 million.

SOCIAL WELFARE

In 2004, about 123,000 people received unemployment benefits, with the average weekly unemployment benefit at $211. In fiscal year 2005, the estimated average monthly participation in the food stamp program included about 521,125 persons (219,503 households); the average monthly benefit was about $90.48 per person. That year, the total of benefits paid through the state for the food stamp program was about $565.8 million.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the system of federal welfare assistance that officially replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) in 1997, was reauthorized through the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. TANF is funded through federal block grants that are divided among the states based on an equation involving the number of recipients in each state. South Carolina's TANF program is called Family Independence. In 2004, the state program had 39,000 recipients; state and federal expenditures on this TANF program totaled $51 million in fiscal year 2003.

In December 2004, Social Security benefits were paid to 750,970 South Carolina residents. This number included 453,910 retired workers, 69,510 widows and widowers, 123,460 disabled workers, 30,770 spouses, and 73,320 children. Social Security beneficiaries represented 18% of the total state population and 93.8% of the state's population age 65 and older. Retired workers received an average monthly payment of $931; widows and widowers, $820; disabled workers, $884; and spouses, $468. Payments for children of retired workers averaged $490 per month; children of deceased workers, $597; and children of disabled workers, $270. Federal Supplemental Security Income payments in December 2004 went to 105,223 Pennsylvania residents, averaging $369 a month. An additional $937,000 of state-administered supplemental payments were distributed to 2,981 residents.

HOUSING

In 2004, there were an estimated 1,890,682 housing units, 1,611,401 of which were occupied; 69.7% were owner-occupied. About 60.6% of all housing units were single-family, detached homes. The state had one of the largest percentages of mobile home units with nearly 18.8% in 2004. Electricity and utility gas were the most common energy sources for heating. It was estimated 102,653 units lacked telephone service, 5,428 lacked complete plumbing facilities, and 8,284 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household had 2.52 members.

In 2004, 43,200 new privately owned housing units were authorized for construction. The median home value was $113,910. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $987. Renters paid a median of $610 per month. In 2006, the state received over $23.9 million in community development block grants from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

South Carolina has made a determined effort to upgrade housing. The State Housing Authority, created in 1971, is empowered to issue bonds to provide mortgage subsidies for low- and middle-income families.

EDUCATION

For decades, South Carolina ranked below the national averages in most phases of education, including expenditures per pupil, median years of school completed, teachers' salaries, and literacy levels. During the 1970s, however, significant improvements were made through the adoption of five-year achievement goals, enactment of a statewide educational funding plan, provision of special programs for exceptional children and of kindergartens for all children, measurement of students' achievements at various stages, and expansion of adult education programs. As of 2004, 83.6% of residents 25 years or older had completed high school, almost meeting the national average of 84%. Some 24.9% had attended four or more years of college.

The total enrollment for fall 2002 in South Carolina's public schools stood at 695,000. Of these, 501,000 attended schools from kindergarten through grade eight, and 194,000 attended high school. Approximately 54.2% of the students were white, 41.3% were black, 3.2% were Hispanic, 1.1% were Asian/Pacific Islander, and 0.3% were American Indian/Alaskan Native. Total enrollment was estimated at 689,000 in fall 2003 and expected to be 675,000 by fall 2014, a decline of 2.7% during the period 200214. Expenditures for public education in 2003/04 were estimated at $6.1 billion. In fall 2003 there were 58,005 students enrolled in 345 private schools. Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has tested public school students nationwide. The resulting report, The Nation's Report Card, stated that in 2005, eighth graders in South Carolina scored 281 out of 500 in mathematics compared with the national average of 278.

As of fall 2002, there were 202,007 students enrolled in college or graduate school; minority students comprised 30.6% of total postsecondary enrollment. In 2005 South Carolina had 63 degree-granting institutions. The state has three major universities: the University of South Carolina, with its main campus in Columbia; Clemson University, at Clemson; and the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. In addition, there are four-year state colleges, as well as four-year and two-year branches of the University of South Carolina. The state also has 23 four-year non-profit private colleges and universities; most are church-affiliated. The Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary in Columbia is the only major private graduate institution. South Carolina has an extensive technical education system, supported by both state and local funds. Tuition grants are offered for South Carolina students in need that are enrolled in private colleges in the state.

ARTS

The South Carolina Arts Commission, created in 1967, has developed apprenticeship programs, under the Folklife and Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Initiative, in which students learn from master artists. In 2005, the South Carolina Arts Commission and other South Carolina arts organizations received 15 grants totaling $933,200 from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). In 2005, the National Endowment for the Humanities contributed $769,885 for 10 state programs. The state and various private sources also provided funding for the council's activities.

South Carolina's three major centers for the visual arts are the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, the Columbia Museum of Art, and the Greenville County Museum of Art. The Town Theater in Columbia was built in 1924 and is the nation's oldest community playhouse in continuous use. The theater building is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places. As of 2005, the Town Theater offered Summer Camps for youths between 2nd and 12th grade.

The Charleston Symphony Orchestra, founded in 1936, celebrated its 70th anniversary during the 2005/06 season. The Charlotte Symphony Orchestra celebrated its 75th anniversary during its 2006/07. Perhaps South Carolina's best-known musical event is the Spoleto Festivalheld annually in Charleston during May and June and modeled on the Spoleto Festival in Italyat which artists of international repute perform in original productions in opera, theater, dance, music, and circus.

LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS

For the fiscal year ending in June 2001, South Carolina had 41 public library systems, with a total of 183 libraries, of which 143 were branches. In that same year, the South Carolina public library systems had a combined book/serial publication stock of 8,260,000 volumes and a total circulation of 18,166,000. The system also had 280,000 audio and 234,000 video items, 30,000 electronic format items (CD-ROMs, magnetic tapes, and disks), and 35 bookmobiles. The State Library in Columbia works to improve library services throughout the state and also provides reference and research services for the state government. The University of South Carolina and Clemson University libraries, with more than 3,067,457 and 1,024,289 volumes, respectively, have the most outstanding academic collections. Special libraries are maintained by the South Carolina Historical Society in Charleston and the De-partment of Archives and History in Columbia; the South Caroliniana Society at the University of South Carolina is a friends' group devoted to the USC library. In fiscal year 2001, operating income for the state's public library system totaled $75,829,000 and included $648,000 in federal funds and $6,990,000 in state funding.

There are 131 museums and historic sites, notably the State Museum in Columbia, with collections reflecting all areas of the state; Charleston Museum (specializing in history, natural history, and anthropology); and the University of South Carolina McKissick Museums (with silver, lapidary, and military collections) also in Columbia. Charleston is also famous for its many old homes, streets, churches, and public facilities; at the entrance to Charleston Harbor stands Ft. Sumter, where the Civil War began. Throughout the state, numerous battle sites of the American Revolution have been preserved; many antebellum plantation homes have been restored, especially in the low country. Restoration projects have proceeded in Columbia and Charleston, where the restored Exchange Building, dating to the Revolutionary War, was opened to the public in 1981.

Among the state's best-known botanical gardens are the Cypress, Magnolia, and Middleton gardens in the Charleston area. Edisto Garden in Orangeburg is renowned for its azaleas and roses, and Brookgreen Gardens near Georgetown displays a wide variety of plants, animals, and sculpture.

COMMUNICATIONS

In 2004, 93.4% of South Carolina's occupied housing units had telephones. Additionally, by June of that same year there were 2,337,367 mobile wireless telephone subscribers. In 2003, 54.9% of South Carolina households had a computer and 45.6% had Internet access. By June 2005, there were 464,917 high-speed lines in South Carolina, 414,608 residential and 50,309 for business. The state had 62 major radio stations (14 AM, 48 FM) and 20 major television stations in 2005. South Carolina has one of the most highly regarded educational television systems in the nation, with ten stations serving the public schools, higher education institutions, state agencies, and the general public through a multichannel closed-circuit network and seven open channels. The Charlotte area alone had 880,570 television households, 67% receiving cable in 1999. Some 45,839 Internet domain names were registered in the state as of 2000.

PRESS

Charleston Courier, founded in 1803, and the Post. founded in 1894 merged to form the Charleston Post and Courier in 1991. The Spartanburg Herald-Journal was founded in 1844 and the Greenville News began publication in 1874. Overall, as of 2005, South Carolina had 14 morning newspapers, 2 evening dailies, and 14 Sunday newspapers.

Leading dailies and their approximate 2005 circulation rates are as follows:

AREA NAME DAILY SUNDAY
Charleston Post and Courier (m,S) 95,588 106,061
Columbia The State (m,S) 115,464 148,865
Greenville News (m,S) 86,573 115,758
Spartanburg Herald-Journal (m,S) 48,798 56,981

ORGANIZATIONS

In 2006, there were over 3,110 nonprofit organizations registered within the state, of which about 2,238 were registered as charitable, educational, or religious organizations. National professional and business organizations with headquarters in the state include the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, the National Peach Council, and the United States Sweet Potato Council. National offices for US Club Soccer and the Southern Conference of collegiate sports are located within the state. State educational and cultural organizations include the South Carolina Historical Society and the South Carolina Humanities Council. There are several local arts councils. The Congressional Medal of Honor Society in Mount Pleasant hosts a museum to honor recipients of this award.

TOURISM, TRAVEL, AND RECREATION

In 2004, the tourism and travel industry ranked first in the state as the largest employer and the largest "export." That year, the state hosted some 32 million visitors with total visitor spending at $7.8 billion. Approximately 132,400 South Carolinians are directly employed by the tourism industry. About 75% of travelers are from out-of-state. Nearly one-third of all trips are day trips. About 75% of out-of-state tourist revenue is spent by vacationers in Charleston, where visitors may tour in a horse-drawn buggy, and at the Myrtle Beach and Hilton Head Island resorts. The Marketplace at the center of Charleston marks the place where over 70% of all slaves were processed into the country. Outside of Charleston, several historic plantations offer tours.

The Cowpens National Battlefield and the Ft. Sumter and Ft. Moultrie and Kings Mountain national military sites are popular tourist attractions. Golf is a major attraction, generating more income than any other single entertainment or recreational activity. During the last week in May, Charleston hosts the Spoleto Festival, which features exhibits, plays, and musical presentations.

There are 46 state parks and 9 welcome centers in the state.

SPORTS

There are no major professional sports teams in South Carolina. Minor league baseball teams are located in Myrtle Beach and Charleston. There are also minor league hockey teams in North Charleston, Greenville, and Florence. Several steeplechase horse races are held annually in Camden, and important professional golf and tennis tournaments are held at Hilton Head Island.

In collegiate football, the Clemson Tigers of the Atlantic Coast Conference won the AP and UPI National Championship in 1981. The University of South Carolina of the Southeastern Conference and South Carolina State of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference also have football programs. Under the tutelage of former Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz, the South Carolina Gamecocks saw a turnaround in their football program, highlighted by consecutive Outback Bowl victories over Ohio State in 2001 and 2002.

Fishing, water-skiing, and sailing are popular sports. There are two major stock car races held at Darlington each year: the Mall. com 400 in March and the Southern 500 on Labor Day weekend.

Other annual sporting events include Polo Games held from February through Easter in Aiken, and the Governor's Annual Frog Jumping Contest held in Springfield on the Saturday before Easter.

FAMOUS SOUTH CAROLINIANS

Many distinguished South Carolinians made their reputations outside the state. Andrew Jackson (17671845), the seventh US president, was born in a border settlement probably inside present-day South Carolina, but studied law in North Carolina before establishing a legal practice in Tennessee. Identified more closely with South Carolina is John C. Calhoun (17821850), vice president from 1825 to 1832; Calhoun also served as US senator and was a leader of the South before the Civil War.

John Rutledge (17391800), the first governor of the state and a leader during the America Revolution, served a term as US chief justice but was never confirmed by the Senate. Another Revolutionary leader, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (17461825), was also a delegate to the US constitutional convention. A strong Unionist, Joel R. Poinsett (17791851) served as secretary of war and as the first US ambassador to Mexico; he developed the poinsettia, named after him, from a Mexican plant. Benjamin R. Tillman (18471918) was governor, US senator, and leader of the populist movement in South Carolina. Bernard M. Baruch (18701965), an outstanding financier, statesman, and adviser to presidents, was born in South Carolina. Another presidential adviser, James F. Byrnes (18791972), also served as US senator, associate justice of the Supreme Court, and secretary of state. The state's best-known recent political leader was J(ames) Strom Thurmond (19022003), who ran for the presidency as a States' Rights Democrat ("Dixiecrat") in 1948, winning 1,169,134 popular votes and 39 electoral votes, and served in the Senate from 1954 until his death.

Famous military leaders native to the state are the Revolutionary War General Francis Marion (1732?95), known as the Swamp Fox, and James Longstreet (18211904), a Confederate lieutenant general during the Civil War, Mark W. Clark (b.New York, 18961984), US Army general and former president of the Citadel, lived in South Carolina after 1954. General William C. Westmoreland (19142005) was commander of US forces in Viet-Nam.

Notable in the academic world are Francis Lieber (b.Germany, 18001872), a political scientist who taught at the University of South Carolina and, later, Columbia University in New York City, and wrote for the United States the world's first comprehensive code of military laws and procedures; Mary McLeod Bethune (18751955), founder of Bethune-Cookman College in Florida and of the National Council of Negro Women; John B. Watson (18781958), a pioneer in behavioral psychology; and Charles H. Townes (b.1915), awarded the Nobel Prize in physics in 1964. South Carolinians prominent in business and the professions include architect Robert Mills (17811855), who designed the Washington Monument and many other buildings; William Gregg (b.Virginia, 18001867), a leader in establishing the textile industry in the South; David R. Coker (18701938), who developed many varieties of pedigreed seed; and industrial builder Charles E. Daniel (18951964), who helped bring many new industries to the state.

South Carolinians who made significant contributions to literature include William Gilmore Simms (180670), author of nearly 100 books; Julia Peterkin (18801961), who won the Pulitzer Prize for Scarlet Sister Mary; DuBose Heyward (18851940), whose novel Porgy was the basis of the folk opera Porgy and Bess; and James M. Dabbs (18961970), a writer who was also a leader in the racial integration movement.

Entertainers born in the state include singer Eartha Kitt (b.1928) and jazz trumpeter John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie (19171993). Tennis champion Althea Gibson (19272003) was another South Carolina native.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Barefoot, Daniel W. Touring South Carolina's Revolutionary War Sites. Winston-Salem, N.C.: John F. Blair, 1999.

Cauthen, Charles E. South Carolina Goes to War, 186065. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.

Cities of the United States. 5th ed. Farmington Hills, Mich.: Thomson Gale, 2005.

Coastal Southeast 2005: Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina. Park Ridge, Ill.: ExxonMobil Travel Publications, 2005.

Council of State Governments. The Book of the States, 2006 Edition. Lexington, Ky.: Council of State Governments, 2006.

Ferris, William (ed.). The South. Vol. 7 in The Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Regional Cultures. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2004.

Graham, Cole Brease. South Carolina Politics & Government. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1994.

McAuliffe, Bill. South Carolina Facts and Symbols. New York: Hilltop Books, 1999.

McCaslin, Richard B. Photographic History of South Carolina in the Civil War. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1994.

Poole, W. Scott. South Carolina's Civil War: A Narrative History. Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 2005.

Rhyne, Nancy (ed.). Voices of Carolina Slave Children. Orange-burg, S.C.: Sandlapper Publishing Company, 1999.

Rogers, George C. A South Carolina Chronology, 14971992. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1994.

US Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, US Census Bureau. South Carolina, 2000. Summary Social, Economic, and Housing Characteristics: 2000 Census of Population and Housing. Washington, D.C.: US Government Printing Office, 2003.

US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Office of Educational Research and Improvement. Digest of Education Statistics, 1993. Washington, D.C.: US Government Printing Office, 1993.

US Department of the Interior, US Fish and Wildlife Service. Endangered and Threatened Species Recovery Program. Washington, D.C.: US Government Printing Office, 1990.

Yuhl, Stephanie E. A Golden Haze of Memory: The Making of Historic Charleston. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.

Zuczek, Richard. State of Rebellion: Reconstruction in South Carolina. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1996.

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South Carolina

SOUTH CAROLINA

SOUTH CAROLINA. The first inhabitants of South Carolina, an area of some 31,000 square miles along the South Atlantic coast, probably arrived in the region around 13,000 b.c. There were dozens of Indian nations in the area just prior to European contact, with a total population numbering between 15,000 and 30,000. However, after European contact, native peoples were devastated by disease, and their populations quickly declined.

European Exploration and Early Settlement

The Spanish were the first Europeans to attempt permanent settlement in South Carolina. In 1526 an expedition led by Lucas Vásquez de Ayllón founded San Miguel de Gualdape on the coast, possibly Winyah Bay, but the settlement was abandoned within a few months. The French were next when Jean Ribaut led an expedition of Huguenots to Parris Island in 1562, where they founded Charlesfort. Their settlement collapsed within a year. The Spanish returned in 1566 under Pedro Menéndez de Avilés, who founded the garrison town of Santa Elena on Parris Island. The Spanish deserted the site in 1587.

The English attempted to settle the region in the years after the restoration of King Charles II, who in 1663 granted eight prominent noblemen (known as the Lords Proprietors) rights to all the land between Virginia and Spanish Florida, a land they called "Carolina" in honor of their king. The Lords Proprietors sponsored a 1670 expedition, of which only the frigate Carolina survived traveling up the Ashley River to Albemarle Point, where settlers established Charles Town. Ten years later, they abandoned Albemarle Point and moved down the river to Oyster Point, near the confluence of the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, where the city that came to be known as Charleston developed. The Lords Proprietors offered generous land grants and religious freedom for settlers, and the colony grew at a healthy pace. By 1700 there were about 4,000 white colonists living in South Carolina, almost all in the coastal plain.

The Peoples of the Colony

A majority of the colony's earliest white settlers were "Barbadians," a term used to describe seasoned settlers from Barbados and other English colonies in the West Indies. The Barbadians were immensely influential, and the acquisitive plantation culture they brought with them set the economic, cultural, and social tone of the colony. After 1700, however, English settlers, whether Barbadians or directly from England, made up less than half of the colony's white population. French, Scottish, Irish, German, Welsh, Jewish, Dutch, and Swiss settlers came to South Carolina in substantial numbers, attracted by incentives such as large land grants and subsidized transportation and provisions. Later, during the 1750s, Scots-Irish settlers from the mid-Atlantic colonies began to

enter South Carolina's largely uninhabited backcountry via a road that ran from Pennsylvania into the Piedmont region. These Scots-Irish farmers filled the region above the fall line, and on the eve of the American Revolution South Carolina's white population stood at 80,000, about half of them in the upcountry.

The Barbadian culture and economy that became established in South Carolina in the late seventeenth century was based on plantation agriculture and African slavery, and black slaves arrived in South Carolina along with the colony's other original founders. In the early years of colonization, a majority of slaves came from the West Indies. After 1700 most were brought directly from Africa to Charleston, the port through which passed 40 percent of Africans brought in to North America before 1775. South Carolina planters were closely attuned to ethnic differences among Africans, and certain peoples were preferred for their technical expertise and ability to adapt to life in South Carolina. Among the Africans brought to the colony were those from the Congo-Angola region (who made up a plurality), Senegambians (preferred), and those from the Windward and Gold Coasts. As a result of the heavy demand for African slave labor, after 1708 blacks made up the majority of nonnatives in South Carolina. Between 1720 and the American Revolution, there were about two blacks for every one white in the colony. The existence of a black majority had a number of important effects, including the development of a distinctive creole culture that combined African and European elements.

Economic and Political Life in Colonial South Carolina

The Indian trade for deerskins was the first economic success in South Carolina's earliest decades, and by the early eighteenth century other lucrative exports included naval stores, salted meats, and lumber products. Commercial agriculture developed slowly, but by the 1720s rice became the colony's first great staple crop and created fabulous wealth for a few Carolina families. It was grown on plantations in the marshy swamps north and south of Charleston, and rice planters relied on the expertise and labor of large numbers of slaves from the rice-growing regions of coastal West Africa. The success of rice fueled the rapid expansion of plantation slavery. Indigo, which produced a blue dye prized in England, was first successfully cultivated in the 1740s and soon became another source of wealth for the colony's planters and farmers. On the eve of the American Revolution, South Carolina was by far the most prosperous British colony in North America. Of the ten wealthiest North Americans, nine were South Carolinians (all from the low country), including Peter Manigault, the richest American. In the upcountry above the fall line, hardscrabble subsistence farms cultivated by white settlers were the norm.

The colony's political character, like so much else, was shaped first by the Barbadians. They were a thorn in the side of the Lords Proprietors, and the Barbadian political faction (the "Goose Creek Men") consistently challenged proprietary rule, seeking stronger defense for the colony and the freedom to pursue wealth as they saw fit. Bitter political factionalism characterized early colonial politics and came to a head after a disastrous war with the Yemassee Indians (1715–1716), fought south of Charleston. The savage Yemassee War severely weakened South Carolina and in 1719 the colonists over threw the proprietary regime and declared themselves to be under the immediate authority of the king. As a royal colony, South Carolina prospered. Imperial authorities left the wealthy elite to establish a political system that met its needs. The British colonial system operated to the benefit of that elite, providing a ready market for the colony's rice and subsidies for its indigo. Among the most significant challenges to royal government was the Stono Rebellion of September 1739, the largest slave uprising in the American colonies prior to the American Revolution. Originating at plantations along the Stono River just south of Charleston, the revolt left twenty whites and nearly twice that number of blacks dead.

The American Revolution and Internal Sectional Tensions

Seeking to protect their riches and solidify respect for their position in society, the South Carolina planters and merchants who had so profited from the British colonial system became the leaders of revolutionary activity in South Carolina. Sentiment against imperial authority was aroused by arrogant customs officials, the Stamp Act of 1765, the Townshend Acts of 1767, and British political claims. Wealthy low-country Carolinians such as Christopher Gadsden, Henry Laurens, Thomas Lynch, and Arthur Middleton led the colony's independence movement, and in March 1776, a provincial congress set up an independent government with Charlestonian John Rutledge as chie fexecutive. A British attempt to take Charleston by force failed on 28 June 1776 at the Battle of Sullivan's Island, but in the spring of 1780 a British siege led to the city's surrender. In spite of the loss of the colonial capital, in the decisive campaign of the American Revolution upcountry militias rallied behind the leadership of Francis Marion, Andrew Pickens, and Thomas Sumter in late 1780 and 1781. In a brutal civil war punctuated by notable victories at King's Mountain (7 October 1780) and Cowpens (17 January 1781), they held the British army and their Tory allies at bay. Meanwhile the Continental Army under the leadership of Nathaniel Greene drove the British into an enclave around Charleston, which they evacuated finally in December 1782.

In the wake of the Revolution, South Carolina was in disarray. Old rivalries between upcountry and low-country resurfaced, resulting in a number of govern-mental reforms that included the removal of the state capital to Columbia in 1786 near the geographic center of the state. Pierce Butler, Henry Laurens, Charles Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, and John Rutledge, all members of the lowcountry elite, represented South Carolina at the 1787 Constitutional Convention. They then led the movement to ratify the document in 1788, in spite of significant opposition from the upcountry. A political compromise in 1808 helped to end the state's internal sectional rivalry when it amended the state constitution to provide roughly equal political representation in the General Assembly for upcountry and lowcountry.

The Antebellum Era and Secession, 1808–1860

The Compromise of 1808 was possible because the interests of upcountry and lowcountry were converging. After the invention of the cotton gin in 1793, short-staple cotton cultivation spread rapidly into the upcountry, and slave-based plantation agriculture spread with it. Improved transportation in the form of canals and railroads helped to integrate South Carolina's economy, and the South Carolina College, founded in Columbia in 1801, educated the planter elite from both sections and helped create a unified political culture. However, it was the development of a landed elite in the upcountry whose wealth was based on slave labor that did the most to unite the interests of upcountry and lowcountry. White South Carolinians were united in their support of slavery.

After 1820 it became nearly impossible to free a slave in South Carolina and the state had one of the most stringent slave codes in the country. The threat of slave insurrection, vividly demonstrated by the thwarted rising plotted by Denmark Vesey in Charleston during 1822, put whites on the defensive, as did declining cotton prices, worn-out cotton lands, and rising prices for slaves through much of the antebellum era. Besieged by developments beyond their control, South Carolina politicians first focused on the federal Tariff of 1828, which, they believed, put their slave-based economy at a disadvantage. Opponents of the tariff united behind South Carolinian and Vice President John C. Calhoun, who anonymously authored the South Carolina Exposition and Protest, a pamphlet outlining the doctrine of nullification, which held that a state could nullify any federal law it felt was unconstitutional. Despite bitter disagreement between Unionists and Nullifiers within South Carolina, an 1832 convention declared the Tariff null and void, threatening secession if the federal government tried to enforce the law. After Congress passed a compromise tariff, the convention repealed the Ordinance of Nullification, temporarily quelling disunionist sentiment in South Carolina.

As the question of the expansion of slavery in the territories seized the attention of the nation in the 1840s, secessionists in South Carolina (the so-called fire-eaters) argued that if the new territories became antislavery states, they would join with the North and force an end to slavery in South Carolina. The fire-eaters tried to push the state to secede in 1850. Unsuccessful in that year, the election of the antislavery Republican Abraham Lincoln in 1860 gave the fire-eaters the political momentum they sought, and a special state convention ratified the Ordinance of Secession on 20 December 1860. South Carolina was the first state to secede, setting the stage for the Civil War.

Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861–1877

The war began on 12 April 1861, when Confederate artillery bombarded the federal installation at Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor. The war that followed devastated South Carolina. A federal blockade virtually shut down the port of Charleston, and federal troops under General William T. Sherman brought modern warfare to the state in early 1865, plundering and destroying homes, farms, and railroads in a wide swath in their march from Savannah northward. On 17 February 1865, Sherman entered Columbia, and that night a fire destroyed one-third of the city. Between 31 and 35 percent of South Carolina's young white male population died during the war.

With defeat came emancipation for nearly 60 percent of South Carolinians, and white and black Carolinians were forced to work out a new relationship. In late 1865, white Carolinians took advantage of lenient federal policies to create a new state government filled with former Confederates, who imposed restrictive black codes that circumscribed black civil rights and later rejected the Fourteenth Amendment. In response, Congress ordered military rule and a new state government. In 1868, a constitutional convention that welcomed freedmen created a new government recognizing black voting rights, removing property qualifications for office holding, and creating a free public school system. Until 1876, the Republican Party controlled state government, and African Americans held office at every level but governor, achieving a greater degree of political power in South Carolina than in any other state. But South Carolina's whites reacted violently to this turn of events. A reign of terror by the Ku Klux Klan during 1870 and 1871 resulted in so many lynchings and beatings of Republicans that the writ of habeas corpus was suspended in nine upstate counties. However, in the aftermath the federal government failed to make more than a token show of force and terror organizations continued to function in South Carolina. In the disputed election of 1876, the Red Shirts, a white paramilitary organization, managed to engineer an apparent Democratic victory through violence and fraud. The Compromise of 1877 ended federal support for Republican Party government in South Carolina, and the white minority, represented by the Democratic Party and led by former Confederate General Wade Hampton III, regained control of state government.

The Rise of Jim Crow and the Persistence of Poverty, 1877–1941

As Hampton and the old elite (the so-called "Bourbons") returned to power, they tried to recreate the world of antebellum South Carolina. However, their inattention to the state's agricultural problems and mildly tolerant racial policies soon led to political revolt. Benjamin R. Tillman rode the disaffection of the state's white farmers to the governor's office, where he and his allies attacked the symbols of Bourbon power, if not the substance. Tillman focused his "reform" impulse on removing the state's black majority from public life. His triumph was the state's Constitution of 1895, which disfranchised the black majority and laid the groundwork for white supremacy and one-party Democratic rule in the twentieth century. In the last years of the nineteenth century and early years of the twentieth, South Carolina's white government also enacted a host of laws designed to segregate public life, and black Carolinians became virtually powerless. Relations between the races not governed by law were controlled by rigid customs that ensured blacks inferior status. As a result, black Carolinians left the state in droves, most bound for northern cities. After about 1922, South Carolina no longer had a black majority.

Persistent poverty plagued the state in the decades after the Civil War and was another factor in the out migration. The economy remained overwhelmingly agricultural and the system of sharecropping and farm tenancy led to heavy dependence on cotton, whose prices were in decline because of overproduction. As a result, farmers in the state's northeastern Pee Dee region turned increasingly to tobacco cultivation, which soon witnessed its own cycle of overproduction and declining prices. In the last years of the nineteenth and the early decades of the twentieth century, South Carolinians began to diversify their economy, primarily into extractive industries such as cotton textiles. Textile mills were organized across the Piedmont region, taking advantage of waterpower and a surplus of white labor, but creating new class tensions in the process. These mills were most often built in up-country towns that boomed with the widespread expansion of railroads after the Civil War. Towns such as Spartanburg, Greenville, Anderson, Rock Hill, and Greenwood became important marketing centers and drew economic activity away from Charleston, which entered a period of decline. In spite of the efforts of an indigenous Progressive movement, which sought to alleviate the effects of poverty, the economic stagnation that plagued South Carolina through the first decades of the twentieth century proved nearly impervious to change.

As bad as the years before 1930 had seemed, the Great Depression brought economic life in South Carolina nearly to a standstill. With Carolinians literally starving, both white and black Carolinians overwhelmingly supported Franklin D. Roosevelt's attempts to break the Great Depression, and U.S. Senator James F. Byrnes of South Carolina was a key to the passage of New Deal legislation. But the New Deal did little to change things in the Palmetto State. In spite of federal aid, debt-ridden farmers abandoned the land in large numbers, seeking work in cities. The textile industry was a shambles because of over production, and the General Textile Strike of 1934 left six dead in the Piedmont mill town of Honea Path.

Modern South Carolina from 1941

With the coming of World War II, a revival began in South Carolina. Military installations boosted the economy in communities all over the state, and defense related industries helped spur a wartime boom. After the war, agriculture began a long-term decline and by 1980 the state's traditional dependence on farming had given way to a diverse economy. Mechanization eliminated tens of thousands of farm jobs, while crop diversification reduced the importance of cotton, which was replaced by tobacco and soy beans as the state's leading cash crops. For three decades after the war, textiles remained the state's most important industry, and during the 1950s manufacturing employment exceeded agricultural employment for the first time. State government made concerted efforts to attract northern and foreign-owned industry by promoting special tax incentives, tax-free government bonds, technical education, and a revived Port of Charleston. By the 1990s, firms such as Michelin, DuPont, BASF, Fuji, BMW, and Hoffman-LaRoche were a major presence in South Carolina, primarily in the Piedmont, but few had located their headquarters in the state. By the end of the twentieth century, textile employment had declined in importance and, in the long term, appeared doomed in the region. Tourism capitalized on the state's climate and environment and emerged as the state's most lucrative industry, concentrated at coastal destinations such as Myrtle Beach, Charleston, and Hilton Head Island. While the state's standard of living rose considerably after World War II, at century's end South Carolina's 4,012,012 inhabitants still ranked near the bottom nationally in per capita income.

South Carolina's postwar revival included a revolution in race relations. At the end of World War II, the state was a part of the solid Democratic South, its politics was controlled by a rural elite, and Jim Crow ruled race relations. But after the war, the civil rights movement achieved a victory with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Briggs v. Elliott (a case arising in Clarendon County) as part of its 1954 decision in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case. Though the state's white leaders at first resisted the demands of black Carolinians for civil rights, by the early 1960s they had begun to heed them. A series of strong, moderately progressive governors, including Ernest F. Hollings (1959–1963), Robert E. McNair (1965– 1971), and John C. West (1971–1975), urged white South Carolinians to peacefully accept federal civil rights laws and rulings. With the notable exception of the deaths of three students at Orangeburg's South Carolina State College in 1968, South Carolina avoided the violence and unrest that plagued other Deep South states during the civil rights era. By 1970, black Carolinians had begun to take their rightful place in the state's public life. At century's end, racial issues continued to play a prominent role in politics, as black Carolinians supplied the core of Democratic Party voters, while the Republican Party attracted few blacks. But for the first time in its history, the state had a genuine, competitive two-party system. South Carolina was a far different place than it had been even fifty years before.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Carlton, David L. Mill and Town in South Carolina, 1880–1920. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1982.

Edgar, Walter B. South Carolina: A History. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1998.

Ford, Lacy K. Origins of Southern Radicalism: The South Carolina Upcountry 1800–1860. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Hayes, J. I. South Carolina and the New Deal. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2001.

Jones, Lewis P. South Carolina: A Synoptic History for Laymen. Rev. ed. Lexington, S.C: Sandlapper, 1978.

Joyner, Charles. Down By the Riverside: A South Carolina Slave Community. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984.

Klein, Rachael N. Unification of a Slave State: The Rise of the Planter Class in the South Carolina Backcountry, 1760–1808. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990.

Kovacik, Charles F., and John J. Winberry. South Carolina: A Geography. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1987. Reprinted as Kovacik, Charles F., and John J. Winberry. South Carolina: The Making of a Landscape. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1989.

Littlefield, Daniel C. Rice and Slaves: Ethnicity and the Slave Trade in Colonial South Carolina. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1981.

Newby, I. A. Black Carolinians: A History of Blacks in South Carolina from 1895 to 1968. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1973.

Simkins, Francis Butler. Pitchfork Ben Tillman, South Carolinian. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1944.

Tindall, George Brown. South Carolina Negroes, 1877–1900. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1952.

Weir, Robert M. Colonial South Carolina: A History. Millwood, N.Y.: KTO Press, 1983.

Williamson, Joel. After Slavery: The Negro in South Carolina during Reconstruction, 1861–1877. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1965.

Wood, Peter H. Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 through the Stono Rebellion. New York: Knopf, 1974.

Zuczek, Richard. State of Rebellion: Reconstruction in South Carolina. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1996.

HenryLesesne

See alsoAlbemarle Settlements ; Black Codes ; Carolina, Fundamental Constitutions of ; Charleston ; Charleston Harbor, Defense of ; Charleston Indian Trade ; Fire-Eaters ; Menéndez de Avilés, Pedro, Colonization Efforts of ; Nullification ; Port Royal ; Proprietary Colonies ; Reconstruction ; Red Shirts ; Secession ; Segregation ; Slave Trade ; Slavery ; Vesey Rebellion ; andvol. 9:Letter Describing Plantation Life in South Carolina ; South Carolina Declaration of Causes of Secession .

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South Carolina

South Carolina, state of the SE United States. It is bordered by North Carolina (N), the Atlantic Ocean (SE), and, across the Savannah River, Georgia (SW).

Facts and Figures

Area, 31,055 sq mi (80,432 sq km). Pop. (2010) 4,625,364, a 15.3% increase since the 2000 census. Capital and largest city, Columbia. Statehood, May 23, 1788 (8th of the original 13 states to ratify the Constitution). Highest pt., Sassafras Mt., 3,560 ft (1,086 m); lowest pt., sea level. Nickname, Palmetto State. Mottos,Dum Spiro Spero [While I Breathe, I Hope] and Animis Opibusque Parati [Prepared in Mind and Resources]. State bird, Carolina wren. State flower, Carolina jessamine. State tree, palmetto. Abbr., S.C.; SC

Geography

South Carolina is roughly triangular in shape. The long, even coast lined with beautiful sand beaches on the "Grand Strand" north of Georgetown becomes generally marshy to the south and is sliced by a network of rivers and creeks, creating a maze of inlets and the famous Sea Islands. The coastal climate is humid subtropical, with long, hot summers and short, mild winters. In this area are found cypress swamps, moss-hung oaks, beautiful flowering gardens, antebellum plantations, and the historic seaports of Georgetown, Beaufort, and Charleston, the latter a major tourist attraction and one of the chief ports of entry in the Southeast.

The fall line on the state's Atlantic-bound rivers separates the coastal Low Country from the rolling Piedmont plateau of the Up Country and runs generally parallel to the coast, passing through Columbia. Inland the climate is temperate, becoming progressively cooler as the elevation increases. In the extreme northwest are the Blue Ridge Mts.; they occupy only c.500 sq mi (1,290 sq km) in the state, with Sassafras Mt. (3,560 ft/1,085 m) the highest point.

Rainfall is abundant and well distributed throughout South Carolina. The Pee Dee, Santee, Edisto, and Savannah river systems drain the state, flowing from the highlands to the sea, creating rapids and waterfalls. This abundant source of hydroelectric power is one of South Carolina's most important natural resources. Several nuclear plants operate in the state as well.

Vacationers are attracted to Myrtle Beach and the Grand Strand, to the Sea Island resorts, and to Charleston's stately homes and gardens. The state's historical places of interest include Fort Sumter National Monument, Kings Mountain National Military Park, and Cowpens National Battlefield (see National Parks and Monuments, table). Columbia is the capital and the largest city; Charleston and Greenville are other major cities.

Economy

South Carolina's manufacturing industries have historically depended on the state's agricultural products as well as on water power. For example, the huge textile and clothing industries, centered in the Piedmont, are based on that region's cotton crop; lumbering and related enterprises (such as the manufacture of pulp and paper) rely on the c.12.5 million acres (5 million hectares) of forestland that cover the state—the longleaf and loblolly pine are prevalent. Other leading manufactures are chemicals, machinery, and automobiles. South Carolina's mineral resources have been of minor importance in the state's economy; except for some gold, most are nonmetallic—cement, stone, clays, and sand and gravel.

In agriculture, tobacco and soybeans now rival cotton as South Carolina's chief crops. Broiler chickens and cattle are economically important, and peanuts, pecans, sweet potatoes, and peaches are grown in abundance. Fishing is a major commercial enterprise; the chief catches are blue crabs and shrimp. Military bases and nuclear facilities are important to the economy, and the tourist industry today ranks as the state's chief source of income.

Government, Politics, and Higher Education

South Carolina's legislature has a senate with 46 members and a house of representatives with 124 members. The state sends two senators and seven representatives to the U.S. Congress and has nine electoral votes. In the early 1970s the state's 1895 constitution was extensively revised. The executive branch is headed by a governor elected for a four-year term. From 1876 to 1975 all the state's governors were Democrats, and South Carolina was part of the "Solid South." Since then Republicans have come to dominate statewide politics. David Beasley, a Republican, won the governorship in 1994 but was defeated in 1998 by Jim Hodges, a Democrat. In 2002, Hodges lost his own reelection bid to Republican Mark Sanford; Sanford was reelected in 2006. Republican Nikki Haley was elected governor in 2010 and 2014; she was the first woman to hold the office.

Among South Carolina's institutions of higher education are The Citadel–The Military College of South Carolina and the College of Charleston, at Charleston; Clemson Univ., at Clemson; Furman Univ., at Greenville; South Carolina State College, at Orangeburg; and the Univ. of South Carolina, at Columbia.

History

French, Spanish, and English Colonization

At an unknown coastal site in the region that is now the Carolinas, what may have been the first European settlement in North America was founded (1526; not permanent) by an expedition under the Spanish explorer Lucas Vásquez de Ayllón. The Frenchman Jean Ribaut established (1562) a Huguenot settlement on Parris Island in Port Royal Sound, but French colonizing ambitions were thoroughly thwarted by Pedro Menéndez de Avilés. Spanish missions soon extended N from Florida almost to the site of present-day Charleston, and they remained until the arrival of the English. Under Juan Pardo, the Spanish explored (1566–68) the interior of the Carolinas and E Tennessee, establishing several short-lived forts.

Charles I asserted England's claim as early as 1629 by granting the territory from lat. 36°N to lat. 31°N (later named Carolina for Charles I) to Sir Robert Heath, but since no settlements were made Heath's charter was forfeited. In 1663, Charles II awarded the area to eight of his prominent supporters, the most active of whom was Anthony Ashley Cooper (Lord Ashley, later 1st earl of Shaftesbury).

The northern and southern sections of Carolina developed separately. The first permanent colony was established in 1670 at Albemarle Point under William Sayle. To govern it, John Locke and others wrote (at Lord Ashley's behest) the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina (1669), which granted some popular rights but also retained feudal privileges and limitations. It was never ratified. The actual government consisted of a powerful council, half of which was appointed by the proprietors in England; a governor, also appointed by the proprietors; and a relatively weak assembly, elected by all freemen. In 1680 the colony moved across the river to Oyster Point, which was better suited for defense. There the colonists established their capital, called Charles Town (later Charleston), which was to become the chief center of culture and of wealth in the South.

Life under Proprietary Rule

The 1680s saw the beginnings of prosperity. Wealthy colonists set up plantations worked by indentured servants and African and Native American slaves, while freemen (many of them former indentured servants) cultivated the 50 acres (20 hectares) of land granted them by the proprietors. On plantations and small farms alike, corn, livestock, and some cotton were raised at first, and tobacco was cultivated in plenitude. Rice, introduced c.1680, flourished in the marshy tidewater area and soon became the plantation staple. Forests yielded rich timber and naval stores. The fur trade (especially in deerskins) with the Creek and other tribes prospered. But conflict with the Spanish and French increased, and the encroachment of the two countries dramatized the proprietors' lack of concern and their inability to defend the distant colony. Popular antagonism to proprietary rule was spurred by the parceling of much of the land into a few large grants, by the quitrent system, and most importantly by the issue of religion.

Several religious groups had freely practiced their faith in the colony until the early 18th cent.; these included Anglicans, dissenters from Britain (see nonconformists), and French Huguenots. In 1704 the Anglicans, without opposition from the proprietors, managed to deprive the other groups of their religious liberty, and it was not until the English government took action (1706) that religious toleration was restored.

South Carolina as a Royal Colony

The colony was divided into North and South Carolina in 1712. In 1715–16 the settlers were attacked by the Yamasee, who had become resentful of exploitation by the Carolina traders. The uprising was finally quelled after much loss of life and property. These attacks further revealed the lack of protection afforded by the proprietors, and in 1719 the colonists rebelled and received royal protection. The crown sent Francis Nicholson as provincial royal governor in 1720, and South Carolina formally became a royal colony in 1729, when the proprietors finally accepted terms.

Conditions for the colonists were now in many respects improved. Pirates such as Blackbeard who had infested the coast had been hanged or dispersed. In addition the founding (1733) of Georgia to the south provided a buffer against the Spanish. Loss of territory and some of the colony's fur trade to Georgia was more than compensated for when indigo, supported by British bounty, became (1740s) the colony's second staple. To counterbalance the vast number of African slaves transported to the colony for use as plantation labor, European immigration was encouraged. Germans and Swiss, arriving in the 1730s and 40s, and Scotch-Irish and other migrants from Virginia and Pennsylvania, arriving in the 60s, settled the colony's lower middle country and uplands.

Regional antipathies were generated by economic and social differences; the small, self-sufficient farmer of the up-country, demanding courts, roads, and defense against outlaws and the Cherokee, elicited little sympathy from the powerful plantation lords of lower Carolina. In the late 1760s discontent culminated in the formation of the Regulator movement. Finally the legislature gave in to some up-country demands, including the establishment of courts in the region.

The Coming of Revolution

South Carolina's long friendship with the mother country was reflected in trade benefits the colony realized under the Navigation Acts and in protection provided to it by the strong British navy. However, public sentiment in the colony was transformed by the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, and by British political claims. South Carolinians—Christopher Gadsden, Henry Laurens, and Arthur Middleton—were leaders in the movement for independence, and in Mar., 1776, an independent government of South Carolina was set up with John Rutledge as president.

In the American Revolution the British failed to take Charleston in June, 1776 (see Fort Moultrie), but Sir Henry Clinton successfully besieged the town in 1780. In the ensuing Carolina campaign the British were ultimately forced to retreat, although they held Charleston until Dec., 1782. In 1786 the site of Columbia was chosen for the new capital; its central location mollified the up-country population. South Carolina ratified the federal Constitution in May, 1788, and replaced the royal charter with a state charter in 1790. Complete religious liberty was established and primogeniture was abolished, but property qualifications for voting and office holding was retained, ensuring planter control of the legislature.

Pre–Civil War Discontent

The constitutional amendment known as the "compromise of 1808" somewhat alleviated the sectional antagonism by reapportioning representation. By this time, however, Eli Whitney's cotton gin had enabled cotton plantations to spread far into the up-country; thus the planters continued to dominate state policies. In the late 1820s cotton from the fertile western states glutted the market, and prosperity declined in South Carolina.

Discontent was aggravated by national tariff policies that were unfavorable to South Carolina's agrarian economy. In 1832 the state passed its nullification act, declaring the tariff laws null and void and not binding upon South Carolina citizens. President Andrew Jackson acted firmly for the Union in this crisis, and in 1833 South Carolina repealed its act. Tariff reform that same year brought relief, but the possibility of secession had been broached and was subsequently renewed in reaction to abolitionist attacks and further economic grievances. John C. Calhoun became the acknowledged leader of the whole South with his defense of the states' rights doctrine; his political philosophy was later to form the intellectual basis for the Confederacy. Some of the state's apologists for slavery, notably Robert B. Rhett, equaled the most radical abolitionists in their zeal.

Civil War and Reconstruction

After Lincoln's election South Carolina was the first state to secede (Dec. 20, 1860) from the Union. Gov. Francis W. Pickens immediately demanded all federal property within the state, including Fort Sumter, which was held by Union men under Major Robert Anderson. The firing on Sumter by Confederate batteries on Apr. 12, 1861, precipitated the Civil War.

In Nov., 1861, a Union naval force under Samuel F. Du Pont took the forts of Port Royal Sound, but Charleston's forts withstood severe bombardments in 1863, and the state was saved from heavy military action until early in 1865. Then Gen. William T. Sherman, commanding the army that had marched through Georgia, crossed the Savannah River and advanced north through the state. Because South Carolina was viewed as the birthplace of secession, it was difficult to restrain many of the Union soldiers, and the deliberate devastation, culminating in the burning of Columbia, was appalling.

The Reconstruction period that followed the war was no less disastrous. South Carolina was selected for President Andrew Johnson's moderate program, but the program had only a brief trial before the radical Republicans took over. For a decade the state was ruled by carpetbaggers and scalawags, with the support of African-American votes. The constitution of 1868, which established universal male suffrage and ended property qualifications for office holding, gained the state readmittance (June, 1868) to the Union.

During the period from 1868 to 1874 accomplishments such as the building of schools and railroads were offset by waste and corruption in the state government and by high taxation. Many of these abuses were corrected by the honest administration of Gov. Daniel H. Chamberlain (1874–76), the state's last Republican governor until the late 20th cent. The Democratic party regained vitality in the late 1870s and South Carolina's politics were strongly Democratic after this period; not until the late 1960s did Republicans regain strength in both state and national elections.

South Carolina's war hero, Wade Hampton, was selected as the Democratic party's candidate for governor in 1876. The election was marked by irregular practices on both sides, and, although Hampton gained a majority, Chamberlain refused to accept defeat. Thus there existed two state governments until 1877, when President Rutherford B. Hayes removed all federal troops from the South, and Chamberlain, bereft of the support that had made Republican rule possible, withdrew. Hampton attempted moderation on race issues, but, despite his efforts, by 1882 the vast majority of blacks had lost the vote and white political supremacy was assured.

The Decline of Agriculture and the Rise of Jim Crowism

The wartime destruction and the abolition of slavery had nearly ruined the state's basic agricultural economy. Although some vigorous planters and merchants managed to recoup their fortunes, farm tenancy (replacing the old plantation system) held most of the state's farmers in economic bondage. The Panic of 1873 was followed by two decades of agrarian hard times. The rice plantations, which had already begun to decline, were hardest hit.

Popular discontent was not ameliorated until the election (1890) of Benjamin Tillman, leader of the up-country farmers, as governor. Tillmanites wrested control of the Democratic party from the conservative element (the tidewater "Bourbon aristocracy" ), reapportioned taxes and representation, expanded public education, and passed rudimentary labor reform laws. Reflecting another aspect of Tillman's policies, the constitution of 1895 initiated "Jim Crow laws" and adopted voting qualifications that excluded virtually all blacks from the crucial Democratic primaries. Renewed agrarian prosperity after 1900 was accompanied by political stagnation that lasted until the governorship (1914–18) of Richard I. Manning; progressive trends already evident in other parts of the country were now belatedly manifested in South Carolina in the passage of education and labor laws.

Agriculture again suffered a setback in the 1920s. Contributing factors were the destruction of the Sea Islands cotton crop by the boll weevil and the erosion of the land as a result of long adherence to the one-crop system. Industry, especially the textile industry (which had been increasing in importance since the Civil War), also suffered in the Great Depression of the 1930s. New Deal legislation and the state road-building program provided South Carolina with some relief. During World War I the position of African Americans had been improved through war work and service in the armed forces; however, in the 1920s the renewed power of the Ku Klux Klan had again brought oppression, and black migration began on a scale sufficient to bring the whites into the majority in the state by 1930.

Voting Rights, Desegregation, and Economic Growth

World War II and the postwar period brought great changes. A state court decision in 1947 opened the Democratic primaries to African-American voters. Under the governorship (1951–55) of the nationally prominent James F. Byrnes, the poll tax was abolished as a voting requirement, steps were taken to curb Ku Klux Klan activities, and the educational system was greatly expanded. Integration of the schools after the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision met considerable opposition, but in 1963 South Carolinians accepted token integration of Clemson College without incident, and desegregation began in the Charleston schools. By 1970 all of the state's public school districts were technically in compliance with federal desegregation requirements. That year four African Americans were elected to the previously all-white state legislature.

In the 1970s and 80s, South Carolina experienced economic growth similar to other Sun Belt states. Low tax rates and a large nonunion workforce have attracted many firms from other states as well as foreign countries. In the 1990s job losses from the closing of naval facilities at North Charleston were largely offset by private undertakings, and the Greenville-Spartanburg area in the northwest was rapidly becoming home to new industries.

Bibliography

See J. G. Barrett, Sherman's March through the Carolinas (1956); E. M. Lander, A History of South Carolina, 1865–1960 (2d ed. 1970); D. D. Wallace, South Carolina: A Short History, 1520–1948 (1951, repr. 1984); M. Lane, Architecture of the Old South: South Carolina (1984); C. Kovacik and J. Winberry, South Carolina: A Geography (1986).

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South Carolina

SOUTH CAROLINA


Charleston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435

Columbia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451

The State in Brief

Nickname: Palmetto State

Motto: Animism opibusque parati (Prepared in mind and resources); Dum spiro spero (While I breathe, I hope)

Flower: Carolina jessamine

Bird: Carolina wren

Area: 32,020 square miles (2000; U.S. rank: 40th)

Elevation: Ranges from sea level to 3,560 feet above sea level

Climate: Humid and subtropical, with long, hot summers, short, mild winters, and abundant rainfall

Admitted to Union: May 23, 1788

Capital: Columbia

Head Official: Governor Mark Sanford (R) (until 2007)

Population

1980: 3,122,000

1990: 3,486,703

2000: 4,012,012

2004 estimate: 4,198,068

Percent change, 19902000: 15.1%

U.S. rank in 2004: 25th

Percent of residents born in state: 64.0% (2000)

Density: 133.2 people per square mile (2000)

2002 FBI Crime Index Total: 217,569

Racial and Ethnic Characteristics (2000)

White: 2,695,560

Black or African American: 1,185,216

American Indian and Alaska Native: 13,718

Asian: 36,014

Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 1,628

Hispanic or Latino (may be of any race): 95,076

Other: 39,926

Age Characteristics (2000)

Population under 5 years old: 264,679

Population 5 to 19 years old: 871,099

Percent of population 65 years and over: 12.1%

Median age: 35.4 years (2000)

Vital Statistics

Total number of births (2003): 55,869

Total number of deaths (2003): 38,060 (infant deaths, 451)

AIDS cases reported through 2003: 6,379

Economy

Major industries: Textiles, tourism, chemicals, agriculture, lumber, machinery, automobiles, manufacturing

Unemployment rate: 6.7% (December 2004)

Per capita income: $26,139 (2003; U.S. rank: 43rd)

Median household income: $38,791 (3-year average, 2001-2003)

Percentage of persons below poverty level: 14.0% (3-year average, 2001-2003)

Income tax rate: Ranges from 2.5% to 7.0%

Sales tax rate: 5.0%

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South Carolina

South Carolina State on the Atlantic Ocean, se USA; the capital and largest city is Columbia. The main port is Charleston. The land rises from the coastal plain to the rolling hills of the Piedmont plateau to the Blue Ridge Mountains in the nw. The region is drained by many rivers, including the Savannah, which forms most of the Georgia border. Major crops include tobacco, soya beans, maize, sweet potatoes, and groundnuts. Timber and fishing are still sources of employment, but tourism is now the state's second biggest source of income after textiles and clothing. The English built the first permanent settlements in the area from 1663. South Carolina became a royal province in 1729, and a plantation society evolved based on rice, indigo, and cotton. One of the original 13 US states (1789), it was the first to secede from the Union and the first shots of the Civil War were fired at Fort Sumter. Union troops devastated the state in 1865. Area: 80,432sq km (31,055sq mi). Pop. (2000) 4,012,012.

Statehood :

May 23, 1788

Nickname :

The Palmetto State

State bird :

Carolina wren

State flower :

Carolina jessamine

State tree :

Palmetto

State motto :

Prepared in mind and resources

http://myscgov.com

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South Carolina

SOUTH CAROLINA


South Carolina was carved out of a much larger piece of territory than other states, and it eventually became one of the most important states in the Old South. For good or ill, it is known for the most rabid opposition of any state to protective tariffs and northern antislavery movements, two issues that led the nation into a civil war. Its history has been marked by several divisions: between the English and other northern European patricians who settled the cosmopolitan city of Charleston and the less educated farmers of the interior, between whites and blacks, and between labor unions and anti-union advocates. In recent decades, however, the state has made the most of its resources by profiting from its important water ports, its good transportation networks, and an improving industrial climate.

Spanish and French explorers were the first Europeans to attempt settlements, all unsuccessful, in the present state of South Carolina. Under English King Charles I, the first permanent settlement was established as a proprietorship in 1670. The first colonists were "adventurers" from the English sugar cane producing island of Barbados. The first crop that was grown in the coastal swamps was rice, which was cultivated by imported black slaves. The agricultural know-how to construct the often elaborate system of channels and dams to irrigate the rice was contributed by the slaves who came from a similar rice-cultivation culture in western Africa. By the mid-1700s inland areas were beginning to develop. At first simply called "Carolina," the colony included the future colonies of North Carolina and Georgia, as well as South Carolina, which broke apart from the north and became a royal colony in 1721. South Carolina supported the American Revolution (17751783) and ratified the U.S. Constitution in 1788.

Transportation networks soon grew from the port of Charleston, through the upcountry, and on to western territories. Several canals were constructed, and the first railroad, from Charleston to Hamburg, was the longest railroad in existence in 1833. South Carolina also boasted the first steam engine built for public railway service. However, in the mid-1800s constructing railroads through the mountains in the middle of the state proved impossible.

Any visitor to modern-day Charleston can sense the city's important history. Because it grew faster than any colonial city, historian Louis B. Wright called it "a city-state ruled by an intelligent and cultivated oligarchy of great families who managed to monopolize control, generation after generation." The political and economic power naturally flowed to the city of Charleston, which controlled the colony (and later the state) for decades. Trade in products like rice, cotton, corn, pitch, and indigo flourished in the port of Charleston, as did the slave trade. Upcountry farmers were generally looked down upon by the elite of Charleston city.


Under the political leadership of Senator John C. Calhoun, in the mid-1800s South Carolina took the lead in congressional discussions on slavery and tariffs. The state greatly disliked the protective tariff which benefited northern manufacturers, raised the prices of manufactured goods, and reduced the ability of the British and the French to buy cotton from South Carolina and other southern states. In 1828 Calhoun outlined his argument for nullification (a rationale permitting a state to deny the viability of a federal regulation). The immediate issue was settled in the 1830s by a compromise devised by Henry Clay, but these divisions over the southern slave economy and the northern industrial system inevitably led to the American Civil War (18611865).

When South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union in 1860, over than half the population of the state consisted of black slaves. When federal troops occupied the state during Reconstruction, South Carolinians blamed northern "carpetbaggers" for depleting the treasury of the state and running it into serious debt. They also blamed the economic chaos following the war on ex-slaves, thus reinforcing a legacy of racism which plagued the state for generation after generation.

After the war an economy based on slave labor had to reorient itself. The cultivation of rice in the state completely disappeared in a few decades following the war, but planters tried to keep producing cotton. A system of tenancy and sharecropping developed, in which a small farmer would pay the landowner shares of his crop for renting the land. This system kept many small farmers in debt and perpetuated the class divisions between rich and poor. After much postwar political and economic turmoil the economy of the state gradually shifted from rice and cotton to tobacco, soybeans, and truck farming. Railroads devastated by the war were rebuilt, connecting most towns and cities. Tired of trying to make a living through sharecropping, poor farmersboth black and whitemoved to the cities to find employment in textile mills, which after 1900 became the state's biggest industry.

Textiles dominated South Carolina's economy until after World War II (19391945), when attempts to diversify brought the chemical, paper, and other industries to the state. The harbors of Charleston, Port Royal, and Georgetown were also improved to facilitate commerce. After many textile mills closed in the 1970s and 1980s the textile industry dropped to second place in the state, behind chemical and allied products.

Although manufacturing industry is now the state's leading employer, agriculture is still important. Some of the major farm products in the 1990s included tobacco, cotton, food products, and soybean oil for newsprint ink. Along with forestry and forestry products, agriculture contributes about 25 percent to the state's economy.

A major blow to South Carolina's economy came in 1989 with Hurricane Hugo, the tenth strongest hurricane to ever hit the United States. The storm wreaked havoc, particularly in Charleston and other coastal towns, killing 37 people and causing over $700 million in property damage. In 1993 severe flooding and subsequent long-term drought were responsible for an estimated $226 million in crop loss.

After experiencing significant population loss from 1940 to 1970 the state rebounded, attracting a net gain of 210,000 between 1970 and 1980. In the late 1990s the state continued to suffer from a bad reputation as an industrial employer because of its low wage rates, its relatively untrained work force, and its anti-union climate. In fact only 3.3 percent of all South Carolina workers were unionized in 1996. Yet real per capita income increased faster than the national norm during the 1970s and early 1980s, reaching thirty-ninth in the nation by 1995. Increased investment from foreign and domestic sources and a growing tourist industry have aided the economy's continued growth.

South Carolina's Department of Commerce has been quite successful in attracting foreign companies, especially to the Piedmont region of the state. In the late 1990s the state government exempted all new industrial construction from local property taxes (excluding school taxes), and assessed industrial property very leniently. Moreover, local and regional authorities have cooperated in providing both low-interest industrial bonds and the infrastructure needed by new businesses. Business was also attracted by the state's conservative fiscal policies, its low pay scales, and its negative attitude toward labor unions.

See also: Rice, Tariff of Abominations


FURTHER READING

Jones, Lewis P. South Carolina: A Synoptic History for Laymen. Orangeburg, SC: Sandlapper Publishing, 1979.

Lander, Ernest M. A History of South Carolina, 1856 1960, 2nd ed. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 1970.

Rogers, George C. A South Carolina Chronology, 14971992. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1994.

Wallace, David Duncan. History of South Carolina. 4 vols. New York: American Historical Society, 1934.

Wright, Louis B. South Carolina: A Bicentennial History. New York, Norton, 1976.

south carolinians have always been ready to declare that their land was only a little less desirable than eden.

louis b. wright, south carolina: a bicentennial history, 1976

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South Carolina

South Carolinabeginner, Berliner, Corinna, dinner, grinner, inner, Jinnah, sinner, skinner, spinner, thinner, winner •echidna •Krishna, Mishnah, Ramakrishna •vintner • prisoner • Pilsner •Kitchener • Modena • bargainer •imaginer •Elinor, Helena •milliner •examiner, stamina •epiphenomena, phenomena, prolegomena •alumina, noumena, numina •determiner •mariner, submariner •foreigner • larcener • Porsena •patina • retina • Pristina •Herzegovina • breadwinner •prizewinner •angina, assigner, china, consignor, decliner, definer, Dinah, diner, diviner, forty-niner, hardliner, incliner, Indo-China, liner, maligner, Medina, miner, minor, mynah, recliner, refiner, Regina, Salina, Shekinah, shiner, signer, South Carolina, Steiner, twiner, vagina, whiner •headliner • jetliner • airliner •mainliner • eyeliner • moonshiner •Landsteiner • Niersteiner •Liechtensteiner

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South Carolina

SOUTH CAROLINA

SOUTH CAROLINA , southeastern state of the United States, bordering the Atlantic Ocean and the states of North Carolina and Georgia. Jews arrived in the British colony of Carolina in the early days of European settlement. A new outpost in the mercantile traffic of the Atlantic basin, Carolina offered economic opportunities and a degree of religious tolerance remarkable for the time. The colony's Fundamental Constitutions of 1669, drafted by philosopher and physician John Locke, who was secretary to one of the eight Lords Proprietors, granted freedom of worship to "Jews, Heathens, and other Dissenters from the purity of the Christian Religion." Although the colonial assembly never endorsed the provision, British *Charleston became known as a place where people of all faiths – except Catholics – could do business and practice their religion without interference. In 1696, Jews in Charleston allied with French Protestants to safeguard their rights to trade, and the next year to secure citizenship.

Most of Carolina's first Jewish settlers traced their roots to Spain or Portugal. Expelled during the Inquisition at the end of the 15th century, the Sephardim dispersed around the globe and established themselves in capitals and port cities in northern Europe, the Mediterranean, and the West Indies. In 1749, Charleston's Jewish community chartered Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim – one of the first five Jewish congregations in America. Like her sister synagogues in New York, Newport, Savannah, and Philadelphia, Beth Elohim was Sephardi in ritual and practice. Charleston's congregation remained so for two generations after the Revolutionary War, though by then the majority of South Carolina Jews were Ashkenazi, hailing from central or eastern Europe.

Following the Revolutionary War, South Carolina's Jewish population surged. When Columbia became the state capital in 1786, seven Jewish men from Charleston were among the first to buy town lots. Jews in Georgetown, Beaufort, and Camden belonged to the business and civic elites. By 1800, Charleston was home to the largest, wealthiest, and most cultured

Jewish community in North America – upwards of five hundred individuals, or one-fifth of all Jews in the nation.

Carolina's Jews pursued the same goals as their white neighbors. Those who could afford it owned slaves. The affluent lived in finely furnished houses and traveled abroad. Many Ashkenazim adopted traditional Sephardi practices and assumed an aristocratic view of themselves as "earliest to arrive."

Charleston's highly acculturated Jewish community produced the first movement to reform Judaism in America. In 1824, a group of young Jewish men, mostly American-born, petitioned the governing body of Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim for shorter services, a sermon preached on the Sabbath, and prayers in English. Rebuffed in their efforts, the dissidents drafted a constitution and established the Reformed Society of Israelites. For eight years the reformers worshiped separately, then returned to the traditional congregation. But in 1840 the reform faction prevailed. With the blessing of Beth Elohim's popular minister, Gustavus Poznanski, a proposal to install an organ in the new synagogue – a Greek revival temple that replaced the original structure, which had burned in the great fire of 1838 – was adopted by a narrow margin. The traditionalists seceded and formed Shearit Israel (Remnant of Israel), with its own burying ground adjacent to Beth Elohim's Coming Street cemetery. A brick wall separated the dead of the two congregations.

While schism in Beth Elohim divided traditionalists and reformers, a new group of immigrants introduced another brand of orthodoxy to Charleston. People of modest means – peddlers, artisans, metalworkers, bakers – the newcomers gave the city's Jewish population a more foreign appearance than before. As early as 1852, these eastern European Jews began meeting under the leadership of Rabbi Hirsch Zvi Levine, recently arrived from Poland. In 1855, they formally organized as Berith Shalome (now Brith Sholom) or "Covenant of Peace," the first Ashkenazi congregation in South Carolina and one of the first in the South.

As the southern states began seceding from the Union in 1860 and 1861, Jews rallied to the Confederate cause. Thousands of Jewish men served in the southern armies, while Jewish women, in accord with their gentile sisters, threw themselves into the war effort, sewing uniforms, knitting socks, rolling bandages, preparing boxes of clothes and provisions, and working in hospitals to care for the sick and wounded.

After the war, during the period of Reconstruction, some South Carolinians of Jewish descent, including the notorious "scalawag" governor, Franklin J. Moses, Jr., supported the Radical Republicans' drive to build a new society. However, most backed the Redeemers' crusade to restore white rule. Jewish women such as Octavia Harby Moses and Phoebe Yates Levy Pember were prominent in memorializing the "Lost Cause." In the shared experience of defeat, Jewish Confederates demonstrated their fierce sense of belonging.

Beginning in the 1880s, East European migration to America brought about a dramatic increase in the nation's Jewish population. Charleston's Jewish population, which had remained flat for decades at around 700, doubled between 1905 and 1912. The neighborhood where the "greenhorns" settled was called "Little Jerusalem." Immigrant men commonly started out as peddlers, then established small businesses. At one time some 40 stores on upper King Street were closed on Saturday, in observance of the Jewish Sabbath. The men held prayer services above stores. The women kept kosher homes. They trained their African American help to make potato kugel and gefilte fish, and they learned, in turn, to fix fried chicken and okra gumbo.

By World War i, Jewish communities in the midlands and upcountry had grown large enough to support synagogues. Meanwhile, some country clubs, fraternities, and sororities barred Jews, who responded by forming their own social groups and athletic teams modeled on the ones that kept them out. These organizations helped unify Jews around an ethnic identity without regard to place of birth, date of arrival in America, and degree of observance.

The revival of the Ku Klux Klan disturbed southern Jews' sense of well-being. In the heyday of Jim Crow, however, the primary targets of discrimination were blacks. Jews generally found themselves on the safe side of the racial divide. They demonstrated their loyalty to country and region in patriotic parades and party politics. When the United States entered World War ii, Jewish southerners joined in the mobilization to fight the Japanese and Nazi foes.

As a result of the Holocaust in Europe, America's place in world Jewry changed radically. Now more than half of all Jewish people were living in the United States. In many ways, South Carolina was a microcosm of the nation. The class of Jewish merchants had begat a generation of lawyers, doctors, accountants, and college teachers, who shifted the Jewish economic niche away from retail business. With the rest of the white American mainstream, urban Jews abandoned the old neighborhoods and moved to the suburbs – a migration that coincided with the first stirrings of the civil rights movement and the rise of Conservative Judaism.

By the end of 20th century, Jewish populations in most small towns across the South had dwindled, while suburban and resort congregations were continuing to grow. South Carolina's Jews remained prominent in political life. Solomon Blatt, of Barnwell, served for 30 years in the state legislature, ending his final term as Speaker of the House in 1970. Numerous other Jewish lawmakers have filled seats in both houses, and, since World War ii, more than a dozen Jews have been elected as mayors of South Carolina towns and cities.

South Carolina mirrors the nation in the drift toward more traditional observance – a trend in all divisions of Judaism. The Addlestone Hebrew Academy in Charleston and Lubavitcher Chabads in Myrtle Beach and Columbia teach Hebrew and religious studies in day schools to an increasingly diverse student population that includes newcomers from other parts of America, and from Russia and the Middle East as well.

bibliography:

S. Breibart, Explorations in Charleston's Jewish History (2005); B.A. Elzas, The Jews of South Carolina, From the Earliest Times to the Present Day (1905, reprint, 1972); "The Diary of Joseph Lyons (1833–35)," a new and unabridged transcript edited, annotated, and introduced by M. Ferrara, H. Greene, D. Rosengarten, and S. Wyssen, in: American Jewish History, 91:3 (Sept. 2003); B. Gergel and R. Gergel, In Pursuit of the Tree of Life: A History of the Early Jews of Columbia and the Tree of Life Congregation (1996); J.S. Gurock, Orthodoxy in Charleston: Brith Sholom Beth Israel & American Jewish History (2004); J.W. Hagy, This Happy Land: The Jews of Colonial and Antebellum Charleston (1993); Jewish Heritage Collection. Special Collections, College of Charleston Library, Charleston, South Carolina. For excerpts from the jhc oral history archives, see www.cofc.edu/~jhc; C. Reznikoff and U.Z. Engelman, The Jews of Charleston: A History of an American Jewish Community (1950); R.N. Rosen, The Jewish Confederates (2000); T. Rosengarten and D. Rosengarten (eds.), A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life (2002). See on-line version of the exhibition "A Portion of the People" at www.lib.unc.edu/apop.

[Dale Rosengarten (2nd ed.)]

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South Carolina

South Carolina

■ AIKEN TECHNICAL COLLEGE G-6

PO Drawer 696
Aiken, SC 29802-0696
Tel: (803)593-9231
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.aik.tec.sc.us/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1972. Setting: 88-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 2,516. 1,177 applied, 65% were admitted. 3% from top 10% of their high school class, 12% from top quarter, 39% from top half. Full-time: 1,397 students, 66% women, 34% men. Part-time: 1,119 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 6 states and territories, 2 other countries, 10% from out-of-state, 3% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 2% black, 88% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 40% 25 or older, 1% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at University of South Carolina-Aiken.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: Common Application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: essay. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2816 full-time, $117 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3176 full-time, $132 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8204 full-time, $337 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $120 full-time, $4.25 per credit hour part-time, $60 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Student-run newspaper. Most popular organizations: student government, Phi Theta Kappa, student newspaper. Major annual events: Field Day, Health Fair, Orientation. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Aiken Technical College Library with 32,118 books, 425 serials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $258,703. 200 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ALLEN UNIVERSITY E-8

1530 Harden St.
Columbia, SC 29204
Tel: (803)254-4165
Admissions: (803)376-5789
Fax: (803)376-5731
Web Site: http://www.allenuniversity.edu/

Description:

Independent African Methodist Episcopal, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1870. Setting: suburban campus. Total enrollment: 565. 784 applied, 61% were admitted. Full-time: 552 students, 38% women, 62% men. Part-time: 13 students, 54% women, 46% men. Students come from 14 states and territories, 1 other country, 9% from out-of-state, 97% black, 3% international, 25% 25 or older, 80% live on campus, 12% transferred in. Retention: 41% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, honors program, independent study, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application. Required: essay, high school transcript, 3 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: 7/31.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $6260 includes full-time tuition ($3609), mandatory fees ($546), and college room and board ($2105). College room only: $1230. Part-time tuition: $301 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 3 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local sororities; 7% of eligible men and 10% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: International Students Club, Social Science Club, Gospel Choir. Major annual events: Homecoming, Religious Emphasis Week, Black History Month observance. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. 324 college housing spaces available; 275 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. J. S. Flipper Library with 50,000 books and 175 serials. 130 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of South Carolina.

■ ANDERSON UNIVERSITY D-3

316 Blvd.
Anderson, SC 29621-4035
Tel: (864)231-2000
Free: 800-542-3594
Admissions: (864)231-2030
Fax: (864)231-2004
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ac.edu/

Description:

Independent Baptist, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1911. Setting: 44-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $17.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2942 per student. Total enrollment: 1,644. Faculty: 150 (68 full-time, 82 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 1,079 applied, 78% were admitted. 17% from top 10% of their high school class, 44% from top quarter, 81% from top half. Full-time: 1,277 students, 64% women, 36% men. Part-time: 367 students, 65% women, 35% men. Students come from 29 states and territories, 18 other countries, 11% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 10% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 17% 25 or older, 50% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 62% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; visual and performing arts. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.5 high school GPA. Required for some: essay, 2 recommendations, interview. Application deadline: 7/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $22,950 includes full-time tuition ($15,400), mandatory fees ($1150), and college room and board ($6400). College room only: $3250. Part-time tuition: $410 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 29 open to all. Most popular organizations: Baptist Campus Ministries, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Student Government Association, Gamma Beta Phi, Student Alumni Council. Major annual events: CORE-Campus Organizations Recruitment Event, Christmas First Night, Founders' Day Convocation. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 879 college housing spaces available; 830 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Olin D. Johnston Library with 69,069 books, 7,200 microform titles, 314 serials, 4,868 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 192 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in the Piedmont Plateau section, Anderson enjoys moderate climate and is a busy manufacturing town with 32 textile plants and many other factories. The area is accessed by major highways, air, bus, and limited rail service. The community has a countywide library system, churches of many denominations, hotel and motels, hospitals, shopping malls, and various civic and fraternal organizations. Local recreation includes theatres, bowling, tennis, excellent golf facilities, two large lakes, swimming, boating, fishing, hunting, and other outdoor sports. Part-time employment is available.

■ BENEDICT COLLEGE E-8

1600 Harden St.
Columbia, SC 29204
Tel: (803)256-4220
Admissions: (803)253-5275
Fax: (803)253-5167
Web Site: http://www.benedict.edu/

Description:

Independent Baptist, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1870. Setting: 20-acre urban campus. Endowment: $17 million. Total enrollment: 3,005. 4,039 applied, 71% were admitted. 7% from top 10% of their high school class, 14% from top quarter, 28% from top half. Full-time: 2,864 students, 50% women, 50% men. Part-time: 141 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 32 states and territories, 20% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 0.2% Hispanic, 99% black, 0.1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 10% 25 or older, 66% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Advanced placement, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: SAT or ACT recommended. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 7/31.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $18,912 includes full-time tuition ($11,574), mandatory fees ($1380), and college room and board ($5958). Part-time tuition: $388 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $45 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 40 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 2% of eligible men and 5% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: NAACP, Student Education Association, African Awareness Student Union. Major annual events: Fall Convocation, Homecoming Week, Spring Fest Week. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. 2,013 college housing spaces available; 1,850 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Option: coed housing available. Benjamin Payton Learning Resource Center with 114,770 books, 35,754 microform titles, 320 serials, 5,954 audiovisual materials, and a Web page. 500 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of South Carolina.

■ BOB JONES UNIVERSITY B-4

1700 Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greenville, SC 29614
Tel: (803)242-5100
Free: 800-BJA-NDME
Admissions: (864)242-5100
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bju.edu/

Description:

Independent religious, university, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1927. Total enrollment: 4,099. Faculty: 302 (235 full-time, 67 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 1,773 applied, 82% were admitted. 7% from top 10% of their high school class, 37% from top quarter, 65% from top half. Full-time: 3,523 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 52 students, 37% women, 63% men. 77% from out-of-state. Retention: 76% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; theology and religious vocations; business/marketing. Calendar: semesters.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript, 3 recommendations, ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: 8/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. Comprehensive fee: $14,750 includes full-time tuition ($9180), mandatory fees ($590), and college room and board ($4980). Part-time tuition: $459 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Student services: health clinic.

■ CENTRAL CAROLINA TECHNICAL COLLEGE F-10

506 North Guignard Dr.
Sumter, SC 29150-2499
Tel: (803)778-1961
Free: 800-221-8711
Fax: (803)773-4859
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cctech.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1963. Setting: 70-acre small town campus. Total enrollment: 3,244. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. Full-time: 945 students, 67% women, 33% men. Part-time: 2,299 students, 71% women, 29% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 49% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.2% international, 46% 25 or older, 13% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for selected health science programs. Option: electronic application. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Area resident tuition: $2700 full-time, $112.50 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3168 full-time, $132.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4800 full-time, $200 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 11 open to all. Most popular organizations: Creative Arts Society, Phi Theta Kappa, Computer Club, National Student Nurses Association (local chapter), Natural Resources Management Club. Major annual events: Spring Fling, Student Appreciation Day. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Central Carolina Technical College Library with 20,356 books, 21,993 microform titles, 245 serials, 1,317 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $256,334. 556 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Morris College.

■ CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY J-11

PO Box 118087
Charleston, SC 29423-8087
Tel: (843)863-7000
Free: 800-947-7474
Admissions: (843)863-7050
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.charlestonsouthern.edu/

Description:

Independent Baptist, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1964. Setting: 500-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $13.1 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4165 per student. Total enrollment: 3,022. Faculty: 178 (106 full-time, 72 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. 2,744 applied, 71% were admitted. 12% from top 10% of their high school class, 34% from top quarter, 67% from top half. Full-time: 2,208 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 374 students, 61% women, 39% men. Students come from 42 states and territories, 25 other countries, 18% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 28% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 20% 25 or older, 46% live on campus, 10% transferred in. Retention: 63% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; social sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-4-1. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships. Off campus study at Charleston Higher Education Consortium, University of North Carolina System, Clemson University. ROTC: Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay, 1 recommendation, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $23,230 includes full-time tuition ($16,780) and college room and board ($6450). Part-time tuition: $271 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 20 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities. Most popular organizations: student government, Baptist Student Union, Fellowship of Christian Athletics. Major annual events: Convocation, Homecoming. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 1,134 college housing spaces available; 1,080 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. L. Mendel Rivers Library with 192,600 books, 215,900 microform titles, 1,111 serials, 8,169 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $883,948. 190 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See The Citadel.

■ THE CITADEL, THE MILITARY COLLEGE OF SOUTH CAROLINA J-11

171 Moultrie St.
Charleston, SC 29409
Tel: (843)953-5000
Free: 800-868-1842
Admissions: (843)953-5230
Fax: (843)953-7084
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.citadel.edu

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1842. Setting: 130-acre urban campus. Endowment: $39.8 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $179,878. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5544 per student. Total enrollment: 3,386. Faculty: 232 (157 full-time, 75 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 1,913 applied, 78% were admitted. 9% from top 10% of their high school class, 31% from top quarter, 67% from top half. Full-time: 2,111 students, 6% women, 94% men. Part-time: 127 students, 47% women, 53% men. Students come from 48 states and territories, 29 other countries, 51% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 7% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 6% 25 or older, 100% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 82% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; security and protective services; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at 4 members of the Charleston Higher Education Consortium. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: 9/1. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $6522 full-time, $198 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,918 full-time, $397 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $998 full-time, $15 per term part-time. College room and board: $4840.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 37 open to all. Major annual events: Parents' Day, Homecoming, Corps Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. 1,913 college housing spaces available. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: coed housing available. Daniel Library with 233,745 books, 1.2 million microform titles, 583 serials, 2,868 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.4 million. 350 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ CLAFLIN UNIVERSITY G-8

400 Magnolia St.
Orangeburg, SC 29115
Tel: (803)535-5097
Admissions: (803)535-5340
Fax: (803)531-2860
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.claflin.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1869. Setting: 32-acre small town campus with easy access to Columbia. Endowment: $14 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4456 per student. Total enrollment: 1,728. Faculty: 127 (93 full-time, 34 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 2,744 applied, 40% were admitted. 25% from top 10% of their high school class, 46% from top quarter, 75% from top half. Full-time: 1,598 students, 67% women, 33% men. Part-time: 80 students, 59% women, 41% men. Students come from 29 states and territories, 19 other countries, 15% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 0.1% Hispanic, 93% black, 0.2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 5% international, 15% 25 or older, 65% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 79% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; security and protective services; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at South Carolina State University, Medical University of South Carolina, Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College, Clemson University. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.00 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: recommendations, SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $16,798 includes full-time tuition ($9206), mandatory fees ($1684), and college room and board ($5908). College room only: $2632. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $384 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $63 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: national fraternities, national sororities; 22% of eligible men and 26% of eligible women are members. Major annual events: graduation, Homecoming, Honors Convocation. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols. 1,003 college housing spaces available; 963 were occupied in 2003-04. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. H. V. Manning Library with 158,108 books, 62,718 microform titles, 427 serials, 981 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $761,608. 500 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ CLEMSON UNIVERSITY C-2

Clemson, SC 29634
Tel: (864)656-3311
Admissions: (864)656-2287
Fax: (864)656-2464
Web Site: http://www.clemson.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1889. Setting: 1,400-acre small town campus. Endowment: $264.9 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $104.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7729 per student. Total enrollment: 17,165. Faculty: 1,143 (1,015 full-time, 128 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 12,463 applied, 57% were admitted. 45% from top 10% of their high school class, 72% from top quarter, 97% from top half. 23 National Merit Scholars, 88 valedictorians. Full-time: 13,257 students, 46% women, 54% men. Part-time: 839 students, 41% women, 59% men. Students come from 53 states and territories, 62 other countries, 32% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 7% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 5% 25 or older, 47% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 89% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; engineering; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 5/1, 12/1 for early action. Notification: continuous, 2/15 for early action. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. State resident tuition: $9016 full-time, $364 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $18,640 full-time, $760 per hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load and program. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and program. College room and board: $5780. College room only: $3470. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 250 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 15% of eligible men and 22% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student government, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Tiger Band. Major annual events: Homecoming/Tigerama, Welcome Back Festival, Campus Sweep. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. College housing designed to accommodate 6,216 students; 6,329 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Robert Muldrow Cooper Library plus 1 other with 1.2 million books, 1.2 million microform titles, 5,587 serials, 131,280 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $10.4 million. 1,250 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Clemson is located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains approximately 135 miles from Charlotte and Atlanta. The average temperature is 61 degrees. The area is served by U.S. Highways 76 and 123, and air service is available nearby. Clemson has several churches of different denominations, a library, YMCA, concert series, and Little Theatre. Hotels, apartments, and rooming houses provide additional student housing. Local recreational facilities include fishing, hunting, golf, tennis, swimming, sailing, and skiing. Job opportunities are available.

■ CLINTON JUNIOR COLLEGE B-8

PO Box 968, 1029 Crawford Rd.
Rock Hill, SC 29730
Tel: (803)327-7402
Fax: (803)327-3261
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.clintonjuniorcollege.edu/

Description:

Independent, 2-year, coed, affiliated with African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. Founded 1894. Calendar: semesters.

■ COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY F-14

PO Box 261954
Conway, SC 29528-6054
Tel: (843)347-3161
Free: 800-277-7000
Admissions: (843)349-2037
Fax: (843)349-2127
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.coastal.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1954. Setting: 244-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $14.8 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $966,347. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4467 per student. Total enrollment: 7,613. Faculty: 414 (233 full-time, 181 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 5,427 applied, 74% were admitted. 11% from top 10% of their high school class, 43% from top quarter, 73% from top half. Full-time: 5,753 students, 52% women, 48% men. Part-time: 644 students, 61% women, 39% men. Students come from 45 states and territories, 41 other countries, 46% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 12% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 13% 25 or older, 35% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 64% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; biological/life sciences; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, 1 recommendation, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/15. Notification: continuous until 9/15. Preference given to state residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $6780 full-time, $290 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,020 full-time, $630 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $80 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. College room and board: $6280. College room only: $4020. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 83 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 7% of eligible men and 6% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Coastal Productions Board, STAR (Students Taking Active Responsibility), FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes), Diversity of Programming. Major annual events: homecoming, Cino Day, Chanticleer Days. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 2,250 college housing spaces available; 2,093 were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Kimbel Library with 144,361 books, 17,804 microform titles, 8,638 serials, 4,003 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.5 million. 600 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Coastal Carolina University is located nine miles from the bustling resort area of Myrtle Beach, SC. Recreational and entertainment options provide many opportunities for internships for the Professional Golf Management and Resort Tourism programs, as well as part-time employment opportunities. Brookgreen Gardens, one of the world's finest outdoor sculpture gardens, provides a tranquil setting for relaxation, while Broadway on the Beach provides entertainment, shopping, and dining attractions.

■ COKER COLLEGE D-11

300 East College Ave.
Hartsville, SC 29550
Tel: (843)383-8000
Free: 800-950-1908
Admissions: (843)383-8050
Fax: (843)383-8056
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.coker.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees (also offers evening program with significant enrollment not reflected in profile). Founded 1908. Setting: 30-acre small town campus with easy access to Charlotte. Total enrollment: 551. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 9:1. 649 applied, 66% were admitted. 20% from top 10% of their high school class, 50% from top quarter, 82% from top half. 2 valedictorians. Full-time: 541 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 10 students, 50% women, 50% men. Students come from 28 states and territories, 6 other countries, 23% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 20% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 8% 25 or older, 70% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 74% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; visual and performing arts; psychology. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: 9/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. Comprehensive fee: $23,728 includes full-time tuition ($17,472), mandatory fees ($480), and college room and board ($5776). College room only: $2740. Part-time tuition: $728 per semester hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 27 open to all. Most popular organizations: Coker College Union, student government, Pan-African American Sisterhood Association, Sigma Alpha Chi, Commissioners. Major annual events: homecoming, C.O.W. Days, Bandfest. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 364 college housing spaces available; 338 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. James Lide Coker III Memorial Library plus 1 other with 78,706 books, 45,391 microform titles, 575 serials, 5,741 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 40 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Coker College is located in Hartsville, a community of approximately 20,000 people. It is located in the northeastern part of the state, 20 miles off I-95, and approximately a two-hour drive from South Carolina's beautiful beaches and mountains. The climate is temperate and mild year-round. There is a township library and many churches of various denominations. Florence airport is 24 miles away. Part-time employment is available for students. Local recreational facilities include two theaters, Lake Robinson, Prestwood Lake, golf, tennis, two city parks, and racing. There are various civic and fraternal organizations that are active within the community. Health service facilities are available.

■ COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON J-11

66 George St.
Charleston, SC 29424-0001
Tel: (843)953-5507
Admissions: (843)953-5670
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cofc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees (also offers graduate degree programs through University of Charleston, South Carolina). Founded 1770. Setting: 52-acre urban campus. Endowment: $36.6 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $4.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5153 per student. Total enrollment: 11,332. Faculty: 858 (515 full-time, 343 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 8,217 applied, 66% were admitted. 25% from top 10% of their high school class, 58% from top quarter, 91% from top half. 34 valedictorians. Full-time: 9,055 students, 64% women, 36% men. Part-time: 823 students, 57% women, 43% men. Students come from 52 states and territories, 76 other countries, 35% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 7% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 8% 25 or older, 29% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 83% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; communications/journalism; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at National Student Exchange, Medical University of South Carolina, Trident Technical College, The Citadel, Charleston Southern University. Study abroad program. ROTC: Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 4/1, 4/1 for nonresidents, 11/1 for early action. Notification: 5/15, 5/15 for nonresidents, 12/15 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $6668 full-time, $278 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,342 full-time, $639 per semester hour part-time. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. College room and board: $6948. College room only: $4768. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 144 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 15% of eligible men and 20% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Cougar Productions, intramural basketball, Black Student Union. Major annual events: Cougar Walk, Pep Supper, Welcome Week. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing designed to accommodate 2,644 students; 2,900 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Marlene and Nathan Addlestone Library plus 1 other with 476,108 books, 822,143 microform titles, 3,723 serials, 5,024 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $4.5 million. 578 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See The Citadel.

■ COLUMBIA COLLEGE E-8

1301 Columbia College Dr.
Columbia, SC 29203-5998
Tel: (803)786-3012
Free: 800-277-1301
Admissions: (803)786-3091
Fax: (803)786-3674
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.columbiacollegesc.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, comprehensive. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1854. Setting: 33-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $19.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6653 per student. Total enrollment: 1,493. Faculty: 154 (82 full-time, 72 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 767 applied, 84% were admitted. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 42% from top quarter, 71% from top half. Full-time: 867 students, 99% women, 1% men. Part-time: 241 students, 94% women, 6% men. Students come from 12 states and territories, 17 other countries, 6% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 43% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 30% 25 or older, 63% live on campus, 11% transferred in. Retention: 71% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; public administration and social services. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Naval (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $25,032 includes full-time tuition ($18,864), mandatory fees ($350), and college room and board ($5818). College room only: $3034. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $506 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 40 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, African-American Student Association, Columbia College Activities Board, Heavenly Creations Gospel Choir, Student Christian Association. Major annual events: Ludy Bowl, Follies, Mom's Day/Dad's Night. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 560 college housing spaces available; 539 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Option: women-only housing available. J. Drake Edens Library plus 1 other with 140,909 books, 12,060 microform titles, 513 serials, 18,144 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $609,877. 150 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY E-8

PO Box 3122
Columbia, SC 29230-3122
Tel: (803)754-4100
Free: 800-777-2227
Fax: (803)786-4209
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ciu.edu/

Description:

Independent nondenominational, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1923. Setting: 450-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $3.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5874 per student. Total enrollment: 1,013. Faculty: 48 (23 full-time, 25 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. 252 applied, 67% were admitted. 24% from top 10% of their high school class, 41% from top quarter, 71% from top half. 3 valedictorians. Full-time: 496 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 54 students, 57% women, 43% men. Students come from 38 states and territories, 10 other countries, 63% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 2% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 14% 25 or older, 59% live on campus, 12% transferred in. Retention: 69% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic area with the most degrees conferred: theology and religious vocations. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Midlands Technical College. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 4 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Required for some: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. Comprehensive fee: $20,592 includes full-time tuition ($14,880) and college room and board ($5712). Part-time tuition: $600 per semester hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 14 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Union, Student Senate, Student Missions Connection. Major annual events: Spring Conference, Homecoming, World Christian Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 375 college housing spaces available; 339 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. G. Allen Fleece Library with 118,752 books, 568,690 microform titles, 490 serials, 17,542 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $406,231. 42 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of South Carolina.

■ CONVERSE COLLEGE B-5

580 East Main St.
Spartanburg, SC 29302-0006
Tel: (864)596-9000
Free: 800-766-1125
Admissions: (864)596-9040
Fax: (864)596-9158
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.converse.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1889. Setting: 70-acre urban campus. Endowment: $50 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $25,000. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6507 per student. Total enrollment: 2,176. Faculty: 173 (83 full-time, 90 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 423 applied, 84% were admitted. 29% from top 10% of their high school class, 62% from top quarter, 88% from top half. Full-time: 648 students, 100% women. Part-time: 128 students, 100% women. Students come from 30 states and territories, 8 other countries, 24% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 14% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 23% 25 or older, 90% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 75% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; visual and performing arts; social sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Wofford College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 4/1. Notification: continuous until 5/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $29,082 includes full-time tuition ($22,234) and college room and board ($6848). Part-time tuition: $720 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $20 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 30 open to all. Most popular organizations: student government, student volunteer services, Student Christian Organization, Student Activities Committee, Athletic Association. Major annual events: 1889 Day, Founders' Day, Formal Opening. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 600 college housing spaces available. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: women-only housing available. Mickel Library with 129,411 books, 60,213 microform titles, 1,467 serials, 30,132 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $546,000. 72 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

One of the leading textile manufacturing cities in the South, Spartanburg is also one of the largest peach shipping centers in the world. The city was named after the Spartan Regiment, which represented this community in the Revolutionary War. The community is located in the Piedmont section of South Carolina and has an average temperature of 60 degrees. Airlines, railroads, and bus lines serve the area. There are many churches representing various denominations, 3 hospitals, libraries, a YMCA Family Center, and various civic and fraternal groups serving the city. Motels, hotels, and rooming houses are available for guests. Local recreation includes football, basketball, baseball, golf, stock car racing, swimming, tennis, picnicking, water skiing, theater, and series of concerts. Part-time employment is available.

■ DENMARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE H-7

Solomon Blatt Blvd., Box 327
Denmark, SC 29042-0327
Tel: (803)793-5100
Admissions: (803)793-5176
Fax: (803)793-5942
Web Site: http://www.denmarktech.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1948. Setting: 53-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 1,408. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 876 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 969 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 439 students, 60% women, 40% men. Students come from 8 states and territories, 0% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 0% Hispanic, 76% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 20% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Voorhees College, South Carolina State University. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, ACT ASSET. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $10. State resident tuition: $2088 full-time, $87 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4176 full-time, $174 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $190 full-time, $95 per term part-time. College room and board: $3096.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 25% of eligible men and 30% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Phi Beta Lambda, Gospel Choir, Drama Club. Major annual events: Homecoming, Family Day, Annual Honors Day Convocation. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. 330 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Denmark Technical College Learning Resources Center with 15,437 books and 200 serials. 105 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ERSKINE COLLEGE D-4

2 Washington St.
PO Box 338
Due West, SC 29639
Tel: (864)379-2131
Free: 800-241-8721
Admissions: (864)379-8830
Fax: (864)379-8759
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.erskine.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. Administratively affiliated with Erskine Theological Seminary. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1839. Setting: 85-acre rural campus. Endowment: $45.6 million. Total enrollment: 890. Faculty: 68 (37 full-time, 31 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 854 applied, 70% were admitted. 31% from top 10% of their high school class, 58% from top quarter, 84% from top half. Full-time: 585 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 9 students, 56% women, 44% men. Students come from 24 states and territories, 12 other countries, 34% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 6% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 1% 25 or older, 88% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 77% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Advanced placement, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships. Off campus study at other colleges having a 4-1-4 calendar. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: electronic application. Required: essay, high school transcript, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous. Preference given to members of Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $25,468 includes full-time tuition ($17,700), mandatory fees ($1342), and college room and board ($6426). Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 49 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities; 14% of eligible men and 25% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: literary societies, religious organizations, Student Government Organization, publications, honor societies. Major annual events: Fall Fest, Spring Fling, homecoming. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 644 college housing spaces available; 535 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. McCain Library with 233,541 books, 62,012 microform titles, 1,020 serials, 1,777 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $463,693. 65 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Due West is a town of approximately 1,300 residents. It enjoys a temperate climate. There is easy access to Interstate Routes 26 and 85, and the cities of Anderson, Greenwood, and Greenville are nearby. The major metropolitan areas of Atlanta and Charlotte are within a 2.5-hour drive. The college arranges transportation to meet students arriving at these points by train, bus or plane. Local recreational facilities include tennis courts, a swimming pool, movies and a physical education/athletic center.

■ FLORENCE-DARLINGTON TECHNICAL COLLEGE E-12

2715 West Lucas St.
PO Box 100548
Florence, SC 29501-0548
Tel: (843)661-8324
Free: 800-228-5745
Admissions: (843)661-8153
Fax: (843)661-8306
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.fdtc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1963. Setting: 100-acre small town campus with easy access to Columbia. Endowment: $1000. Total enrollment: 4,041. Full-time: 2,147 students, 67% women, 33% men. Part-time: 1,894 students, 75% women, 25% men. Students come from 4 states and territories, 1% Native American, 0.4% Hispanic, 46% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 3% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, deferred admission. Required for some: high school transcript, SAT or ACT, CPT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/1.

Collegiate Environment:

Choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 3 open to all. Most popular organizations: International Club, FDTC Outreach Choir, Student Ambassadors. Major annual events: Spring Fling, Back to School Bash, Black History Month. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Florence-Darlington Technical College Library with 34,814 books and 286 serials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $341,742. 220 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Agriculture and industry support the economy of Florence. There are several diversified manufacturing companies within the area. Florence can be called an urban and a suburban community. It is located approximately 50 miles from the Atlantic Ocean resort areas. The city enjoys a temperate climate. Community services include public library, hospitals, museums, many churches of various denominations, and major civic, fraternal, and veteran's organizations. Local entertainment and recreation encompasses the Little Theatre group, movie theatres, a YMCA, a Civic Center, swimming, hunting, golf, tennis, and ice hockey.

■ FORREST JUNIOR COLLEGE D-3

601 East River St.
Anderson, SC 29624
Tel: (864)225-7653
Fax: (864)261-7471
Web Site: http://www.forrestcollege.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1946. Setting: 3-acre small town campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7240 per student. Total enrollment: 165. 26 applied, 92% were admitted. Students come from 2 states and territories, 26% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 0% Hispanic, 47% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 20% 25 or older. ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, freshman honors college, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, recommendations, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: 9/30.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Tuition: $4950 full-time, $110 per quarter hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $450 full-time, $150 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program.

Collegiate Environment:

Student services: legal services, health clinic. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Forrest Junior College Library plus 1 other with an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $12,000. 37 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ FRANCIS MARION UNIVERSITY E-12

PO Box 100547
Florence, SC 29501-0547
Tel: (843)661-1362
Free: 800-368-7551
Admissions: (843)661-1231
Fax: (843)661-4635
Web Site: http://www.fmarion.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1970. Setting: 309-acre rural campus. Endowment: $200,000. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $250,236. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4662 per student. Total enrollment: 4,008. Faculty: 281 (176 full-time, 105 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 2,524 applied, 71% were admitted. 14% from top 10% of their high school class, 39% from top quarter, 72% from top half. 7 valedictorians. Full-time: 3,058 students, 64% women, 36% men. Part-time: 442 students, 73% women, 27% men. Students come from 31 states and territories, 21 other countries, 4% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 42% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 11% 25 or older, 44% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 65% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; biological/life sciences; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at University of South Carolina, Florence-Darlington Technical College, Clemson University. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $6327 full-time, $316.35 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,654 full-time, $632.70 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $185 full-time, $4.75 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $5430. College room only: $2960.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 60 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 3% of eligible men and 4% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Baptist Campus Ministries, Education Club, University Ambassadors, Psychology Club, Campus Outreach. Major annual events: Homecoming, Arts Alive, Springfest. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,381 college housing spaces available; 1,358 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. James A. Rogers Library plus 1 other with 332,043 books, 351,613 microform titles, 1,559 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.6 million. 551 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Florence-Darlington Technical College.

■ FURMAN UNIVERSITY B-4

3300 Poinsett Hwy.
Greenville, SC 29613
Tel: (864)294-2000
Admissions: (864)294-2034
Fax: (864)294-3127
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.furman.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1826. Setting: 750-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $429.8 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $13,967 per student. Total enrollment: 3,221. Faculty: 272 (220 full-time, 52 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 11:1. 4,007 applied, 53% were admitted. 64% from top 10% of their high school class, 88% from top quarter, 98% from top half. 20 National Merit Scholars, 32 class presidents, 47 valedictorians, 176 student government officers. Full-time: 2,699 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 105 students, 49% women, 51% men. Students come from 45 states and territories, 24 other countries, 71% from out-of-state, 0.1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 6% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 0% 25 or older, 91% live on campus, 1% transferred in. Retention: 93% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: social sciences; visual and performing arts; business/marketing. Core. Calendar: 3-2-3. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA, 2 recommendations. Required for some: SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 1/15, 11/15 for early decision. Notification: 3/15, 12/1 for early decision. Preference given to children of alumni.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $33,264 includes full-time tuition ($25,888), mandatory fees ($464), and college room and board ($6912). College room only: $3712. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $809 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 130 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 35% of eligible men and 40% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Collegiate Educational Service Corps, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Baptist Student Union, Student Activities Board, Furman Singers. Major annual events: Homecoming Spirit Competition, May Day-Play Day, Beach Weekend. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 2,425 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. James Buchanan Duke Library plus 2 others with 453,211 books, 811,000 microform titles, 2,052 serials, 5,644 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.8 million. 340 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

An industrial city, Greenville is in an important manufacturing region with very diverse industry. It is a metropolitan community that enjoys a temperate climate. Part-time employment is available. The city is served by air, rail and bus lines. Community facilities include a performing arts center, 16,000 seat arena, public library, art museum, YMCA, YWCA, 5 general and 1 children's hospital, and over 400 churches that represent major denominations. Local recreation includes several community theatre groups, lakes and rivers for water sports, mountains for hiking and camping, and most major sports, including golf and minor league baseball and hockey teams.

■ GREENVILLE TECHNICAL COLLEGE B-4

PO Box 5616
Greenville, SC 29606-5616
Tel: (864)250-8000
Free: 800-723-0673
Admissions: (864)250-8109
Fax: (864)250-8534
Web Site: http://www.greenvilletech.com/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1962. Setting: 407-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 13,000. Students come from 6 other countries, 42% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for allied health, nursing programs. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Recommended: SAT, ACT ASSET, or ACT COMPASS. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 8/20.

Collegiate Environment:

Social organizations: 12 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Phi Theta Kappa, Student Nurses Association, Christians on Campus, International and Friends Organization. Major annual events: Spring Picnic, Red Ribbon Week, Student Leadership Conference. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Verne Smith Library/Technical Resource Center with 49,500 books and 658 serials. 830 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Furman University.

■ HORRY-GEORGETOWN TECHNICAL COLLEGE F-14

2050 Hwy. 501, PO Box 261966
Conway, SC 29528-6066
Tel: (843)347-3186
Admissions: (843)349-5277
Fax: (843)347-4207
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hgtc.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: small town campus. Total enrollment: 5,362. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 5% from top 10% of their high school class, 5% from top quarter, 45% from top half. Full-time: 2,446 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 2,916 students, 71% women, 29% men. Students come from 10 states and territories, 22 other countries, 11% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 24% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international. Retention: 51% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: early admission. Required for some: high school transcript. Application deadlines: Rolling, Rolling for nonresidents. Notification: continuous, continuous for nonresidents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Area resident tuition: $2800 full-time, $117 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3544 full-time, $148 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4264 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $144 full-time, $1 per credit hour part-time, $35 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. College housing not available. Conway Campus Learning Resource Center plus 2 others with a Web page. 300 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The college is located at the center of the largest tourist recreational environment along the Eastern Seaboard. Over 75 miles of white sand beaches as well as golf courses, restaurants, and hotels abound in the area. Air and bus service is available and Highway 17, the "Kings Highway", is the major coastal route in the area. Major arts and entertainment centers, libraries, churches, as well as numerous fraternal and civic organizations serve the community. There are extensive part-time employment opportunities for students, especially from March through September, the height of the tourist season.

■ ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE B-4

6 Independence Pointe
Greenville, SC 29615
Tel: (864)288-0777
Fax: (864)297-0053
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of ITT Educational Services, Inc. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1992. Core.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Recommended: recommendations. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available.

■ LANDER UNIVERSITY E-4

320 Stanley Ave.
Greenwood, SC 29649-2099
Tel: (864)388-8000; 888-452-6337
Admissions: (864)388-8307
Fax: (864)388-8125
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.lander.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1872. Setting: 100-acre small town campus. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $11,187. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4586 per student. Total enrollment: 2,703. Faculty: 190 (126 full-time, 64 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 1,750 applied, 85% were admitted. 11% from top 10% of their high school class, 33% from top quarter, 72% from top half. Full-time: 2,373 students, 66% women, 34% men. Part-time: 239 students, 70% women, 30% men. Students come from 28 states and territories, 17 other countries, 3% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 24% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 13% 25 or older, 33% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 63% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: history; business/marketing; education. Core. Calendar: semesters plus 3 summer sessions. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at University Center of Greenville. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $6108 full-time, $275 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,528 full-time, $564 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level. Part-time tuition varies according to degree level. College room and board: $5468. College room only: $3360. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 49 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 11% of eligible men and 12% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Students Promoting Intelligent Choices and Experiences (S.P.I.C.E.), Lander Association of Biological Science. Major annual events: Miss Lander Pageant, Homecoming, graduation. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,032 college housing spaces available; 971 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: coed, women-only housing available. Jackson Library with 175,366 books, 149,680 microform titles, 763 serials, 2,913 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $798,827. 125 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Greenwood, an industrial city noted for its production of textiles, is located in west-central South Carolina. The climate is temperate and mild. Five rail lines, commercial air service, buses, and major highways serve the community. Public service facilities include one hospital and various health centers, an area mental health center, churches of all denominations, a library, and a YMCA. There are several motels, shopping, and various civic and fraternal organizations within the immediate area. Recreation includes several swimming pools, two recreation centers, 3 golf courses, baseball, football, tennis, basketball, and nearby Greenwood State Park, which provides water sports and picnic areas. Part-time employment is available.

■ LIMESTONE COLLEGE A-6

1115 College Dr.
Gaffney, SC 29340-3799
Tel: (864)489-7151
Free: 800-795-7151
Admissions: (864)488-4549
Fax: (864)487-8706
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.limestone.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1845. Setting: 115-acre suburban campus with easy access to Charlotte. Endowment: $8.7 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3711 per student. Total enrollment: 676. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 884 applied, 58% were admitted. 7% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 54% from top half. 1 class president, 7 student government officers. Full-time: 660 students, 46% women, 54% men. Part-time: 16 students, 38% women, 63% men. Students come from 29 states and territories, 9 other countries, 41% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 18% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 9% 25 or older, 49% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 67% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; psychology; parks and recreation. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $21,000 includes full-time tuition ($15,000) and college room and board ($6000). Part-time tuition: $625 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 16 open to all; local sororities; 2% of women are members. Most popular organizations: Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Student Government Association, Gospel Choir, KDK, Student Ambassadors. Major annual events: Christmas On Campus, Mid-Term Madness, Earth Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center, student success center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 345 college housing spaces available; 304 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. A. J. Eastwood Library with 104,582 books, 2,630 microform titles, 289 serials, 2,707 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $221,973. 81 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Once predominately a cotton-textile manufacturing city, Gaffney has many diversified industries today including the manufacture of frozen foods, roller bearings, clothes, gloves, rugs, clay and concrete products. The surrounding agricultural area is a major producer of peaches, and also grain and livestock. The city is located 2 miles from Interstate I-85. Approximately 45 miles north is the Charlotte International Airport, and 40 miles south is the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport. The community has several churches representing many denominations, and many civic and service organizations.

■ MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA J-11

171 Ashley Ave.
Charleston, SC 29425-0002
Tel: (843)792-2300
Admissions: (843)792-3813
Fax: (843)792-3764
Web Site: http://www.musc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, upper-level, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1824. Setting: 61-acre urban campus. Endowment: $68.4 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $99.9 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $55,776 per student. Total enrollment: 2,428. Faculty: 1,281. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. Students come from 19 states and territories, 10% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 0.3% Hispanic, 16% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 59% 25 or older. Retention: 87% of full-time entering class returned the following year. Calendar: semesters. Advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, part-time degree program, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Charleston Higher Education Consortium, University of South Carolina, University Center of Greenville, Francis Marion University.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $75.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 11 open to all. Most popular organizations: MUSC Student Government Association, Multicultural Group Advisory Board, Public Health Interest Group, International Association, Crisis Ministries. Major annual events: Alhambra, Back to School Party, Halloween Horror Cruise. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Medical University of South Carolina Library plus 1 other with 225,061 books, 3,088 microform titles, 3,746 serials, 1,570 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $5.3 million. 200 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See The Citadel.

■ MIDLANDS TECHNICAL COLLEGE E-8

PO Box 2408
Columbia, SC 29202-2408
Tel: (803)738-1400
Admissions: (803)738-8324
Fax: (803)738-7784
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.midlandstech.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1974. Setting: 113-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $2.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3594 per student. Total enrollment: 10,779. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 21:1. 4,409 applied, 69% were admitted. Full-time: 4,743 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 6,036 students, 69% women, 31% men. Students come from 33 states and territories, 5% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 37% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.4% international, 40% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, radiology programs. Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: ACT ASSET. Recommended: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Area resident tuition: $2904 full-time, $121 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $3676 full-time, $157 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8612 full-time, $363 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $100 full-time, $50 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. College housing not available. 89,618 books, 11,600 microform titles, 551 serials, 1,036 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 125 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See University of South Carolina.

■ MILLER-MOTTE TECHNICAL COLLEGE J-11

8085 Rivers Ave., Ste. E
Charleston, SC 29418
Tel: (843)574-0101; 877-617-4740
Fax: (843)266-3434
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.miller-motte.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards diplomas degrees. Founded 2000. Setting: urban campus.

■ MORRIS COLLEGE F-10

100 West College St.
Sumter, SC 29150-3599
Tel: (803)934-3200; (866)853-1345
Admissions: (803)934-3225
Fax: (803)773-3687
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.morris.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Baptist Educational and Missionary Convention of South Carolina. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1908. Setting: 34-acre small town campus. Endowment: $5.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4058 per student. Total enrollment: 863. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 892 applied, 85% were admitted. 0% from top 10% of their high school class, 9% from top quarter, 24% from top half. Full-time: 844 students, 64% women, 36% men. Part-time: 19 students, 63% women, 37% men. Students come from 21 states and territories, 16% from out-of-state, 99% black, 11% 25 or older, 72% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 55% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; health professions and related sciences; security and protective services. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, medical examination. Required for some: interview, SAT or ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $12,234 includes full-time tuition ($8163), mandatory fees ($235), and college room and board ($3836). Part-time tuition: $330 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $45 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 50 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 12% of eligible men and 11% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, New Emphasis on Nontraditional Students, Block 'M' Club, Students of South Carolina Educational Association, Baptist Student Union. Major annual events: Coronation of Miss Morris College, Thanksgiving Rally/Homecoming Parade, Homecoming Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, controlled dormitory access. 696 college housing spaces available; 684 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Richardson-Johnson Learning Resources Center with 102,206 books, 202,608 microform titles, 414 serials, 3,955 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $612,095. 210 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Sumter was named for General Thomas Sumter, "The Gamecock of the Revolution." The community is served by two bus lines and is 50 miles from an airport and 35 miles from rail service. The mean summer temperature is 90 degrees, and the mean winter temperature is 40 degrees. The city has many churches of various faiths, as well as a public library. Sumter offers both large natural parks and many lakes, and is famed for its Swan Lake Iris Gardens. Sports and recreation go hand-in-hand with the compatible climate and natural resources found in the community, and includes four theatres, a skating rink, bowling, and night-lit tennis courts.

■ NEWBERRY COLLEGE D-6

2100 College St.
Newberry, SC 29108-2197
Tel: (803)276-5010
Free: 800-845-4955
Admissions: (803)321-5129
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.newberry.edu/

Description:

Independent Evangelical Lutheran, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1856. Setting: 60-acre small town campus. Endowment: $15.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3691 per student. Total enrollment: 841. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 1,102 applied, 59% were admitted. 3 class presidents, 6 valedictorians, 48 student government officers. Full-time: 841 students, 40% women, 60% men. Students come from 26 states and territories, 13 other countries, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 26% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 4% 25 or older, 87% live on campus, 7% transferred in. Retention: 61% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; biological/life sciences; communications/journalism. Core. Calendar: semesters. Advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: 1 recommendation, interview. Required for some: essay. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $26,511 includes full-time tuition ($18,900), mandatory fees ($731), and college room and board ($6880). College room only: $3230. Part-time tuition: $350 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $50 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 15 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 30% of eligible men and 31% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Metoka Galeda (gospel choir and service group), Lutheran Student Movement, Baptist Student Union, Students Organized for Community Service. Major annual events: Homecoming, Fall Fling, Indian Princess event. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. 630 college housing spaces available; 552 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Wessels Library with 79,899 books, 7,212 microform titles, 499 serials, 1,389 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $114,950. 78 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Newberry is located in the Piedmont region of South Carolina between Lakes Murray and Greenwood. The city enjoys mild weather. Community services include churches of many denominations, a hospital, a county library, and various civic and fraternal organizations. Local recreation and facilities include a swimming pool, barbecue facilities, parks, theaters, fishing, boating, swimming, and camping on nearby lakes. Part-time employment is available for college students.

■ NORTH GREENVILLE COLLEGE

PO Box 1892
Tigerville, SC 29688-1892
Tel: (864)977-7000
Free: 800-468-6642
Admissions: (864)977-7052
Fax: (864)977-7177
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ngc.edu/

Description:

Independent Southern Baptist, 4-year, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1892. Setting: 500-acre rural campus with easy access to Greenville. Endowment: $10.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3322 per student. Total enrollment: 1,766. 900 applied, 81% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 38% from top quarter, 68% from top half. Full-time: 1,559 students, 53% women, 47% men. Part-time: 207 students, 48% women, 52% men. Students come from 28 states and territories, 24 other countries, 21% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 9% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 7% 25 or older, 66% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, internships. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA, CPT. Required for some: interview, CPT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: 8/18. Notification: continuous. Preference given to Baptists.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $16,300 includes full-time tuition ($10,350) and college room and board ($5950). Part-time tuition: $200 per hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Most popular organizations: Baptist Student Union, Fellowship of Christians in Service, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Black Student Fellowship, Education Club. Major annual events: Homecoming, Founders' Day, Miss NGC Pageant. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, controlled dormitory access. 1,200 college housing spaces available; 1,163 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Hester Memorial Library with 49,000 books, 2,930 microform titles, 536 serials, 5,644 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $398,682. 72 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Tigerville is a rural area adjacent to Greenville in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The climate is temperate. There are several civic and fraternal organizations and a Baptist Church in the community. Part-time employment is available. Local recreation includes hunting, fishing, rafting, fine arts and the advantages of nearby Greenville.

■ NORTHEASTERN TECHNICAL COLLEGE C-11

PO Drawer 1007
Cheraw, SC 29520-1007
Tel: (843)921-6900
Admissions: (843)921-6935
Fax: (843)537-6148
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.netc.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1967. Setting: 59-acre rural campus. Endowment: $27,621. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $1445 per student. Total enrollment: 1,115. 468 applied, 100% were admitted. Students come from 2 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 2% Native American, 0.4% Hispanic, 46% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 45% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Option: early admission. Required: high school transcript, interview. Required for some: SAT. Entrance: noncompetitive.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $12.50. Area resident tuition: $2496 full-time, $104 per semester hour part-time. State resident tuition: $2688 full-time, $112 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4080 full-time, $170 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $30 full-time, $4 per semester hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Major annual event: Field Day. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Northeastern Technical College Library with 20,502 books, 261 serials, 690 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $167,842. 125 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Cheraw is a small community enjoying mild climate year-round. The city has a public library, a shopping center, churches of many denominations, and good medical facilities. There are several service and civic organizations active in the area.

■ ORANGEBURG-CALHOUN TECHNICAL COLLEGE G-8

3250 St Matthews Rd., NE
Orangeburg, SC 29118-8299
Tel: (803)536-0311
Admissions: (803)535-1218
Fax: (803)535-1388
Web Site: http://www.octech.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education, South Carolina. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 100-acre small town campus with easy access to Columbia. Endowment: $2.5 million. Total enrollment: 2,491. Full-time: 1,380 students, 68% women, 32% men. Part-time: 1,111 students, 77% women, 23% men. Students come from 5 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 0.3% Hispanic, 58% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 35% 25 or older, 4% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: interview. Placement: ACT ASSET required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Most popular organization: Student Advisory Council. Major annual events: Get Acquainted Day, Awards Day. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. College housing not available. Gressette Learning Center with 43,500 books, 143 serials, 2,253 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $357,362. 361 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus.

Community Environment:

See South Carolina State University.

■ PIEDMONT TECHNICAL COLLEGE E-4

620 North Emerald Rd.
PO Box 1467
Greenwood, SC 29648-1467
Tel: (864)941-8324
Admissions: (864)941-8603
Fax: (864)941-8555
Web Site: http://www.ptc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: 60-acre small town campus. Endowment: $1.1 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $124,427. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2515 per student. Total enrollment: 4,911. 890 applied, 100% were admitted. Students come from 2 states and territories, 5 other countries, 1% from out-of-state, 38% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, health sciences programs. Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Recommended: interview. Placement: ACT ACCESS, ACT COMPASS required; SAT recommended. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 8/20.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group. Social organizations: 18 open to all. Most popular organizations: National Honor Society, Career Peers (student volunteers), Student Nurses Association, Psychology Club, Ebony Club. Major annual events: Spring Activities Day, club fairs, Fall Convocation/Back to School Bash. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Piedmont Technical College Library with 27,497 books, 4,497 microform titles, 345 serials, 1,501 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $221,086. 320 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

In additions to Greenwood county campus, Piedmont has 6 county center campuses serving students of the service area which includes Abbeville, Laurens, Edgefield, McCormick, Saluda, and Newberry.

■ PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE D-5

503 South Broad St.
Clinton, SC 29325
Tel: (864)833-2820
Free: 800-476-7272
Admissions: (864)833-8229
Fax: (864)833-8481
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.presby.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1880. Setting: 215-acre small town campus with easy access to Greenville-Spartanburg. Endowment: $83.8 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $26.7 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7696 per student. Total enrollment: 1,196. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 1,110 applied, 76% were admitted. 31% from top 10% of their high school class, 62% from top quarter, 87% from top half. Full-time: 1,138 students, 51% women, 49% men. Part-time: 58 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 30 states and territories, 13 other countries, 33% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 5% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 1% 25 or older, 94% live on campus, 1% transferred in. Retention: 83% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; biological/life sciences; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, internships. Off campus study at Gulf Coast Marine Laboratory, American University. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 4/1, 12/5 for early decision. Notification: continuous until 6/1, 1/31 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $30,044 includes full-time tuition ($21,222), mandatory fees ($2022), and college room and board ($6800). College room only: $3340. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $885 per semester hour. Part-time tuition varies according to program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 60 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 80% of eligible men and 65% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student volunteer services, intramurals, Student Union Board, Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Major annual events: homecoming, Special Olympics. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,147 college housing spaces available; 1,099 were occupied in 2003-04. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. James H. Thomason Library with 155,830 books, 13,376 microform titles, 740 serials, 9,037 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $828,683. 130 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in the Piedmont section of South Carolina, Clinton is approximately 64 miles northwest of Columbia. The annual mean January temperature is 43.6 degrees; July 79.9 degrees. The community has air and bus service and is adjacent to U.S. Highway 76, I-385; I-26. There are many churches of various denominations, a hospital, hotels and motels in town. Part-time employment is available. Local recreational facilities include tennis, golf, theatre and swimming; nearby Lake Greenwood provides boating, fishing and hunting. Various civic, fraternal and veteran's organizations are active in the community.

■ SOUTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY G-8

300 College St. Northeast
Orangeburg, SC 29117-0001
Tel: (803)536-7000
Free: 800-260-5956
Admissions: (803)536-8408
Fax: (803)536-8990
Web Site: http://www.scsu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1896. Setting: 160-acre small town campus. Endowment: $651,061. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.8 million. Total enrollment: 4,294. 4,364 applied, 53% were admitted. 6% from top 10% of their high school class, 22% from top quarter, 56% from top half. 35 student government officers. Full-time: 3,345 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 359 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 36 states and territories, 26 other countries, 14% from out-of-state, 0.03% Native American, 0.2% Hispanic, 98% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 0.02% 25 or older, 58% live on campus, 7% transferred in. Retention: 76% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at National Student Exchange. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: SAT Subject Tests. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: 7/31. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $6480 full-time, $270 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,288 full-time, $554 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $185 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, reciprocity agreements, and student level. Part-time tuition varies according to course load, degree level, reciprocity agreements, and student level. College room and board: $6028. College room only: $3642. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 89 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 20% of eligible men and 20% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student government, Student Union Board, NAACP. Major annual events: Spring Convocation, Smith-Hammond Middleton Memorial Program, Bulldog Fest. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. College housing designed to accommodate 2,049 students; 2,142 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Miller F. Whittaker Library plus 1 other with 273,264 books, 1,346 serials, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.3 million. 300 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Orangeburg is in an agricultural and dairying area. Its industries include textiles, wood products, meat packing, chemicals, and baking goods. This is a suburban community with a temperate climate. Airline service is available at nearby Columbia. Railroad and bus lines serve the immediate community. There is a public library, churches of major denominations, a hospital, and major civic and fraternal organizations. Some part-time employment is available. Local recreation includes four theatres, swimming, fishing and many sports.

■ SOUTH UNIVERSITY E-8

3810 Main St.
Columbia, SC 29203-6400
Tel: (803)799-9082; (866)629-3031
Fax: (803)799-9038
Web Site: http://www.southuniversity.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Part of South University-Savannah. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1935. Setting: 2-acre urban campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $528 per student. Total enrollment: 491. Faculty: 40 (18 full-time, 22 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 162 applied, 69% were admitted. 0% from top 10% of their high school class, 11% from top quarter, 77% from top half. Full-time: 289 students, 81% women, 19% men. Part-time: 137 students, 88% women, 12% men. 0% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 90% black, 0.5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 71% 25 or older, 19% transferred in. Retention: 42% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: law/legal studies; business/marketing. Core. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, interview. Recommended: SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Tuition: $11,475 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 2 open to all. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. South University Library with 10,765 books, 100 serials, 250 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $184,505. 40 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus.

■ SOUTHERN METHODIST COLLEGE G-8

541 Broughton Stret, PO Box 1027
Orangeburg, SC 29116-1027
Tel: (803)534-7826
Free: 800-360-1503
Web Site: http://www.smcollege.edu/

Description:

Independent religious, 4-year, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1956. Endowment: $397,606. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6815 per student. Total enrollment: 77. Full-time: 61 students, 62% women, 38% men. Part-time: 16 students, 75% women, 25% men. Students come from 7 states and territories, 1 other country, 15% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 0% Hispanic, 52% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 69% 25 or older, 19% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Core. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Williamson Christian College.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, early admission, early action, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, 3 recommendations, interview, health certificate. Recommended: SAT or ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadlines: 7/15, 7/15 for early action. Notification: continuous until 7/22.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $9400 includes full-time tuition ($4600), mandatory fees ($600), and college room and board ($4200). Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time and course load. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $192 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $25 per semester hour. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time and course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. 13 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Lynn Corbett Library with 21,743 books, 10,000 microform titles, 60 serials, and 171 audiovisual materials. 6 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See South Carolina State University.

■ SOUTHERN WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY C-2

907 Wesleyan Dr., PO Box 1020
Central, SC 29630-1020
Tel: (864)644-5000
Free: 800-289-1292
Admissions: (864)644-5550
Fax: (864)644-5900
Web Site: http://www.swu.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Wesleyan Church. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1906. Setting: 230-acre small town campus. Endowment: $2.4 million. Total enrollment: 2,632. Faculty: 228 (50 full-time, 178 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 401 applied, 66% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 23% from top quarter, 75% from top half. 1 National Merit Scholar, 2 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,909 students, 66% women, 34% men. Part-time: 86 students, 70% women, 30% men. Students come from 27 states and territories, 5 other countries, 15% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 36% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 16% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 64% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; parks and recreation. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Clemson University, Tri-County Technical College, Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.3 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, lifestyle statement, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Application deadline: 8/11. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $20,900 includes full-time tuition ($15,000), mandatory fees ($450), and college room and board ($5450). College room only: $2050. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $460 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $225 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and degree level.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 10 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Student Missions Fellowship, Ministry Teams, Music Club, Council for Exceptional Children. Major annual events: homecoming, Spiritual Emphasis Week, Christmas Banquet. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night security patrols. 362 college housing spaces available; 330 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Rickman Library with 88,983 books, 975 microform titles, 525 serials, 3,502 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $535,189. 92 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Central is located in the Piedmont section of South Carolina, between Atlanta, Georgia, and Charlotte, North Carolina. The community is five miles North of Clemson and is located near the metropolitan area of Greenville.

■ SPARTANBURG METHODIST COLLEGE B-5

1200 Textile Rd.
Spartanburg, SC 29301-0009
Tel: (864)587-4000
Free: 800-772-7286
Admissions: (864)587-4223
Fax: (864)587-4355
Web Site: http://www.smcsc.edu/

Description:

Independent Methodist, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1911. Setting: 111-acre urban campus with easy access to Charlotte, NC. Endowment: $14.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5200 per student. Total enrollment: 779. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 23:1. 999 applied, 84% were admitted. 9% from top 10% of their high school class, 33% from top quarter, 65% from top half. 16 class presidents, 161 student government officers. Full-time: 716 students, 50% women, 50% men. Part-time: 63 students, 65% women, 35% men. Students come from 9 states and territories, 6 other countries, 6% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 32% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 6% 25 or older, 75% live on campus, 4% transferred in. Retention: 59% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, summer session for credit, part-time degree program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, rank in upper 75% of high school class, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Required for some: recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $15,476 includes full-time tuition ($9816), mandatory fees ($150), and college room and board ($5510). College room only: $2784. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $260 per credit. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 14 open to all. Most popular organizations: College Christian Movement, Alpha Phi Omega, Campus Union, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Kappa Sigma Alpha. Major annual events: College Wide Day of Service, Homecoming, Field Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 530 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Marie Blair Burgess Learning Resource Center with 75,000 books, 2,900 microform titles, 5,000 serials, 3,150 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $178,000. 48 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Converse College.

■ SPARTANBURG TECHNICAL COLLEGE B-5

PO Box 4386
Spartanburg, SC 29305-4386
Tel: (864)591-3600
Admissions: (864)592-4800
Web Site: http://www.stcsc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded1961. Setting: 104-acre suburban campus. Total enrollment: 4,409. 2% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 27% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 43% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters plus summer sessions. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: early admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $3094 full-time, $127 per hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3860 full-time, $159 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5490 full-time, $228 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $20 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 5 open to all. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. Spartanburg Technical College Library with 36,173 books, 295 serials, 3,534 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 360 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Converse College.

■ TECHNICAL COLLEGE OF THE LOWCOUNTRY K-9

921 Ribaut Rd., PO Box 1288
Beaufort, SC 29901-1288
Tel: (843)525-8324
Admissions: (843)525-8307
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tclonline.org/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina Technical and Comprehensive Education System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1972. Setting: 12-acre small town campus. Total enrollment: 1,765. 75% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: ACT ASSET. Recommended: SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Campus security: security during class hours. College housing not available. 25,226 books and 244 serials. 106 computers available on campus for general student use.

■ TRI-COUNTY TECHNICAL COLLEGE C-2

PO Box 587, 7900 Hwy. 76
Pendleton, SC 29670-0587
Tel: (864)646-8361
Admissions: (864)646-1500
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tctc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1962. Setting: 100-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 4,100. Students come from 3 states and territories, 7 other countries, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 11% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 38% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for allied health programs. Option: early admission. Placement: SAT, National League of Nursing Exam required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 14 open to all. Major annual events: Welcome Back Bash, Annual Talent Show. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. College housing not available. Tri-County Technical College Library with 34,513 books, 356 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $380,152. 600 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ TRIDENT TECHNICAL COLLEGE J-11

PO Box 118067
Charleston, SC 29423-8067
Tel: (843)574-6111
Admissions: (843)574-6483
Fax: (843)574-6109
Web Site: http://www.tridenttech.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1964. Setting: urban campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3750 per student. Total enrollment: 11,795. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. Full-time: 5,270 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 6,525 students, 65% women, 35% men. 1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 28% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 47% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, allied health programs. Options: Common Application, early admission. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/4. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Area resident tuition: $2950 full-time, $120 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3276 full-time, $134 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5586 full-time, $230 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $50 full-time, $5 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 33 open to all. Major annual events: Holiday Drop-in, Big Band Concert, Spring Week Carnival. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Learning Resources Center plus 3 others with 68,462 books and 868 serials. 500 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

North Charleston is a suburb located just eight miles from downtown Charleston. The community enjoys all the cultural, recreational and civic advantages of the nearby larger community, yet retains an air of the small town. There are good shopping areas, churches, parks and theatres.

■ UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA E-8

Columbia, SC 29208
Tel: (803)777-7000
Admissions: (803)777-7700
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.sc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Part of University of South Carolina System. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1801. Setting: 315-acre urban campus. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $78.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $8011 per student. Total enrollment: 27,065. Faculty: 1,567 (1,190 full-time, 377 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. 13,023 applied, 68% were admitted. 26% from top 10% of their high school class, 60% from top quarter, 91% from top half. 31 National Merit Scholars, 65 valedictorians. Full-time: 16,399 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 1,963 students, 50% women, 50% men. Students come from 54 states and territories, 66 other countries, 12% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 14% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 9% 25 or older, 46% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 83% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; communications/journalism.
Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 12/1. Notification: continuous until 10/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. State resident tuition: $6914 full-time, $324 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $18,556 full-time, $844 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to program. College room and board: $6080. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 270 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 14% of eligible men and 15% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Association of African-American Students, Baptist Student Union, Garnet Circle/Student Alumni. Major annual events: Homecoming, Tigerburn, Greek Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, Division of Law Enforcement and Safety. 6,937 college housing spaces available. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Thomas Cooper Library plus 7 others with 3.4 million books, 5.1 million microform titles, 22,744 serials, 46,648 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $15.5 million. 2,432 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Columbia is located in the Midlands, halfway between the coast and the mountains - an easy two-and-a-half hour drive to some of the nicest beaches on the East Coast and some of the Carolinas' best hiking trails. A few blocks east of the university lies bustling Five Points, a longtime favorite of students for it boutiques, bookstores, restaurants, and bars. West of the university lies the Congaree Vista, a more upscale shopping and eating district. As the state's capital city, Columbia is home to the state government, as well as several other colleges and universities. Culture and entertainment abound. The city has several theatre groups, an art museum, and an art center that brings in major musical, dance, and theatre entertainment. For relaxation on Columbia's balmy spring-like days, downtown's Finlay Park is close by, and nearby Lake Murray offers swimming, camping, and fishing.

■ UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AIKEN G-6

471 University Parkway
Aiken, SC 29801-6309
Tel: (803)648-6851; 888-WOW-USCA
Fax: (803)641-3727
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.usca.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of University of South Carolina System. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1961. Setting: 453-acre suburban campus with easy access to Columbia. Endowment: $15.6 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $144,263. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4986 per student. Total enrollment: 3,303. Faculty: 246 (147 full-time, 99 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 2,064 applied, 48% were admitted. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 39% from top quarter, 79% from top half. 10 valedictorians. Full-time: 2,270 students, 67% women, 33% men. Part-time: 880 students, 68% women, 32% men. Students come from 35 states and territories, 24 other countries, 11% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 26% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 26% 25 or older, 22% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 60% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at other units of the University of South Carolina System. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum SAT of 800 or ACT of 17, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $5928 full-time, $258 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,070 full-time, $520 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $230 full-time, $8 per semester hour part-time, $7 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $5560. College room only: $3800. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 53 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 1% of eligible men and 1% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: student government, Pacesetters, Student Alumni Ambassadors, African-American Student Alliance, Pacer Union Board. Major annual events: Homecoming Week, leadership training events, Black History Month. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 680 college housing spaces available; 672 were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Gregg-Graniteville Library with 165,459 books, 26,566 microform titles, 745 serials, 915 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1 million. 450 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Aiken, population c. 24,929, is the seat of Aiken County and is about 17 miles from Augusta, Georgia.

■ UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA BEAUFORT K-9

801 Carteret St.
Beaufort, SC 29902-4601
Tel: (843)521-4100
Web Site: http://www.sc.edu/beaufort/

Description:

State-supported, 4-year, coed. Part of University of South Carolina System. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1959. Setting: 5-acre small town campus. Endowment: $832,000. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $107,353. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4642 per student. Total enrollment: 1,319. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 464 applied, 87% were admitted. 5% from top 10% of their high school class, 22% from top quarter, 52% from top half. Full-time: 676 students, 62% women, 38% men. Part-time: 643 students, 56% women, 44% men. Students come from 47 states and territories, 18 other countries, 19% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 16% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 33% 25 or older, 12% transferred in. Retention: 56% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; social sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $4954 full-time, $207 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $11,870 full-time, $495 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $330 full-time, $10 per credit hour part-time. College room only: $6900.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 8 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Gamma Beta Phi, Black Student Organization, Business Club, Environmental Awareness Club. Major annual events: student cookouts, Christmas Party, Spring Fling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, evening security service. College housing not available. University of South Carolina at Beaufort Library plus 1 other with 50,000 books, 395 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $449,830. 85 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA LANCASTER C-8

PO Box 889
Lancaster, SC 29721-0889
Tel: (803)313-7471
Admissions: (803)313-7000
Fax: (803)313-7106
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://usclancaster.sc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of University of South Carolina System. Awards transfer associate and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1959. Setting: 17-acre small town campus with easy access to Charlotte. Total enrollment: 943. 302 applied, 98% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 25% from top quarter, 50% from top half. Students come from 3 states and territories, 1 other country, 0.2% Native American, 0.3% Hispanic, 19% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 37% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, honors program, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: SAT or ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group, student-run newspaper. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. College housing not available. Medford Library with 68,192 books and 454 serials. 25 computers available on campus for general student use.

■ UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SALKEHATCHIE I-7

PO Box 617
Allendale, SC 29810-0617
Tel: (803)584-3446
Web Site: http://uscsalkehatchie.sc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of University of South Carolina System. Awards transfer associate degrees. Founded 1965. Setting: 95-acre rural campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2086 per student. Total enrollment: 777. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 45% from top quarter, 75% from top half. 10 valedictorians. Students come from 3 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 41% black, 27% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. ROTC: Army (c), Naval (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Major annual event: Feast Day. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Salkehatchie Learning Resource Center with 47,877 books, 11,477 microform titles, 832 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $371,233. 70 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SUMTER F-10

200 Miller Rd.
Sumter, SC 29150-2498
Tel: (803)775-8727
Admissions: (803)938-3882
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.uscsumter.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of University of South Carolina System. Awards transfer associate degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: 50-acre urban campus. Endowment: $1.8 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $25,459. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4064 per student. Total enrollment: 1,020. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 453 applied, 62% were admitted. 1 class president, 3 student government officers. Full-time: 580 students, 63% women, 37% men. Part-time: 440 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 4 other countries, 1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 26% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.1% international, 30% 25 or older, 11% transferred in. Retention: 56% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/8.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $4064 full-time, $169 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,124 full-time, $422 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $260 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 16 open to all. Most popular organizations: Association of African-American Students, Baptist Student Union, Student Education Association, Gamecock Ambassadors, Environmental Club. Major annual events: Convocation, Alcohol Awareness Week Festival, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day festivities. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. University of South Carolina at Sumter Library with 81,114 books, 12,938 microform titles, 1,114 serials, 913 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $302,089. 355 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UNION C-6

PO Drawer 729
Union, SC 29379-0729
Tel: (864)427-3681
Admissions: (864)429-8728
Web Site: http://uscunion.sc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of University of South Carolina System. Awards transfer associate degrees. Founded 1965. Setting: small town campus with easy access to Charlotte. Total enrollment:321. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 127 applied, 89% were admitted. 5% from top 10% of their high school class, 18% from top quarter, 41% from top half. Full-time: 161 students, 69% women, 31% men. Part-time: 160 students, 69% women, 31% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 27% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 35% 25 or older, 12% transferred in. Calendar: semesters. Part-time degree program.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $4064 full-time, $169 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,124 full-time, $422 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $100 full-time, $10 per hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 12 open to all. College housing not available. 30 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UPSTATE B-5

800 University Way
Spartanburg, SC 29303-4999
Tel: (864)503-5000
Free: 800-277-8727
Admissions: (864)503-5280
Fax: (864)503-5201
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.uscupstate.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of University of South Carolina System. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1967. Setting: 300-acre urban campus with easy access to Charlotte. Endowment: $2.6 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $354,813. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6436 per student. Total enrollment: 4,484. Faculty: 356 (207 full-time, 149 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 2,296 applied, 33% were admitted. 12% from top 10% of their high school class, 38% from top quarter, 71% from top half. 5 valedictorians. Full-time: 3,564 students, 66% women, 34% men. Part-time: 845 students, 67% women, 33% men. Students come from 37 states and territories, 42 other countries, 3% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 26% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 32% 25 or older, 15% live on campus, 13% transferred in. Retention: 61% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; health professions and related sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Wofford College, Greenville Higher Education Consortium. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, college prep courses, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $6436 full-time, $282 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,274 full-time, $583 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $326 full-time, $11 per hour part-time, $25 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $5160. College room only: $3200. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 56 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 4% of eligible men and 4% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: African-American Association, Campus Activity Board, Student Nurses Association, Student Government Association, Association for the Education of Young Children. Major annual events: Premier Fall Kick-Off, Technology Fair, Angel Tree Program. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, campus security cameras. 730 college housing spaces available; 400 were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. University of South Carolina Upstate Library with 188,572 books, 55,051 microform titles, 14,953 serials, 7,640 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.9 million. 320 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Spartanburg, South Carolina, is one of the fastest-growing communities in the region, located on the thriving Interstate 85 corridor about three hours from Atlanta and an hour and a half from Charlotte, North Carolina. The Blue Ridge Mountains are less than an hour away; South Carolina's Grand Strand and historic Low Country are a four-hour drive in the other direction. The area has a growing international presence, and arts and cultural activities that would be the envy of many larger cities.

■ VOORHEES COLLEGE H-7

1411 Voorhees Rd., PO Box 678
Denmark, SC 29042
Tel: (803)793-3351
Free: 800-446-6250
Admissions: (803)703-7124
Fax: (803)793-5773
Web Site: http://www.voorhees.edu/

Description:

Independent Episcopal, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1897. Setting: 350-acre rural campus. Endowment: $5 million. Total enrollment: 847. 2,624 applied, 41% were admitted. 1% from top 10% of their high school class, 44% from top quarter, 50% from top half. Full-time: 807 students, 66% women, 34% men. Part-time: 40 students, 30% women, 70% men. Students come from 18 states and territories, 5 other countries, 0% Native American, 0% Hispanic, 95% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 26% 25 or older, 85% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 58% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: high school transcript, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $11,848 includes full-time tuition ($7106), mandatory fees ($170), and college room and board ($4572). College room only: $1904. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $242 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $170 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 30 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 15% of eligible men and 10% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: White Rose, Elizabeth Evelyn Wright Culture Club. Major annual events: Founders' Day, Homecoming, Fall Convocation. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. 550 college housing spaces available; 404 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Wright-Potts Library with 107,260 books, 24,266 microform titles, 408 serials, 1,172 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $213,167. 300 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Denmark is a rural community located in south central South Carolina. The climate is temperate. There is a public library, local hospitals and several churches representing various denominations. The Lions Club, Masonic Lodge, and Woodmen of the World are active within the community. Recreation includes golf, swimming, boating, fishing and a local theatre.

■ WILLIAMSBURG TECHNICAL COLLEGE G-11

601 Martin Luther King, Jr Ave.
Kingstree, SC 29556-4197
Tel: (843)355-4110
Free: 800-768-2021
Fax: (843)355-4296
Web Site: http://www.wiltech.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1969. Setting: 41-acre rural campus. Endowment: $52,987. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $1476 per student. Total enrollment: 595. 0% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 0.2% Hispanic, 71% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 49% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT ASSET, ACT COMPASS required; SAT or ACT recommended. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Social organizations: 9 open to all; national fraternities, local fraternities, local sororities; 30% of eligible men and 30% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, National Vocational-Technical Honor Society, Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society, Computer Club. Major annual events: Tech Fest, Miss Tech Pageant, Christmas Party. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Learning Resource Center with 25,456 books, 24,365 microform titles, 109 serials, 3,601 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $134,408. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ WINTHROP UNIVERSITY B-8

701 Oakland Ave.
Rock Hill, SC 29733
Tel: (803)323-2211
Free: 800-763-0230
Admissions: (803)323-2191
Fax: (803)323-2137
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.winthrop.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1886. Setting: 418-acre suburban campus with easy access to Charlotte. Endowment: $693,815. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $316,031. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4460 per student. Total enrollment: 6,480. Faculty: 542 (270 full-time, 272 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 4,304 applied, 69% were admitted. 22% from top 10% of their high school class, 56% from top quarter, 92% from top half. Full-time: 4,587 students, 69% women, 31% men. Part-time: 600 students, 72% women, 28% men. Students come from 41 states and territories, 30 other countries, 11% 25 or older, 43% live on campus, 7% transferred in. Retention: 72% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; visual and performing arts. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at National Student Exchange, 19 members of the Charlotte Area Educational Consortium. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 5/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $8756 full-time, $364 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $16,150 full-time, $673 per semester hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to degree level. Part-time tuition varies according to degree level. College room and board: $5352. College room only: $3420. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 115 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities. Most popular organizations: Ebonites, campus ministries, Student Government Association, Dinkins Student Union. Major annual events: Homecoming, Greek Week, Convocation/Student Activities Fair. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Dacus Library with 414,879 books, 1.2 million microform titles, 1,446 serials, 2,884 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.2 million. 250 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Rock Hill is a small progressive city of nearly 50,000 residents located 30 miles below Charlotte, North Carolina. The city is uniquely situated to offer the advantages of both small town living and big city amenities. Diversified industry fuels a growing local economy which produces textiles, wood, paper, concrete, plastic and chemical products. Rock Hill's facilities include the Museum of York County (featuring the world's largest collection of hooved African animals); Winthrop Galleries, host to local, national and international artists; Winthrop Coliseum, Glencairn Gardens, a six acre garden spot; and Cherry Park, a 68 acre recreation park featuring five major league baseball and softball diamonds, which attracts major tournaments from throughout the United States. Opportunities for recreation in the mild piedmont climate are plentiful. The city maintains a system of 28 parks that offer athletic fields and courts, play areas, fitness, walking and jogging trails, and amphitheaters. Lakes 20 minutes away are a convenient destination for water sports and sailing.

■ WOFFORD COLLEGE B-5

429 North Church St.
Spartanburg, SC 29303-3663
Tel: (864)597-4000
Admissions: (864)597-4130
Fax: (864)597-4149
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wofford.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with United Methodist Church. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1854. Setting: 140-acre urban campus with easy access to Charlotte. Endowment: $123 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6761 per student. Total enrollment: 1,173. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 1,871 applied, 66% were admitted. 58% from top 10% of their high school class, 83% from top quarter, 98% from top half. 1 National Merit Scholar, 8 class presidents, 19 valedictorians, 42 student government officers. Full-time: 1,158 students, 48% women, 52% men. Part-time: 15 students, 33% women, 67% men. Students come from 30 states and territories, 5 other countries, 35% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 6% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 0% 25 or older, 88% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 89% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; biological/life sciences; social sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships. Off campus study at Converse College, University of South Carolina-Spartanburg. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadlines: 2/1, 11/15 for early decision. Notification: 3/15, 12/1 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $30,935 includes full-time tuition ($24,130) and college room and board ($6805). Part-time tuition: $875 per hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 68 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 51% of eligible men and 59% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: performing arts groups, Twin Towers student volunteers, Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Major annual events: homecoming, Spring Weekend/Greek Games, Phi Beta Kappa Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. College housing designed to accommodate 966 students; 1,029 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: coed housing available. Sandor Teszler Library with 245,730 books, 37,005 microform titles, 10,046 serials, 2,796 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 35 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Spartanburg County (population 250,000) is a thriving, rapidly growing Sunbelt business center that is particularly well known for its international community. Wofford students live in a downtown setting near restaurants, churches of all denominations, shopping districts, a busy arts center, and four other college campuses. Memorial Auditorium, Wofford's next-door neighbor, features concerts, touring Broadway plays, and other special attractions. Several major airlines serve the convenient Greenville-Spartanburg Airport, which is only twenty miles from the campus. Interstate highways 26 and 85 intersect at Spartanburg. Charlotte, Atlanta, historic Charleston, and South Carolina's world-famous coastal resorts are all within a pleasant afternoon drive.

■ YORK TECHNICAL COLLEGE B-8

452 South Anderson Rd.
Rock Hill, SC 29730-3395
Tel: (803)327-8000
Admissions: (803)981-7021
Fax: (803)327-8059
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.yorktech.com/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1961. Setting: 110-acre small town campus with easy access to Charlotte. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2900 per student. Total enrollment: 4,153. Full-time: 2,039 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 2,114 students, 67% women, 33% men. 2% from out-of-state, 2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 24% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.02% international, 39% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Charlotte Area Educational Consortium.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for health and human services program. Option: electronic application. Required for some: high school transcript, SAT, ACT, or ACT ASSET, ACT COMPASS. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2900 full-time, $121 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3264 full-time, $136 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6528 full-time, $272 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $136 full-time, $4 per credit hour part-time, $68 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 16 open to all. Most popular organizations: Jacobin Society, Phi Theta Kappa, Student Government Association, Phi Beta Lambda, Student Activities Board. Major annual events: Tech Fest, Welcome Back Blast, Health Fair. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. Anne Springs Close Library with 26,947 books, 50,574 microform titles, 475 serials, 1,813 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 250 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Winthrop University.

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South Carolina

South Carolina

AIKEN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

PO Drawer 696
Aiken, SC 29802-0696
Tel: (803)593-9231
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.aik.tec.sc.us/
President/CEO: Susan A. Graham
Registrar: Dr. James Schmidt
Admissions: Evelyn Pride Patterson
Financial Aid: John Garrison
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education % Accepted: 65 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2816 full-time, $117 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3176 full-time, $132 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8204 full-time, $337 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $120 full-time, $4.25 per credit hour part-time, $60 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,397, PT 1,119 Faculty: FT 55, PT 109 Library Holdings: 32,118 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABET, ADA, ACBSP Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M

ALLEN UNIVERSITY

1530 Harden St.
Columbia, SC 29204
Tel: (803)254-4165
Admissions: (803)376-5789
Fax: (803)376-5731
Web Site: http://www.allenuniversity.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Charles E. Young
Registrar: Nathan Vereen
Admissions: Kristy J. Sinkfield
Financial Aid: Antonia Roberts
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: African Methodist Episcopal Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED not accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $6260 includes full-time tuition ($3609), mandatory fees ($546), and college room and board ($2105). College room only: $1230. Part-time tuition: $301 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 552, PT 13 Faculty: FT 25, PT 14 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 80 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 80 Library Holdings: 50,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Football M; Volleyball W

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY

316 Blvd.
Anderson, SC 29621-4035
Tel: (864)231-2000
Free: 800-542-3594
Admissions: (864)231-2030
Fax: (864)231-2004
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ac.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Evans P. Whitaker
Registrar: Lisa Thompson
Admissions: Pam Bryant
Financial Aid: Jeff Holliday
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Baptist Scores: 95.7% SAT V 400+; 96.9% SAT M 400+; 65.2% ACT 18-23; 21.4% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 78 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: July 01 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $22,950 includes full-time tuition ($15,400), mandatory fees ($1150), and college room and board ($6400). College room only: $3250. Part-time tuition: $410 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,277, PT 367 Faculty: FT 68, PT 82 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 86 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 50 Library Holdings: 69,069 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

BENEDICT COLLEGE

1600 Harden St.
Columbia, SC 29204
Tel: (803)256-4220
Admissions: (803)253-5275
Fax: (803)253-5167
Web Site: http://www.benedict.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. David H. Swinton
Registrar: Wanda Scott-Kinney
Admissions: Gary Knight
Financial Aid: Sul M. Black
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Baptist Scores: 44.31% SAT V 400+; 46.35% SAT M 400+; 11.46% ACT 18-23 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $18,912 includes full-time tuition ($11,574), mandatory fees ($1380), and college room and board ($5958). Part-time tuition: $388 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $45 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,864, PT 141 Faculty: FT 127, PT 41 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 66 Library Holdings: 114,770 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 125 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: CSWE, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M; Softball W; Tennis M; Track and Field M; Volleyball W

BOB JONES UNIVERSITY

1700 Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greenville, SC 29614
Tel: (803)242-5100
Free: 800-BJA-NDME
Admissions: (864)242-5100
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bju.edu/
Admissions: David Christ
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 46% ACT 18-23; 39% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 82 Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $45.00 Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. Comprehensive fee: $14,750 includes full-time tuition ($9180), mandatory fees ($590), and college room and board ($4980). Part-time tuition: $459 per credit hour. Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 3,523, PT 52, Grad 524 Faculty: FT 235, PT 67 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: ACT

CENTRAL CAROLINA TECHNICAL COLLEGE

506 North Guignard Dr.
Sumter, SC 29150-2499
Tel: (803)778-1961
Free: 800-221-8711
Fax: (803)773-4859
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cctech.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Kay Raffield
Registrar: Mary Agnes White
Admissions: Lisa M. Bracken
Financial Aid: Bill Whitlock
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For nursing programs: High school diploma required; GED not accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Area resident tuition: $2700 full-time, $112.50 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3168 full-time, $132.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4800 full-time, $200 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 945, PT 2,299 Faculty: FT 82, PT 98 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Library Holdings: 20,356 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACBSP, NLN

CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

PO Box 118087
Charleston, SC 29423-8087
Tel: (843)863-7000
Free: 800-947-7474
Admissions: (843)863-7050
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.charlestonsouthern.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Jairy C. Hunter, Jr.
Registrar: Rex Nestor
Admissions: Kathryn LaCross
Financial Aid: Cheryl Burton
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Baptist Scores: 92.94% SAT V 400+; 92.37% SAT M 400+; 60.94% ACT 18-23; 14.7% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 71 Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $23,230 includes full-time tuition ($16,780) and college room and board ($6450). Part-time tuition: $271 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Miscellaneous, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,208, PT 374, Grad 440 Faculty: FT 106, PT 72 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 66 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 46 Library Holdings: 192,600 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credit hours, Associates; 125 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Air Force Professional Accreditation: NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

THE CITADEL, THE MILITARY COLLEGE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

171 Moultrie St.
Charleston, SC 29409
Tel: (843)953-5000
Free: 800-868-1842
Admissions: (843)953-5230
Fax: (843)953-7084
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.citadel.edu
President/CEO: Maj. Gen. John S. Grinalds
Registrar: Maj. Sylvia Nesmith
Admissions: Lt. Col. John Powell
Financial Aid: Lt. Col. Henry M. Fuller, Jr.
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 99.4% SAT V 400+; 99.8% SAT M 400+; 66.3% ACT 18-23; 27.6% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 78 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $6522 full-time, $198 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,918 full-time, $397 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $998 full-time, $15 per term part-time. College room and board: $4840. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,111, PT 127, Grad 1,148 Faculty: FT 157, PT 75 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 49 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 100 Library Holdings: 233,745 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Ice Hockey M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Riflery M & W; Rugby M & W; Sailing M & W; Soccer M & W; Tennis M; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W; Weight Lifting M & W; Wrestling M

CLAFLIN UNIVERSITY

400 Magnolia St.
Orangeburg, SC 29115
Tel: (803)535-5097
Admissions: (803)535-5340
Fax: (803)531-2860
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.claflin.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Henry N. Tisdale
Registrar: Kathryn Boyd
Admissions: Michael Zeigler
Financial Aid: Delores Cooper
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Scores: 83% SAT V 400+; 75% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 40 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $16,798 includes full-time tuition ($9206), mandatory fees ($1684), and college room and board ($5908). College room only: $2632. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $384 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $63 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,598, PT 80, Grad 50 Faculty: FT 93, PT 34 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT II % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 65 Library Holdings: 158,108 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

Clemson, SC 29634
Tel: (864)656-3311
Admissions: (864)656-2287
Fax: (864)656-2464
Web Site: http://www.clemson.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James F. Barker
Registrar: Stanley B. Smith
Admissions: Robert S. Barkley
Financial Aid: Marvin G. Carmichael
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 18% ACT 18-23; 61% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 57 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission Application Deadline: May 01 Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. State resident tuition: $9016 full-time, $364 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $18,640 full-time, $760 per hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load and program. Part-time tuition varies according to course load and program. College room and board: $5780. College room only: $3470. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 13,257, PT 839, Grad 3,069 Faculty: FT 1,015, PT 128 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 38 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 47 Library Holdings: 1,233,478 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACCE, ACA, ADtA, ACSP, ASLA, NASAD, NCATE, NLN, NRPA, SAF Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Fencing M & W; Field Hockey M & W; Football M; Golf M; Ice Hockey M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Riflery M & W; Rugby M & W; Sailing M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Ultimate Frisbee M & W; Volleyball M & W; Weight Lifting M & W; Wrestling M

CLINTON JUNIOR COLLEGE

PO Box 968, 1029 Crawford Rd.
Rock Hill, SC 29730
Tel: (803)327-7402
Fax: (803)327-3261
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.clintonjuniorcollege.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Janis Pen
Admissions: Dr. Janis Pen
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church Calendar System: Semester Professional Accreditation: TACCS

COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY

PO Box 261954
Conway, SC 29528-6054
Tel: (843)347-3161
Free: 800-277-7000
Admissions: (843)349-2037
Fax: (843)349-2127
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.coastal.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Ronald R. Ingle
Registrar: Brenda Sawyer
Admissions: Dr. Judy Vogt
Financial Aid: Glenn Hanson
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 75% ACT 18-23; 23% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 74 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 15 Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $6780 full-time, $290 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,020 full-time, $630 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $80 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. College room and board: $6280. College room only: $4020. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 5,753, PT 644, Grad 1,216 Faculty: FT 233, PT 181 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 66 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 34 Library Holdings: 144,361 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, NASAD, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

COKER COLLEGE

300 East College Ave.
Hartsville, SC 29550
Tel: (843)383-8000
Free: 800-950-1908
Admissions: (843)383-8050
Fax: (843)383-8056
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.coker.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. B. James Dawson
Registrar: Bobb E. Riggs
Admissions: Perry Wilson
Financial Aid: Betty Williams
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Scores: 91% SAT V 400+; 92% SAT M 400+; 63% ACT 18-23; 10% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 66 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. Comprehensive fee: $23,728 includes full-time tuition ($17,472), mandatory fees ($480), and college room and board ($5776). College room only: $2740. Part-time tuition: $728 per semester hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 541, PT 10 Faculty: FT 55, PT 10 Student-Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 84 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 70 Library Holdings: 78,706 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: NASM Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON

66 George St.
Charleston, SC 29424-0001
Tel: (843)953-5507
Admissions: (843)953-5670
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cofc.edu/
President/CEO: Leo Higdon
Registrar: Pamela Anastassion
Admissions: Suzette Stille
Financial Aid: Donald Griggs
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 48.9% ACT 18-23; 49.7% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 66 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: April 01 Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $6668 full-time, $278 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $15,342 full-time, $639 per semester hour part-time. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. College room and board: $6948. College room only: $4768. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 9,055, PT 823, Grad 1,454 Faculty: FT 515, PT 343 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 37 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 29 Library Holdings: 476,108 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 122 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, JRCEPAT, NASM, NASPAA, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports W; Golf M & W; Sailing M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

COLUMBIA COLLEGE

1301 Columbia College Dr.
Columbia, SC 29203-5998
Tel: (803)786-3012
Free: 800-277-1301
Admissions: (803)786-3091
Fax: (803)786-3674
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.columbiacollegesc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Caroline Whitson
Admissions: Dr. Ronald G. White
Financial Aid: Anita Kaminer Elliott
Type: Comprehensive Affiliation: United Methodist Scores: 89.5% SAT V 400+; 94.23% SAT M 400+; 59.63% ACT 18-23; 22.94% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 84 Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $25,032 includes full-time tuition ($18,864), mandatory fees ($350), and college room and board ($5818). College room only: $3034. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $506 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 867, PT 241, Grad 385 Faculty: FT 82, PT 72 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 78 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 63 Library Holdings: 140,909 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 127 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Professional Accreditation: CSWE, NASAD, NASD, NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball W; Soccer W; Tennis W; Volleyball W

COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY

PO Box 3122
Columbia, SC 29230-3122
Tel: (803)754-4100
Free: 800-777-2227
Fax: (803)786-4209
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ciu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. George W. Murray
Registrar: Wanda Burch
Admissions: Michelle MacGregor
Financial Aid: Mary Bisesi
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: nondenominational Scores: 89% SAT V 400+; 96% SAT M 400+; 42% ACT 18-23; 46% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 67 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. Comprehensive fee: $20,592 includes full-time tuition ($14,880) and college room and board ($5712). Part-time tuition: $600 per semester hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 496, PT 54, Grad 327 Faculty: FT 23, PT 25 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 75 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 59 Library Holdings: 118,752 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 63 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AABC, ATS

CONVERSE COLLEGE

580 East Main St.
Spartanburg, SC 29302-0006
Tel: (864)596-9000
Free: 800-766-1125
Admissions: (864)596-9040
Fax: (864)596-9158
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.converse.edu/
President/CEO: Nancy O. Gray
Registrar: Mary Brown
Admissions: Aaron Meis
Financial Aid: Peggy Collins
Type: Comprehensive Scores: 97% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400+; 47% ACT 18-23; 41% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 84 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: April 01 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $29,082 includes full-time tuition ($22,234) and college room and board ($6848). Part-time tuition: $720 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $20 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 648, PT 128, Grad 1,400 Faculty: FT 83, PT 90 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 71 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 90 Library Holdings: 129,411 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AAMFT, NASM Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball W; Cheerleading W; Cross-Country Running W; Soccer W; Tennis W; Volleyball W

DENMARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Solomon Blatt Blvd., Box 327
Denmark, SC 29042-0327
Tel: (803)793-5100
Admissions: (803)793-5176
Fax: (803)793-5942
Web Site: http://www.denmarktech.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Joann R. G. Boyd-Scotland
Admissions: Michelle McDowell
Financial Aid: Clara B. Moses
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $10.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $10. State resident tuition: $2088 full-time, $87 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4176 full-time, $174 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $190 full-time, $95 per term part-time. College room and board: $3096. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 969, PT 439 Faculty: FT 30, PT 17 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 15,437 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACBSP Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Softball W

ERSKINE COLLEGE

2 Washington St.
PO Box 338 Due West, SC 29639
Tel: (864)379-2131
Free: 800-241-8721
Admissions: (864)379-8830
Fax: (864)379-8759
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.erskine.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John L. Carson
Registrar: Charlene Haynes
Admissions: Bart Walker
Financial Aid: Rebecca Pressley
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church; Erskine Theological Seminary Scores: 98% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400+; 45% ACT 18-23; 39% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 70 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $25,468 includes full-time tuition ($17,700), mandatory fees ($1342), and college room and board ($6426). Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 585, PT 9, Grad 127 Faculty: FT 37, PT 31 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 81 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 88 Library Holdings: 233,541 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W

FLORENCE-DARLINGTON TECHNICAL COLLEGE

2715 West Lucas St.
PO Box 100548
Florence, SC 29501-0548
Tel: (843)661-8324
Free: 800-228-5745
Admissions: (843)661-8153
Fax: (843)661-8306
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.fdtc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Charles W. Gould
Registrar: Joe Onessimo, Jr.
Admissions: Kevin Qualls
Financial Aid: Joseph Durant
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For nursing, dental services, chemical engineering technology, surgical technology, health information management, medical laboratory technology: High school diploma required; GED accepted. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,147, PT 1,894 Faculty: FT 110, PT 202 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 34,814 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 61 credit hours, Associates ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ABET, ADA, AHIMA, ACBSP, CARC, JRCERT, NAACLS, NLN

FORREST JUNIOR COLLEGE

601 East River St.
Anderson, SC 29624
Tel: (864)225-7653
Fax: (864)261-7471
Web Site: http://www.forrestcollege.com/
President/CEO: Dr. Roger Burnett
Admissions: Janie Turmon
Financial Aid: Kathy Montgomery
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Tuition: $4950 full-time, $110 per quarter hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $450 full-time, $150 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 114, PT 51 Faculty: FT 4, PT 14 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Credit Hours For Degree: 109 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

FRANCIS MARION UNIVERSITY

PO Box 100547
Florence, SC 29501-0547
Tel: (843)661-1362
Free: 800-368-7551
Admissions: (843)661-1231
Fax: (843)661-4635
Web Site: http://www.fmarion.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Luther F. Carter
Registrar: H. Elizabeth McLean
Admissions: Cynthia Harding
Financial Aid: Kim Ellisor
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 93.4% SAT V 400+; 94.3% SAT M 400+; 65% ACT 18-23; 13.2% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 71 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $6327 full-time, $316.35 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,654 full-time, $632.70 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $185 full-time, $4.75 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $5430. College room only: $2960. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,058, PT 442, Grad 508 Faculty: FT 176, PT 105 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 45 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 44 Library Holdings: 332,043 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACSB, NASAD, NAST, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

FURMAN UNIVERSITY

3300 Poinsett Hwy.
Greenville, SC 29613
Tel: (864)294-2000
Admissions: (864)294-2034
Fax: (864)294-3127
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.furman.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. David E. Shi
Registrar: Brad Barron
Admissions: David R. O'Cain
Financial Aid: Martin Carney
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 13% ACT 18-23; 54% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 53 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Early Decision Plan Application Deadline: January 15 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $33,264 includes full-time tuition ($25,888), mandatory fees ($464), and college room and board ($6912). College room only: $3712. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $809 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Miscellaneous, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,699, PT 105, Grad 417 Faculty: FT 220, PT 52 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT II % Receiving Financial Aid: 44 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 91 Library Holdings: 453,211 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Fencing M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Ice Hockey M; Lacrosse M; Rugby M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W; Weight Lifting M & W

GREENVILLE TECHNICAL COLLEGE

PO Box 5616
Greenville, SC 29606-5616
Tel: (864)250-8000
Free: 800-723-0673
Admissions: (864)250-8109
Fax: (864)250-8534
Web Site: http://www.greenvilletech.com/
President/CEO: Dr. Thomas E. Barton, Jr.
Registrar: Renee Holcombe
Admissions: Martha S. White
Financial Aid: Janie Reid
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 248, PT 230 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 49,500 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACF, ADA, AHIMA, AOTA, APTA, ACBSP, CARC, JRCERT, JRCEMT, NAACLS, NLN

HORRY-GEORGETOWN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

2050 Hwy. 501, PO Box 261966
Conway, SC 29528-6066
Tel: (843)347-3186
Admissions: (843)349-5277
Fax: (843)347-4207
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hgtc.edu/
President/CEO: H. Neyle Wilson
Registrar: Mary Jo Black
Admissions: George Swindoll
Financial Aid: Susan Thompson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For health science programs: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Area resident tuition: $2800 full-time, $117 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3544 full-time, $148 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4264 full-time, $178 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $144 full-time, $1 per credit hour part-time, $35 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,446, PT 2,916 Faculty: FT 128, PT 276 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 63 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACF, ADA, ACBSP, JRCERT, NLN

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

6 Independence Pointe
Greenville, SC 29615
Tel: (864)288-0777
Fax: (864)297-0053
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/
President/CEO: Rod Kruse
Admissions: David Murray
Financial Aid: Andre Davis
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: ITT Educational Services, Inc Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Not available Exams: Other Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates; 180 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACICS

LANDER UNIVERSITY

320 Stanley Ave.
Greenwood, SC 29649-2099
Tel: (864)388-8000; 888-452-6337
Admissions: (864)388-8307
Fax: (864)388-8125
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.lander.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Daniel W. Ball
Registrar: R. Thomas Nelson, III
Admissions: Jonathan T. Reece
Financial Aid: Stephan Schnaiter
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina Commission on Higher Education Scores: 88% SAT V 400+; 94% SAT M 400+; 51% ACT 18-23; 14% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 85 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $6108 full-time, $275 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,528 full-time, $564 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level. Part-time tuition varies according to degree level. College room and board: $5468. College room only: $3360. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,373, PT 239, Grad 91 Faculty: FT 126, PT 64 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 39 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 33 Library Holdings: 175,366 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 125 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, MACTE, NASAD, NASM, NAST, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

LIMESTONE COLLEGE

1115 College Dr.
Gaffney, SC 29340-3799
Tel: (864)489-7151
Free: 800-795-7151
Admissions: (864)488-4549
Fax: (864)487-8706
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.limestone.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Walt Griffin
Registrar: Brenda F. Watkins
Admissions: Chris Phenicie
Financial Aid: Summer G. Robertson
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Scores: 96% SAT V 400+; 95% SAT M 400+; 54% ACT 18-23; 8% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 58 Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $21,000 includes full-time tuition ($15,000) and college room and board ($6000). Part-time tuition: $625 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 660, PT 16 Faculty: FT 55, PT 32 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 78 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 49 Library Holdings: 104,582 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates; 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: CSWE, NASM Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

171 Ashley Ave.
Charleston, SC 29425-0002
Tel: (843)792-2300
Admissions: (843)792-3813
Fax: (843)792-3764
Web Site: http://www.musc.edu/
President/CEO: W. Stuart Smith
Admissions: George W. Ohlandt
Financial Aid: Pearl M. Givens
Type: Two-Year Upper Division Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $75.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $75. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Library Holdings: 225,061 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACPE, ACEHSA, AACN, AANA, ACNM, ACPhE, ADA, ADtA, AOTA, APTA, APA, ASC, ASLHA, LCMEAMA, NLN

MIDLANDS TECHNICAL COLLEGE

PO Box 2408
Columbia, SC 29202-2408
Tel: (803)738-1400
Admissions: (803)738-8324
Fax: (803)738-7784
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.midlandstech.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Barry W. Russell
Registrar: Carolyn Gatlin
Admissions: Sylvia Littlejohn
Financial Aid: Margaret Hunt
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education % Accepted: 69 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Area resident tuition: $2904 full-time, $121 per credit part-time. State resident tuition: $3676 full-time, $157 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8612 full-time, $363 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $100 full-time, $50 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,743, PT 6,036 Faculty: FT 223, PT 408 Student-Faculty Ratio: 21:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 89,618 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABET, ADA, AHIMA, APTA, ACBSP, CARC, JRCERT, NAACLS, NLN

MILLER-MOTTE TECHNICAL COLLEGE

8085 Rivers Ave., Ste. E
Charleston, SC 29418
Tel: (843)574-0101; 877-617-4740
Fax: (843)266-3434
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.miller-motte.com/
President/CEO: Julie Corner
Admissions: Julie Corner
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Quarter Professional Accreditation: ACICS

MORRIS COLLEGE

100 West College St.
Sumter, SC 29150-3599
Tel: (803)934-3200; (866)853-1345
Admissions: (803)934-3225
Fax: (803)773-3687
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.morris.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Luns C. Richardson
Registrar: Deborah C. Calhoun
Admissions: Deborah Calhoun
Financial Aid: Sandra Gibson
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Baptist Educational and Missionary Convention of South Carolina Scores: 27% SAT V 400+; 33% SAT M 400+; 12% ACT 18-23; 1% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 85 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $12,234 includes full-time tuition ($8163), mandatory fees ($235), and college room and board ($3836). Part-time tuition: $330 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $45 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 844, PT 19 Faculty: FT 47, PT 12 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 96 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 72 Library Holdings: 102,206 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

NEWBERRY COLLEGE

2100 College St.
Newberry, SC 29108-2197
Tel: (803)276-5010
Free: 800-845-4955
Admissions: (803)321-5129
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.newberry.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Mitchell M. Zais
Registrar: Carol Bickley
Admissions: Michel Robbins
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Evangelical Lutheran Scores: 93.62% SAT V 400+; 93.25% SAT M 400+; 25.31% ACT 18-23; 3.7% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 59 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For nontraditional students: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $26,511 includes full-time tuition ($18,900), mandatory fees ($731), and college room and board ($6880). College room only: $3230. Part-time tuition: $350 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $50 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 841 Faculty: FT 50 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 84 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 87 Library Holdings: 79,899 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 126 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

NORTH GREENVILLE COLLEGE

PO Box 1892
Tigerville, SC 29688-1892
Tel: (864)977-7000
Free: 800-468-6642
Admissions: (864)977-7052
Fax: (864)977-7177
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ngc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James B. Epting
Registrar: Pamela Farmer
Admissions: Buddy Freeman
Financial Aid: Michael Jordan
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southern Baptist Scores: 91% SAT V 400+; 90% SAT M 400+; 57% ACT 18-23; 15% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $16,300 includes full-time tuition ($10,350) and college room and board ($5950). Part-time tuition: $200 per hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,559, PT 207 Faculty: FT 73, PT 59 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 66 Library Holdings: 49,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

NORTHEASTERN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

PO Drawer 1007
Cheraw, SC 29520-1007
Tel: (843)921-6900
Admissions: (843)921-6935
Fax: (843)537-6148
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.netc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James C. Williamson
Registrar: Catherine L. Sellers
Admissions: Mary K. Newton
Financial Aid: Sheryll N. Marshall
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $12.50 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $12.50. Area resident tuition: $2496 full-time, $104 per semester hour part-time. State resident tuition: $2688 full-time, $112 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4080 full-time, $170 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $30 full-time, $4 per semester hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 28, PT 75 Student-Faculty Ratio: 25:1 Exams: SAT I Library Holdings: 20,502 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates

ORANGEBURG-CALHOUN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

3250 St Matthews Rd., NE
Orangeburg, SC 29118-8299
Tel: (803)536-0311
Admissions: (803)535-1218
Fax: (803)535-1388
Web Site: http://www.octech.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Anne S. Crook
Registrar: Phyllis Stoudenmire
Admissions: Bobbie Felder
Financial Aid: Chris Dooley
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education, South Carolina Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,380, PT 1,111 Faculty: FT 78, PT 51 Exams: Other, SAT I and SAT II or ACT Library Holdings: 43,500 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACBSP, JRCERT, NAACLS, NLN

PIEDMONT TECHNICAL COLLEGE

620 North Emerald Rd.
PO Box 1467
Greenwood, SC 29648-1467
Tel: (864)941-8324
Admissions: (864)941-8603
Fax: (864)941-8555
Web Site: http://www.ptc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Lex D. Walters
Registrar: Katherine B. Moseley
Admissions: Steve Coleman
Financial Aid: Deborah Williams
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 103, PT 130 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: Other, SAT I Library Holdings: 27,497 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABET, ABFSE, ACBSP, CARC, JRCERT, NLN

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE

503 South Broad St.
Clinton, SC 29325
Tel: (864)833-2820
Free: 800-476-7272
Admissions: (864)833-8229
Fax: (864)833-8481
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.presby.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John V. Griffith
Registrar: Ethel W. Aldridge
Admissions: Leni Patterson
Financial Aid: Judi F. Gillespie
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 45% ACT 18-23; 46% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 76 Admission Plans: Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: April 01 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $30,044 includes full-time tuition ($21,222), mandatory fees ($2022), and college room and board ($6800). College room only: $3340. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $885 per semester hour. Part-time tuition varies according to program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,138, PT 58 Faculty: FT 81, PT 29 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 62 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 94 Library Holdings: 155,830 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 122 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Riflery M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

SOUTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY

300 College St. Northeast
Orangeburg, SC 29117-0001
Tel: (803)536-7000
Free: 800-260-5956
Admissions: (803)536-8408
Fax: (803)536-8990
Web Site: http://www.scsu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Andrew Hugine, Jr.
Registrar: Annie R. Belton
Admissions: Dwight Bailey
Financial Aid: Sandra Davis
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina Commission on Higher Education Scores: 64% SAT V 400+; 67% SAT M 400+; 24% ACT 18-23; 2% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $6480 full-time, $270 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,288 full-time, $554 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $185 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, reciprocity agreements, and student level. Part-time tuition varies according to course load, degree level, reciprocity agreements, and student level. College room and board: $6028. College room only: $3642. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,345, PT 359, Grad 590 Faculty: FT 211, PT 56 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT, SAT II % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 57 Library Holdings: 273,264 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, AAFCS, ASLHA, CORE, CSWE, NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

SOUTH UNIVERSITY

3810 Main St.
Columbia, SC 29203-6400
Tel: (803)799-9082; (866)629-3031
Fax: (803)799-9038
Web Site: http://www.southuniversity.edu/
President/CEO: Anne F. Patton
Registrar: Brad Kauffman
Admissions: Trisha Sherwood
Financial Aid: Walt Haversat
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: South University-Savannah Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 69 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Tuition: $11,475 full-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 289, PT 137, Grad 65 Faculty: FT 18, PT 22 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I and SAT II or ACT Library Holdings: 10,765 Credit Hours For Degree: 92 quarter hours, Associates; 180 quarter hours, Bachelors

SOUTHERN METHODIST COLLEGE

541 Broughton Stret, PO Box 1027
Orangeburg, SC 29116-1027
Tel: (803)534-7826
Free: 800-360-1503
Web Site: http://www.smcollege.edu/
President/CEO: Daniel H. Shapley
Registrar: Glenn Blank
Admissions: Dr. Richard G. Blank
Financial Aid: Terry H. Lynch
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $9400 includes full-time tuition ($4600), mandatory fees ($600), and college room and board ($4200). Full-time tuition and fees vary according to class time and course load. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $192 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $25 per semester hour. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time and course load. Scholarships: Available Enrollment: FT 61, PT 16 Faculty: FT 6, PT 18 Student-Faculty Ratio: 5:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 89 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 19 Library Holdings: 21,743 Credit Hours For Degree: 63 credits, Associates; 124 credits, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: TACCS

SOUTHERN WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

907 Wesleyan Dr., PO Box 1020
Central, SC 29630-1020
Tel: (864)644-5000
Free: 800-289-1292
Admissions: (864)644-5550
Fax: (864)644-5900
Web Site: http://www.swu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. David J. Spittal
Registrar: Rock McCaskill
Admissions: Chad Peters
Financial Aid: Jeff Dennis
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Wesleyan Church Scores: 93% SAT V 400+; 93% SAT M 400+; 47% ACT 18-23; 24% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 66 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 11 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $20,900 includes full-time tuition ($15,000), mandatory fees ($450), and college room and board ($5450). College room only: $2050. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $460 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $225 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and degree level. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,909, PT 86, Grad 637 Faculty: FT 50, PT 178 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 42 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 16 Library Holdings: 88,983 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 hours, Associates; 128 hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Volleyball W

SPARTANBURG METHODIST COLLEGE

1200 Textile Rd.
Spartanburg, SC 29301-0009
Tel: (864)587-4000
Free: 800-772-7286
Admissions: (864)587-4223
Fax: (864)587-4355
Web Site: http://www.smcsc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Charles Teague
Registrar: Jill Johnson
Admissions: Daniel L. Philbeck
Financial Aid: Carolyn Sparks
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Methodist Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 34% ACT 18-23; 3% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 84 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $15,476 includes full-time tuition ($9816), mandatory fees ($150), and college room and board ($5510). College room only: $2784. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $260 per credit. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 716, PT 63 Faculty: FT 23, PT 23 Student-Faculty Ratio: 23:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 75 Library Holdings: 75,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates ROTC: Army Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

SPARTANBURG TECHNICAL COLLEGE

PO Box 4386
Spartanburg, SC 29305-4386
Tel: (864)591-3600
Admissions: (864)592-4800
Web Site: http://www.stcsc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Dan Terhune
Registrar: Celcia B. Bauss
Admissions: Nancy T. Garmroth
Financial Aid: Nancy Garmroth
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For industrial technology programs: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $3094 full-time, $127 per hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3860 full-time, $159 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5490 full-time, $228 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $20 full-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,435, PT 1,974 Faculty: FT 100 Library Holdings: 36,173 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABET, ADA, ACBSP, CARC, JRCERT, NAACLS

TECHNICAL COLLEGE OF THE LOWCOUNTRY

921 Ribaut Rd., PO Box 1288
Beaufort, SC 29901-1288
Tel: (843)525-8324
Admissions: (843)525-8307
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tclonline.org/
President/CEO: Dr. Anne S. McNutt
Registrar: Melanie Gallion
Admissions: Les Brediger
Financial Aid: Cleo Martin
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina Technical and Comprehensive Education System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $10.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 41, PT 28 Exams: Other, SAT I and SAT II or ACT Library Holdings: 25,226 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NLN

TRI-COUNTY TECHNICAL COLLEGE

PO Box 587, 7900 Hwy. 76
Pendleton, SC 29670-0587
Tel: (864)646-8361
Admissions: (864)646-1500
E-mail: [email protected]sc.us
Web Site: http://www.tctc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Don C. Garrison
Registrar: Scott Harvey
Admissions: Rachel Campbell
Financial Aid: Stewart Spires
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For welding, industrial mechanics programs: High school diploma or equivalent not required Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 220, PT 180 Student-Faculty Ratio: 25:1 Exams: Other, SAT I Library Holdings: 34,513 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ABET, ADA, ACBSP, NAACLS, NLN

TRIDENT TECHNICAL COLLEGE

PO Box 118067
Charleston, SC 29423-8067
Tel: (843)574-6111
Admissions: (843)574-6483
Fax: (843)574-6109
Web Site: http://www.tridenttech.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Mary Thornley
Registrar: Pamela Droste
Admissions: Clara Martin
Financial Aid: Cindy Seabrook
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: August 04 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Area resident tuition: $2950 full-time, $120 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3276 full-time, $134 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5586 full-time, $230 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $50 full-time, $5 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 5,270, PT 6,525 Faculty: FT 262, PT 375 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Library Holdings: 68,462 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACF, ADA, AOTA, APTA, ACBSP, CARC, JRCERT, NAACLS, NLN

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

Columbia, SC 29208
Tel: (803)777-7000
Admissions: (803)777-7700
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.sc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Andrew A. Sorensen
Registrar: Barbara Blaney
Admissions: Scott Verzyl
Financial Aid: Dr. Ed Miller
Type: University Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of South Carolina System Scores: 99.54% SAT V 400+; 99.77% SAT M 400+; 36.34% ACT 18-23; 50% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 68 Application Deadline: December 01 Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. State resident tuition: $6914 full-time, $324 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $18,556 full-time, $844 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to program. College room and board: $6080. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 16,399, PT 1,963, Grad 7,263 Faculty: FT 1,190, PT 377 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 49 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 46 Library Holdings: 3,374,496 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates; 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEHSA, ACEJMC, AACN, AANA, ABA, ACPhE, ACA, ALA, APTA, APA, ASLHA, AALS, CEPH, CORE, CSWE, JRCEPAT, LCMEAMA, NASAD NASM, NASPAA, NAST, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running W; Equestrian Sports W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AIKEN

471 University Parkway
Aiken, SC 29801-6309
Tel: (803)648-6851; 888-WOW-USCA
Fax: (803)641-3727
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.usca.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Thomas L. Hallman
Registrar: Vivan Grice
Admissions: Andrew Hendrix
Financial Aid: Glenn Shumpert
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of South Carolina System Scores: 91% SAT V 400+; 96% SAT M 400+; 73% ACT 18-23; 15% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 48 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. State resident tuition: $5928 full-time, $258 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,070 full-time, $520 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $230 full-time, $8 per semester hour part-time, $7 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $5560. College room only: $3800. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,270, PT 880, Grad 153 Faculty: FT 147, PT 99 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 22 Library Holdings: 165,459 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACSB, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA BEAUFORT

801 Carteret St.
Beaufort, SC 29902-4601
Tel: (843)521-4100
Web Site: http://www.sc.edu/beaufort/
President/CEO: Dr. Jane T. Upshaw
Registrar: Mary-David Fox
Financial Aid: Sally Maybin
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of South Carolina System Scores: 87% SAT V 400+; 82% SAT M 400+; 53% ACT 18-23; 42% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 87 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $4954 full-time, $207 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $11,870 full-time, $495 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $330 full-time, $10 per credit hour part-time. College room only: $6900. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 676, PT 643 Faculty: FT 42, PT 43 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 50,000 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates; 120 semester hours, Bachelors

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA LANCASTER

PO Box 889
Lancaster, SC 29721-0889
Tel: (803)313-7471
Admissions: (803)313-7000
Fax: (803)313-7106
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://usclancaster.sc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John Catalano
Admissions: Rebecca D. Parker
Financial Aid: Leah Sturgis
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of South Carolina System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 459, PT 484 Faculty: FT 23, PT 24 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 68,192 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NLN

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SALKEHATCHIE

PO Box 617
Allendale, SC 29810-0617
Tel: (803)584-3446
Web Site: http://uscsalkehatchie.sc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Ann Carmichael
Registrar: Jane T. Brewer
Admissions: Jane T. Brewer
Financial Aid: Julie Hadwin
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of South Carolina System Scores: 7% SAT V 400+; 6%SATM400 + Admission Plans: Open Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 283, PT 494 Faculty: FT 18, PT 20 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 47,877 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Golf M

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SUMTER

200 Miller Rd.
Sumter, SC 29150-2498
Tel: (803)775-8727
Admissions: (803)938-3882
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.uscsumter.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. C. Leslie Carpenter
Registrar: Flora Y. Gadson
Admissions: Keith Britton
Financial Aid: Sue Sims
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of South Carolina System Scores: 85.2% SAT V 400+; 85.2% SAT M 400+; 57.4% ACT 18-23; 3.7% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 62 Application Deadline: August 08 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $4064 full-time, $169 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,124 full-time, $422 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $260 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 580, PT 440 Faculty: FT 40, PT 35 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 81,114 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates ROTC: Army, Air Force

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UNION

PO Drawer 729
Union, SC 29379-0729
Tel: (864)427-3681
Admissions: (864)429-8728
Web Site: http://uscunion.sc.edu/
President/CEO: James W. Edwards
Registrar: Terry Young
Admissions: Terry E. Young
Financial Aid: Robert Holcombe
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of South Carolina System Scores: 75% SAT V 400+; 80% SAT M 400 + % Accepted: 89 Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $4064 full-time, $169 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,124 full-time, $422 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $100 full-time, $10 per hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 161, PT 160 Faculty: FT 12, PT 13 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UPSTATE

800 University Way
Spartanburg, SC 29303-4999
Tel: (864)503-5000
Free: 800-277-8727
Admissions: (864)503-5280
Fax: (864)503-5201
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.uscupstate.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John C. Stockwell
Registrar: Kathryn Murphy
Admissions: Donette Stewart
Financial Aid: Kim Jenerette
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of South Carolina System Scores: 94% SAT V 400+; 94% SAT M 400+; 71% ACT 18-23; 10% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 33 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $6436 full-time, $282 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,274 full-time, $583 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $326 full-time, $11 per hour part-time, $25 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $5160. College room only: $3200. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,564, PT 845, Grad 75 Faculty: FT 207, PT 149 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 64 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 15 Library Holdings: 188,572 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 71 semester hours, Associates; 120 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

VOORHEES COLLEGE

1411 Voorhees Rd., PO Box 678
Denmark, SC 29042
Tel: (803)793-3351
Free: 800-446-6250
Admissions: (803)703-7124
Fax: (803)793-5773
Web Site: http://www.voorhees.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Lee E. Monroe, Jr.
Registrar: Carolyn V. White
Admissions: Benjamin O. Watson
Financial Aid: Carolyn V. White
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Episcopal Scores: 56% SAT V 400+; 57% SAT M 400 + Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $11,848 includes full-time tuition ($7106), mandatory fees ($170), and college room and board ($4572). College room only: $1904. Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $242 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $170 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 807, PT 40 Faculty: FT 37, PT 27 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 91 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 85 Library Holdings: 107,260 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ACBSP Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Softball W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

WILLIAMSBURG TECHNICAL COLLEGE

601 Martin Luther King, Jr Ave.
Kingstree, SC 29556-4197
Tel: (843)355-4110
Free: 800-768-2021
Fax: (843)355-4296
Web Site: http://www.wiltech.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James C. Williamson
Registrar: Lynn Selph
Admissions: Sharon B. Hanna
Financial Aid: Joe DuRant
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $10.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 269, PT 326 Faculty: FT 14, PT 34 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 25,456 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACBSP

WINTHROP UNIVERSITY

701 Oakland Ave.
Rock Hill, SC 29733
Tel: (803)323-2211
Free: 800-763-0230
Admissions: (803)323-2191
Fax: (803)323-2137
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.winthrop.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Anthony DiGiorgio
Registrar: Timothy Drueke
Admissions: Deborah Barber
Financial Aid: Betty Whalen
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina Commission on Higher Education Scores: 98.45% SAT V 400+; 98.83% SAT M 400+; 62.4% ACT 18-23; 31.82% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 69 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: May 01 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $8756 full-time, $364 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $16,150 full-time, $673 per semester hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to degree level. Part-time tuition varies according to degree level. College room and board: $5352. College room only: $3420. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,587, PT 600, Grad 1,293 Faculty: FT 270, PT 272 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 59 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 43 Library Holdings: 414,879 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEJMC, ACA, ADtA, CSWE, FIDER, NASAD, NASD, NASM, NAST, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Fencing M & W; Golf M & W; Lacrosse M & W; Rugby M; Soccer M; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

WOFFORD COLLEGE

429 North Church St.
Spartanburg, SC 29303-3663
Tel: (864)597-4000
Admissions: (864)597-4130
Fax: (864)597-4149
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wofford.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Benjamin B. Dunlap
Registrar: Lucy B. Quinn
Admissions: Brand Stille
Financial Aid: Donna D. Hawkins
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Church Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 36% ACT 18-23; 54% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 66 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: February 01 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $30,935 includes full-time tuition ($24,130) and college room and board ($6805). Part-time tuition: $875 per hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,158, PT 15 Faculty: FT 89, PT 33 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 52 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 88 Library Holdings: 245,730 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Fencing M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Riflery M & W; Soccer M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

YORK TECHNICAL COLLEGE

452 South Anderson Rd.
Rock Hill, SC 29730-3395
Tel: (803)327-8000
Admissions: (803)981-7021
Fax: (803)327-8059
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.yorktech.com/
President/CEO: Dr. Dennis F. Merrell
Registrar: Kelli D. Collins
Admissions: Kenny Aldridge
Financial Aid: Regina Venson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For health and human services program applicants: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $2900 full-time, $121 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $3264 full-time, $136 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $6528 full-time, $272 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $136 full-time, $4 per credit hour part-time, $68 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,039, PT 2,114 Faculty: FT 115, PT 123 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 26,947 Regional Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABET, ADA, ACBSP, JRCERT, NAACLS, NLN

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South Carolina

South Carolina

AIKEN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology, A

Engineering Technology, A

Human Services, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Interdisciplinary Studies, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Nuclear/Nuclear Power Technology/Technician, A

ALLEN UNIVERSITY

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Social Sciences, B

ANDERSON UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Ceramic Arts and Ceramics, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Creative Writing, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

CytoTechnology/Cytotechnologist, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Drawing, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Finance, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Human Services, B

Interior Design, B

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Psychology, B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

BENEDICT COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Child Development, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Health, B

Finance, B

History, B

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Philosophy, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

BOB JONES UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Actuarial Science, B

Apparel and Textiles, B

Applied Horticulture/Horticultural Operations, A

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Aviation/Airway Management and Operations, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biophysics, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Building/Construction Site Management/Manager, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Carpentry/Carpenter, A

Chemistry, B

Child Care and Support Services Management, AB

Cinematography and Film/Video Production, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Communication Disorders, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering, B

Computer Technology/Computer Systems Technology, B

Corrections and Criminal Justice, B

Cosmetology/Cosmetologist, A

Counseling Psychology, B

Creative Writing, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Emotional Disturbances, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities, B

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering Science, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Economics and Related Services, B

Finance, B

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

French Language and Literature, B

General Office Occupations and Clerical Services, A

German Language and Literature, B

Health and Physical Education, B

Health/Medical Preparatory Programs, B

History, B

Hospitality Administration/Management, AB

Housing and Human Environments, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, AB

International Relations and Affairs, B

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Landscaping and Groundskeeping, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians, AB

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, AB

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Office Management and Supervision, B

Operations Management and Supervision, B

Operations Research, B

Physics, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Radio and Television, B

Religious Education, B

Restaurant, Culinary, and Catering Management/Manager, A

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Technical and Business Writing, B

Theological and Ministerial Studies, AB

CENTRAL CAROLINA TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Child Care and Support Services Management, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Environmental Control Technologies/Technicians, A

Industrial Electronics Technology/Technician, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mechanical Drafting and Mechanical Drafting CAD/CADD, A

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, A

Natural Resources Management/Development and Policy, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Sales, Distribution and Marketing Operations, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

Accounting, BM

American History (United States), B

Applied Mathematics, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biochemistry, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, BM

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Programming/Programmer, AB

Computer Science, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Criminology, M

Dramatic/Theatre Arts and Stagecraft, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Economics, B

Education, BM

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, B

Elementary and Middle School Administration/Principalship, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

Engineering, B

Engineering Technology, B

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Environmental Studies, B

European History, B

Finance, B

Finance and Banking, M

Health Services Administration, M

Health/Medical Preparatory Programs, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Management Information Systems and Services, BM

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Music Therapy/Therapist, B

Natural Resources Management/Development and Policy, B

Natural Sciences, AB

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Organizational Management, M

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Sciences, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Engineering, A

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, BM

Science Technologies/Technicians, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Secondary School Administration/Principalship, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, BM

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, B

Voice and Opera, B

Youth Ministry, B

THE CITADEL, THE MILITARY COLLEGE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Chemistry, B

Civil Engineering, B

Computer Science, BM

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Education, MO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

English, M

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

Health Education, M

History, BM

History Teacher Education, B

Information Science/Studies, M

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, BM

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BM

Reading Teacher Education, M

School Psychology, MO

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, BM

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Social Studies Teacher Education, BM

Spanish Language and Literature, B

CLAFLIN UNIVERSITY

African-American/Black Studies, B

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biochemistry, B

Bioinformatics, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Computer Software Engineering, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Sciences, B

Health and Physical Education, B

History, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Organizational Behavior Studies, B

Philosophy and Religious Studies, B

Sociology, B

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

Accounting, BM

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Agricultural Economics, BM

Agricultural Education, M

Agricultural Mechanization, B

Agricultural Sciences, MD

Agricultural Teacher Education, B

Agricultural/Biological Engineering and Bioengineering, B

Animal Sciences, BMD

Applied Economics, MD

Applied Mathematics, MD

Aquaculture, MD

Architecture, BM

Astronomy, MD

Astrophysics, MD

Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology, MD

Biochemistry, BMD

Bioengineering, MD

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MD

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biomedical/Medical Engineering, B

Biophysics, MD

Biosystems Engineering, MD

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, B

Ceramic Sciences and Engineering, B

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BMD

Civil Engineering, BMD

Communication and Media Studies, MD

Communication, Journalism and Related Programs, B

Community College Education, M

Computational Sciences, MD

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Art and Design, M

Computer Engineering, BMD

Computer Programming/Programmer, B

Computer Science, BMD

Construction Engineering and Management, M

Construction Management, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, BM

Curriculum and Instruction, D

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Economics, BMD

Education, MDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Educational Leadership and Administration, D

Electrical Engineering, MD

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Electronic Commerce, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MD

Engineering Mechanics, B

Engineering/Industrial Management, B

English, M

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

Entomology, MD

Environmental and Occupational Health, D

Environmental Design/Architecture, D

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, MD

Environmental Sciences, MD

Environmental Studies, MD

Ergonomics and Human Factors, D

Finance, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fish, Game and Wildlife Management, MD

Fishing and Fisheries Sciences and Management, B

Food Science, B

Food Science and Technology, MD

Forest Management/Forest Resources Management, B

Forestry, MD

Genetics, BMD

Geology/Earth Science, BM

Graphic Communications, B

Health Physics/Radiological Health, D

Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences, B

Health Services Administration, M

Historic Preservation and Conservation, M

History, BM

Horticultural Science, B

Human Development, M

Human Resources Development, BM

Hydrology and Water Resources Science, M

Industrial and Manufacturing Management, MD

Industrial and Organizational Psychology, D

Industrial Design, B

Industrial Education, M

Industrial Engineering, B

Industrial/Management Engineering, MD

Information Science/Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

International Public Health/International Health, B

Landscape Architecture, BM

Management, MD

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Management Strategy and Policy, D

Manufacturing Engineering, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Materials Engineering, BMD

Materials Sciences, MD

Mathematics, BMD

Mathematics Teacher Education, BM

Mechanical Engineering, BMD

Microbiology, BMD

Middle School Education, M

Modern Languages, B

Molecular Biology, MD

Natural Resources and Conservation, B

Nursing, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nutritional Sciences, M

Operations Research, MD

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, B

Philosophy, B

Physics, BMD

Plant Biology, MD

Plant Sciences, MD

Political Science and Government, B

Polymer Chemistry, B

Polymer/Plastics Engineering, MD

Psychology, BM

Public Administration, M

Public Health (MPH, DPH), B

Public Policy Analysis, DO

Reading Teacher Education, M

Real Estate, M

Recreation and Park Management, MD

Rhetoric, D

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, BM

Science Technologies/Technicians, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Studies Teacher Education, M

Sociology, BM

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Statistics, MD

Textile Sciences and Engineering, BMD

Travel and Tourism, MD

Turf and Turfgrass Management, B

Urban and Regional Planning, MD

Veterinary Sciences, MD

Visual and Performing Arts, B

Vocational and Technical Education, MD

Wildlife Biology, B

Writing, M

Zoology/Animal Biology, MD

COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Applied Mathematics, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Dramatic/Theatre Arts and Stagecraft, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, BM

Economics, B

Education, M

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

Finance, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

History, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography, B

Marine Sciences, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Music, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Public Health Education and Promotion, B

Resort Management, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

COKER COLLEGE

Acting, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Computer Science, B

Corrections, B

Counseling Psychology, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminology, B

Dance, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Dramatic/Theatre Arts and Stagecraft, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

Graphic Design, B

Health and Physical Education, B

Health and Physical Education/Fitness, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Photography, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Technical Theatre/Theatre Design and Technology, B

Therapeutic Recreation/Recreational Therapy, B

Voice and Opera, B

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON

Accounting, BM

Anthropology, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Arts Management, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Chemistry, B

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, M

Corporate and Organizational Communication, O

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, BM

Economics, B

Education, MO

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English, M

English as a Second Language, O

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Sciences, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, M

French Language and Literature, B

Geology/Earth Science, B

German Language and Literature, B

Historic Preservation and Conservation, B

History, BM

Hospitality Administration/Management, B

Information Science/Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Latin American Studies, B

Legal and Justice Studies, MO

Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography, BM

Mathematics, BMO

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Music, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Psychology, B

Public Administration, M

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Urban Studies/Affairs, B

COLUMBIA COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Applied Art, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Communication, Journalism and Related Programs, B

Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services, B

Conflict Resolution and Mediation/Peace Studies, MO

Dance, B

Drama and Dance Teacher Education, B

Education, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

History, B

Human Development and Family Studies, B

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mathematics, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Organizational Behavior Studies, O

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Public Administration and Social Service Professions, B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Voice and Opera, B

COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY

Ancient Near Eastern and Biblical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, AB

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Cultural Studies, MPO

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Education, MDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MD

Elementary Education and Teaching, M

English as a Second Language, MO

General Studies, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Intercultural/Multicultural and Diversity Studies, B

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, MDPO

Multilingual and Multicultural Education, M

Near and Middle Eastern Studies, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, BMD

PO Pre-Theology/Pre-Ministerial Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religious Education, BMPO

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, MDPO

Youth Ministry, B

CONVERSE COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Applied Art, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art Therapy/Therapist, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Curriculum and Instruction, O

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Economics, B

Education, BMO

Education/Teaching of the Gifted and Talented, M

Educational Administration and Supervision, O

Educational Leadership and Administration, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English, M

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

History, BM

Interior Design, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Studies, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Marriage and Family Therapy/Counseling, O

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Modern Languages, B

Music, BM

Music History, Literature, and Theory, B

Music Teacher Education, BM

Music Therapy/Therapist, B

Performance, M

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, BM

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Sign Language Interpretation and Translation, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, M

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Violin, Viola, Guitar and Other Stringed Instruments, B

Voice and Opera, B

DENMARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Engineering Technology, A

Human Services, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

ERSKINE COLLEGE

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Behavioral Sciences, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

French Language and Literature, B

History, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Natural Sciences, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

FLORENCE-DARLINGTON TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Chemical Engineering, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology, A

Engineering Technology, A

Funeral Service and Mortuary Science, A

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Human Services, A

Industrial Radiologic Technology/Technician, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, A

FORREST JUNIOR COLLEGE

Business Administration and Management, A

FRANCIS MARION UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Chemistry, B

Clinical Psychology, M

Community Psychology, M

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, BM

Economics, B

Education, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

Finance, B

Foreign Languages and Literatures, B

French Language and Literature, B

Geography, B

Health Services Administration, M

History, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Psychology, BM

School Psychology, M

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, M

FURMAN UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Asian Studies/Civilization, B

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, BM

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer Science, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Economics, B

Education, BM

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

Geology/Earth Science, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, B

Information Technology, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Latin Language and Literature, B

Mathematics, B

Modern Greek Language and Literature, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Neuroscience, B

Philosophy, B

Physics, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Urban Studies/Affairs, B

Voice and Opera, B

GREENVILLE TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Airframe Mechanics and Aircraft Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Avionics Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Fire Science/Firefighting, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Hospitality Administration/Management, A

Industrial Radiologic Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Materials Sciences, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Public Health (MPH, DPH), A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Special Products Marketing Operations, A

HORRY-GEORGETOWN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agriculture, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Culinary Arts/Chef Training, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Forestry Technology/Technician, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, A

Industrial Radiologic Technology/Technician, A

Landscaping and Groundskeeping, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, A

Word Processing, A

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

Animation, Interactive Technology, Video Graphics and Special Effects, B

CAD/CADD Drafting and/or Design Technology/Technician, A

Computer and Information Systems Security, B

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

E-Commerce/Electronic Commerce, B

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, AB

System, Networking, and LAN/WAN

Management/Manager, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, A

LANDER UNIVERSITY

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Education, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Sciences, B

History, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

LIMESTONE COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business/Commerce, AB

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Programming/Programmer, AB

Computer Science, AB

Corrections, B

Corrections and Criminal Justice, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Graphic Design, B

Health and Physical Education/Fitness, B

History, B

Human Resources Development, B

Information Science/Studies, AB

Jazz/Jazz Studies, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Marriage and Family Therapy/Counseling, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Nursing Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, AB

MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

Allied Health and Medical Assisting Services, MDO

Allopathic Medicine, PO

Anatomy, D

Biochemistry, DO

Bioengineering, MD

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MDO

Biometry/Biometrics, MDO

Biostatistics, MD

Cell Biology and Anatomy, DO

Clinical Research, M

Communication Disorders, M

Dentistry, PO

Epidemiology, MDO

Gerontological Nursing, MO

Health Services Administration, BMDO

Immunology, MDO

Maternal/Child Health and Neonatal Nurse/Nursing, MO

Maternity Nursing, MO

Medical Technology, M

Microbiology, MDO

Molecular Biology, DO

Molecular Pharmacology, DO

Neuroscience, MDO

Nurse Anesthetist, M

Nurse Midwife/Nursing Midwifery, M

Nursing, MDO

Nursing - Adult, MO

Nursing - Advanced Practice, MO

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nursing Administration, MO

Nursing Education, M

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, M

Pathobiology, DO

Pathology/Experimental Pathology, MDO

Perfusion Technology/Perfusionist, B

Periodontics, M

Pharmaceutical Sciences, D

Pharmacy, P

Physical Therapy/Therapist, D

Physician Assistant, M

Physiology, MDO

Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse/Nursing, MO

Rehabilitation Sciences, MD

MIDLANDS TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business/Commerce, A

Cartography, A

Chemical Technology/Technician, A

Child Care Provider/Assistant, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services, A

Computer Installation and Repair Technology/Technician, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Court Reporting/Court Reporter, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Dental Assisting/Assistant, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Engineering Technology, A

Fashion Merchandising, A

Gerontology, A

Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator Production, A

Health Information/Medical Records Technology/Technician, A

Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Electronics Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Mechanical Drafting and Mechanical Drafting CAD/CADD, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, A

Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Occupational Therapist Assistant, A

Pharmacy Technician/Assistant, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

Precision Production, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Sales, Distribution and Marketing Operations, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

Youth Services/Administration, A

MORRIS COLLEGE

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, B

Community Health Services/Liaison/Counseling, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

History, B

Journalism, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Political Science and Government, B

Religious Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Sociology, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

NEWBERRY COLLEGE

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, B

Voice and Opera, B

NORTH GREENVILLE COLLEGE

Accounting and Business/Management, B

Ancient Near Eastern and Biblical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, B

Music History, Literature, and Theory, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, B

Piano and Organ, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Theatre/Theatre Arts Management, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

Voice and Opera, B

NORTHEASTERN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Science, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Drafting/Design Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

ORANGEBURG-CALHOUN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Business/Commerce, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer Programming, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Instrumentation Technology/Technician, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

PIEDMONT TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Building/Construction Finishing, Management, and Inspection, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business/Commerce, A

Carpentry/Carpenter, A

Child Development, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Engineering, A

Engineering Technology, A

Funeral Service and Mortuary Science, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Human Services, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mechanical Drafting and Mechanical Drafting CAD/CADD, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Office Management and Supervision, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Social Work, A

PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, B

English Language and Literature, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Mathematics, B

Modern Languages, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

SOUTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, B

Agribusiness, M

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Audiology/Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Child and Family Studies, M

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Communication Disorders, M

Computer Science, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MDO

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Economics, B

Education, BMDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MDO

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, BM

Fashion Merchandising, B

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

French Language and Literature, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

Industrial Technology/Technician, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, B

Music Management and Merchandising, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nuclear Engineering, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nutritional Sciences, M

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Rehabilitation Counseling, M

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, B

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

SOUTH UNIVERSITY

Accounting, A

Business Administration and Management, AB

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

Information Technology, AB

Law and Legal Studies, B

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

SOUTHERN METHODIST COLLEGE

Bible/Biblical Studies, AB

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, AB

SOUTHERN WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business/Commerce, AB

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), B

Education, BM

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Emotional Disturbances, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Mental Retardation, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Health and Physical Education, B

History, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Management, M

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, M

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Social Sciences, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

SPARTANBURG METHODIST COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Information Technology, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

SPARTANBURG TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Engineering Technology, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Horticultural Science, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Robotics Technology/Technician, A

Sign Language Interpretation and Translation, A

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, A

TECHNICAL COLLEGE OF THE LOWCOUNTRY

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Carpentry/Carpenter, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Typography and Composition Equipment Operator, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Environmental Studies, A

Fashion Merchandising, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Horticultural Science, A

Human Services, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

TRI-COUNTY TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Apparel and Textiles, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Public Health (MPH, DPH), A

Quality Control Technology/Technician, A

Radio and Television, A

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

TRIDENT TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Airframe Mechanics and Aircraft Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Broadcast Journalism, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Child Care Provider/Assistant, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Graphics, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Culinary Arts/Chef Training, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Engineering Technology, A

Horticultural Science, A

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, A

Human Services, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Law and Legal Studies, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Telecommunications Technology/Technician, A

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, A

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

Accounting, BMO

Advertising, B

African-American/Black Studies, B

Allopathic Medicine, PO

Anthropology, BMD

Aquatic Biology/Limnology, B

Art Education, M

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, BM

Art Teacher Education, B

Astronomy, MD

Biochemistry, MD

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MD

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biostatistics, MD

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MDO

Business Education, M

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Cell Biology and Anatomy, MD

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BMD

Civil Engineering, BMD

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Clinical Psychology, MD

Communication Disorders, MD

Community Health Nursing, MO

Community Psychology, MD

Comparative Literature, MD

Composition, MD

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering, BMD

Computer Science, MD

Consumer Economics, M

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, DO

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminology, MO

Curriculum and Instruction, D

Developmental Biology and Embryology, MD

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, MD

Ecology, MD

Economics, BMDO

Education, MDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MDO

Educational Measurement and Evaluation, MD

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Educational Psychology, MD

Electrical Engineering, MD

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, MD

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MD

English, MDO

English as a Second Language, O

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental and Occupational Health, MD

Environmental Policy and Resource Management, MO

Environmental Sciences, M

Epidemiology, MD

European Studies/Civilization, B

Evolutionary Biology, MD

Exercise and Sports Science, MD

Experimental Psychology, BMD

Finance, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, MD

Foundations and Philosophy of Education, D

French Language and Literature, BM

Genetic Counseling/Counselor, M

Geography, BMD

Geology/Earth Science, BMD

Geophysics and Seismology, B

Geosciences, MD

German Language and Literature, BM

Gerontology, O

Hazardous Materials Management and Waste Technology/Technician, MD

Health Education, MDO

Health Promotion, MDO

Health Services Administration, MDO

Higher Education/Higher Education Administration, M

Historic Preservation and Conservation, M

History, BMDO

Hospitality Administration/Management, BM

Human Resources Management and Services, MO

Industrial Hygiene, MD

Information Science/Studies, MO

Insurance, B

International Affairs, MD

International Business/Trade/Commerce, M

International Relations and Affairs, B

Italian Language and Literature, B

Journalism, BMD

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Latin American Studies, B

Law and Legal Studies, PO

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Library Science, MO

Linguistics, MDO

Management Science, B

Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography, B

Marine Science/Merchant Marine Officer, B

Marine Sciences, MD

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, BMD

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Mechanical Engineering, BMD

Media Studies, M

Medical/Surgical Nursing, M

Molecular Biology, MD

Museology/Museum Studies, MO

Music, BMDO

Music History, Literature, and Theory, M

Music Teacher Education, BMD

Music Theory and Composition, M

Nurse Anesthetist, M

Nursing, MDO

Nursing - Adult, M

Nursing - Advanced Practice, MO

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nursing Administration, M

Oceanography, Chemical and Physical, B

Office Management and Supervision, B

Pediatric Nurse/Nursing, M

Performance, MDO

Pharmaceutical Sciences, MD

Pharmacy, P

Philosophy, BMD

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BMD

Physics, BMD

Political Science and Government, BMD

Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse/Nursing, MO

Psychology, MD

Public Administration, MO

Public Health, MO

Public History, MO

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Reading Teacher Education, MD

Real Estate, B

Rehabilitation Counseling, MO

Rehabilitation Sciences, O

Religion/Religious Studies, BM

School Psychology, D

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Secondary Education and Teaching, MD

Social Studies Teacher Education, M

Social Work, MDO

Sociology, BMD

Software Engineering, M

Spanish Language and Literature, BM

Special Education and Teaching, MD

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, M

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, BM

Statistics, BMDO

Student Personnel Services, M

Theater, M

Travel and Tourism, M

Vocational and Technical Education, M

Women's Health Nursing, MO

Women's Studies, BO

Writing, M

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA AIKEN

Applied Mathematics, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Psychology, M

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer Science, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Education, M

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

History, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sociology, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA BEAUFORT

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Education, B

English Language and Literature, B

Foreign Languages and Literatures, B

History, B

Hospitality Administration/Management, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Psychology, B

Social Sciences, B

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA LANCASTER

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SALKEHATCHIE

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mathematics, A

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SUMTER

Interdisciplinary Studies, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UNION

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UPSTATE

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Education, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

French Language and Literature, B

History, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Mathematics, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, M

VOORHEES COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Mathematics, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Political Science and Government, B

Sociology, B

WILLIAMSBURG TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business/Commerce, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Information Technology, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

WINTHROP UNIVERSITY

Art Education, M

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Arts Management, M

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Communication Disorders, B

Computer Science, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Dance, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Education, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English, M

English Language and Literature, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

History, BM

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Studies, M

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Middle School Education, M

Modern Languages, B

Music, BM

Music Teacher Education, BM

Nutritional Sciences, M

Performance, M

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Political Science and Government, B

Project Management, MO

Psychology, BMO

Reading Teacher Education, M

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, M

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Software Engineering, MO

Spanish Language and Literature, M

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Technical and Business Writing, B

WOFFORD COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Creative Writing, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

English Language and Literature, B

Finance, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Mathematics, B

Neuroscience, B

Philosophy, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

YORK TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business/Commerce, A

Child Care and Support Services Management, A

Child Care Provider/Assistant, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Dental Assisting/Assistant, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electrical/Electronics Equipment Installation and Repair, A

General Office Occupations and Clerical Services, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Electronics Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Mechanical Drafting and Mechanical Drafting CAD/CADD, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Radio and Television Broadcasting Technology/Technician, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

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South Carolina

SOUTH CAROLINA

STATE EDUCATION OFFICE

Dawn Sudduth, Education Associate/Curriculum
Office of Career and Technology Education
912-A Rutledge Bldg.
1429 Senate St.
Columbia, SC 29201
(803)734-8410

STATE REGULATORY INFORMATION

The South Carolina Nonpublic Postsecondary Institution Licensing Act, Chapter 58 of Title 59, South Carolina Code of Laws, 1976, as amended, provides for the licensing of certain nonpublic postsecondary institutions by the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education.
Sales agents representing these schools are required to secure permits before soliciting the enrollment of students.
The act does not apply to degree-granting institutions chartered by the South Carolina Secretary of State before 1953; certain independent or church-related degree-granting institutions located in South Carolina; institutions offering only K-12 courses; religious or theological institutions; institutions offering only a vocational courses; state supported institutions; certain aviation training; institutions licensed under the authority of an occupational licensing law of South Carolina; programs sponsored by employers for their employees, or by professional organizations for their members; and institutions offering certain review courses, such as certified public accountancy tests, law school aptitude tests, bar exams, etc.
Licenses are for specifically indicated programs; supplemental applications may be submitted for additional programs. Bonding is required of licensed institutions, and application and renewal fees are required.
Sales agents (solicitors) permits are required before any person may solicit enrollment of students away from the institution's premises. Permits are issued for a one-year period and application and renewal fees are required.

AIKEN

Aiken Technical College

PO Drawer 696, Aiken, SC 29802. Two-Year College. Founded 1972. Contact: Susan A. Graham, Pres., (803)593-9231, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.atc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,800/year in-state; $7,688/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,249. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ADA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (1 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Chemical Technology (1 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (1 Yr); Computer Technology (2 Yr); Dental Assisting (1 Yr); Drafting, Industrial (1 Yr); Electricity, Industrial (1 Yr); Electro-Mechanical Technology (2 Yr); Engineering Technology, Computer (2 Yr); Engineering Technology, Electronic (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Industrial Technology (1 Yr); Machine Tool & Die (2 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr); Mechanical Technology (1 Yr); Nuclear Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Occupational Therapy (2 Yr); Office, General (1 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Stenography, General (1 Yr); Welding Technology (1 Yr)

Lacy Cosmetology School

3084 Whiskey Rd., Aiken, SC 29803. Cosmetology. Contact: Jay Lacy, Chief Administrator, (803)648-6181, 877-648-6181, Fax: (803)648-8601, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.lacyschools.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $9,995 for cosmetologist; $5,095 for esthetician; $3,300 for nail technologist. Enrollment: Total 22. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Esthetician (1000 Hr); Nail Technology (600 Hr)

ALLENDALE

University of South Carolina-Salkehatchie

PO Box 617, Allendale, SC 29810. Two-Year College. Contact: Barbara Blaney, Registrar, (803)584-3446, (803)777-3530, Fax: (803)777-3548, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://uscsalkehatchie.sc.edu/. Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $3,798 in-state; $9,460 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 177.

ANDERSON

Anderson Area Medical Center

800 N. Fant St., Anderson, SC 29621. Allied Medical. Founded 1947. Contact: Gaye Nichols, (864)261-1000, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $1,000 per year. Enrollment: Total 38. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology (24 Mo)

Anderson College

316 Blvd., Anderson, SC 29621. Other. Founded 1911. Contact: Mark Hughes, VP for Enrollment Services, (864)231-2000, (864)231-2030, 800-542-3594, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ac.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $15,200 per year. Enrollment: Total 1,255. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NASM. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Administration; Business Education; Commercial Art; Fashion Merchandising; Medical Record Technology; Occupational Therapy; Secretarial, General; Secretarial, Science

Forrest Junior College

601 E. River St., Anderson, SC 29624. Two-Year College. Founded 1946. Contact: Dr. Julia Robertson Barnes, Pres., (864)225-7653, Fax: (803)261-7471, Web Site: http://www.forrestcollege.com; Liz Floyd, Registrar. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $110 per quarter credit hour. Enrollment: men 20, women 180. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS; CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Administrative Assistant; Business Administration; Computer Information Science; Computer Networking; Computer Repair; Early Childhood Specialist; Legal Assistant; Medical Assistant; Medical Laboratory Assistant; Medical Office Management; Nurses Aide; Office Administration; Paralegal

BATESBURG-LEESVILLE

SAGE Technical Services

230 East Church St., Batesburg-Leesville, SC 29070. Trade and Technical. (866)452-5157, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.sageschools.com; Web Site: http://www.sageschools.com/sagecontact_sage.htm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $1,925-$4,035. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Heavy Equipment (150 Hr); Tractor Trailer Operators Training (150 Hr)

BEAUFORT

Technical College of the Lowcountry

921 Ribaut Rd., Beaufort, SC 29901. Trade and Technical. Contact: Anne S. McNutt, President, (843)525-8211, 800-768-8252, Fax: (843)525-8285, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tcl.edu. Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,750 in-state; $3,710 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

BLUFFTON

South Carolina Massage & Esthetics Institute (Bluffton)

23 Towne Dr., Bluffton, SC 29910. Other. Founded 1998. Contact: Linda V. Beach, Dir., (866)777-1377, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://scmassage.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Esthetician (450 Hr); Massage Therapy (605 Hr)

CAMDEN

Applied Technology Education Campus

874 Vocational Ln., Camden, SC 29020. Trade and Technical. Founded 1968. Contact: Allen Teal, Dir., (803)425-8982, Fax: (803)425-8983, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://atec.kcsdschools.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: None required. Enrollment: men 4,944, women 3,820. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: FAA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics - Diesel (2 Yr); Building Construction Technology (2 Yr); Carpentry (30 Wk); Child Care & Guidance (2 Yr); Clerical, General (1 Yr); Commercial Art (2 Yr); Construction Technology (1 Yr); Data Processing (2 Yr); Distributive Education (2 Yr); Electricity, Industrial (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Food Service & Management (2 Yr); Graphic Arts (2 Yr); High School Diploma; Machine Shop (2 Yr); Marketing (1 Yr); Masonry (2 Yr); Metal Trades Technology (2 Yr); Nurses Aide (1 Yr); Nursing, Practical (2 Yr); Radio & Television Service & Repair (1 Yr); Salesmanship (1 Yr); Secretarial, General (2 Yr); Sewing, Commercial (1 Yr); Truck Driving (6 Wk); Welding Technology (2 Yr)

CAYCE

Columbia Beauty School

1824 Airport Blvd., Cayce, SC 29033. Cosmetology, Other. Founded 1966. Contact: Gloria Lee Smith, (803)796-5252, Fax: (803)791-3883, Web Site: http://www.columbiabeautyschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $8,190. Enrollment: Total 28. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

CHARLESTON

Charleston Cosmetology Institute

8484 Dorchester Rd., Charleston, SC 29420. Cosmetology. Founded 1984. Contact: Jerry R. Poer, Pres., (843)552-3670, Fax: (843)760-0976, Web Site: http://www.charlestoncosmetology.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Hour. Tuition: $8,995 cosmetology; $2,495 manicuring/nail technology; $5,500 esthetics; $2,495 teacher training. Enrollment: men 5, women 115. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (750 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr); Skin Care (600 Hr)

Johnson & Wales University

701 E. Bay St., Charleston, SC 29403. Other. Founded 1914. Contact: Mim Runey, Campus Pres., (843)727-3018, 800-342-5598, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.jwu.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Trisemester. Tuition: $13,713-$16,986. Enrollment: Total 1,441. Degrees awarded: Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Baking (2 Yr); Culinary Arts (2 Yr); Food Service & Management (4 Yr); Hotel & Restaurant Management (2 Yr); Restaurant Operations (2 Yr); Travel & Tourism (2 Yr)

Trident Technical College

PO Box 118067, Charleston, SC 29423-8067. Two-Year College. Founded 1964. Contact: Susan Norton, Office of Academic Affairs, (843)574-6111, (843)574-6211, 877-349-7184, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tridenttech.org. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Full-time per semester: $1,425 in Tri-county area; $1,588 out of Tri-county area; $2,743 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 10,177. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Accounting, Specialist; Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Aircraft Airframe Maintenance; Architectural Design Technology; Auto Body & Fender Repair; Auto Engine Diagnosis; Auto Mechanics - Automatic Transmission; Auto Mechanics - Brake & Wheel Alignment; Automotive Service; Automotive Specialist; Automotive Technology; Baking; Bookkeeping; Business; Business Education; Business, International; Chemical Engineering; Civil Engineering Technology; Computer Aided Design; Computer Engineering; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Computer Technology; Construction Management; Construction Technology; Cosmetology; Criminal Justice; Culinary Arts; Customer Service; Dental Assisting; Dental Hygiene; Dental Laboratory Technology; Drafting, Industrial; Early Childhood Education; Electrical Engineering Technology; Electricity, Industrial; Electronic Engineering Technology; Engineering Technology, Architectural; Engineering Technology, Mechanical; Entrepreneurship; Environmental Technology; Forestry Technology; Golf Course Landscape Technology; Graphic Arts; Histologic Technology; Horticulture; Hospitality; Human Services; Industrial Maintenance; Industrial Management & Supervision; Information Systems; Information Sciences Technology; Internet Technologies; Landscape Architecture; Landscaping; Law Enforcement; Legal Assistant; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Management; Manicurist; Marketing; Massage Therapy; Mechanical Engineering; Media Technology; Medical Assistant; Medical Laboratory Technology; Medical Office Management; Medical Technology Phlebotomy; Medical Transcription; Microcomputers; Nurse, Assistant; Nursing, Practical; Occupational Therapy Assistant; Office, General; Ophthalmic Assistant; Paralegal; Pharmacy Technician; Photography; Physical Therapy Aide; Printing; Quality Control; Radio & Television; Radiologic Technology; Respiratory Therapy; Secretarial, General; Small Business Management; Stenography, General; Surveying; Technician, Electronic Service; Telecommunications Technology; Transportation Engineering Technology; Veterinary Technology; Web Development; Welding, Arc & Gas; Welding, Combination; Welding Technology; Wood Crafts

CHERAW

Northeastern Technical College

PO Drawer 1007, Cheraw, SC 29520. Two-Year College. Founded 1969. Contact: James C. Williamson, Pres., (843)921-6900, 800-921-7399, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.netc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,346/year in-state; $3,936/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 574. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Administration; Criminal Justice; Data Processing; Drafting Technology; Early Childhood Education; Electronics, Industrial; Liberal Arts; Machine Tool & Die; Nursing, Practical; Office Technology; Welding Technology; Word Processing

CLINTON

Royal Academy

200 W. Main St., Clinton, SC 29325-2313. Cosmetology. Founded 1985. Contact: Terri Alley-Haddock, Owner & Director, (864)833-6976. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $6,300. Enrollment: men 1, women 19. Degrees awarded: Diploma, Certificate. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (10 Mo)

COLUMBIA

Beta Tech - Columbia

7500 Two Notch Rd., Columbia, SC 29223. Trade and Technical.(803)754-7544, 877-604-2121, Fax: (803)714-6797, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.betatech.edu; Web Site: http://www.betatech.edu/columbia-south-carolina.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $11,465; $1,200 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 220. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Computer Operations; Medical Assistant; Network Support

ECPI College of Technology (Columbia)

250 Berryhill Rd., No. 300, Columbia, SC 29210. Trade and Technical, Business, Allied Medical.(803)772-3333, 888-526-4654, Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/campus/cl/; Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/admissions/contact/route/routeinquiry.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,559 plus $1,066 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Automated; Biomedical Technology; Business Administration; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Criminology - Identification Technology; Information Systems; Internet Technologies; Office Technology; Secretarial, Medical

Kenneth Shuler School of Cosmetology And Nail Design

449 St. Andrews Rd., Columbia, SC 29210. Cosmetology. Contact: Kenneth Shuler, President, (803)772-6042, (803)772-6098, Web Site: http://www.kennershuler.com. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $10,755 cosmetology; $3,895 cosmetology instructor. Enrollment: Total 192. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (600 Hr)

Midlands Technical College (Columbia)

PO Box 2408, Columbia, SC 29202. Two-Year College. Founded 1974. Contact: Dr. Berry Russell, Pres., (803)738-8324, 800-922-8038, Fax: (803)738-7784, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.midlandstech.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,452/semester Richland, Lexington and Fairfield counties; $1,812 other South Carolina counties; $4,356 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 11,000. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: JRCRTE; ABET; ADA; CAAHEP; NAACLS; NLNAC; NCRA; ABA; SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Air Conditioning & Heating; Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Automotive Technology; Banking & Finance; Biomedical Technology; Carpentry; Civil Engineering Technology; Commercial Art; Computer Programming; Computer Technology; Court Reporting; Criminal Justice; Dental Assisting; Dental Hygiene; Early Childhood Specialist; Electrical Technology; Electricity, Industrial; Electronics, Industrial; Electronics Technology; Engineering Technology, Architectural; Engineering Technology, Electronic; Graphic Arts; Graphic Design; Health Care & Management; Human Services; Information Systems; Legal Assistant; Liberal Arts; Machine Tool & Die; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Management; Marketing; Mechanics, Diesel; Medical Assistant; Medical Laboratory Technology; Medical Record Technology; Medical Transcription; Nuclear Medical Technology; Nursing, Practical; Nursing, Vocational; Paralegal; Pharmacy Technician; Physical Therapy Aide; Radiologic Technology; Respiratory Therapy; Secretarial, General; Surgical Technology; Surveying; Telecommunications Technology (6 Qt); Web Development

PAL Travel School

2301 N. Beltline Blvd., Columbia, SC 29204. Other. Founded 1983. Contact: Kathy Palyok, Dir., (803)787-5530, Web Site: http://www.paltravel.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $999 per program. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Travel & Tourism (14 Wk)

Palmetto Health Baptist/School of Medical Technology

PO Box 2266, Columbia, SC 29202-2266. Allied Medical. Founded 1963. Contact: Jennifer Gray, Prog.Dir., (803)771-5014, Web Site: http://www.palmettohealth.org. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Month. Tuition: $1,000 for year. Enrollment: Total 81. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: CAAHEP; NAACLS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Curriculum: Medical Technology (12 Mo); Ultrasonography (13-14 Mo)

South University

3810 Main St., Columbia, SC 29203. Other. Founded 1899. Contact: Dr. Anne Patton, Pres., (803)799-9082, (866)629-3031, Fax: (803)799-9038, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.southuniversity.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: varies with program. Enrollment: Total 200. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS; SACS; CAAHEP; ABA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Medical Assistant (2 Yr); Paralegal (2 Yr)

CONWAY

Conway School of Practical Nursing

PO Box 260005, Conway, SC 29528. Nursing. Contact: Gail H. Moss, Dir., (843)488-6805, (843)488-6877. Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $4,100. Degrees awarded: Associate.

Horry-Georgetown Technical College

2050 Hwy. 501 East, PO Box 261966, Conway, SC 29528-6066. Two-Year College. Founded 1967. Contact: H. Neyle Wilson, Pres., (843)347-3186, Fax: (843)347-4207, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.hgtc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,328/semester, Horry or Georgetown County resident; $1,652/semester out-of-county; $2,132/semester out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 2,922. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: FAA; SACS; ABET; ACF; ADA; ABA; JRCERT; NLNAC; ACBSP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Advanced; Accounting, Automated; Accounting, General; Air Conditioning & Heating; Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Business; Civil Engineering Technology; Computer Technology; Criminal Justice; Culinary Arts; Data Entry; Data Processing; Early Childhood Specialist; Electronic Engineering Technology; Electronics Technology; Financial Planning; Food Distribution & Management; Food Preparation & Service; Forestry Technology; Golf Course Management; Horticulture; Hospitality; Interior Design; Machine Tool & Die; Microcomputers; Nursing, Practical; Nursing, Vocational; Occupational Therapy; Occupational Therapy Assistant; Office Machines; Office Technology; Paralegal; Physical Therapy Aide; Radiologic Technology; Sales Management; Secretarial, Medical; Tax Consultant; Tourism

North American Institute of Aviation

Conway-Horry County Airport, 1700 Airport Rd., Conway, SC 29527. Flight and Ground. Founded 1972. Contact: Daniel Flaherty, Dir. of Operations, (843)397-9111, 800-327-6242, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.naiasc.com/. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $37,273 professional pilot; $19,105 A&P-aviation maintenance. Enrollment: men 30, women 5. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: FAA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Aircraft Flight Instruction; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Advanced Ground; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Airline Transport Pilot; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Commercial Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor Additional Rating; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Instrument Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Multi-Engine Rating - Airplane; Aviation Maintenance Technology (14 Mo); Avionics (7 Mo)

DENMARK

Denmark Technical College

500 Solomon Blatt Blvd., PO Box 327, Denmark, SC 29042. Two-Year College. Founded 1948. Contact: Margaree Bonnette, Recruitment Dir., (803)793-5176, (803)793-5149, Web Site: http://www.denmarktech.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 670. Degrees awarded: Diploma, Associate, Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Barbering (1 Yr); Building Construction Technology (1 Yr); Carpentry (1 Yr); Computer Networking (1 Yr); Computer Repair (1 Yr); Cosmetology (1 Yr); Customer Service (1 Yr); Early Childhood Specialist (1 Yr); Food Preparation & Service (1 Yr); General Studies (1 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Industrial Technology (1 Yr); Legal Assistant (1 Yr); Machine Tool & Die (2 Yr); Maintenance Technology (1 Yr); Medical Record Technology (1 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Pharmacy Technician (1 Yr); Plumbing (1 Yr); Welding Technology (1 Yr); Word Processing (1 Yr)

FLORENCE

Betty Stevens Cosmetology Institute

301 Rainbow Dr., PO Box 7688, Florence, SC 29502. Cosmetology, Trade and Technical. Founded 1965. Contact: Rita Andrews-Buck, VP/Admin., (843)669-4451, (843)669-4452, E-mail: [email protected], contact. [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bettystevens.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $5,000. Enrollment: Total 35. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (750 Hr); Manicurist (300 Hr); Skin Care (450 Hr)

DoveStar Institute

518 Palmetto St., Florence, SC 29501. Trade and Technical. Founded 1973. (843)678-9902, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.dovestar.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Hydrotherapy; Massage Therapy (500-1000Hr)

Florence Career Center

126 E. Howe Springs Rd., Florence, SC 29505. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Howard E. Wilkes, Guidance Director, (843)664-8465, Fax: (843)413-4688, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.fsd1.org/careercenter. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: None required. Enrollment: Total 1,370. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Agri-Engineering & Mechanics (2 Yr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Technology (2 Yr); Computer Programming (2 Yr); Computer Support Technology (2 Yr); Computer Technology; Cosmetology (2 Yr); Culinary Arts (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (2 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr)

Florence-Darlington Technical College

2715 W. Lucas St., P.O. Box 100548, Florence, SC 29501. Two-Year College. Founded 1964. Contact: Charles T. Muse, VP of Academic Affairs, (843)661-8100, 800-228-5745, Fax: (843)661-8010, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.fdtc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,428 per semester in-county, $1,559 out-of-county, $2,476 out-of-state, $3,524 out-of-country. Enrollment: Total 4,500. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma, Associate. Accreditation: ABET; ADA; CAAHEP; JRCERT; NAACLS; NLNAC; ACBSP; ABA; SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (2 Yr); Art (2 Yr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (1 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Business Administration (9 Mo); Civil Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Computer Aided Design (2 Yr); Computer Aided Drafting (1 Yr); Computer Technology (2 Yr); Cosmetology (1 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Dental Assisting (1 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Diesel Technology (2 Yr); Early Childhood Specialist (9-12 Mo); Electro-Mechanical Technology (2 Yr); Electronic Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Electronics, Industrial (1 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); Health Occupations (1 Yr); Heavy Equipment (1 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Legal Assistant (2 Yr); Machine Tool & Die (1-2 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Medical Transcription (1 Yr); Nursing, Practical; Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Occupational Therapy Assistant (2 Yr); Office Technology (1 Yr); Optical Technology (1 Yr); Paralegal (2 Yr); Pharmacy Technician (1 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide (2 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Secretarial, Medical (1 Yr); Small Business Management (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (1 Yr); Welding, Combination (1 Yr); Word Processing (9 Mo)

GAFFNEY

Cherokee County School of Practical Nursing

3110 Cherokee Ave, Gaffney, SC 29340. Nursing. Founded 1958. Contact: Candace Transou, (864)489-3191, Fax: (864)487-1287. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Year. Enrollment: Total 28. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

GREENVILLE

Academy of Hair Technology

3715 E. North St., Ste. F, Greenville, SC 29615. Cosmetology. Founded 1984. Contact: Richard West, Dir. of Admissions, (864)322-0300, Web Site: http://www.hairchamps.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $8,300 Cosmetology; $1,550 Nail Technician; $5,000 Esthetics Tuition. Enrollment: men 8, women 122. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Esthetician (600 Hr); Manicurist (300 Hr)

Arrythmia Technologies Institute

150 Executive Center Dr., Box 120, Greenville, SC 29615. Allied Medical. Founded 1987. Contact: Mark Sweesy, Dir. of Ed., (864)297-9232, Fax: (864)297-9250, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.arrhythmiatech.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $17,750 per year. Enrollment: Total 24. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cardio - Pulmonary Technology (1080 Hr)

Carolina College of Hair Design

38 Liberty Ln., Greenville, SC 29607. Cosmetology. Contact: Kenneth W. Lochridge, Pres., (864)271-0020. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 120. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Cosmetology

ECPI College of Technology (Greenville)

1001 Keys Dr., No. 100, Greenville, SC 29615. Trade and Technical, Business, Allied Medical.(864)288-2828, 888-526-4654, Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/campus/grv/; Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/admissions/contact/route/routeinquiry.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,559 plus $1,066 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Automated; Biomedical Technology; Business Administration; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Criminology - Identification Technology; Information Systems; Internet Technologies; Office Technology; Secretarial, Medical

Enoree Career Center

108 Scaleybark Rd., Greenville, SC 29617. Trade and Technical. Founded 1973. Contact: John Banning, Dir., (864)355-7400, Fax: (864)355-7407, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.greenville.k12.sc.us/enoree. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Enrollment: men 172, women 100. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Auto Body Design (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Building Construction Technology (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (1 Yr); Computer Technology (1 Yr); Cosmetology (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (2 Yr); Graphic Arts (2 Yr); Health Occupations (2 Yr); Law Enforcement (1 Yr)

Greenville Technical College

PO Box 5616, Greenville, SC 29606-5616. Two-Year College. Founded 1961. Contact: Martha Duncan, Dir. of Admissions, (864)250-8111, 800-723-0673, Fax: (803)250-8247, Web Site: http://www.greenvilletech.com/. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,900/year in-state; $5,900/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 5,188. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ABET; APTA; CAAHEP; FAA; NLNAC; SACS; ARCEST; ABA; ACF; ASHP; CAPTE; CARC; ADA; JRCEDMS; JRCERT; NAACLS; NAEYC; NATEF. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Aircraft Powerplant Maintenance; Art; Automotive Technology; Business; Computer Business Systems Technology; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Computer Technology; Construction Technology; Criminal Justice; Dental Assisting; Dental Hygiene; Early Childhood Specialist; Electrical Engineering Technology; Electronic Engineering Technology; Emergency Medical Technology; Engineering Technology; Food Service & Management; Hazardous Waste Technology; Health Care & Management; Human Services; Industrial Maintenance; Industrial Technology; Legal Assistant; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Management; Marketing; Materials Engineering Technology; Mechanical Engineering; Medical Laboratory Technology; Nursing, Practical; Occupational Therapy Assistant; Paralegal; Physical Therapy Technology; Radiologic Technology; Respiratory Therapy

International Visions Travel School

100 W. Antrim Dr., Greenville, SC 29607. Trade and Technical. Founded 1985. Contact: Sara Schearer, (864)672-1052, Fax: (864)239-2388, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ivts.org. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $1,695 for full course. Enrollment: Total 50. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Travel Agents (96 Hr)

ITT Technical Institute

6 Independence Pointe, Greenville, SC 29615. Trade and Technical. (864)288-0777, 800-932-4488, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Enrollment: Total 452. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits); Software Development/Engineering (96 Credits); Web Development (96 Credits)

Southeastern School of Neuromuscular and Massage Therapy

850 S. Pleasantburg Dr., Ste. 105, Greenville, SC 29607. Other. Founded 1997. Contact: Marilyn Rhodes, Dir., (864)421-9481, Fax: (864)421-9483, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.southeasternmassageschools.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $4,200 for professional massage therapy program, plus application fee and books. Enrollment: Total 30. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Massage Therapy (500 Hr)

GREENWOOD

Charzanne Beauty College

1549 Hwy. 72 E., Greenwood, SC 29646. Cosmetology. Contact: Cille C. Bishop, President, (864)223-7321. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $7,875. Enrollment: Total 34. Degrees awarded: Associate.

H & R Block Tuition Tax School

134 Maxwell Ave., Greenwood, SC 29646. Business. Contact: Ida Mae M. Smith, (864)223-5331, 800-HRB-LOCK, Fax: (864)223-1917, Web Site: http://www.hrblock.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Week. Tuition: $199-$225. Enrollment: Total 15. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Income Tax Preparation (11 Wk)

Piedmont Technical College

620 North Emerald Rd., PO Box 1467, Greenwood, SC 29648-1467. Two-Year College. Founded 1966. Contact: Katherine B. Moseley, (864)941-8324, (864)941-8363, 800-868-5528, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ptc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,526/year in-state, $2,186/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 2,047. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ABET. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (2 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Computer Aided Design (2 Yr); Computer Aided Manufacturing (2 Yr); Computer Technology (2 Yr); Construction Management (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Electronics, Industrial (2 Yr); Engineering Technology, Electronic (2 Yr); Engineering Technology, Mechanical (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Industrial Management & Supervision (2 Yr); Machine Tool & Die (2 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr); Nurse, Assistant (6 Mo); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Technology (2-4 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (1 Yr); Welding Technology (1 Yr)

HILTON HEAD ISLAND

DoveStar Institute

20-D Palmetto Pkwy., Hilton Head Island, SC 29926. Trade and Technical. Founded 1973.(843)342-3361, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.dovestar.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Hydrotherapy; Massage Therapy (500-1000Hr)

IRMO

South Carolina School of Dog Grooming

10611 Broad River Rd., Irmo, SC 29063. Trade and Technical. Founded 1990. Contact: Kathleen N. White, Owner/Operator, (803)781-6598, 888-814-9822, Fax: (803)781-0430, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.scschoolofdoggrooming.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $4,750 (application fee, supplies, tuition & tools/books); $1,650 for improving you skills (app fee, supplies & tuition). Enrollment: Total 3. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Pet Grooming (12 Wk)

KINGSTREE

Williamsburg Technical College

601 MLik Jr. Ave., Kingstree, SC 29556-4197. Two-Year College. Founded 1969. Contact: Sharon Hanna, Dir. of Admissions, (843)355-4110, (843)355-4162, 800-768-2021, Fax: (843)355-4296, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.wiltech.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,670/year in-state; $4,968/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 269. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS; ACBSP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Art (2 Yr); Business Education (2 Yr); Business, General Office (2 Yr); Cosmetology (18 Mo); Science (2 Yr); Secretarial, General (2 Yr)

LANCASTER

University of South Carolina at Lancaster

P.O. Box 889, Lancaster, SC 29721. Two-Year College. Founded 1959. Contact: Rebecca D. Parker, Dir. of Enrollment Management, (803)313-7000, (803)313-7071, Fax: (803)313-7116, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://usclancaster.sc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $4,058/year in-state; $9,720/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 503. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr)

MARION

Marion County School of Practical Nursing

P.O. Box 890, Marion, SC 29571. Nursing, Other. Founded 1967. Contact: Mary Lynn Pool, (843)423-9800, Fax: (843)423-1943, Web Site: http://mctec.org/nurse.htm. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 2, women 69. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (18 Mo)

MYRTLE BEACH

Golf Academy of The Carolinas

3268 Waccamaw Blvd., Myrtle Beach, SC 29579-9451. Trade and Technical. Founded 1998. Contact: Dana K. Powell, President, (843)236-0481, 800-342-7342, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.sdgagolf.com; Web Site: http://www.sdgagolf.com/info_form.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,563; $700 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 122. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Golf Course Management (2 Yr)

South Carolina Massage & Esthetics Institute (Myrtle Beach)

4720-B Hwy 17, Bypass S, Myrtle Beach, SC 29577. Other. Founded 1998. Contact: Linda V. Beach, Dir., (843)293-2225, Fax: (843)293-2224, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://scmassage.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $5,200 Massage; $4,200 Esthetics. Enrollment: Total 35. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Esthetician (450 Hr); Massage Therapy (605 Hr)

Strand College of Hair Design

423 79th Ave. N., Myrtle Beach, SC 29572. Cosmetology. Contact: Nancy Poole, President, (843)449-1017, (843)467-2397, Web Site: http://strandcollege.com. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $9,000. Enrollment: Total 66. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Esthetician (450 Hr); Nail Technology (300 Hr)

NORTH AUGUSTA

Kenneth Shuler School of Cosmetology and Hair Design

736 Martintown Rd., North Augusta, SC 29841. Cosmetology. Founded 1974. Contact: Kenneth Schuler, Pres., (803)278-1200, (866)804-2471, Web Site: http://www.kennethshuler.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $8,999 Cosmetology; $3,564 Manicuring. Enrollment: Total 82. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

NORTH CHARLESTON

Academy of Cosmetology

5117 Dorchester Rd., North Charleston, SC 29418. Cosmetology. Founded 1959. Contact: Kay Hawkins, Admissions Dir., (843)552-3241, Fax: (843)552-7717, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.realpagessites.com/academy/. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $1,400-$6,200. Enrollment: men 2, women 113. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (12 Mo); Manicurist (15 Wk)

Beta Tech - Charleston

8088 Rivers Ave., North Charleston, SC 29406. Trade and Technical, Allied Medical. Contact: Gerald Yagen, President, (843)569-0889, 877-604-2121, Fax: (843)569-7499, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.betatech.edu; E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.betatech.edu/charleston-south-carolina.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Other. Tuition: $11,340; $1,200 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 277. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Computer Operations; Legal Assistant; Medical Assistant; Network Support

ECPI College of Technology (Charleston)

7410 Northside Dr., Ste. G101, North Charleston, SC 29420. Trade and Technical, Business, Allied Medical.(843)414-0350, 888-526-4654, Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/campus/cn/; Web Site: http://www.ecpi.edu/admissions/contact/route/routeinquiry.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,559 plus $1,066 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Automated; Biomedical Technology; Business Administration; Computer Electro-Mechanics; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Criminology - Identification Technology; Information Systems; Internet Technologies; Office Technology; Secretarial, Medical

ORANGEBURG

Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College

3250 St. Matthews Rd., Orangeburg, SC 29118. Two-Year College. Founded 1968. Contact: Barbara Felder, VP for Student Affairs, (803)536-0311, (803)535-1218, 800-813-6519, Fax: (803)535-1388, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.octech.org. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,320/year in-county; $1,644/year out-of-county; $2,232/year out-of-state. Enrollment: men 600, women 1,300. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (18 Mo); Agribusiness Technology (18 Mo); Automotive Technology (21 Mo); Building Engineer (21 Mo); Business Administration (18 Mo); Computer Programming (18 Mo); Criminal Justice (18 Mo); Diesel Technology (12 Mo); Drafting, Engineering (18 Mo); Electricity, Industrial (21 Mo); Electronics, Instrumentation (18 Mo); Engineering Technology (18 Mo); Engineering Technology, Mechanical (18 Mo); Forestry Technology (18 Mo); Heating Technology (21 Mo); Machine Tool & Die (24 Mo); Medical Assistant (12 Mo); Medical Laboratory Technology (21 Mo); Nursing, Practical (12 Mo); Nursing, R.N. (24 Mo); Office, General (18 Mo); Radiologic Technology (24 Mo); Respiratory Therapy (24 Mo); Secretarial, General (18 Mo); Welding Technology (21 Mo)

PENDLETON

Tri-County Technical College

Hwy. 76, PO Box 587, Pendleton, SC 29670. Two-Year College. Founded 1962. Contact: R.L. Booth, Pres., (803)646-8361, (866)269-5677, Fax: (803)646-1895, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tctc.edu; Rebecca W. Eidson, Public Information Officer. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $550 per semester. Enrollment: men 1,871, women 2,838. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ABET; ACBSP; ADA; CAAHEP; NAACLS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (2 Yr); Broadcasting, Nontechnical (2 Yr); Computer Graphics (2 Yr); Computer Technology (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Dental Assisting (1 Yr); Drafting, Engineering (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (1 Yr); Electronics, Industrial (2 Yr); Engineering Technology, Electronic (2 Yr); Fine Arts (2 Yr); Industrial Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Industrial Technology (2 Yr); Machine Tool Programming Technology (2 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Quality Control (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (1 Yr); Textile Technology (2 Yr); Veterinary Technology (2 Yr); Welding Technology (2 Yr)

Tri-County Technical College Practical Nursing Program

7900 Highway 76, PO Box 587, Pendleton, SC 29670. Nursing, Two-Year College. Founded 1960. Contact: Lynn M. Lollis, Program Coordinator, (864)646-8361, (864)646-1346, (866)269-5677, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tctc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 30. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (2 Yr)

ROCK HILL

Plaza School of Beauty

946 Oakland Ave., Rock Hill, SC 29730-3552. Cosmetology. Contact: Orri J. Putnam, Owner, (803)328-5166. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $10,800 in-state; $10,800 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 40. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Curriculum: Cosmetology - Administration, Management & Supervision (1500 Hr)

York Technical College

452 South Anderson Rd., Rock Hill, SC 29730. Two-Year College. Founded 1964. Contact: Sherry Glenn, Assoc.VP for Academic and Student Affair, (803)327-8000, (803)327-8047, 800-922-TECH, Fax: (803)981-7237, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.yorktech.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,886/year in-state; $6,336/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 3,937. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ABET; CAAHEP; NAACLS; ADA; AACSB; SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (1 or 2 Yr); Automotive Technology (1 or 2 Yr); Business (2 Yr); Computer Technology (2 Yr); Dental Assisting (1 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Drafting, Engineering (1 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Early Childhood Specialist (1 Yr); Electricity, Industrial (1 Yr); Engineering Technology, Computer (2 Yr); Engineering Technology, Electronic (2 Yr); Engineering Technology, Mechanical (2 Yr); Industrial Technology (1 Yr); Machine Tool & Die Design (1 or 2 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 or 2 Yr); Office Technology (2 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (1 Yr); Telecommunications Technology (1 Yr); Welding Technology (1 Yr)

SPARTANBURG

Spartanburg Methodist College

1200 Textile Rd., Spartanburg, SC 29301. Two-Year College. Founded 1911. Contact: Daniel L. Philbeck, VP of Enrollment Management, (864)587-4000, (864)587-4213, 800-772-7286, Fax: (864)587-4355, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.smcsc.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $9,966 per year. Enrollment: Total 760. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Art (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Science (2 Yr)

Spartanburg Technical College

PO Box 4386, Spartanburg, SC 29305. Two-Year College. Founded 1962. Contact: Geraldine Brantley, Dir. of Counseling, (864)592-4600, (864)592-4800, 800-922-3679, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.stcsc.edu/. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,736/year in-state; $5,300/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 4,034. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ABET; CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration; Automotive Technology; Civil Engineering Technology; Commercial Art; Computer Aided Drafting; Computer Networking; Computer Operations; Computer Technology; Culinary Arts; Dental Assisting; Dental Hygiene; Early Childhood Specialist; Electronic Engineering Technology; Electronics, Industrial; Electronics Technology; Engineering Technology, Mechanical; Fire Science; Health Technology; Horticulture; Hospitality; Industrial Engineering Technology; Information Sciences Technology; Landscaping; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Manufacturing Technology; Marketing Management; Mechanical Engineering; Medical Assistant; Medical Laboratory Technology; Medical Technology; Numerical Control; Nursing, Practical; Office Technology; Pharmacy Technician; Radiologic Technology; Respiratory Therapy; Surgical Technology; Technological Studies; Welding Technology

SUMTER

Central Carolina Technical College

506 N. Guignard Dr., Sumter, SC 29150. Trade and Technical. Contact: Kay R. Raffield, Pres., (803)778-1961, Web Site: http://www.cctech.edu. Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,980 in-state; $5,188 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

H & R Block Tax School

286 Broad St., Sumter, SC 29150. Other. Contact: Cheryl Tisdale, Dist. Mgr., (803)775-9513, 800-HRB-LOCK, Web Site: http://www.hrblock.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $250. Enrollment: Total 45. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Income Tax Preparation (11 Wk)

Sumter Beauty College, Inc.

921 Carolina Ave., Sumter, SC 29150. Cosmetology. Founded 1960. Contact: Faye H. Smith, Dir., (803)773-7311, Fax: (803)773-7312. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $6,750. Enrollment: Total 50. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: COE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr)

University of South Carolina-Sumter

200 Miller Rd., Sumter, SC 29150-2498. Contact: Les Carpenter, Dean, (803)775-8727, (803)775-3888, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.uscsumter.edu/; Keith Britton, Dir. of Admission Services, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $3,798 in-state; $9,460 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 199.

TIGERVILLE

North Greenville University

PO Box 1892, Tigerville, SC 29688. Other. Founded 1892. Contact: Dr. Buddy Freeman, Dir. of Admissions, (864)977-7001, 800-468-6642, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ngc.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $8,700 per year. Enrollment: Total 1,498. Degrees awarded: Diploma, Associate. Accreditation: SACS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Business Administration (4 Sm); Christian Service; Music (4 Sm); Recreation Technology; Theatre Arts (4 Sm)

UNION

University of South Carolina at Union

309 Academy St., PO Drawer 729, Union, SC 29379. Other. Founded 1965. Contact: James W. Edwards, (864)429-8728, 800-768-5566, Fax: (864)427-3682, Web Site: http://uscunion.sc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $6,914/year in-state; $18,556/year out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 383. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ABA; LCMEAMA; NASM; NCATE; CACREP; APA; NASPAA; NAST; NASAD; ACEJMC; ALA; CCNE; ACPE; CSWE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Science - Terminal Operation; Economics & Business Administration; Engineering; Journalism; Mathematics; Nursing, Practical

WEST COLUMBIA

Eagle Aviation, Inc.

2861 Aviation Way, West Columbia, SC 29169. Flight and Ground. Founded 1969. Contact: Doug Thomas, Dir., (803)822-5577, 800-848-6359, Fax: (803)822-5592, Web Site: http://www.eagle-aviation.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Accreditation: FAA. Curriculum: Aircraft Flight Instruction, Advanced Ground; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Airline Transport Pilot; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Basic Ground; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Commercial Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor Additional Rating; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Instrument Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Multi-Engine Rating - Airplane; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Primary Flying

South Carolina Massage & Esthetics Institute (West Columbia)

1905 Sunset Blvd., West Columbia, SC 29169. Other. Founded 1998. Contact: Linda V. Beach, Dir., (803)939-9600, Fax: (803)739-8935, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://scmassage.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $5,200. Enrollment: Total 80. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Esthetician (450 Hr); Massage Therapy (605 Hr)

WILLIAMSTON

Anderson Districts1&2 Career & Technology Center

702 Belton Hwy., Williamston, SC 29697. Trade and Technical. Founded 1973. Contact: Dr. Jerry R. Kirkley, Dir., (864)847-4121, Fax: (864)847-3539, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.andersonctc.k12.sc.us. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Term: Other. Tuition: None required. Enrollment: Total 1,050. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Placement service available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Allied Health Occupations (2 Yr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Business, General Office (2 Yr); Carpentry (2 Yr); Communications, Commercial (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (2 Yr); Food Preparation & Service (2 Yr); Horticulture, Ornamental (2 Yr)

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South Carolina

South Carolina

1 Location and Size

2 Topography

3 Climate

4 Plants and Animals

5 Environmental Protection

6 Population

7 Ethnic Groups

8 Languages

9 Religions

10 Transportation

11 History

12 State Government

13 Political Parties

14 Local Government

15 Judicial System

16 Migration

17 Economy

18 Income

19 Industry

20 Labor

21 Agriculture

22 Domesticated Animals

23 Fishing

24 Forestry

25 Mining

26 Energy and Power

27 Commerce

28 Public Finance

29 Taxation

30 Health

31 Housing

32 Education

33 Arts

34 Libraries and Museums

35 Communications

36 Press

37 Tourism, Travel & Recreation

38 Sports

39 Famous South Carolinians

40 Bibliography

State of South Carolina

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Named in honor of King Charles I of England.

NICKNAME : The Palmetto State.

CAPITAL: Columbia.

ENTERED UNION: 23 May 1788 (8th).

OFFICIAL SEAL: The official seal consists of two ovals showing the original designs for the obverse and the reverse of South Carolina’s great seal of 1777. left (obverse): same as the coat of arms. right (reverse): as the sun rises over the seashore, Hope, holding a laurel branch, walks over swords and daggers. The motto Dum spiro spero is above her, the word “Spes” (Hope) below.

FLAG: Blue field with a white palmetto in the center and a white crescent at the union.

MOTTO: Animis opibusque parati (Prepared in mind and resources); Dum spiro spero (While I breathe, I hope).

SONG: “Carolina;” “South Carolina on My Mind.”

FLOWER: Yellow jessamine.

TREE: Palmetto.

ANIMAL: White-tailed deer.

BIRD: Carolina wren; wild turkey (wild game bird).

FISH: Striped bass.

GEM: Amethyst.

ROCK OR STONE: Blue granite.

BEVERAGE: Milk and tea (hospitality beverage).

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year’s Day, 1 January; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Washington’s Birthday/Presidents’ Day, 3rd Monday in February; Confederate Memorial Day, 10 May; National Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Veterans’ Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving Day, 4th Thursday in November; Christmas Eve, 24 December, when declared by the governor; Christmas Day, 25 December and the day following.

TIME: 7 AM EST = noon GMT.

1 Location and Size

Situated in the southeastern United States, South Carolina ranks 40th in size among the 50 states. The state’s total area is 31,113 square miles (80,583 square kilometers), of which land takes up 30,203 square miles (78,226 square kilometers) and inland water 910 square miles (2,357 square kilometers). South Carolina extends 273 miles (439 kilometers) from east to west and 210 miles (338 kilometers) from north to south. Its total boundary length is 824 miles (1,326 kilometers), including a general coastline of 187 miles (301 kilometers). The state includes 13 of the Sea Islands in the Atlantic.

2 Topography

South Carolina is divided into two major regions: the upcountry, which lies within the Piedmont Plateau, and the low country to the southeast, which forms part of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. In the extreme northwest, the Blue Ridge Mountains cover about 500 square miles (1,300 square kilometers). The highest elevation, at 3,560 feet (1,086 meters), is Sassafras Mountain. Many artificial lakes are associated with electric power plants. One of them, Lake Marion, is the state’s largest lake with and area of 173 square miles (48 square kilometers). Three river systems—the Pee Dee, Santee, and Savannah—drain most of the state.

3 Climate

South Carolina has a humid, subtropical climate. Average temperatures range from 68°f (20°c) on the coast to 58°f (14°c) in the northwest, with colder temperatures in the mountains. The daily average temperature at Columbia is 45°f (7°c) in January and 82°f (27°c) in July. The record high temperature is 111°f (44°c) set in Camden on 28 June 1954. The record low for the state is -20°f (-29°c), set at Caesars Head Mountain on 18 January 1977.

Rainfall is ample throughout the state, ranging from 38 inches (97 centimeters) in the central region to 52 inches (132 centimeters) in the upper Piedmont. Snow and sleet occur about three times annually with an average of 2 inches

South Carolina Population Profile

Total population estimate in 2006:4,321,249
Population change, 2000–06:7.7%
Hispanic or Latino†:3.3%
Population by race
One race:98.9%
White:67.4%
Black or African American:28.5%
American Indian /Alaska Native:0.3%
Asian:1.2%
Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander:0.0%
Some other race:1.5%
Two or more races:1.1%

Population by Age Group

Major Cities by Population
City Population % change 2000–05
Notes: †A person of Hispanic or Latino origin may be of any race. NA indicates that data are not available.
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey and Population Estimates. www.census.gov/ (accessed March 2007).
Columbia117,0880.7
Charleston106,71210.4
North Charleston86,3138.4
Rock Hill59,55419.7
Mount Pleasant57,93221.7
Greenville56,6761.2
Sumter39,6790.1
Spartanburg38,379-3.3
Summerville37,71435.9
Hilton Head Island34,4971.9

(5 centimeters) a year at Columbia. Snowfall is more frequent in the mountains.

4 Plants and Animals

Principal trees of South Carolina include palmetto (the state tree), balsam fir, pitch pine, maple, hickory, cypress, and beech. Rocky areas of the Piedmont contain a mixture of moss and lichens. The coastal plain has a wide variety of grasses, shrubs, and vines. In 2006, at least 19 plant species were listed as threatened or endangered, including smooth coneflower, Schweinitz’s sunflower, black spored quillwort, pondberry, and persistent trillium.

South Carolina mammals include white-tailed deer (the state animal), cottontail and marsh rabbits, and woodchuck. Three varieties of raccoon are indigenous, one of them unique to Hilton Head Island. The state is also home to Bachman’s shrew, originally identified in South Carolina by John Bachman, one of John J. Audubon’s collaborators. Common birds include the mockingbird and Carolina wren (the state bird).

In 2006, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed 19 animal species as threatened or endangered, including the Indiana bat, Carolina heel-splitter, bald eagle, five species of sea turtle, wood stork, and shortnose sturgeon.

5 Environmental Protection

The Department of Health and Environmental Control, established in 1973, is South Carolina’s primary environmental protection agency. South

South Carolina Population by Race

Census 2000 was the first national census in which the instructions to respondents said, “Mark one or more races.” This table shows the number of people who are of one, two, or three or more races. For those claiming two races, the number of people belonging to the various categories is listed. The U.S. government conducts a census of the population every ten years.

 Number Percent
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Census 2000: Redistricting Data. Press release issued by the Redistricting Data Office. Washington, D.C., March, 2001. A dash (—) indicates that the percent is less than 0.1.
Total population4,012,012100.0
One race3,972,06299.0
Two races36,9410.9
White and Black or African American7,8900.2
White and American Indian/Alaska Native8,8410.2
White and Asian4,8370.1
White and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander533
White and some other race7,0130.2
Black or African American and American Indian/Alaska Native2,2840.1
Black or African American and Asian1,226
Black or African American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander304
Black or African American and some other race1,738
American Indian/Alaska Native and Asian244
American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander42
American Indian/Alaska Native and some other race532
Asian and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander344
Asian and some other race958
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and some other race155
Three or more races3,0090.1

Carolina has an aggressive environmental compliance program.

The state has implemented an innovative river basin planning program for the protection of its surface water resources. In 2002, more than 99% of the state’s 1,520 federally defined public water systems had complied with drinking water regulatory requirements.

South Carolina is preparing to implement an aggressive air quality permitting program. The state has an industrial fee system in place to support the air quality program. The state also has innovative programs for source reduction, waste minimization, and recycling. Regulations have been approved for municipal and industrial waste land disposal systems, incineration, construction, land clearing debris, and other solid waste actions.

In 2003, South Carolina had 194 hazardous waste sites listed in the Environmental Protection Agency’s database, 26 of which were on the National Priorities List as of 2006.

6 Population

In 2006, South Carolina ranked 24th in population in the United States with an estimated total of 4,321,249 residents. The population is projected to reach 4.98 million by 2025. The population density in 2004 was 139.4 persons per square mile (53.8 persons per square kilometer). The median age in 2004 was 36.9 years. In 2005, about 12% of all residents were 65 years old or older while 25% were 18 or younger.

The largest city in 2005 was Columbia, with an estimated population of 117,088; other large cities include Charleston, 106,712; North Charleston, Rock Hill, Mount Pleasant, Greenville, Sumter, and Spartanburg.

7 Ethnic Groups

The population of South Carolina is mainly of Northern European heritage. According to the 2000 census, the black American population was 1,185,216, or about 30% of the state’s population (the third-highest percentage in the nation). In the coastal regions and offshore islands there are still some vestiges of African heritage, notably the Gullah dialect. Also in 2000, there were 13,718 Native Americans in the state. The Hispanic and Latino population was about 95,076 people (about 3% of the total population), including 52,871 Mexicans and 12.211 Puerto Ricans. South Carolina had 36,014 Asians, including 6,423 Filipinos, 2,448 Japanese, and 3,665 Koreans. Pacific Islanders numbered 1,628. In 2000, about 115,978 (2.9%) of South Carolinians were foreign born.

In 2006, estimates indicated that 28.5% of the population was black, 3.3% was Hispanic or Latino, and 1.2% was Asian.

8 Languages

South Carolina English is marked by a division between the South Midland of the upcountry and the plantation Southern dialect of the coastal plain. Along the coast and on the Sea Islands, some blacks still use the Gullah dialect, based on a Creole mixture of pre-Revolutionary English and African speech. In 2000, 94.8% of all state residents five years of age and older reported speaking English at home. Other languages spoken at home and number of speakers included Spanish, 110,030; French, 19,110; and German, 15,195.

9 Religions

Evangelical Protestants account for a majority of the religiously active residents in the state. The largest single Christian denomination in 2000 was the Southern Baptist Convention with 928,341 adherents. The next largest of the Evangelical denominations were the Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee) with 56,612 adherents and the Pentecostal Holiness Church with 33,820 adherents. The largest mainline Protestant denomination was the United Methodist Church with about 241,680 members in 2004. Other denominations (with 2000 membership figures) were the Presbyterian Church USA, 103,883 and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, 61,380. The Episcopal Church had great influence during colonial times, but in 2000 it had only 52,486 members. In 2004, there were 152,413 Roman Catholics in the state. In 2000, there were an estimated 11,000 Jews, 17,586 adherents to the Baha’i faith, and 5,761 Muslims. About 2.1 million people (52.4% of the population) were not counted as members of any religious organization.

10 Transportation

In 2003, there were 2,423 rail miles (3,901 kilometers) of track, utilized by two Class I, seven local, and four switching and terminal railroads. Amtrak passenger trains pass north–south through the state, providing limited service to Charleston, Columbia, and other cities.

The public road network in 2004 was made up of 66,250 miles (106,662 kilometers) of roads. Highway I-26, running northwest–southeast from the upcountry to the Atlantic, intersects I-85 at Spartanburg, I-20 at Columbia, and I-95 on its way toward Charleston. In 2004, there were 1.9 million automobiles, 1.29 million trucks, and 5,000 buses registered in the state. The state had 2.9 million licensed drivers. City bus service is most heavily used in the Charleston and Columbia systems.

The state has three deepwater seaports. Charleston is one of the major ports on the Atlantic and the harbors of Georgetown and Port Royal also handle significant waterborne trade. The Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, crossing the state slightly inward from the Atlantic Ocean, is a major thoroughfare.

South Carolina had 162 airports in 2005. Charleston, Myrtle Beach, Columbia, and Greenville-Spartanburg are the major airports within the state; however, many travelers also enter South Carolina via the air terminals at Savannah, Augusta, and Atlanta, Georgia, and at Charlotte, North Carolina.

11 History

Prior to European settlement, the region now called South Carolina was populated by several Native American groups, including Iroquoian, Siouan, and Muskogean tribes. In the early 1500s, long before the English claimed the Carolinas, Spanish sea captains explored the coast. The English established their first permanent settlement in 1670 under the supervision of the eight lords who had been granted rights to “Carolana” by King Charles II. At first the colonists settled at Albemarle Point on the Ashley River. Ten years later, they moved across the river to the present site of Charleston.

The colony flourished, as rice cultivation began in the coastal swamps, and black slaves were imported as field hands. The original royal grant had created a very large colony, but eventually the separate provinces of North Carolina and Georgia were established. The colonists were successful in overthrowing the lords in 1719 and the government transferred to royal rule by 1721.

Statehood South Carolina opposed the Stamp Act of 1765 and took an active part in the American Revolution. The first British property seized by American Revolutionary forces was Fort Charlotte in McCormick County in 1775. Delegates from South Carolina were leaders at the federal constitutional convention of 1787. On 23 May 1788, South Carolina became the eighth state to ratify the Constitution.

Between the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, two issues dominated South Carolinian political thinking: tariffs and slavery. Large farms became profitable by using slave labor, and with more than half its population consisting of black slaves, the state seceded from the Union on 20 December 1860. The first battle of the Civil War took place at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor on 12 April 1861. In the closing months of the war, Union troops under General William Tecumseh Sherman burned Columbia and caused widespread destruction elsewhere. South Carolina contributed about 63,000 soldiers to the Confederacy out of a white population of some 291,000.

Given the right to vote and hold office during Reconstruction, blacks attained the offices of lieutenant governor and US representative. Former Confederate general Wade Hampton was elected governor in 1876, and the following year President Rutherford B. Hayes declared an end to Reconstruction and withdrew federal troops from the state.

1880s to 1990s For the next 100 years, South Carolina suffered through political turmoil, crop failures, and recessions. The political reign of Benjamin Ryan “Pitchfork Ben” Tillman, who served as governor from 1890 to 1894 and then as US senator until his death in 1918, inaugurated a period of political and racial repression that sought to exclude black voters.

The main economic transformation since 1890 has been the replacement of rice and cotton farming by tobacco and soybean cultivation, along with the movement of tenant farmers, or sharecroppers, from the land to the cities. There they found jobs in textile mills, and textiles became the state’s leading industry after 1900. With the devastation of the cotton crop by the boll weevil in the 1920s, farmers were compelled to diversify their crops. Labor shortages in the North during and after World War II drew many thousands of blacks to Philadelphia, Washington, DC, New York, and other cities. In the postwar period, industry took over the dominant role formerly held by agriculture and the focus of textile production shifted from cotton to synthetic fabrics. Throughout the 1990s, the major industries were textiles and chemicals,

South Carolina Governors: 1776–2007

1776–1778John Rutledge 
1778–1779Rawlins Lowndes 
1779–1782John Rutledge 
1782–1783John Mathews 
1783–1785Benjamin Guerard 
1785–1787William Moultrie 
1787–1789Thomas PinckneyFederalist
1789–1792Charles PinckneyFederalist and Republican
1792–1794William MoultrieFederalist
1794–1796Arnoldus Van der HorstFederalist
1796–1798Charles PinckneyDem-Rep
1798–1800Edward RutledgeFederalist
1800–1802John DraytonDem-Rep
1802–1804James Burchill RichardsonDem-Rep
1804–1806Paul HamiltonDem-Rep
1806–1808Charles PinckneyDem-Rep
1808–1810John DraytonDem-Rep
1810–1812Henry MiddletonRepublican
1812–1814Joseph AlstonDem-Rep
1814–1816David Rogerson WilliamsDem-Rep
1816–1818Andrew PickensDem-Rep
1818–1820John GeddesDem-Rep
1820–1822Thomas BennettDem-Rep
1822–1824John Lyde WilsonDem-Rep
1824–1826Richard Irvine Manning IDem-Rep
1826–1828John TaylorDem-Rep
1828–1830Stephen Decatur MillerDemocrat Nullifier
1830–1832James Hamilton, Jr.S.R. Dem
1832–1834Robert Young HayneS.R. Dem
1834–1836George McDuffieS.R. Dem
1836–1838Pierce Mason ButlerS.R. Dem
1838–1840Patrick NobleS.R. Dem
1840Barnabas Kelet. HenaganDemocrat
1840–1842John Peter Richardson IIJacksonian
1842–1844James Henry HammondDemocrat
1844–1846William AikenDemocrat
1846–1848David JohnsonDemocrat
1848–1850Whitemarsh Benjamin SeabrookDemocrat
1850–1852John Hugh MeansS.R. Dem
1852–1854John Lawrence ManningS.R. Dem
1864–1856James Hopkins AdamsS.R. Dem
1856–1858Robert Francis Withers AllstonDemocrat
1858–1860William Henry GistS.R. Dem
1860–1862Francis Wilkinson PickensS.R. Dem
1862–1864Milledge Luke BonhamConfed-Dem
1864–1865Andrew Gordon McGrathConfed-Dem
1865Benjamin Franklin PerryUnion-Dem
1865–1867James Lawrence OrrRepublican
1867–1868Gen. Edward R. S. CanbyMilitary
1868–1872Robert Kingston ScottRepublican
1872–1874Franklin J. Moses, Jr.Republican
1874–1876Daniel Henry ChamberlainRepublican
1876–1879Wade HamptonConserv-Dem
1879–1880William Dunlap SimpsonDemocrat
1880Thomas Bothwell JeterDemocrat
1880–1882Johnson HagoodDemocrat
1882–1886Hugh Smith ThompsonDemocrat
1886John Calhoun SheppardConserv-Dem
1886–1890John Peter Richardson IIIDemocrat
1890–1894Benjamin Ryan TillmanDemocrat
1894–1897John Gary EvansDemocrat
1897–1899William Haselden EllerbeDemocrat
1899–1903Miles Benjamin McSweeneyDemocrat
1903–1907Duncan Clinch HeywardDemocrat
1907–1911Martin Frederick AnselDemocrat
1911–1915Coleman Livingston BleaseDemocrat
1915Charles Aurelius SmithDemocrat
1915–1919Richard Irvine Manning IIIDemocrat
1919–1922Robert Archer CooperDemocrat
1922–1923Wilson Godfrey HarveyDemocrat
1923–1927Thomas Gardon McLeodDemocrat
1927–1931John Gardiner RichardsDemocrat
1931–1935Ibra Charles BlackwoodDemocrat
1935–1939Olin Dewitt JohnstonDemocrat
1939–1941Burnet Rhett MaybankDemocrat
1941–1942Joseph Emile HarleyDemocrat
1942–1943Richard Manning JefferiesDemocrat
1943–1945Olin Dewittt JohnstonDemocrat
1945–1947Ransome Judson WilliamsDemocrat
1947–1951James Strom ThurmondDemocrat
1951–1955James Francis ByrnesDemocrat
1955–1959George Bell Timmerman, Jr.Democrat
1959–1963Ernest Frederick HollingsDemocrat
1963–1967Donald Stuart RussellDemocrat
1967–1971Robert Evander McNairDemocrat
1971–1975John Carl WestDemocrat
1975–1979James Burrows EdwardsRepublican
1979–1987Richard Wilson RileyDemocrat
1987–1995Carroll Ashmore Campbell, Jr.Republican
1995–1999David M. BeasleyRepublican
1995–2002Jim HodgesDemocrat
2002–Mark SanfordRepublican
Confederate Democrat – Confed-Dem
Conservative Democrat – Conserv-Dem
Democratic Republican – Dem-Rep
State Rights Democrat – S.R. Dem
Union Democrat – Union-Dem

with foreign investment playing a major role in the economy.

In social development, public school desegregation after 1954 proceeded peaceably, and

South Carolina Presidential Vote by Political Parties, 1948–2004

YEAR SOUTH CAROLINA WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN STATES’ RIGHTS DEMOCRAT LIBERTARIAN
* Won US presidential election.
1948Thurmond (SRD)34,4235,386102,607
1952Stevenson (D)172,957168,043
    UNPLEDGED
1956Stevenson (D)136,27875,63488,509
1960*Kennedy (D)198,121188,558
1964Goldwater (R)215,723309,048
    AMERICAN IND.  
1968*Nixon (R)197,486254,062215,430
    AMERICAN  
1972*Nixon (R)186,824477,04410,075
1976*Carter (D)450,807346,1492,996
1980*Reagan (R)430,385441,8414,975
1984*Reagan (R)344,459615,5394,359
1988*Bush (R)370,554606,4434,935
    IND. (PEROT)  
1992Bush (R)479,514577,507138,8722,719
1996Dole (R)506,283573,45864,3864,271
    NADER  
2000*Bush, G. W. (R)566,039786,89220,2794,898
2004*Bush, G. W. (R)661,699937,9745,5203,608

racial integration at the workplace became the standard. In 1983, for the first time in 95 years, a black state senator was elected. In response to a Supreme Court ruling, The Citadel, one of only two state-supported military schools in the country, admitted its first female cadet in 1995, the first in its 156-year history. Nevertheless, most South Carolinians remained staunchly conservative in political and social matters. In January 2000, a protest against the display of the Confederate flag on the dome of the State House drew nearly 50,000 demonstrators, black and white. Some view the flag as a symbol of African American oppression. The flag was moved to a spot on the capitol lawn.

Republican presidential candidates have carried the state in every election except that of 1976, in which Southerner Jimmy Carter prevailed. The well-known conservative Republican Strom Thurmond represented South Carolina in the US Senate from 1954 to 2003, when he died at the age of 100. His democratic counterpart, Ernest Hollings, served in the Senate from 1966 to 2005. Republican Mark Sanford was elected as governor in 2002.

As of 2005, the state was struggling with a budget deficit of $300–500 million and South Carolina was ranked among the ten states in the nation with lowest per capita personal income and highest poverty rates.

12 State Government

The South Carolina General Assembly consists of a senate of 46 members, elected for four-year terms; and a house of representatives of 124 members, elected for two years. Officials elected statewide include the governor and lieutenant governor (who run separately), attorney general, secretary of state, comptroller general, and treasurer.

Bills may be introduced in either house, except for revenue measures, which are reserved to the house of representatives. The governor has a regular veto and an item veto on appropriation matters, either of which may be overridden by a two-thirds vote of those present in each house of the legislature. Bills automatically become law after five days if the governor takes no action.

The legislative salary in 2004 was $10,400 and the governor’s salary was $106,078.

13 Political Parties

From the end of Reconstruction, the Democratic Party dominated state politics. In 1948 the States’ Rights Democrat (or “Dixiecrat”) faction was formed and its candidate, South Carolina governor J. Strom Thurmond, carried the state. Thurmond switched to the Republican Party while in the US Senate and boosted support for the state’s Republican Party, which since 1964 has captured South Carolina’s eight electoral votes in ten of the eleven presidential elections.

In the 2000 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush won 57% of the popular vote, while Democrat Al Gore received 41%. In 2004, Bush won 58% of the vote and Democrat John Kerry won 41%.

Following the 2006 midterm elections, there were two Democrats and four Republicans serving as US Representatives. South Carolina’s US senators that year were Republicans James DeMint and Lindsey Graham. In 2002, voters elected a Republican, Mark Sanford, to the governor’s office, and reelected him in 2006. Following the 2006 elections, the state senate had 20 Democrats and 26 Republicans, while in the state house there were 73 Republicans and 51 Democrats. Fifteen women were elected to the state legislature in 2006, or 8.8%, the lowest percentage in the nation.

In 2004, there were 2,325,000 registered voters in the state. Voters do not register according to political parties.

14 Local Government

As of 2005, South Carolina had 46 counties, 269 incorporated municipalities, 90 school districts, and 301 special districts of various types. Most municipalities operate under the mayor-council or city manager system. More than half the counties have a county administrator or manager. Customarily, each county has a council or commission, attorney, auditor, clerk of the court, coroner, tax collector, treasurer, and sheriff.

15 Judicial System

South Carolina’s unified judicial system is headed by the chief justice of the five-member supreme court, which is the final court of appeal. A five-member intermediate court of appeals for criminal cases became a permanent constitutional court in 1984. Sixteen circuit courts hear major criminal and civil cases. The state also has a system of family courts for domestic and juvenile cases.

The state’s violent crime rate in 2004 was 784.2 reported incidents per 100,000 persons. Crimes against property were reported at a rate of about 4,504.8 incidents per 100,000 people. In December 2004 there were 23,428 inmates in state and federal correctional institutions. South Carolina has a death penalty law; in January 2006, there were 74 inmates on death row. Between 1912 and 1962 there were 241 executions. There were 35 executions between 1976 and May 2006.

16 Migration

The original European migration into South Carolina consisted mostly of German, Welsh, and Scotch-Irish settlers. During the 19th century, many of the original settlers emigrated westward to Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas. In the 20th century, many blacks left the state for cities in the North.

Between 1990 and 1998, the state had net gains of 119,000 in domestic migration and 16,000 in international migration. In the period 1995–2000, some 442,449 people moved into the state and 310,244 moved out, for a net gain of 132,205, of whom 15,760 were age 65 or over. For the period 2000–05, net international migration was 36,401 and net internal migration was 115,084 for a net gain of 151,485 people.

17 Economy

Textiles and farming completely dominated the economy until after World War II, when efforts toward economic diversification attracted paper, chemical, and other industries to the state. Since the end of World War II, rising foreign and domestic investment, coupled with an abundance of first class tourist facilities along the coast, have contributed to the continuing growth of South Carolina’s economy.

By 1999, manufacturing had become the most important part of the South Carolina economy. The national recession of 2001 had a negative impact on South Carolina’s economy, however, as the annual growth rate of the economy, averaging 5.5% from 1998 to 2000, dropped to 2.6% in 2001. In 2001, general services, including health, business, tourist, personal, and educational services rose to 30.3% of the economy while manufacturing dropped to 20% of the economy. In 2004, an estimated 11,745 new businesses were established in the state while 10,975 businesses closed.

18 Income

In 2005, South Carolina had a gross state product (GSP) of $140 billion, ranking 28th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. In 2004, South Carolina ranked 45th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia with a per capita (per person) income of $27,185; the national average was $33,050. The average median annual household income for 2002–04 was $39,326, compared to the national average of $44,473. For the same period, 14% of the population lived below the federal poverty level, compared to the national average of 12.4%.

19 Industry

Many textile mills were closed during the 1970s and early 1980s because of the importation of cheaper textiles from abroad. The economic slack was made up, however, by the establishment of new industries, especially paper and chemical manufacturers. South Carolina’s major manufacturing centers are concentrated in the northern part of the state and in the Piedmont area. The total value of manufactured goods shipments in 2004 was $81.6 billion. Transportation equipment manufacturing accounted for the largest amount of shipment values. The textile mill industries accounted for the largest number of manufacturing employees.

20 Labor

In April 2006, the labor force in South Carolina numbered 2,123,800, with approximately 139,9 00 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 6.6%, compared to the national average of 4.7%. In 2006, 6.4% of the labor force was employed in construction; 13.7% in manufacturing; 19.3% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 5.3% in financial activities; 10% in education and health services; 10.7% in leisure and hospitality services, and 17.5% in government.

Textiles, clothing, and women’s garment workers’ unions make up the bulk of union membership, followed by transportation and electrical workers. Several large textile companies have made major efforts to prevent their workers from organizing unions. Conflicts between management and workers have continued for years, but without serious violence.

In 2005, some 40,000 of South Carolina’s 1,739,000 employed wage and salary workers were members of unions, representing 2.3% of those so employed. The national average was 12%.

21 Agriculture

The total cash receipts for agriculture were about $1.75 billion in 2004, but this figure represents only a fraction of the impact of agriculture and agribusiness in the state. Agriculture (food and fiber) along with forestry and forestry products contribute about 25% to the gross state product (GSP). Some 18% of all jobs in South Carolina are from agriculture and agribusiness. As of 2004, there were about 24,400 farms in the state occupying 4.8 million acres (1.9 million hectares) with an average size of 199 acres (80 hectares). Agriculture in South Carolina supplies not only food for consumption, but also cotton for clothing and soybean oil for newsprint ink.

The primary farming area is a 50-mile (80-kilometer) band across the upper coastal plain. The Pee Dee region in the east is the center for tobacco production. Cotton is grown mostly south of the fall line, and feed crops thrive in the coastal and sand hill counties. Tobacco is the leading crop by value. In 2004, farmers in the state produced 60.75 million pounds (27.61 million kilograms) of tobacco. Soybean and cotton production in that year were 14.8 million bushels and 390,000 bales, respectively. Peach production in 2004 was 70 million pounds (31.8 million kilograms). Greenhouse and nursery products contributed 15.6% to total farm receipts in 2004.

South Carolina farmers and agribusinesses also produce apples, barley, beans, berries, canola, corn, cucumbers, hay, kiwifruit, mushrooms, oats, peanuts, pecans, popcorn, rye, sorghum, sweet potatoes, tea, turf grasses, tomatoes, ornamental trees, and wheat.

22 Domesticated Animals

In 2005, there were an estimated 435,000 cattle and calves, worth $339.3 million. During 2004, there were around 300,000 hogs and pigs, valued at $27 million. Dairy farmers produced around 318 million pounds (144.5 million kilograms) of milk from 19,000 milk cows in 2003. Poultry farmers produced 1.4 billion eggs, worth some $87.9 million in the same year, as well as 14.8 million pounds (6.7 million kilograms) of chicken, 1.14 billion pounds (518 million kilograms) of broilers, and 494 million pounds (224.5 million kilograms) of turkey.

23 Fishing

The state’s oceanfront saltwater inlets and freshwater rivers and lakes provide ample fishing opportunities. Major commercial fishing is restricted to saltwater species of fish and shell-fish, mainly shrimp, crab, clams, and oysters. In 2004, the commercial catch totaled 12.4 million pounds (5.6 million kilograms), valued at $18.5 million. In 2003, there were three processing plants in the state. In 2002, the commercial fleet had 556 vessels.

In 2001, the state issued 498,088 sport fishing licenses. There are two national fish hatcheries in the state (Orangeberg and Bears Bluff). In 2004, there were nine catfish farms.

24 Forestry

South Carolina had 12,415,000 acres (5,024,000 hectares) of forestland in 2004, about two-thirds of the state’s area and 1.7% of all US forests. The state’s two national forests, Francis Marion and Sumter, comprised 5% of the forested area. Nearly all of South Carolina’s forests are classified as commercial timberland, about 90% of it privately owned. Several varieties of pine, loblolly, longleaf, and shortleaf, are the major source of timber and of pulp for the paper industry. Total lumber production in 2004 was 1.57 billion board feet.

25 Mining

The estimated 2003 value of mineral commodities produced in South Carolina was $474 million, ranking 27th in the nation. Portland cement was the leading mineral commodities, with over 2.7 million tons produced in 2003. Crushed stone, the second leading mineral, consisted primarily of granite and limestone with minor amounts of dolomite, marl, and shell. Over 28.9 million tons of crushed stone were produced in 2003. Construction sand and gravel was the third most valuable nonfuel mineral produced and kaolin was the fourth. Common clay and shale and fuller’s earth were other varieties of clay mined. South Carolina ranked first in production of vermiculite in 2003, second in the production of fire clay, third in the production of kaolin and masonry cement, and ninth in common clays.

26 Energy and Power

Although it lacks fossil fuel resources, South Carolina produces more electricity than it consumes. In 2003, total production of electricity was 93.7 billion kilowatt hours. About 53.8% of electric output came from nuclear reactors and 39.3% came from coal-fired plants.

South Carolina is strongly committed to nuclear energy. As of 2006, the state had seven nuclear reactors in operation, two at the Catawba plant (the state’s largest), three at the Oconee facility near Greenville, one at the H. B. Robinson plant near Hartsville, and one at the Virgil C. Summer plant near Jenkinsville. The vast Savannah River plant in Aiken County produces most of the plutonium for the nation’s nuclear weapons. Chem-Nuclear Systems in Barnwell County stores about half of the country’s low-level nuclear wastes and a Westinghouse plant in Richland County makes fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors.

South Carolina has no proven reserves or production of crude oil or natural gas.

27 Commerce

Wholesale sales totaled $32.9 billion for 2002; retail sales were $40.6 billion. Tobacco wholesale markets and warehouses are centered in the Pee Dee region, while soybean sales and storage facilities cluster around the port of Charleston. Truck crops, fruits, and melons are sold in large quantities at the state farmers’ market in Columbia. The leading types of retail establishments are clothing and clothing accessories, followed by gasoline stations and motor vehicle and auto parts dealers. Foreign exports of South Carolina’s own products were valued at $13.9 billion in 2005.

28 Public Finance

The state constitution requires that budget appropriations not exceed expected revenues. South Carolina’s governor submits the annual budget to the General Assembly in January. The fiscal year is from 1 July to June 30.

Revenues for 2004 were $21.2 billion and expenditures were $21.4 billion. The largest general expenditures were for education ($6 billion), public welfare ($4.9 billion), and highways ($1.4 billion). South Carolina’s public debt totaled $11.1 billion, or $2,659.09 per capita (per person).

29 Taxation

The state’s six bracket personal income tax schedule ranges from 2.5% to 7%. The corporate income tax rate is 5%. The state sales and use tax rate is 5% with allowable local add-ons up to 2%. The state imposes a full array of selective sales (excise) taxes on items such as motor fuels and tobacco products.

The state collected $7.3 billion in taxes in 2005, of which 39.7% came from the general sales tax, 36.8% came from individual income taxes, 13.4% from selective sales taxes, and 3.4% from corporate income taxes. In 2005, South Carolina ranked 43rd among the states in terms of per capita tax burden, which amounted to $1,720 per person. The national average was $2,192 per person.

In 2005, South Carolina’s infant mortality rate was 8.4 per 1,000 live births. The state’s crude death rate was 9.2 per 1,000 inhabitants in 2003. As of 2002, death rates for major causes of death (per 100,000 resident population) included heart disease, 235.2; cancer, 202.9; cerebrovascular diseases, 68.7; chronic lower respiratory diseases, 46; and diabetes, 27.1. The death rate for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported at 7.3 per 100,000. In 2004, the reported acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases rate was at about 18.1 per 100,000. As of 2004, about 24.3% of state residents were smokers.

South Carolina’s 61 community hospitals had 11,100 beds in 2003. There were 231 physicians per 100,000 residents in 2004 and 732 nurses per 100,000 in 2005. In 2004, there were a total of 1,949 dentists in the state. The average expense for hospital care was $1,355 per inpatient day in 2003. In 2004, at least 15% of South Carolina’s residents were uninsured.

31 Housing

In 2004, there were an estimated 1,890,682 housing units, 1,611,401 of which were occupied; 69.7% were owner-occupied. About 60.6% of all housing units were single-family, detached homes; nearly 18.8% were mobile homes (the largest percentage in the nation that year). Electricity and utility gas were the most common energy sources for heating. It was estimated 102,653 units lacked telephone service, 5,428 lacked complete plumbing facilities, and 8,284 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household size was 2.52 people.

In 2004, 43,200 new privately owned housing units were authorized for construction. The median home value was $113,910. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $987, while renters paid a median of $610 per month.

32 Education

As of 2004, 83.6% of all residents 25 years or older had completed high school and 24.9% had attended four or more years of college.

Total public school enrollment was estimated at 695,000 in fall 2002. Expenditures for public education in 2003/04 were estimated at $6.1 billion. Enrollment in private schools in fall 2003 was 58,005.

As of fall 2002, there were 202,007 students enrolled in college or graduate school. In 2005, South Carolina had 63 degree-granting institutions. The state has three major universities: the University of South Carolina, Clemson University, and the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. In addition, there are four-year state colleges, as well as four-year and two-year branches of the University of South Carolina. The state also has 23 four-year private colleges and universities, most of which are church-affiliated. The Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary in Columbia is the only major private graduate institution. There are six private junior colleges. South Carolina has an extensive technical education system, supported by both state and local funds.

33 Arts

South Carolina’s three major centers for the visual arts are the Gibbes Art Gallery in Charleston, the Columbia Museum of Art and Science, and the Greenville County Museum of Art. Local theater groups in the larger municipalities produce five or six plays a year; Columbia’s Town Theater claims to be the nation’s oldest continuously operating community playhouse.

Augusta is home to the Augusta Opera, the Augusta Symphony, and the Augusta Jazz Project. Charleston and Charlotte also have orchestras. Perhaps South Carolina’s best known musical event is the Spoleto Festival, held annually in Charleston during May and June and modeled on the Spoleto Festival in Italy.

The South Carolina Arts Commission, created in 1967, has developed apprenticeship programs in which students learn from master artists. The state has approximately 200 arts associations and 50 local arts groups. In 2005, South Carolina arts organizations received 15 grants totaling $933,200 from the National Endowment for the Arts. The same year, the National Endowment for the Humanities awarded 10 grants totaling $769,885 for state programs.

34 Libraries and Museums

In 2001, there were 41 public library systems in South Carolina with 183 libraries. The combined book and serial publication stock was over 8.2 million volumes with a total circulation of 18.1 million.

The State Library in Columbia works to improve library services throughout the state and also provides reference and research services for the state government. The University of South Carolina and Clemson University libraries have the most outstanding academic collections.

There are 131 museums and historic sites, notably the Charleston Museum specializing in history, natural history, and anthropology. Charleston is also famous for its many old homes, streets, churches, and public facilities. At the entrance to Charleston Harbor stands Fort Sumter, where the Civil War began. Among the state’s best known botanical gardens are the Cypress, Magnolia, and Middleton gardens in the Charleston area. Edisto Garden in Orangeburg is renowned for its azaleas and roses, and Brookgreen Gardens near Georgetown displays a wide variety of plants, animals, and sculpture.

35 Communications

In 2004, 93.4% of South Carolina’s occupied housing units had telephones. The same year, there were over 2.3 million mobile phone subscribers. In 2003, about 54.9% of all households had a personal computer and 45.6% had access to the Internet. Some 45,839 Internet domain names were registered in the state by the year 2000.

In 2005, the state had 62 major radio stations (14 AM, 48 FM) and 20 major television stations. South Carolina has one of the most highly regarded educational television systems in the nation, with ten stations serving the public schools, higher education institutions, state agencies, and the general public.

36 Press

In 2005, South Carolina had 14 morning newspapers, 2 evening dailies, and 14 Sunday newspapers. The same year, the leading morning newspaper was The State published in Columbia with a daily circulation of 115,464. The Charleston Post and Courier had a daily circulation of 95,588 and 106,061 on Sunday. Others included the Spartanburg Herald-Journal , 48,798 daily and 56,981 on Sunday; and the Greenville News , 86,573 daily and 115,758 on Sunday.

37 Tourism, Travel & Recreation

In 2004, the tourism and travel industry ranked first in the state as the largest employer. That year, the state hosted about 32 million visitors with total visitor spending at about $7.8 billion. Approximately 132,400 South Carolinians are directly employed by the tourism industry. About 75% of travelers are from out-of-state.

About 75% of out-of-state tourist revenue is spent by vacationers in Charleston and at the Myrtle Beach and Hilton Head Island resorts. The Cowpens National Battlefield and the Fort Sumter and Kings Mountain national military sites are popular tourist attractions. Golf is a major attraction, generating more income than any other single entertainment or recreational activity.

There are 46 state parks and nine welcome centers in the state.

38 Sports

There are no major league professional sports teams in South Carolina. Minor league baseball teams are located in Fort Mill, Myrtle Beach, Greenville, Columbia, and Charleston. There is also minor league hockey in North Charleston, Greenville, and Florence.

Several steeplechase horse races are held annually in Camden and important professional golf and tennis tournaments are held at Hilton Head Island.

In collegiate football, the Clemson University Tigers of the Atlantic Coast Conference, the University of South Carolina of the Southeastern Conference, and South Carolina State of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference have popular programs. Under the tutelage of former Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz, the University of South Carolina Gamecocks won Outback Bowl victories in 2001 and 2002.

Fishing, waterskiing, and sailing are popular participant sports. There are two major stock car races held at Darlington each year: the Mall.com 400 in March and the Southern 500 on Labor Day weekend. Other annual sporting events include Polo Games held from February through Easter in Aiken and the Governor’s Annual Frog Jumping Contest held in Springfield on the Saturday before Easter.

39 Famous South Carolinians

Many distinguished South Carolinians made their reputations outside the state. South Carolina native Andrew Jackson (1767–1845), the seventh US president, studied law in North Carolina before establishing a legal practice in Tennessee. John Rutledge (1739–1800), the first governor of the state and a leader during the America Revolution, served a term as US chief justice but was never confirmed by the Senate. Identified more closely with South Carolina is John C. Calhoun (1782–1850), vice president from 1825 to 1832.

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (1746–1825) was a delegate to the US constitutional convention. Benjamin R. Tillman (1847–1918) was governor, US senator, and leader of the populist movement in South Carolina. The state’s best known recent political leader is J(ames) Strom Thurmond (1902–2003), who was the only person ever elected to the US Senate by write-in vote, and who served in the Senate from 1954 until January 3, 2003.

Famous military leaders native to the state include the Revolutionary War General Francis Marion (1732?–1795), known as the Swamp Fox; and General William C. Westmoreland (b.1914), commander of US forces in Vietnam. Notable in the academic world are Mary McLeod Bethune (1875–1955), founder of Bethune-Cookman College in Florida and of the National Council of Negro Women; and Charles H. Townes (b.1915), awarded the Nobel Prize in physics in 1964.

South Carolinians who made significant contributions to literature include DuBose Heyward (1885–1940), whose novel Porgy was the basis of the folk opera Porgy and Bess. Tennis champion Althea Gibson (1927–2003) was another South Carolina native. Entertainers born in the state include singer Eartha Kitt (b.1928) and jazz trumpeter John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie (1917–1993).

40 Bibliography

BOOKS

Bristow, M. J. State Songs of America. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2000.

Cornelius, Kay. Francis Marion. Philadelphia, PA: Chelsea House, 2000.

Dykstra, Mary. South Carolina. Milwaukee, WI: Gareth Stevens, 2006.

Heinrichs, Ann. South Carolina. Minneapolis, MN: Compass Point Books, 2003.

Hoffman, Nancy. South Carolina. Tarrytown, NY: Benchmark Books, 2001.

McAuliffe, Bill. South Carolina Facts and Symbols. Rev. ed. New York: Capstone, 2003.

Murray, Julie. South Carolina. Edina, MN: Abdo Publishing, 2006.

Taylor, Frances Wallace, ed. The Leverett Letters: Correspondence of a South Carolina Family, 1851–1868. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 2000.

Whitehurst, Susan. The Colony of South Carolina. New York: PowerKids Press, 2000.

WEB SITES

South Carolina Government. SC.GOV: The Official Web Site of the State of South Carolina. www.sc.gov (accessed March 1, 2007).

South Carolina Tourism. South Carolina. Smiling Faces, Beautiful Places. www.discoversouthcarolina.com (accessed March 1, 2007).

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South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina entered the Union as the eighth state on May 23, 1788. Located in the southeastern United States, it is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, Georgia , and North Carolina.

Several Native American groups inhabited the region, including the Iroquois, Sioux, and Muskogee. Spanish sea captains explored the coast in the early 1500s, but it was the English who established the region's first permanent European settlement, in 1670. Settlers cultivated rice in the swampy coastal areas, and the colony flourished.

South Carolina's wealthy plantation owners profited by using slave labor. More than half the state's population between the American Revolution (1775–83) and the Civil War (1861–65) were slaves. Once the South lost the Civil War, the slaves were freed and granted the rights to vote and hold political office during Reconstruction (the time of rebuilding in the South).

South Carolina was a state in turmoil from the 1880s to the 1890s. Residents suffered from economic recession, political corruption, social unrest, and crop failures. Rice and cotton farming were replaced by tobacco and soybean cultivation, and it was difficult for large farms to thrive without the use of slave labor. As freed slaves migrated to urban areas around 1900 and found work in textile mills, textiles became the state's leading industry.

The state's total population in 2006 was just over 4.3 million; 67.4 percent were white, 28.5 percent were African American, and 3.3 percent were Hispanic or Latino. That same year, 19.3 percent of the labor force worked in trade, transportation, or public utilities; 17.5 percent were employed by the government; and another 13.7 percent held manufacturing jobs. Greenville was the most heavily populated city, with 417,166 residents.

About 75 percent of the millions of tourists who travel throughout South Carolina are out-of-state residents. Popular attractions include Myrtle Beach and Hilton Head Island resorts. Golf generates more income than any other single entertainment or recreational activity, but tourists also appreciate the forty-six state parks.

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South Carolina

SOUTH CAROLINA

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South Carolina

South Carolina

Dum spiro spero (While I breathe, I hope).

At a Glance

Name: South Carolina was named after King Charles I of England.

Nickname: Palmetto State

Capital: Columbia

Size: 31,117 sq. mi. (80,593 sq km)

Population: 4,012,012

Statehood: South Carolina became the eighth state on May 23, 1788.

Electoral votes: 8 (2004)

U.S. representatives: 6 (until 2003)

State tree: palmetto

State flower: yellow jessamine

State fish: striped bass

Highest point: Sassafras Mountain, 3,560 ft. (1,085 m)

The Place

South Carolina is the smallest of the states in the Deep South. The southeastern two-thirds of South Carolina is part of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, which stretches along the Atlantic coast from Maine to Florida. South Carolina residents call the low but sometimes hilly southeast the Low Country. This area has good soil, rivers, swamps, and some pine forests. There are also sand hills left behind from the time when eastern South Carolina was under the Atlantic Ocean.

Western South Carolina is known as the Upcountry, because it is a region of hills that gradually rise into mountains in the northwest corner. Most of South Carolina's major rivers cross through the middle of the state to the Atlantic Ocean and provide good sources of energy.

The Blue Ridge Mountains, part of the Appalachian Mountain system that extends from Maine to Alabama, cross South Carolina in its most northwestern region. The forested Blue Ridge Mountains of South Carolina are lower than the mountains of the same chain in North Carolina.

South Carolina has a warm, subtropical climate. South Carolina receives little snow, and the small amount it does receive usually falls in the mountains. Subtropical plants, such as palmettos and yuccas, grow along the coast. South Carolina has large deposits of clay, limestone, sand, talc, gravel, gold, granite, and topaz.

The Past

The first European settlement in the United States may have been founded in South Carolina. In 1526, Lucas Vasquez de Ayllon, from the colony of Santo Domingo on the island of Hispaniola, started a Spanish settlement named San Miguel de Gualdape on the coast of either present-day South Carolina or Georgia. The settlement lasted less than a year.

South Carolina: Facts and Firsts

  1. In 1861, the first battle of the Civil War took place at Fort Sumter.
  2. South Carolina's official state amphibian is the spotted salamander.
  3. At 411 feet (125 m), the Upper Whitewater Falls is the highest waterfall in the eastern United States.
  4. Sumter is home to the largest ginkgo farm in the world.
  5. The Duncan Park baseball stadium in Spartanburg is the oldest minor league stadium in the country.
  6. Myrtle Beach, one of the most popular resort destinations on the East Coast, is in the center of the Grand Strand, a 60-mile (96-km) stretch of South Carolina's best beaches.
  7. At the Riverbanks Zoological Park in Columbia, more than 2,000 animals live in re-created habitats without cages.

England claimed control of all of North America in the early 1600s. Under English control, present-day South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia comprised a territory named Carolana that was granted to English noble Sir Robert Heath. Heath did not settle Carolana; King Charles II of England sent the first permanent colonists there in 1669.

During the Revolutionary War, colonists won two battles in South Carolina that helped turn the tide of war against the British. Important American victories took place during the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1780 and at Cowpens in 1781.

After the Revolution, South Carolina strongly supported the right of each state to make its own laws and control its own affairs. This belief led South Carolina to be the first state to secede from the Union during the Civil War. The first shots of the war were fired at Fort Sumter in 1861.

Before the Civil War, South Carolina's economy depended on large plantations worked by slaves. After the South's defeat and the abolition of slavery, South Carolina's farms were hurt by competition from farms in the West. The state turned to industry, and built textile mills that ran on hydroelectric power from the area's many rivers.

South Carolina: State Smart

The Charleston Museum is the oldest museum in the United States. Built in 1773, the museum's many displays showcase the rich history of the city of Charleston.

As South Carolina continued to industrialize throughout the 20th century, large river dams were built to supply the necessary energy. In 1953, the Savannah River Plant, one of the first nuclear power plants, was built near Aiken.

The Present

The growth of its factories and manufacturing industries during the 20th century helped South Carolina to become an important industrial center. Today, South Carolina is one of the leading textile-producing states, with approximately 500 textile factories that produce goods such as acrylic, cotton, polyester, silk, and wool cloth. South Carolina industries also manufacture chemicals such as synthetic fibers, dyes, and pharmaceuticals; industrial machinery; and a variety of wood products from the state's extensive forests. While industrial expansion has brought jobs and economic growth to the state, it has also caused serious air and water pollution problems.

Many traditional agricultural activities, such as growing tobacco, raising broilers (young chickens), and growing crops like cotton, soybeans, and corn, continue today. Approximately one-fourth of South Carolina's land is used for farming, and the state ranks as one of the leading tobacco producers in the United States.

Born in South Carolina

  1. John C. Calhoun , statesman
  2. Althea Gibson , athlete
  3. Dizzy Gillespie , jazz musician and composer
  4. DuBose Heyward , poet, playwright, and novelist
  5. Jesse Jackson , civil rights leader
  6. Eartha Kitt , actress, singer, and dancer
  7. Francis "Swamp Fox" Marion , soldier
  8. Ronald McNair , astronaut
  9. John Rutledge , jurist
  10. Strom Thurmond , senator
  11. Charles Townes , physicist
  12. William Westmoreland , general
  13. Vanna White , television personality

South Carolina maintains strong ties to its history. Antebellum (pre–Civil War) homes and plantations near Charleston attract many tourists who want to experience historic South Carolinian life and farming. Myrtle Beach and Hilton Head are two of the most popular beach resort areas in the United States.

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South Carolina

SOUTH CAROLINA

From 1754 to 1829, South Carolina evolved from a politically divided colony to a state united in defense of slavery. During the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, South Carolina grew slowly, with black slaves outnumbering white inhabitants: in 1761 around fifty-seven thousand blacks lived in the colony, compared to thirty thousand whites. Slavery was strongest in the low country and Charleston, the state's only significant city; only 4 percent of slaves lived in the backcountry (defined in the eighteenth century as beginning fifty miles inland). During the 1770s, white farmers from Virginia and Pennsylvania began to move south and settle in the backcountry districts of South Carolina. By the 1770s the colony's total population was around 180,000. But low country planters, worried that new residents in the backcountry were not sufficiently concerned about protecting slavery, retained political control. It would take a radical shift in the distribution of slave ownership before low country leaders were willing to share power.

For their part, backcountry residents chafed at the political power of the low country elites. While numerous parishes (election districts for the Commons House of Assembly) served the small white population of the low country, only one—created in 1757—served the backcountry. Since the parishes provided, in addition to legislative representation, the services of local government, the result was a lack of order in the backcountry. One source of conflict was a general lawlessness that went unchecked given the lack of law enforcement personnel and courts. Another source of conflict was the Cherokees on the northwestern frontier. In October 1767, Regulator groups sprang up to provide order where the royal government did not; they demanded that courts, jails, and schools be provided. Although Regulators were an extralegal force, they were largely small planters and property owners, not vagrant thugs. Regulators remained strong until the low country power structure began to make concessions to the movement, deflating the Regulators' power. In 1768 two additional parishes were established in the backcountry, and courts and jails were established by the Circuit Court Act of 1769.

It was in this context that South Carolina entered the Revolutionary War, which had the feeling of a civil war in the backcountry. After the Declaration of Independence, an armed force had to be sent to subdue Loyalists there. Backcountry residents also battled the Cherokees in a war that concluded in 1777 with the latter ceding their land in the state. In 1780 the British laid siege to Charleston, which signaled the initiation of sustained southern hostilities in the war. The city fell on 12 May 1780, but the British were unable to capitalize on their success. British tactics in the countryside, exemplified by the ruthless Banastre Tarleton, added to the popular support for Patriot partisans led by men such as Francis Marion and Thomas Sumter. The British could not root out the partisans or destroy General Nathanael Greene's Continental Army, and so they withdrew from the state in December 1782. The intense fighting across the state left it in economic ruin.

South Carolina's Charles Pinckney was a leading critic of the Articles of Confederation, and when the Constitutional Convention met in 1787, he played a major role in designing the new document. Pinckney and his cousin and fellow delegate, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, helped insure that slavery was protected in the Constitution. Many of Charles Pinckney's proposals, such as counting slaves as three-fifths of a person for the purposes of apportioning representatives in the federal legislature, were adopted by the convention. Although some in the South Carolina backcountry opposed the new Constitution, South Carolina's ratification of the document was never in doubt, thanks to a power structure that still privileged the low country. The ratification convention overwhelmingly approved the document in May 1788.

With war and independence decided, South Carolinians focused again on political conflict between backcountry and low country. A redistribution of the slave population helped bring about political changes in South Carolina. Slaves were rapidly being brought to the area north of the fall line as backcountry farmers began adapting to cotton production; whereas only 14,415 slaves lived in this area in 1790, 43,578 did in 1810. The integration of the backcountry into the plantation economy and the rapid growth of slavery in the area finally made low country elites comfortable with extending political power to the remainder of the state. In 1785 county courts were created to help establish legal structure in the backcountry. The following year, the General Assembly moved the state's capital from Charleston to the middle of the state in the new city of Columbia. The compromise of 1808, a constitutional amendment, apportioned the state's house of representatives on the basis of population and wealth, finally bringing more equitable representation to the backcountry. The state's population reached 249,073 in 1790, 345,591 in 1800, 415,115 in 1810, 502,741 in 1820, and 581,185 in 1830.

This period also saw the Denmark Vesey plot, which garnered a swift response from the state. In May 1822, a slave exposed the plot to his master: a free black, Denmark Vesey, supposedly intended to lead an army of thousands of slaves against the whites of Charleston. The city council responded with a series of trials that resulted in the hanging or expulsion of dozens of slaves. The state also passed an act that December making it illegal for free black seamen to associate with slaves, and the African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston was demolished.

Events in 1828 brought South Carolina to the center of the national stage: native sons Andrew Jackson and John C. Calhoun were elevated to the presidency and vice presidency, respectively, and Congress passed the "Tariff of Abominations," which sparked the state's nullification movement. Although South Carolina's attempt to nullify federal law ultimately failed, it laid the groundwork for South Carolina's eventual departure from the Union in 1860.

See alsoCharleston; Constitution, Ratification of; Regulators; Revolution as Civil War: Patriot-Loyalist Conflict;Slavery: Slave Insurrections; Tariff Politics; Vesey Rebellion .

bibliography

Edgar, Walter. Partisans and Redcoats: The Southern Conflict That Turned the Tide of the American Revolution. New York: Morrow, 2001.

Egerton, Douglas R. He Shall Go Out Free: The Lives of Denmark Vesey. Madison, Wis.: Madison House, 1999.

Freehling, William W. Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, 1816–1836. New York: Harper and Row, 1966.

Klein, Rachel N. Unification of a Slave State: The Rise of the Planter Class in the South Carolina Backcountry, 1760–1808. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990.

Paquette, Robert L., and Douglas R. Egerton. "Of Facts and Fables: New Light on the Denmark Vesey Affair." South Carolina Historical Magazine 105 (2004): 8–48.

Aaron W. Marrs

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South Carolina

South Carolina

AIKEN TECHNICAL COLLEGE G-6
ALLEN UNIVERSITY E-8
ANDERSON COLLEGE D-3
BENEDICT COLLEGE E-8
CENTRAL CAROLINA TECHNICAL COLLEGE F-10
CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY J-11
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ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE B-4
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SOUTH UNIVERSITY E-8
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SOUTHERN WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY C-2
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TECHNICAL COLLEGE OF THE LOWCOUNTRY K-9
TRI-COUNTY TECHNICAL COLLEGE C-2
TRIDENT TECHNICAL COLLEGE J-11
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA E-8
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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA BEAUFORT K-9
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA LANCASTER C-8
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SALKEHATCHIE I-7
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SUMTER F-10
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UNION C-6
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UPSTATE B-5
VOORHEES COLLEGE H-7
WILLIAMSBURG TECHNICAL COLLEGE G-11
WINTHROP UNIVERSITY B-8
WOFFORD COLLEGE B-5
YORK TECHNICAL COLLEGE B-8

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South Carolina

South Carolina

AIKEN TECHNICAL COLLEGE
ALLEN UNIVERSITY
ANDERSON COLLEGE
BENEDICT COLLEGE
CENTRAL CAROLINA TECHNICAL COLLEGE
CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY
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NEWBERRY COLLEGE
NORTH GREENVILLE COLLEGE
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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA LANCASTER
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SALKEHATCHIE
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SUMTER
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UNION
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UPSTATE
VOORHEES COLLEGE
WILLIAMSBURG TECHNICAL COLLEGE
WINTHROP UNIVERSITY
WOFFORD COLLEGE
YORK TECHNICAL COLLEGE

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South Carolina

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South Carolina

South Carolina

Beckhamville
Beech Island
Bee's Plantation
Belleville Plantation (Midway Plantation)
Biggin Bridge and Church
Black Mingo Creek
Blackstock Battlefield
Blue Savannah
Brierly's Ferry (or Ford)
Buford's Defeat (Waxhaws)
Camden
Cedar Spring
Charleston
Cheraw
Combahee Ferry and Tar Bluff (Chehaw Point)
Cowpens
Dean Swamp
Drayton Hall
Eutaw Springs Battlefield
Fairforest Creek ("the Forest")
Fish Dam Ford
Fishing Creek (Catawba Ford)
Fort Charlotte
Fort Dorchester
Fort Galphin (Dreadnought)
Fort Granby (the Congarees)
Fort Johnson
Fort Motte
Fort Watson
Francis Marion and Sumter National Forest
Georgetown
Givhan's Ferry State Park
Goose Creek (St. James) Church
Great Cane Brake
Halfway Swamp
Hammond's Store
Hampton Plantation State Historic Site
Hanging Rock
Hayne Grave and Homesite
High Hills of Santee
Hopewell (Pickens Home)
Hopsewee Plantation
Horse Shoe
Hunt's Bluff
Jacksonboro
Jackson (Andrew) State Historical Park
Juniper Spring
Kings Mountain
Kingstree
Lafayette-Kalb Landing Site
Leneud's Ferry
Lower Bridge
Manigault's Ferry
Marion Tomb
Mathew's Bluff
Mepkin Plantation
Middleton Place Gardens
Mobley's (or Gibson's) Meeting House
Moncks Corner
Mount Hope Swamp
Mulberry Plantation
Murray's Ferry
Musgrove's Mill State Historic Site
Nelson's Ferry
Ninety Six
Oconee Station State Historic Site
Orangeburg
Parker's Ferry Battleground
Pegues Place
Pendleton District
Pickens Grave
Pon Pon
Pon Pon Chapel
Port Royal Island
Prince's Fort (Blackstock Road)
Purrysburg Site
Quinby Bridge and Shubrick's Plantation
Ratcliff's Bridge
Ring Fight and Andrew Pickens Homesites
Rocky Mount
Round O
Rugeley's Mill (Clermont)
St. James Santee Church
Sampit Bridge
Seneca Old Town Site
Sheldon Church
Singleton's Mill
Snows Island
Stateburg
Stono Ferry
Strawberry Ferry
Sullivan's Island
Tearcoat (Tarcote) Swamp Skirmish
Thicketty Fort (Fort Anderson)
Wadboo Bridge and Plantation
Wallace
Walnut Grove Plantation (Moore House)
Wambaw Bridge
Washington's Grave
Wateree Ferry and Fort Carey
Waxhaw Presbyterian Church
Wiboo Swamp
Williamson's Plantation (Huck's Defeat)
Winnsboro
Witherspoon's Ferry
Wofford's Iron Works

South Carolina's experience of the Revolution was particularly bitter and complex. In 1976 the South Carolina Department of Archives and History published a list of 180 military engagements that took place over a seven-year period (November 1775 to November 1782) in the state, though the majority of these were minor skirmishes. Of that number, the exact location of nine engagements cannot be determined, and sixteen engagements occurred without any overt hostilities.

So many military actions took place in South Carolina not only because it was a principal theater of British operations in 1780 but also because it was the scene of exceptionally virulent civil war between Whigs and Loyalists, as well as the country of the guerrilla leaders Andrew Pickens, Thomas ("Gamecock") Sumter, and Francis ("Swamp Fox") Marion. This "irregular warfare" and its colorful leaders generated an inordinate number of historic sites. In addition, South Carolina was the scene of some of the Revolution's biggest battles.

The interest in the American Revolution in South Carolina is exceeded only by the obsession with the Civil War, though it can take a number of peculiar local forms, such as commemorating "the 225th Anniversary of the American Revolution" in 2005 rather than 2000. A great number of significant books explore many aspects of the Revolution in South Carolina. Especially helpful guides are John W. Gorden's South Carolina and the American Revolution: A Battlefield History (University of South Carolina Press, 2003) and Daniel W. Barefoot's Touring South Carolina's Revolutionary War Sites (Blair Publishing, 1999).

South Carolina unfortunately has no published guide to highway historical markers, although the state-sponsored Historical Marker Program offers some information on individual markers. Another good source of the state's Revolutionary War history is through the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism. Its official website is www.discoversouthcarolina.com. Phone: (803) 734-1700. The state's Department of Archives and History is also helpful. It is located at 8301 Parklane Road, Columbia, S.C. 29223. Phone: (803) 896-6100.

Beaufort

Beaufort and vicinity. Seeport royal island.

Beckhamville

Beckhamville (Beckham's Old Field), northwest corner of Great Falls, Chester County. The "Battle of Beckhamville" may have historical significance as the first Patriot victory after the fall of Charleston in May 1780. It was a surprise attack by Captain John McClure and thirty-two other Patriots on a much larger force of Loyalists assembled to support British efforts to administer oaths of loyalty at Beckham's Old Field. Without the loss of a man and with a minimum of shooting, the Patriots routed the entire force of about two hundred Loyalists.

On the edge of an open field northeast of the junction of S.C. 97 and 99 is the granite marker to the event. The date is erroneously given as "May 1780." The exact day of the action probably will never be determined, though it is known that it came after Buford's Defeat (29 May) and is variously given as falling between 2 and 6 June. A similar action took place at Mobley's Meeting House.

Beech Island

Beech Island, Savannah River just south of Augusta, Georgia. When the Patriots undertook their final siege of Augusta, Georgia, Colonel Elijah Clark sent the horses to Beech Island with a six-man guard. Learning of this, Colonel Thomas Brown ordered out a body of regulars, militia, and Indians that killed the guards, took the horses, and headed back to Augusta. Over Mountain Men under Colonel Isaac Shelby and Georgia militia under Major Patrick Carr routed Brown's force as it returned, the action taking place probably on the Georgia side of the river. The date was about a week before the Patriot victory at Fort Galphin, approximately 15 May 1781. The present town of Beech Island, Aiken County, South Carolina, is just east of the old horseshoe bend of the Savannah in which Beech Island lay. The explanation available as to the derivation of Beech Island's name, since it is not an island, comes from the Beech Island Historical Society. It informs that the area's plentiful beech trees provided the impetus. The Society is a good source of local information and is located at 144 Old Jackson Highway, Beech Island, S.C. 29842. Phone: (803) 827-0184. (The topographic feature now called Beech Island is listed in Georgia.)

Bee's Plantation

Bee's Plantation, Edisto River just below Jacksonboro, Colleton and Charleston counties. In a skirmish here on 23 March 1780 Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton killed ten Patriot militia, captured four, and picked up a few desperately needed horses for his troopers. The plantation of 1,500 acres, no vestiges of which have survived, was owned by Lieutenant Governor Thomas Bee. Some authorities give the site of this skirmish the name "Pon Pon," which is what the Indians called the Edisto River.

Belleville Plantation (Midway Plantation)

Belleville Plantation (Midway Plantation) and associated sites, Santee River, just east of U.S. 601 bridge in Calhoun County. Colonel William Thomson's Belleville Plantation here was occupied by the British in 1780 and became a fortified post and supply depot. General Thomas Sumter surprised the defenders in February 1781 but had to withdraw when British troops approached from Camden (see fort watson). Belleville changed hands several times but presumably was permanently liberated by the Patriots when they took nearby Fort Motte in May 1781.

It is a National Historic Site but apparently not highly treasured by state authorities. The notice in Colonials and Patriots (1964) says: "Among the historic remains at and near the plantation are earthwork fortifications overlooking the Santee; the Thomson Cemetery, said to contain the remains of troops who died in the area; a camp and hospital site; McCord's Ferry, a strategic crossing of the Camden Road over the river; and Gillon's Retreat, plantation of Alexander Gillon, a commodore of the South Carolina Navy during the War for Independence."

The spot on Thomson's Plantation where Sumter's action of 22 February 1781 took place is on the east side of S.C. 151 just north of its junction with S.C. 80.

Biggin Bridge and Church

Biggin Bridge and Church, Cooper River, opposite Moncks Corner. The church whose brick ruins and ancient cemetery stand today alongside S.C. 44 less than a mile south of U.S. 17A and 52 was founded in 1706. The first structure was built in 1712 and replaced in 1756; its vestrymen later included William Moultrie and Henry Laurens (see mepkin plantation). The church was burned in a forest fire during the first year of the Revolution, rebuilt, and its interior burned by the British in the summer of 1781 after they had made it into a military stronghold (see quinby bridge and quinby plantation). A little more than a year earlier the Patriots under General Isaac Huger had been deployed around Biggin Bridge and were defeated in the action remembered by the name of Moncks Corner. The reconstructed church was again destroyed by a forest fire in 1886, but its ruined brick walls survive as a monument to this embattled site in a neighborhood of Revolutionary War skirmishes.

Black Mingo Creek

Black Mingo Creek, Georgetown-Williamsburg counties, about 20 miles north-northwest of Georgetown near Rhems (junction of S.C. 41 and 51). One of Marion's hottest fights took place in this area, which has a number of other important historical associations. Beautiful Black Mingo winds through coastal swamps to join Black River, and Willtown was settled on its bank near modern Rhems in 1750. Although the town has disappeared, in 1800 it was the largest in the region. The British set up an outpost of about fifty men under Loyalist Colonel John Coming Ball at Shepherd's Ferry, about where S.C. 41-51 now crosses the Black Mingo and somewhat less than a mile downstream from Willtown. In September 1780 Marion attempted to surprise Ball in a night attack.

Loyalist sentinels heard the Patriot horsemen crossing the bridge at Willtown around midnight, and Ball formed his men quietly in the open. The Patriots suffered heavy casualties when their center column was hit by surprise fire at short range, but they rallied to rout the Loyalists in a brisk skirmish that lasted only fifteen minutes. Only fifty men were engaged on each side, but Marion had ten men killed or wounded and the Loyalist losses were almost twice as heavy. One prize was Colonel Ball's fine mount, which Marion renamed Ball and rode for the rest of the war.

Sparsely inhabited today but sprinkled with signs of real-estate developers, this region was the home of many of Marion's partisans, and they were at their best in this skirmish known by the name of Black Mingo Creek. Willtown prospered for several decades after the Revolution, and Aaron Burr stayed in its tavern when traveling to visit his beloved daughter Theodosia near Georgetown.

The town site can be found in a region of cut-over pine by following an unimproved road about a mile from the historical marker ("Skirmish at Black Mingo Creek") on S.C. 41-51, 1.6 miles northeast of Rhems. A shorter route is over this same unimproved road from its intersection with County Road 24 about 1.6 miles north of Rhems. Either way you will come to Black Mingo Baptist Church. A woods road just north of the large frame church and its chain-link-fenced cemetery leads eastward a short distance to several old graves on the edge of a large pond. These are said to be "British" graves.

About half a mile north of the church is the overgrown site of Willtown. Black Mingo Creek will be seen here, but unless the weather has been dry this is no place to try to drive an ordinary passenger car. The picturesque creek can also be viewed from the highway bridge of S.C. 41-51 and from several spots to the east in this vicinity. One such place is Tara Hall, a boys' home on the creek 0.7 miles from the highway, the entrance being marked by a sign about 0.7 miles north of Rhems.

Another way to explore Black Mingo Creek is through the services of a local outfitter, one of which is Blackwater Adventures, which provides guided canoe and kayak trips up and down the creek. Phone: (843) 761-1850.

Blackstock Battlefield

Blackstock Battlefield, Tyger River, western edge of Union County. A small granite marker on a prominent hill is the monument to one of General Thomas Sumter's most important battles, a National Historic Site.

Reinforced by Georgia troops under Elijah Clark and John Twiggs, Sumter was threatening Loyalist posts just north of Ninety Six. Cornwallis ordered Tarleton to break off his operations against Marion along the lower Pee Dee and disperse this Rebel partisan force under Sumter. Warned by a British deserter, Sumter started a hasty retreat north to avoid being caught between Tarleton and the strong Loyalist force at Ninety Six. Tarleton pursued with his entire force until he realized that Sumter was gaining, so Tarleton pushed ahead with his mounted troops and ordered his infantry and artillery to follow. The Patriots had reached the Tyger River as the light was failing on 20 November 1780, and the Carolina Gamecock decided to take advantage of a good defensive position around Blackstock Plantation to make a stand.

The Patriot force of about 1,000 was deployed when Tarleton made contact with his advance element of 190 dragoons of his legion and 80 mounted infantry of the Sixty-third Regiment. Sumter had learned that the rest of the enemy force was still to the rear, so he undertook an attack to destroy Tarleton's advance piecemeal. With a numerical superiority of almost four to one, Sumter had reason to expect success from the bold but completely orthodox tactical decision. The plan was for the Patriot center to hold its defensive positions on high ground around five log houses and along a rail fence. Clark was to lead 100 Georgians in an encirclement of the British right flank and block the advance of Tarleton's reinforcements. Sumter himself led the main effort, an attack by 400 Patriot militia against the 80 regulars of the Sixty-third Regiment, who had dismounted to take up a position on Tarleton's right overlooking a creek.

The 400 were routed by the 80 British soldiers and driven back through the plantation houses of the American center. Sumter ordered a detachment of mounted infantry under Colonel Lacey to attack the dragoons on the British left. Lacey got close enough to deliver a surprise fire that inflicted 20 casualties among Tarleton's troopers (who had been distracted by the remarkable performance of the British infantry), but he was then driven back. Sumter was returning to the center of his line when he was badly wounded and forced to relinquish command to Twiggs. Colonel Wade Hampton's South Carolina riflemen and the Georgia sharpshooters stood fast, stopping the 80 British regulars and forming a strong point around which the rest of Sumter's troops rallied. Tarleton had to lead a desperate charge of cavalry into the center to break contact and withdraw his infantry.

The statistics tell a curious story. Of 1,000 engaged, the Patriots lost 3 killed and 5 wounded, whereas Tarleton lost about 50 killed and wounded out of 270 engaged.

A dirt road named Monument Road that goes on to follow the track of the original Blackstock Road leads for about 1.5 miles to the hill where the battlefield marker is located. Vandals repeatedly removed the bronze plaques originally set there by the local DAR, so now an unadorned engraved concrete monument commemorates the spot. The Palmetto Conservation Foundation has recently acquired and given to the state 110 acres of the Blackstock Battlefield area. The state is in the process (2005) of developing this into a historic site, complete with hiking trails and interpretive panels outlining the history of the area.

The village of Blackstock, about 40 miles east of the battlefield and near the southern boundary of Chester County, was settled after the Revolution.

Blue Savannah

Blue Savannah, Little Pee Dee River, near U.S. 501 south of Ariel Cross Roads in Marion County, or south of Galivants Ferry Bridge. Francis Marion moved 60 miles east to Port's Ferry after his triumph at Nelson's Ferry. Having escaped pursuit from that direction, he learned that Major Micajah Ganey was moving down the Little Pee Dee with a large Loyalist force. Marion advanced with his small band, only fifty-two mounted partisans, to cope with this new threat. In a clash between advance guards, Major John James routed forty-five men under Ganey's personal command. When Marion saw the remaining two hundred Loyalists forming he withdrew to Blue Savannah, he circled back to set up an ambuscade, and surprised his pursuers with a sudden attack. The Loyalists under Captain Jesse Barfield delivered one volley (three Patriots wounded) before scattering. Important as this action of 4 September 1780 is—it broke Loyalist morale east of the Pee Dee and doubled Marion's strength by bringing him sixty volunteers—the location has never been fixed. That it took place on a swampy island just south of Galivants Ferry appears to be certain, but the authoritative WPA Guide of 1941 refers to the site as being unmarked, as being east of the river, and as taking place on 16 August. One of Marion's more recent biographers, Robert D. Bass, places the action just west of the river and south of Ariel (intersection of U.S. 501 and S.C. 41). State historical authorities favor the latter location.

Brierly's Ferry (or Ford)

Brierly's Ferry (or Ford), Broad River. This critical point on the British line of communications between Ninety Six and Camden, frequently mentioned in accounts of operations in 1780 to 1781, is about where S.C. 213 crosses the Broad between Parr Shoals Dam and Peak. The exact site has not yet been fixed. Here Tarleton on 18 November 1780 drew fire from 150 mounted militia as he tracked Sumter to Blackstock. About this time the Seventy-first Highlanders under Major McArthur from Cheraw and eighty survivors of Major Wemyss's engagement at Fish Dam Ford established a post on orders from Cornwallis, who was worried about the security of Ninety Six. From Brierly's Ferry, McArthur and his Highlanders marched with Tarleton in pursuit of Dan Morgan to Cowpens.

Buford's Defeat (Waxhaws)

Buford's Defeat (Waxhaws), 9 miles east of Lancaster, 0.15 miles south on S.C. 522 from S.C. 9, Lancaster County. Known also as the Battle of the Waxhaws and Buford's Massacre, 29 May 1780, this Patriot defeat ended organized military resistance in South Carolina for many long months. When Charleston surrendered on 12 May 1780 the only American military force left in the field was the Third Virginia Continental Regiment commanded by Colonel Abraham Buford. They had been joined by a few cavalry troops who had survived the skirmishes at Moncks Corner and Leneud's Ferry. Buford was ordered to retreat to Hillsborough, North Carolina, and he had a ten-day lead when Cornwallis started up the Santee in pursuit. Seeing that Buford would get away, and being particularly anxious to capture the rebel governor, John Rutledge, who was being escorted by Buford, Cornwallis ordered Colonel Banastre Tarleton to take over the pursuit.

The stocky little redhead had already impressed his British superiors with his exceptional abilities as a commander of mobile troops. Since the end of 1778 he had commanded the British Legion, Loyalists who qualified before the end of the Revolution for official acceptance as regulars. For this mission the 130 cavalry and 100 infantry of Tarleton's legion were reinforced by forty British dragoons, and on 27 May they left Nelson's Ferry. In the next fifty-four hours Tarleton covered 105 miles to pick up the tail of the Patriot column. Governor Rutledge had left Buford's column at Rugeley's Mill, and the 350 Virginia Continentals were double-timing to escape when Tarleton sent Buford a "flag" demanding surrender.

It was early afternoon, and for several days the weather had been oppressively hot. Many of Tarleton's horses had died of exhaustion and the British column was badly strung out. But the British advance guard badly chopped up Buford's rear guard after the Continental commander defied the surrender summons, and at around 3 p.m. the Americans turned to fight.

When it was all over a very short time later, the American casualties were 113 killed and 203 captured. Of the 200 British and Loyalists on hand, Tarleton reported 19 killed or wounded. Patriot propagandists cried "massacre" because Tarleton's troops killed several Patriots who had surrendered (inspiring the phrase "Tarleton's quarter"—that is, no quarter), but the brilliance of Tarleton's accomplishment and the tactical errors of Buford's command remain apparent.

Most of the battlefield remains in open land just south of a main highway and intersected by a secondary road. In a grove of hardwood trees on a low knoll alongside the latter road (S.C. 522) is the common grave of Buford's dead, encircled by a 2-foot wall of white rocks. A weathered obelisk about 7 feet tall serves as the common headstone, and its almost illegible inscription is copied on a newer monument of 1955. With the long view of a blue ridge line to the west and good observation south and east, it is easy to visualize the battle from a sketch map. Unfortunately, contemporary Patriots of the region have not seen fit to develop the site by providing interpretive exhibits on the well-preserved battlefield. However, the Andrew Jackson State Park sponsored a complete weekend of festivities on the battlegrounds in 2005 to commemorate the 225th anniversary of the battle.

Authorities have long confused this site with that of the Waxhaw Presbyterian Church, probably because the church is where the wounded from the battle were brought for care.

Camden

Camden and vicinity, Kershaw County. On U.S. 1 and just off I-20, modern Camden retains its antique charm and historic interest. Fortunately, the site of the original settlement has been preserved because newer construction after the Revolution was to the north. Hobkirk Hill, a major battlefield, is completely taken over by a residential area, and the Logtown of the Revolution is the business district, but the 1780 to 1781 town site is being explored, and a main portion of it restored. About 5 miles north of Camden in country that has changed little since the Revolution is the battlefield where Lord Cornwallis inflicted a decisive and demoralizing defeat on a large American army under General Horatio Gates.

To outline quickly the history of this region, it was one of several picked by colonial authorities for settlement in the early 1730s. Until then only the coastal areas had been developed, and King George II ordered the creation of nine townships on major rivers well back in the interior. Camden quickly evolved from Fredericksburg Township, whereas most of the others died out, and it claims to be the oldest inland town of South Carolina.

Because Camden was a natural communications hub at the head of navigation on the Wateree River and near the intersection of important Indian trails, it prospered and became a strategic location during the Revolution.

When Lord Cornwallis assumed command of all British forces in the South after the capture of Charleston in May 1780, he ignored his instructions to pursue a passive defense of the conquered territory. Instead, he sent young Lord Rawdon to establish a forward base at Camden with strong outposts at Cheraw, Hanging Rock, and Rocky Mount. Congress selected General Horatio Gates, the victor of Saratoga, as the man to liberate the Carolinas, and on the moonless night of 15 to 16 August, two armies were advancing, each intending to attack the other the next morning. Around 2:30 a.m. they collided a few miles north of Camden.

Cornwallis had the disadvantage of being less than a mile north of Saunders Creek, with insufficient depth of position to deploy his reserves properly and no opportunity for maneuver initially. Gates had slightly higher ground on which to form for battle, but no natural protection for his flanks. On the other hand, he had about twice as many troops as Cornwallis, even though 80 percent of these were unseasoned militia.

But Gates had brought his army to the battlefield in a weakened and dispirited condition. Unfortunately, his militia were on the east flank where, as it turned out, Cornwallis had put his regulars and one of the war's most remarkable troop leaders, Lieutenant Colonel James Webster. At the age of thirty-two Webster had succeeded Cornwallis as commander of the Thirty-third Foot ("West Riding"), a regiment that was to figure prominently in the American Revolution. Webster came to America in early 1776 as part of Cornwallis's force and led his regiment with great distinction. He was cited by General Clinton for his performance at Monmouth, New Jersey in June 1778, given the temporary rank of brigadier less than a year later, and entrusted with command of a vital British post in the Hudson Highlands (Verplanck's, opposite Stony Point); and in December 1779 he sailed south with the forces that overran the Carolinas. Seven months after the Battle of Camden, having meanwhile been conspicuous in the operations against General Nathanael Greene in North Carolina and defying death on many battlefields, he was mortally wounded in the final stages of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina.

This was the man who commanded on the British right at Camden, and the foregoing summary of his career may make it somewhat easier to understand why the American militia opposite him did not distinguish itself for martial valor on this day.

Gates seems to have had no plan other than to deploy as best he could and let Cornwallis take the initiative. Webster formed his line as the artillery exchanged volleys with little effect other than to shroud the battlefield with dust and smoke. Colonel Otho Williams, a brilliant officer of the Maryland Line who was serving as principal staff officer to Gates on this occasion, prevailed on the Virginia militia to advance and hit the British before they could complete their deployment. He then led about fifty volunteers forward to disrupt the enemy.

Deploying with drill-field precision from march column into line of battle and then advancing with volley fire and the traditional cheering, Brigadier Webster's wing inspired such terror that the Virginia militia fled panic-stricken to the rear. Few tarried long enough to fire a shot, most threw their loaded weapons to the ground, and only three are known to have been wounded. Their flight inspired the North Carolina militia in the center to follow suit, leaving the Second Maryland Brigade unsupported on the American right flank.

Webster wheeled left to roll up the American flank rather than pursuing the militia. Cornwallis then turned Webster's efforts toward the American reserves, which is why the First Maryland Brigade was unable to fight its way forward to support the Second Brigade.

General Johann Kalb commanded the Continentals on the right, and the Marylanders stood fast initially against the wing led by Lord Rawdon. Despite several wounds and the loss of his horse, the huge Bavarian, fifty-eight years old and a professional officer since 1743, refused to retreat without orders from Gates. As the British closed in with overwhelming numbers the heroic Kalb went down bleeding from eleven wounds.

The miserable Horatio Gates had long since quit the battlefield. Swept back to Rugeley's Mill with the militia, he covered 60 miles on the day of the battle to reach Charlotte. (Camden being famous horse country even today, it must be mentioned that Gates was mounted on no ordinary steed for this ride.) Two days later, using relays of horses, Gates had covered another 120 miles to Hillsborough, North Carolina, where he planned to reorganize his shattered army. Only seven hundred of his original four thousand troops rejoined him. There is almost hopeless disagreement among authorities as to numbers engaged in the Battle of Camden and losses sustained on the Patriot side. According to some computations the Americans did not have as many as two hundred men killed in this tremendous defeat. Gates himself did not know how many men he had on the battlefield after sending large detachments off earlier on secondary missions, but only about one thousand Patriot troops did any real fighting in the Battle of Camden. And this action lasted only about an hour. Cornwallis's claim of one thousand Americans killed seems absurdly high, but it is credited by respectable authorities. About one thousand were captured, including almost all the wounded. The British lost 324 officers and men killed and wounded out of about two thousand engaged.

General Kalb died in Camden three days after the battle, and his grave was moved to its present location in front of the Bethesda Presbyterian Church at 502 DeKalb Street. The cornerstone for his monument, designed by Robert Mills, was laid by Lafayette in 1825.

Johann Kalb was the son of Bavarian peasants. He left home at the age of sixteen (in 1737) and six years later entered the pages of history as Lieutenant Jean de Kalb of the French army. After reaching the rank of major and further distinguishing himself as a soldier, he married a wealthy woman and retired from the army in 1765 to live near Paris. Three years later he traveled in America as a secret agent with the mission of reporting to the minister of foreign affairs on the colonists' attitude toward their mother country. In 1775 Kalb returned to the army; he was commissioned a brigadier general the next year, but meanwhile had decided to seek his military fortune in America. With a contract from Silas Deane he came to America with Lafayette in the summer of 1777 (see georgetown), but it was two years before Congress gave him an assignment commensurate with his rank of major general in the Continental army.

In April 1780 he was ordered to lead the Maryland and Delaware Continentals south to the relief of Charleston, but on 25 July he was superseded by Gates. General Kalb remained as a subordinate to Gates and tried vainly to prevent him from making the blunders that led to disaster at Camden. As we have seen, he died a hero's death here.

The Camden Battlefield is 5 miles north of the town of Camden on a county road just west of U.S. 521 and 601. The site has changed little from the time of the battle, consisting of open fields and pine woods bordered by small streams. The DAR put up a marker approximately where Kalb fell. In 2000 a group of local residents set up a nonprofit group to protect the site, which remains privately owned, from development.

The British fortified the town of Camden after the battle of 16 August 1780. An outer perimeter of six redoubts incorporated the stockaded house and outbuildings of Camden's founder, Joseph Kershaw. The latter had arrived from Charleston in 1758 and built a store. His large new home was still unfinished when the British occupied Camden but became their headquarters and has been known since as the Cornwallis House. Other structures incorporated into the fortifications were the civil jail and the Patriot powder magazine.

Lord Rawdon had been the British commander at Camden when the base was first established. He was twenty-six years old when he led the left wing of Cornwallis's army in the defeat of Gates, and only a year older when entrusted with command of eight thousand troops for the control of South Carolina and Georgia while Cornwallis undertook to win the American Revolution in North Carolina. After Cornwallis's subsequent departure for Virginia, Rawdon was supreme commander of British field forces in the South. (This point is disputed, particularly in connection with the Isaac Hayne Affair—see hayne grave and homesite. But major military operations of the British after Cornwallis left South Carolina were directed by Rawdon.)

Of a noble Irish family (he succeeded his father as earl of Moira in 1793, having added his mother's surname of Hastings to his own when his mother succeeded to the barony of Hastings in 1789), Francis Rawdon had distinguished himself in his baptism of fire at Bunker Hill. Tall and athletic, with a fine military bearing, he also was known as the "ugliest man in England." This distinction is not supported by his portraits, but he proved to be an ugly opponent to Nathanael Greene in the Battle of Hobkirk Hill on 25 April 1781.

When Greene undertook the reconquest of South Carolina he advanced on Camden from the northeast in hopes of surprising its defenders. But Rawdon kept himself well informed of Greene's movements and of his logistic problems. Marion the "Swamp Fox" and Sumter the Carolina "Gamecock" had been his greatest problems before the American regulars entered the arena, and as Greene approached Camden about half of Rawdon's fighting forces were detached under Lieutenant Colonel John Watson to wipe out Marion's partisans in the Pee Dee swamps. Meanwhile, Greene had detached the legion of "Light Horse Harry" Lee to support Marion. The Gamecock had his own ideas of how the war should be prosecuted, and refused to cooperate with Greene, but the latter did not know this and was expecting Sumter to join the team around Camden.

While the sideshow between Watson and the Lee-Marion combination progressed (see fort watson), Greene reached the outskirts of Camden. He had failed to achieve surprise, and although Rawdon's garrison had been reduced to only nine hundred men, Greene was not strong enough to take the fortified British position by assault. Greene therefore went into camp on Hobkirk Hill to await suppplies and reinforcements.

Although he could scrape together only eight hundred combatants, including convalescents, Rawdon decided to attack Greene's army of almost twice that number. His audacity paid off, largely because he was able to catch the Americans off guard and because they made a number of tactical mistakes. Captain Robert Kirkwood's Delaware Company effectively delayed the British advance once it was detected, but the crack First Maryland Regiment for some unaccountable reason collapsed, followed by the Fifth Maryland and the Fourth Virginia. Only the Fifth Virginia stood firm; otherwise Greene's entire force might have been destroyed. The Patriots fell back in good order to Rugeley's Mill.

Highway markers on U.S. 521 and 601 (Broad Street) point to the locations of Greene's headquarters and the American line (just north of Greene Street) in the handsome residential area that now covers Hobkirk Hill. (Signs tell you to keep your horse off the sidewalks.) Markers are also visible on I-20 heading west from Florence and heading east out of Columbia toward Camden. Lots on Hobkirk Hill started being sold in 1817 for summer cottages, and some of these original structures are incorporated in the mansions built after 1840 in Camden's golden era. Nearly all the houses of historic interest have numbered markers keyed in with a guidebook available at various places in Camden. The battlefield in the center of the residential Hobkirk Hill, now named Kirkwood Commons, has been preserved, and there are several commemorative monuments to both Patriot and Loyalist soldiers.

Restoration of Historic Camden, the fortified village of the Revolution, is an all-too-rare example of what can be accomplished by an intelligent group of local citizens who, in this case, formed the aptly named Historic Camden Foundation.

The Foundation owns and operates Historic Camden, a 107-acre outdoor museum complex with nature trails, a gift shop, picnic areas, and its most spectacular presentation—a number of historic houses that were reproduced or moved into the park from the surrounding area. They include: Bradley House (c.1800), moved from 9 miles east of Camden to the park in the late 1970s; Craven House (c.1789), moved in 1979 from Mill Street; Cunningham House (1840), which serves as the executive offices and gift shop, moved from Market and Dekalb Streets; Drakeford House (c.1812), moved from the farthest location of them all—about 12 miles in the early 1970s; and the Kershaw-Cornwallis House, which is a reproduction of the original home owned by Camden founder Joseph Kersaw. Historic Camden is open to the public every day but Monday. Website: www.camden-sc.org; phone: (803) 432-9841.

Although modern building construction continues to obliterate some of the Revolutionary War fortifications, developers of Historic Camden are striving to acquire additional acreage that includes much of the eighteenth-century town site that has not yet been destroyed.

The visitor to modern Camden will find his way well marked to the area's many historic attractions. Literature is available at the clearly identified information center on the north side of U.S. 1 in the quiet business district. Historic Camden is just off U.S. 521 (Broad Street), on the south edge of town, and the way is marked. The route north to Hobkirk Hill, the Camden Battlefield, and Rugeley's Mill (U.S. 521 and 601 for about 6 miles, then left on County Road 58) is marked by the "Washington Coach" silhouette signs posted by the state.

Cedar Spring

Cedar Spring, junction of S.C. 56 and 295 on southeast edge of Spartanburg. Alongside the highway, at the foot of the hill on which the South Carolina Deaf and Blind School is located, is a pipe spewing forth the waters of old Cedar Spring. Only about 2 miles from Wofford's Iron Works, this spring gave its name to two little battles of the Revolution. In July 1780 Mrs. Jane Thomas left her home near here to visit her husband at Ninety Six, where the militia colonel was imprisoned for parole violation. Overhearing two Loyalist women mention a proposed raid to surprise the Rebel camp at Cedar Spring, Jane raced back to warn her son, who commanded the sixty Patriots. She arrived in the evening after a nonstop ride of 60 miles. The Patriots left their fires burning and withdrew to set up an ambuscade that routed the 150-man raiding party. On 8 August, three weeks later, there was a drawn battle in this vicinity known variously as the Second Battle of Cedar Springs, the Peach Orchard Fight, and the Old Iron Works Engagement. It was a running battle, with most of the action taking place about halfway between the spring and the iron works. Although indecisive, it was followed by gradually increasing Whig supremacy in the region.

Charleston

Charleston. In 1670 a permanent English settlement was established at Albemarle Point on the west bank of the Ashley River about 3.5 miles from where that river joins the Cooper to form Oyster Point. The site remained in private ownership for three centuries, unspoiled by developers, and is part of the 200-acre Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site. Phone: (843) 852-4200. No trace of the old settlement survives, but the palisade, redoubt, and trenches have been rebuilt. In Old Town Creek is a reproduction of a seventeenth-century trading ship. Nearby is an exhibition of the crops grown experimentally by the original settlers. Other attractions are a "forest" with animals indigenous to the state (including bison) and a landscaped park of almost 100 acres. Routes to the site are marked.

Oyster Point quickly proved to be a better location than Albemarle Point, despite its greater vulnerability to naval attack. Settlement soon started here on the tip of the peninsula formed by the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, and in 1680 the seat of government was moved to the new Charles Town. French Protestants started arriving this same year. Around 1719 the name of the growing settlement was changed to Charlestowne, and the current spelling was not adopted until British occupation ended in 1783 and the town was incorporated.

As the colonists moved toward revolution the population of Charleston (to use its present name) grew to 12,000. Only Philadelphia (with 38,000), New York City (22,000), and Boston (18,000) were larger in 1775. Although Charleston was not a chartered city and did not even have a township government until the end of the Revolution, it was by far the most important settlement south of Philadelphia, and was the political and social center of South Carolina. In the immediate vicinity were many prosperous plantations. Charleston was therefore intimately involved in the political and commercial controversies that started in 1763. But the city enjoyed many years of immunity from serious warfare while the British made their main effort in the North.

This immunity was bought early in 1776 when a major British attempt to take Charleston and the southern provinces was repulsed on nearby Sullivan's Island, primarily because of the gallant resistance at the place later named Fort Moultrie. But with the next threat, a mere feint made by General Augustine Prevost to relieve General Benjamin Lincoln's counteroffensive toward Augusta, Georgia in May 1779, Charlestonian civic leaders wanted to surrender. While Governor John Rutledge and General William Moultrie carried out uncoordinated and ineffectual efforts to manage the defense of the city, the terrified citizenry tried to work out a deal with the enemy to spare Charleston in return for a promise of the city's neutrality. The white citizens of Charleston were not only anxious to avoid battle, they also feared that a British attack, which would likely come with promises of freedom to the state's slaves, would permanently disrupt their "way of life." Given that the majority of South Carolina's population was enslaved, it is easy to understand their fear. Negotiations broke down because Prevost foolishly insisted that the armed garrison of the city be surrendered—the very garrison which the whites of Charleston relied upon for protection from slave uprisings. Having achieved much more success in this strategic diversion than he could have hoped for, Prevost shifted his force to Johns Island to reestablish his lines of communication by sea with his base in Georgia. (He had advanced on Charleston overland from Ebenezer, Georgia, marching along the general line of today's U.S. 17.) When he learned that Lincoln was racing back to "save" Charleston, precisely what the British strategy had sought to achieve, Prevost left a large rear guard on the islands south of Charleston and withdrew the rest of his troops along the coast to Savannah. About a month later this rear guard repulsed a mismanaged American attack at Stono Ferry.

Early in 1780 the British were able to launch a major expedition into the Carolinas. Meanwhile, a combined force of French and Americans had suffered a costly defeat in trying to recapture Savannah, Georgia (9 October 1779). The British expedition from New York under General Henry Clinton was so buffeted by storms that it could not come into North Edisto Inlet, just south of Charleston, as planned, but had to reorganize at Savannah. In a plodding campaign Clinton forced the surrender of Charleston on 12 May 1780 after the citizens of Charleston informed General Lincoln that they would not act to defend their city. The decisive military action took place along the Patriot lines of communications into Charleston, particularly around Moncks Corner; within the city itself there are no significant landmarks associated with the siege. A block of tabby construction in Marion Square, just north of Calhoun Street, is a vestige of the "horn work" that was roughly in the center of the main defensive line. Forts Moultrie and Johnson had no significant role in the defense or the city in 1780. The surrender was a major disaster to the Patriot cause. A vigorous pursuit by "Butcher" Tarleton destroyed the last organized Patriot armed force in the action known as Buford's Defeat, more than 100 miles from Charleston, and South Carolina was a conquered province for almost a year before the tide of war turned again. Forced slowly back to Charleston, the British finally evacuated their last stronghold here on 11 July 1782. General Nathanael Greene maintained his headquarters in Charleston until August 1783, when he received news that the preliminary peace treaty had been negotiated.

About 550 buildings of the eighteenth and first half of the nineteenth century survive in the two historic areas of Charleston. Concentrated in the southeast corner of the city, they may be found on maps and literature furnished without charge by the well-organized tourist agencies of the state and city. One of the most helpful and active is the Historic Charleston Foundation, founded in 1947. Phone: (843) 723-1623. Following is a discussion of the highlights.

The report of the National Survey of Historic Sites and Buildings names twenty-seven structures "worthy of special notice." Of these, the following are listed in the order of a walking tour that requires a minimum of backtracking:

Miles Brewton House, 27 King Street. Built in 1765 to 1769 for the prominent citizen and slave trader from which it takes its name, probably the best example of the Charleston "double-house," and perhaps the "finest town house of the colonial period," it is a brick structure, almost square in design, with a two-story white portico and a formidable barbed fence put up in 1822 in response to the alleged Denmark Vesey slave insurrection. The exterior and interior are richly ornamented. As the National Survey points out, "such historical interest as the house possesses springs directly from its architectural distinction." It naturally became headquarters for the British, and is now a private residence.

Heyward-Washington House, 87 Church Street. Built in 1772 on a street where several other noteworthy eighteenth-century houses survive, this was the home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Heyward, Jr. The city rented it for George Washington to stay in for a week in May 1791; hence it is called the Heyward-Washington House. The house was recognized as a National Historic Landmark in 1976 and is owned and operated by the Charleston Museum, which has opened it to the public. Phone: (843) 722-2996.

St. Michael's Episcopal Church, 80 Meeting Street at Broad Street. Called "one of the great Georgian churches of the Colonies," it features a two-story portico of gigantic proportions and a spire that rises from a square base in a series of three diminishing octagons to a conical tip which is 185 feet high. The architect may have been Peter Harrison, whose King's Chapel in Boston is marred by the absence of the lofty spire he intended it to have. Dedicated in 1761, St. Michael's is a memorial to the culture and wealth of Charleston in the early days of the colony.

The Exchange (Custom House) and Provost Dungeon, 122 East Bay Street, east end of Broad Street. Built in 1767 to 1771 after adoption of the Townshend Acts (duties on imports of glass, lead, painters' colors, tea, and paper by the colonists were imposed to pay expenses of British government in America), the Exchange had commodious cellars for customs storage. American opposition to the Townshend Acts led to the elimination of all products but tea from the duty list before Charleston's new customhouse was finished. In 1773 the cellars held British tea seized by the colonists, and in 1780 they were used by the Patriots for storing powder. During the British occupation American prisoners were held here, including Colonel Isaac Hayne (see hayne grave and homesite). When renovations were undertaken in 1965 a portion of the old city seawall of 1690 and a gun battery were uncovered. The "Provost Dungeon" is a DAR museum with a model of the Half Moon Battery that stood on the site before the Revolution, artifacts from recent excavations, a representation of the Patriot powder cache that remained undetected during the British occupation, and life-size wax figures of prisoners and guards. The Exchange has undergone extensive modification throughout the years and was badly damaged during the Civil War, but much of the original structure has survived. It was renovated again in 1981 by the Friends of the Old Exchange, who raise money and awareness on the building's behalf. Open daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Museum phone: (843) 727-2165.

Colonial Powder Magazine, 79 Cumberland Street. The oldest public building in the city, this low, single-story structure of stuccoed brick with a heavy tile roof was authorized in 1703 and completed several years later. Of architectural note are the unusually small bricks used in its construction and a massive arch supporting the central portion of the roof. Located near the northwest bastion of the walled city, the magazine was used until the British besieged Charleston in the spring of 1780. The public powder supply was then moved to the Exchange. Owned by the Colonial Dames until they entrusted it to the Historic Charleston Foundation in 1993, the Powder Magazine is a museum open to the public daily from mid-March through October, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., except on Sunday, when it is open from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: (843) 722 3767.

William Rhett House, 54 Hasell Street. The oldest dwelling in Charleston and still a private residence, it was completed by 1716 as a plantation house just outside the fortified walls of the city. Major alterations have been made on the exterior of this National Historic Landmark. William Rhett was an outstanding leader in the early days of the colony, commanding the flotilla that repulsed a Franco-Spanish attack in 1706 and leading the expedition that captured Stede Bonnet, the pirate. Confederate General Wade Hampton (1818–1902), grandson of the Colonel Wade Hampton who served under Thomas Sumter, was born in the Rhett House.

Charleston Museum, 360 Meeting Street. Established in 1773, this claims to be the oldest museum in the United States. Devoted to the life and environment of Charleston and its region, the museum contains a number of historical displays, including a permanent exhibit on slavery. Open Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. Phone: (843) 722-2996.

Old Bethel United Methodist Church, 222 Calhoun Street. Though construction did not start until 1797, Old Bethel is the oldest extant Methodist Church in Charleston, and provides interesting insights to racial relations under slavery. The church was built by whites, free blacks, and slaves at a time when the Methodist Church still encouraged interracial worship. All that changed in the 1840s when the Methodist Church divided between North and South, with the latter supporting slavery and segregating services. Old Bethel, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, currently serves a largely African American congregation. Phone: (803) 722-3470.

Old Slave Mart, 6 Chalmers Street. Nothing about the South, including the American Revolution, makes sense without integrating slavery into the story. The Old Slave Mart, where people were bought and sold, was slated for demolition in 1960 when the Wragg sisters, Judith and Louise, realized the importance of preserving this vestige of African American history. It took these white women twenty years to pay for the Mart, and they never realized their dream of an African American museum on the site. The city now owns the site and there are plans to fulfill the Wraggs's vision of a museum. The Wraggs also collected more than twenty thousand books and documents relevant to African American history. This library is on Sullivan's Island and can be seen by appointment only; phone: (803) 883-3797.

Many of the historic homes and sites in and around Charleston are open all year; many others are open for tours from mid-March to mid-April. Schedules and fees (if any) being subject to change, you should check on these in advance through tourist agents or the Historic Charleston Foundation; phone: (843) 723-1623.

Cheraw

Cheraw, Great Pee Dee River, Chesterfield County. Because of its location on a navigable stream about 100 miles above the major port of Georgetown and covering the northeastern approaches to the state from North Carolina, Cheraw was of considerable strategic importance during the Revolution. It had been settled around 1752 by Welsh from Pennsylvania, and the church they completed in 1773 is the major architectural attraction in modern Cheraw.

A British punitive expedition under the notorious Major James Wemyss came up the Pee Dee as far as Cheraw soon after the coastal region was overrun in May 1780. When the enemy base was established at Camden, a major outpost was created at Cheraw in June. Major Archibald McArthur with his First Battalion, Seventy-first Highlanders, garrisoned the place until moved to Brierly's Ferry five months later. Meanwhile, hopes of the region's Patriots had been raised briefly when General Gates came by in August on his way toward Camden.

When General Greene succeeded Gates after the Camden disaster and adopted the unorthodox strategy of splitting his forces into two widely separated wings, he himself came with the larger force to the vicinity of Cheraw. His camp was selected by Colonel Thaddeus Kosciuszko 2 miles from the settlement, where modern Wallace is located. Here about one thousand troops camped during the period 20 December 1780 to 28 January 1781 while Lord Cornwallis tore his hair trying to figure out Greene's strategy. That strategy worked out beautifully, with General Dan Morgan winning a major victory at Cowpens, way off on the other side of the state, and both wings of Greene's army then running for Virginia with the British in hot but unsuccessful pursuit. Greene himself had reached the Cheraw encampment with Huger's Division on 26 December and had left with a small escort on 28 January.

When Cornwallis withdrew from Guilford Court House toward the port of Wilmington, North Carolina and Greene moved to attack Camden, Cheraw again became a critical point. Should Cornwallis turn and seek battle with Greene in South Carolina he would have to do so around Cheraw. Lee's Legion had the mission of screening against this threat, and when it did not materialize, the legion came through Cheraw to join up with Francis Marion's command along the Pee Dee.

The Heritage and Beauty Trail links the places of interest in modern Cheraw, which has an attractive district of old homes and a number of historic buildings. Most of these date from after the Revolution, but the notable exception, previously mentioned, is St. David's Episcopal Church. This is a simple but impressive white frame structure with a high belfry. The British used it as a hospital during a smallpox epidemic, and fifty patients are buried in a common grave in the churchyard. The Greater Cheraw Chamber of Commerce, located at 221 Market Street, is a good source of local historic information. Phone: (843) 537-7681.

Cherokee Ford

Cherokee Ford, Savannah River. See under Georgia.

Combahee Ferry and Tar Bluff (Chehaw Point)

Combahee Ferry and Tar Bluff (Chehaw Point), Combahee River. The light brigade under General Mordecai Gist, which had been created to cope with strong foraging expeditions sent out by the British to supply their remaining garrisons at Savannah and Charleston in 1782, was ordered to destroy one of these forces in the Combahee River.

Gist set up a howitzer position at Chehaw Point, 12 miles down the meandering river from Combahee Ferry, where the British expedition of about eighteen sailing craft and five hundred troops was located. When he learned that the British were dropping down the river under cover of darkness, Gist moved his entire brigade toward Chehaw Point. Colonel John Laurens, ordered to move ahead quickly with an advance guard and secure the howitzer position, started from Gist's camp near the ferry and stopped briefly at the Stock Plantation, about 6 miles from his destination. At 3 a.m. on 27 August he resumed his march and walked into an ambuscade.

The skirmish that followed is well-known only because it cost the life of John Laurens, a fine young officer (see mepkin plantation) who had distinguished himself not only as a combat leader on many major battlefields of the Revolution but also in a diplomatic assignment in Paris with Benjamin Franklin (spring 1781). Laurens was also notorious in his time for opposing slavery and proposing that slaves be offered their freedom in return for serving in the Continental army. With a reputation for "intrepidity bordering on rashness," as Washington put it, "and a love of military glory [that] made him seek it upon occasions unworthy of his rank," as General Greene said of him, the twenty-seven-year-old Colonel Laurens had left a sickbed to follow Gist from the Charleston area and plead for this assignment. He was killed in leading a charge against impossible odds because he had no alternative but surrender.

But all this should not obscure the superior military ability of the British in this clash. Learning of Gist's maneuver, they had landed three hundred regulars undetected on Chehaw Point and deployed to surprise the Patriot column on its line of march. After shattering the advance guard, the British rose from their positions in the tall grass and drove the survivors back onto the main body that followed. The regulars then formed a defensive line in rough, wooded terrain where the American cavalry could not operate to support Gist's infantry elements. Without the loss of a man, the British finally withdrew and carried on with their foraging. One Patriot in addition to Laurens was killed, about twenty were wounded, and the howitzer was captured along with its crew.

Old Chehaw Point remains unspoiled on the bank of the wide and picturesque Combahee River. To reach it from the U.S. 17 bridge over the Combahee (the site of Combahee Ferry; remains of an old fort are at the southwest end of the bridge), drive east for 2.2 miles and turn south on S.C. 162. Continue for 6.5 miles to the junction with S.C. 161. This is the site of the Stock Plantation, where Laurens spent several hours with Mrs. Stock and her family. He was buried just east of this road junction. "A small inclosure, without a stone, marks his grave," wrote Benson Lossing in 1849. (Laurens's cenotaph is on the site of Mepkin Plantation.)

Continue south, on S.C. 161, about 3 miles and turn right on the unimproved road that goes about 3 miles southwest to the river. The action took place along this route.

Congarees, The.

Congarees, The. Seefort granby.

Cowpens

Cowpens. This national battlefield site is about 20 miles west of Kings Mountain, 11 miles northwest of Gaffney, and 2 miles southeast of Chesnee at intersection of S.C. 11 and 221. Take Exit 78 from the I-85.

Daniel Morgan (1736–1802) won a little masterpiece of a battle here on 17 January 1781, whipping the redoubtable Banastre Tarleton (1754–1833) and raising Patriot morale at a time when it badly needed raising. The battle is remarkable for the critical role played by terrain, and the site has been sufficiently well preserved and marked for a visitor to appreciate Morgan's tactical genius in selecting and using this unusual piece of ground.

The temperamental and irascible Morgan had come out of retirement and offered his services to Horatio Gates after that misguided general had led the Americans to a humiliating defeat at Camden. Shortly thereafter, Morgan was promoted to brigadier general, and he took command of a little force of light troops comprising 320 Continentals of the Maryland and Delaware line, 200 Virginia riflemen, and about 80 light dragoons. When Nathanael Greene arrived on 3 December 1780 to replace Gates, this southern army had a handful of superb military leaders. Greene was probably second only to Washington as a combat leader. Morgan had established his record long before as a formidable leader of light troops, but even more important, he had two outstanding subordinate commanders: Colonel John Eager Howard (1752–1827), who led the foot elements, and Colonel William Washington (1752–1810), a distant cousin of the commander in chief, who led the dragoons. (A dragoon was a mounted infantryman. That is to say, he did not normally fight from horseback, but rode into battle and dismounted to fight on foot.)

Furthermore, to complete this all-star roster, militia general Andrew Pickens (1739–1817) arrived on the field on the eve of battle, and to his leadership is due most of the credit for the remarkably good performance of the militia at Cowpens.

The day before this great Patriot victory, however, nobody would have predicted such an outcome. Morgan had led his command from Charlotte, North Carolina, in a deep penetration of the territory supposedly under the control of Cornwallis and the Loyalists. (About three weeks after Morgan was detached, Greene further confounded his enemy by moving the rest of his little army to Cheraw, arriving there a few days before Christmas 1780.) On New Year's Day Cornwallis got alarming reports that Morgan was approaching the Loyalist stronghold at Ninety Six with three thousand men, and Tarleton was dispatched to that place to counter the American threat. The report was, of course, grossly exaggerated. Morgan had only one-fifth the strength reported to Cornwallis, and he was hampered by lack of supplies. William Washington had raided to within 15 miles of Ninety Six, but the Patriots were not about to try assaulting that place.

Cornwallis had the main body of his four-thousand-man field army at Winnsboro and was anxious to undertake a major offensive into North Carolina, but he could not start this until the threat of Morgan was eliminated. He therefore accepted the strategy proposed by Tarleton: with his legion and a reinforcement of supporting troops, Tarleton would take off through the rugged country of backwoods South Carolina and destroy Morgan or drive him toward Kings Mountain; Cornwallis would move toward the same point with the main body to trap the Americans who got away from Tarleton.

Morgan confounded this plan by not following the obvious and shorter route through Kings Mountain to rejoin Greene. Taking advantage of the numerous streams as delaying positions, the American commander withdrew in a more westerly direction. On 15 January, however, Morgan learned that Tarleton was on his track with a force that outnumbered him two to one. During the day Tarleton probed unsuccessfully for an unguarded ford on the Pacolet River. That night he faked a march up the stream, went silently into bivouac, and then moved downstream to make an unopposed crossing 6 miles below Morgan. The Americans were about to have breakfast at 6:00 the morning of 16 January when scouts clattered in with the reports of Tarleton's approach. Half an hour later Morgan was hurrying north to put the Broad River between him and the British, and Tarleton was eating Morgan's breakfast.

The peculiar piece of terrain called "Hannah's Cowpens" was known to some of the officers with Morgan as he moved northward that day. Not far off their route, this was relatively high, open ground where a wealthy Loyalist had owned extensive enclosures used for wintering cattle. It was a place where the Americans could stop and make a stand, and it had the additional advantage of being well-known to local guides because the Patriots had used it as an assembly point before the Battle of Kings Mountain. Bodies of militia were moving to reinforce Morgan, so this would be an ideal rendezvous. By mid-afternoon 16 January, when he was still 10 miles from the safety of the Broad River and 5 miles from Hannah's Cowpens, Morgan decided to head for that place and make a stand.

Looking at the prospective battlefield from the south, the direction from which Tarleton would approach it, Morgan saw a tree-dotted meadow rising gradually to a height of about 70 feet in total elevation. About 300 yards forward of this peak and 400 yards from the edge of the woods was a break in the ground known to tacticians as the "military crest" of the hill. That is to say, troops deployed along this crest would have a view of the lower slope and could cover it by fire. On the other hand, troops on the top of the hill would have their fire masked by such a military crest until the enemy reached it.

Morgan's unusual plan of battle called for three lines. The veteran Virginia riflemen and Continentals, under the command of John Eager Howard, would form the main line near the top of the hill. The bulk of the militia, under Andrew Pickens, would be deployed along the military crest, some 150 yards forward of Howard and at a lower elevation. Out in front of Pickens about 200 yards and well concealed in the grass and behind trees would be 150 picked riflemen of the militia.

Knowing that militia would not stand and fight like veteran regulars, Morgan devised unorthodox tactics to make use of the terrain so as to capitalize on their presence in large numbers. In so doing he showed the all-too-rare leadership quality of shaping his plans to the weaknesses of troops rather than exhorting them to make efforts of which they were incapable.

The 200-pound, 6-foot veteran of Braddock's massacre, Arnold's march to Quebec, and the two battles of Saratoga moved around his noisy bivouac the night before the battle and made sure that everybody understood what he wanted them to do the next day. He carefully explained to the militiamen that he wanted them to run, but that he first wanted them to actually fire their guns. The picked riflemen in the line closest to the enemy were to hold their fire until the last possible minute and then deliver only two shots. But Morgan wanted these to be two hits; then these men were free to drop back to Pickens's line. This stronger militia line was to do about the same thing: fire one or two shots from their muskets and then fall back. But they were to withdraw along a prescribed route, around the left (east) flank of the Continentals, and re-form in reserve.

While Morgan's troops were making careful preparations for the battle and getting a good night's rest, Tarleton's were making an exhausting night march through the brush. British scouts drew scattered shots from Morgan's forward riflemen when they reached the battlefield around dawn. Loyalist guides told Tarleton about this well-known clearing in the wilderness, but the British commander saw no need to waste time in reconnaissance.

Forming his infantry in line of battle on the southern edge of the clearing, and holding the Seventy-first Highlanders and 250 horsemen in reserve, Tarleton started the engagement in the standard European fashion: he ordered a wave of fifty troopers to charge forward to drive in the enemy skirmishers. The Georgia and North Carolina militia of Morgan's forward line squeezed off their two shots from hidden positions at close range and emptied fifteen saddles.

Even a horse cavalryman should have had enough sense to change his plans for a frontal attack. But not Tarleton. He led his infantry forward, Pickens held his fire until the range was closed to 100 paces, and then 450 militiamen fired on order. Many of the 100 British killed at Cowpens fell in this phase of the battle. Almost half of these were officers and noncommissioned officers, in accordance with Morgan's instructions to fire at the epaulettes and the crossbelts.

But when the militia withdrew, the British thought they had won the field and had only to mop it up. Tarleton re-formed his line and started for the crest of the hill. His men were cheering in triumph when the first volley hit them. While his line continued to press forward, Tarleton rode to the rear and ordered his reserve of two hundred kilted Highlanders and fifty attached dragoons to attack the American right (west) flank. To meet this new threat, Howard issued orders for the unit on the right of the line to withdraw slightly and face the enveloping force—a maneuver known as "refusing the flank."

The rest of the line misunderstood this maneuver and thought Howard had ordered a general withdrawal, with the result that the entire line started to the rear, although in good order. This accident was turned into a final triumph because Howard had the good sense to let the withdrawal continue, but he also kept it under control, and Morgan himself selected a new position to the rear. As the British rushed forward for the kill, the retreating Americans stopped, turned, fired a volley at point-blank range, and counterattacked with the bayonet.

William Washington had been watching all this from the flank, and led a well-timed cavalry attack against the British right and rear. Then to compound British misfortunes of the day, Pickens showed up at the head of the militia to attack the other flank.

Most of the British tried to fight their way out, but the battle was lost. Tarleton's final humiliation, which he richly deserved for his lack of mature military leadership in this action, was the refusal of his 200 legion cavalry to follow him in a final effort to save the day.

The fighting had lasted only an hour, but the British had 100 killed and about 830 captured. American losses were 12 killed and 60 wounded. Morgan wasted no time leaving the scene of his triumph, marching north at about noon and making camp on the other side of the Broad River. He rejoined Greene in North Carolina at Beattie's Ford.

In April 1972 Congress passed legislation creating the Cowpens National Battlefield Park. Formerly known as Cowpens National Battlefield Site, which comprised a mere 1.25 acres, it has been enlarged to 842 acres that include the major features of the battlefield. This national full-service park includes many hiking trails, including an interpretive Battlefield Trail that takes the visitor around the battle site. There is camping, a museum, and a visitors center with interactive panels and other educational media. The Battlefield is open daily except holidays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: (864) 461-2828.

Dean Swamp

Dean Swamp, just northwest of Salley, Aiken County. In May 1782 Captains Michael Watson and William Butler went to disperse a body of Loyalists here and were lured into an ambush. Watson and a sergeant were mortally wounded. Butler rallied the survivors in a farmhouse, and a rescue column came out from Orangeburg. Historians have long been confused about the date and place of this action. Heitman's Register says Michael Watson was killed at Sharon, Georgia, on 24 May 1782. But the death date on Watson's grave in Orangeburg is 5 May 1782. The site of the skirmish is said to be within a few hundred yards south of the S.C. 394 highway bridge over Dean Creek, about a mile northwest of Salley (once Johntown). A new marker is on S.C. 394.

Drayton Hall

Drayton Hall, 3380 Ashley River Road, Charleston County. "The best surviving example in South Carolina of the colonial plantation house," says the National Survey of this "monumental brick structure of two stories over a high basement, [with an interior] distinguished by spacious rooms with magnificent paneling and richly ornamented ceilings." "Especially impressive are the stair halls," this authority goes on to say, "with its double flight of stairs, and the entrance hall, with fireplace after a design by the great British architect Inigo Jones. The other rooms are almost equally fine" (Colonials and Patriots, pp. 161-162).

A landmark in the British military operations around Charleston in 1780, it was the birthplace of the fiery Patriot William Henry Drayton (1742–1779), whose father built Drayton Hall when he acquired the property around 1738.

In 1973 the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Historic Charleston Foundation jointly leased the mansion and 633 acres with an option to purchase it for $680,900 (the appraised value of the property for tax assessment). Long unoccupied, the mansion is unique in that it remains unmarred by the addition of modern plumbing, heat, or electricity. It is one of only three mansions on the Ashley River not destroyed by General William T. Sherman's troops during the Civil War, spared because it was being used as a hospital for smallpox victims. Unusually, the plantation has a well-preserved slave cemetery and an excellent tour that discusses the role of slaves in building this plantation and investing their labor to create its prosperity. Important archaeological excavations are currently being conducted at this site. It has remained in the Drayton family for seven generations and is open daily, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone: (843) 769-2600.

Its grounds adjoin Magnolia Gardens. The property is about 2 miles north of the village of Drayton Hall (junction of S.C. 57 and 61) and is reached via S.C. 61.

Eutaw Springs Battlefield

Eutaw Springs Battlefield (lost site), village of Eutaw Springs on an arm of Lake Marion, Orangeburg County. A pretty little park maintained by the state on a curve of a country highway is the monument to the last major engagement in the South (8 September 1781), one of the hardest-fought battles of the Revolution and one of the most interesting. The British hero of the battle, Major John Marjoribanks (pronounced Marshbanks), is buried in the park, his remains having been moved there after Lake Marion overtook his original burial spot. Several historical markers summarize the action, and although the battlefield has not been preserved except for the park, it remains on firm ground—reports of its being submerged and lying underneath Lake Marion are greatly exaggerated. Take Exit 98 off I-95 and head east on S.C. 6 for 12 miles. Open daily, dawn to dusk.

Fairforest Creek ("the Forest")

Fairforest Creek ("the Forest"), Spartanburg and Union Counties. A picturesque battleground in the civil war between Whigs and Loyalists, the valley of this creek was known as "the Forest." The stream runs through Spartanburg, then generally midway between the Pacolet and Tyger Rivers before entering the latter at a point due south of modern Union. Colonel Thomas Fletchall was a principal Loyalist leader of the Forest until taken prisoner in the Snow Campaign of 1775. His impressive home overlooking Fairforest Creek has not survived, but the site is known. (It is on private property, a few miles south of Union near U.S. 176.)

Fish Dam Ford

Fish Dam Ford, Broad River, Chester County. Major James Wemyss with his one hundred mounted troops of the Sixty-third Foot and forty dragoons of Tarleton's Legion undertook to surprise the camp of General Thomas Sumter about 30 miles northwest of Cornwallis's base at Winnsboro. Five British dragoons had the special mission of capturing Sumter dead or alive, and the leader of this enterprise, Wemyss, was second only to Tarleton as an object of Patriot hatred and fear.

The British expected to surprise Sumter at dawn, 9 November 1780, at a place called Moore's Mill. But the Patriots had moved 5 miles south, to the east end of Fish Dam Ford. Here Wemyss rode into Sumter's outposts around 1 a.m., there was a quick volley of shots before the security detachment fell back, and the British commander toppled from the saddle with a broken arm and a wounded knee. Tarleton's troopers charged blindly ahead and were badly shot up. The British infantry went into action on foot, but finally withdrew after sustaining heavy losses.

As at Fishing Creek, Sumter escaped by making a run for it, but because it was dark he hid in the vicinity. About noon the next day he returned to his camp, where his troops had started reassembling a few hours after dawn and where a British sergeant had been left to tend the wounded. The story is that Sumter was handed a paper taken from Wemyss's pocket that listed the Patriots he had hanged and the houses he had burned on his expedition to Cheraw. Sumter allegedly threw the incriminating document in the fire. (Wemyss was paroled with the other wounded, presumably exchanged, was promoted to lieutenant colonel of the Sixty-third Foot in 1787, and left the British army two years later. But he does not reappear in the history of the Revolution.)

Fish Dam Battleground Monument is just east of the Broad River bridge on the north side of S.C. 72 and 121, more easily seen when the trees are bare. Visible when water is low during the summer, the "fish dam" is a zigzag chain of rocks built by the Cherokee as a dual-purpose ford and fish trap.

Fishing Creek (Catawba Ford)

Fishing Creek (Catawba Ford), just north of Great Falls, Chester County. The loss of historic sites is usually lamented, but in the case of the Fishing Creek battlefield modern Patriots must secretly be happy. A granite marker on U.S. 21 just north of Great Falls indicates the general area of General Thomas Sumter's defeat on 18 August 1780. Sumter was retreating from Wateree Ferry and Fort Carey to escape British forces pursuing the survivors of the Camden disaster. Early on 17 August, Tarleton got on Sumter's trail. The next morning he pushed on with 100 dragoons and 60 infantry (riding double), cut down two scouts, and caught Sumter's command lolling around camp unprepared for action. With a loss of 16 killed and wounded, Tarleton killed 150 Patriots, captured 300, liberated 100 British prisoners, and recovered more than 40 loaded supply wagons. Sumter escaped by leaping bareback on a horse, and reports of this skirmish made Tarleton a hero in England.

The exact location of the action is not known. Most of the battlefield, if not all of it, is beneath Fishing Creek Reservoir near the dam. A granite marker is on the east side of U.S. 21 just north of Great Falls, on a dangerous hilltop curve. Just south of this marker is a loop of the older highway, and from this stretch of road the waters that cover Sumter's unfortunate campsite can be viewed.

Fletchall (Thomas) Estate Site

Fletchall (Thomas) Estate Site. Seefairforest creek.

Fort Charlotte

Fort Charlotte (lost site), Savannah River, McCormick County. About 50 miles up the Savannah River from Augusta was Fort Charlotte of the colonial era. The first overt act of rebellion in the state took place when Patriots seized the fort on 12 July 1775 by order of the Council of Safety. After this the place was mentioned frequently in accounts of military operations across the Savannah River, so its map location is of historical importance. Opposite the mouth of Georgia's Broad River and covering Cowens Ford, the site is under the waters of J. Strom Thurmond Lake. S.C. 91, running southwest from Mount Carmel in the western tip of McCormick County, ends at the aforementioned body of water officially named J. Strom Thurmond Lake and Dam at Clarks Hill, which is in the general vicinity of the lost site.

Fort Dorchester

Fort Dorchester, Ashley River, Dorchester County. At the start of the Revolution Patriot forces rebuilt Fort Dorchester on the site of a settlement that had existed here from 1696 (see midway under Georgia). Dorchester was a British base from April 1780 until retaken by General Greene's forces on 1 December 1781. The British garrison of 850 made the mistake of assuming that Greene's presence in the approaching column meant that he had his entire army with him, so they destroyed their supplies, threw their artillery into the river, and without a fight abandoned the last outpost around Charleston. The truth was that Greene had only two hundred infantry and two hundred cavalry, having sent the main body of his army to Round O, more than 20 miles to the west.

In Old Dorchester State Park, on S.C. 642 about 6 miles south of Summerville, the picturesque tabby ruins mark the site of the old town that was finally abandoned by 1788. (Do not confuse this place with the present town of Dorchester, about 20 miles to the northwest on U.S. 78.)

Fort Galphin (Dreadnought)

Fort Galphin (Dreadnought), Savannah River about 12 miles below Augusta (beeline) on Silver Bluff, extension of S.C. 32. A small stockaded place, home of George Galphin, deputy superintendent of Indian affairs, it was garrisoned by two Loyalist companies in May 1781 when the final siege of Augusta was undertaken. After Elijah Clark and Andrew Pickens had attacked boats bringing the annual royal presents for the Indians, driving their guard into Fort Galphin, Lee's Legion arrived from Augusta to capture the position on 21 May. With the loss of only one man, Lee took supplies and arms badly needed by the Rebels.

To reach the site, drive north from Jackson on S.C. 5 about 2 miles from the center of town (junction of S.C. 62 and 299 with 5). Turn west on the unimproved road that is joined by the extension of S.C. 32 a little more than a mile farther west, and continue about a mile to Silver Bluff. The site is now part of the Audubon Society's Silver Bluff Center and sanctuary. For the last several years, the Savannah River Archeological Research Program has been exploring and unearthing many note-worthy artifacts on the Fort Galphin site. Phone: (803) 725-3623.

Fort Granby (the Congarees)

Fort Granby (the Congarees), Congaree River below Columbia. A graveyard and historical marker just south of Cayce in Lexington County identify the site of Granby, once known as the Congarees. Here an Indian trading post was built in 1718. By 1754 this had grown into an important river depot and the seat of old Lexington District. The Cayce House, built in 1765 and surviving until modern times, was fortified during the Revolution and served as a major British stronghold from 1780 until its capture on 15 May 1781 by Lee's Legion.

Fort Johnson

Fort Johnson, James Island, Charleston. The principal fort guarding Charleston from naval attack in colonial times, Fort Johnson protected royal officials and papers during the Stamp Act crisis. When the Provincial Congress seized all authority in South Carolina after Lexington and Concord, one of its first acts was to order the capture of Fort Johnson. The royal governor learned of this and started dismantling the fort, and the Patriots found only five British guards when they occupied Fort Johnson on 15 September 1775. No resistance was put up by the British; the twenty heavy guns of the fort were soon back in battery and they took part (ineffectually) in repulsing the attack nine months later on Sullivan's Island. The first flag of South Carolina was designed by Colonel William Moultrie and flown here after his troops occupied Fort Johnson. Maintenance was not kept up, and the fort was easily captured by the British from the land side when they attacked Charleston in early 1780. The brick powder magazine remains standing on the site of Fort Johnson, whose grounds are presently occupied by the Marine Laboratory of the College of Charleston. To visit the site, phone (843) 953-9200.

Fort Motte

Fort Motte, on the Congaree River near its junction with the Wateree. The fortified mansion of the widow Rebecca Brewton Motte at this point on the old trail from Charleston to the backcountry was the principal British supply depot during their occupation of South Carolina. Motte was living in a nearby farmhouse when Patriot forces under Francis Marion and Harry Lee arrived on 8 May 1781 from their victory at Fort Watson to besiege the British garrison of 150 infantry and a few visiting dragoons. The Americans had started digging trenches for a formal siege when they learned that Lord Rawdon was abandoning Camden, and there was danger that he would rescue the Fort Motte garrison on his way south to the Charleston area.

Lee conceived the plan of quickly capturing the fort by using fire arrows to ignite the shingle roof of Motte's home, whereupon the patriotic lady not only granted her permission but also produced a fine East Indian bow and a bundle of arrows. When the approach trenches were within range, one of Marion's men lobbed two flaming arrows onto the roof, American artillery prevented the British firefighters from knocking burning shingles to the ground, and the defenders put up the white flag. The fire was then extinguished, and Motte served dinner to the British and American officers.

A village grew up around the Revolutionary War post, and the name Fort Motte survives on the highway map and in the Southern Railway system. Patriotic ladies of the twentieth century erected a granite marker on the site of Rebecca Motte's home in 1909, but this has since been abandoned in an overgrown area 1.5 miles straight-line distance northeast of Fort Motte village. The monument is shown on the Calhoun County highway map, but as of this writing is buried in the brush about half a mile from the nearest road. A DAR chapter is named for this prolific woman, and recent scholars of the American Revolution, intent on directing more attention toward women from this era, have done extensive research on Rebecca Motte's role in the war. Fort Motte is also known as the Mount Joseph Plantation, and is privately owned.

Fort Moultrie

Fort Moultrie. Seesullivan's island.

Fort Watson

Fort Watson, Santee River (now Lake Marion). Preserved in a small, fenced park on the edge of Lake Marion near the northeast end of the highway bridges (I-95; U.S. 15 and 301) is the Indian mound where the British constructed a fort on their line of communications from Charleston to Camden. Named for the British Guards officer John Watson Tadwell Watson (1748–1826), who became a full colonel in 1783 and a full general in 1808, it was this officer's base of operations to defend the British supply lines against raids by American partisans. The fort comprised a small but strong stockade on top of the 30-foot-high mound (whose flat top is today a rough oval about 75 feet long and 50 feet wide), with three rings of abatis. Known earlier as Wright's Bluff, the site was on the edge of Scott's Lake, then part of the swamp-lined Santee River, and it had a commanding view over the bare plain by which an enemy would approach.

In mid-February 1781 General Thomas Sumter ordered General Francis Marion to join him for a campaign that was supposed to touch off a great uprising of patriotic militia along the Santee. The operation was premature; the British were at this time reinforcing security detachments along their extended line of communications, and Sumter was forced to scurry northward after failing in his efforts around Fort Granby, Belleville Plantation, and Fort Watson. His mismanaged attack against the last place on 28 February 1781 cost him heavy losses, and he suffered another reverse on Lynches River near modern Bishopville (see ratcliff's bridge) before temporarily calling off his private war to liberate South Carolina. (See camden for his negative role in the Battle of Hobkirk Hill.)

When General Nathanael Greene's regulars pushed into South Carolina after forcing Cornwallis to abandon his offensive in North Carolina, the time had come to start reducing British outposts between Charleston and Camden. The British, meanwhile, were making their last major effort to wipe out the partisan bands that had given them so much trouble, and Watson was given about half of Lord Rawdon's available field forces—some five hundred regulars and Loyalists—to run the "Swamp Fox" to ground and wipe him out. But Marion had been reinforced by the legion of "Light Horse Harry" Lee, and the fox turned against the hounds.

Lee linked up with Marion on 14 April 1781, and the next evening they invested the British garrison of eighty regulars and forty Loyalists under Lieutenant McKay at Fort Watson. Colonel Watson, meanwhile, had run himself ragged in trying to catch Marion, and had then been forced to take refuge at the British base of Georgetown. But the British and Americans around Fort Watson did not know that Colonel Watson would move from Georgetown to rejoin Rawdon at Camden (instead of coming to the relief of Fort Watson), and there was the very real threat that he might appear over the horizon.

Lieutenant McKay heroically declined the traditional surrender demand. When the besiegers seized his water point on the lake he quickly improvised a system whereby water from the lake filled a newly dug well. Lacking artillery and fearing the intervention of a British relief column, the Americans were becoming worried when Colonel Hezekiah Maham came up with the suggestion for building a type of siege tower that subsequently bore his name. Used successfully here and in later sieges, the Maham Tower was a fabricated crib of notched logs, rectangular in plan and topped by a protected platform from which fire could be delivered into a fort. Of flexible design, it could be made of varying heights and could serve as a platform for small cannon (see augusta under Georgia).

It took five days to prepare the logs, but a company of riflemen started delivering plunging fire into the fort at dawn on 23 April. When two assault parties attacked the abatis and the marksmen on the tower kept the defenders pinned down behind their stockade, Lieutenant McKay surrendered his garrison. Patriot losses were only two killed and six wounded.

Fort Watson was the first important British post retaken in the liberation of South Carolina. Rawdon abandoned Camden on 10 May and withdrew to Moncks Corner as the Patriots took Orangeburg, Fort Motte, and Fort Granby during the period 11 to 15 May.

To reach Fort Watson, take Exit 102 on I-95, look for the sign on U.S. 15 and 301 (named "Highway to Southern Living") about 8 miles southwest of Summerton and a little less than a mile short of the Lake Marion bridge. This highway also features the "Swamp Fox Murals Trail," a series of viewable, artful murals that demonstrate and honor the exploits of General Francis Marion. Drive northwest for about a mile to the site, passing the patrol station of the Santee National Wildlife Refuge. Plainly visible on the edge of the lake and indicated by a historical marker is the Indian mound with several flights of wooden stairs leading up one side.

Francis Marion and Sumter National Forest

Francis Marion and Sumter National Forest, northeast of Charleston, Berkeley, and Charleston Counties. These two parks make up nearly 600,000 acres. Although this remarkable reservation is not especially identified with the heroes for whom it is named, it deserves special mention in this guide for two reasons. First, it includes the following sites: Biggin Bridge and Church, Wadboo Bridge and Plantation (proposed Waterhorn Historic Area), Quinby Bridge and Plantation, a stretch of the King's Highway, St. James Santee Church, Hampton Plantation, and Leneud's Ferry (now Jamestown Bridge). Second, an exceptionally fine map is available through normal tourist information channels that shows not only these sites within the national forest but also the important historic landmarks to the west, along the Cooper River. These include Goose Creek (St. James) Church, Strawberry (the ferry site, the settlement itself, and the chapel), Moncks Corner, and Mepkin Plantation. For further information on this vast area call or write to the park itself. USDA Forest Service, 4931 Broad River Road, Columbia, S.C. 29212; phone: (803) 561-4000.

Georgetown

Georgetown, Winyah Bay, Georgetown County. The Pee Dee and three other rivers empty into the bay here to form one of the state's three major harbors. Georgetown was founded in 1735, became a busy port, and was surrounded by prosperous indigo and rice plantations. Parallel streets, most of them retaining such old royal names as Prince, Duke, King, Queen, and Orange, divide a quiet residential district of some thirty blocks in the center of Georgetown, where many eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century homes, churches, and public buildings are preserved. Visitors may find remnants of the wharves along the Sampit River behind Front Street, where planters pulled in during colonial days to do their shopping, including for slaves, and where until not long ago the merchants of Front Street did as much business out of their back doors as on the street.

When the British occupied South Carolina in 1780 they established a small garrison in Georgetown. Francis Marion raided the town on 15 November 1780 and, supported by Lee's Legion, on 24 January 1781. In late July 1781 a body of General Sumter's irregulars plundered Loyalists in Georgetown, and the British retaliated by virtually destroying the town on 2 August.

Near Georgetown on S.C. 45 is the site of Belle Isle Plantation, where Francis Marion's family may have come to live when he was about six years old, and which his brother Gabriel owned at the time of the Revolution. Its handsome gardens are open to the public. Featured there is the Marion family cemetery, containing the remains of General Marion and his wife, among other descendents. Across the bay from here you can see North Island, where Lafayette and Kalb landed on 13 June 1777 to join the Patriot cause as volunteers.

Prince George Winyah Church, on Broad Street at Highmarket, about in the center of historic Georgetown, is a charming little brick structure of 1750 with a huge but graceful belfry dating from 1824. Phone: (843) 546-4358. British occupation troops used it as a stable. Annual tours of private plantations and town houses are sponsored in the spring by the Women of Prince George Winyah Episcopal Church. Phone: (843) 543-8291.

The Masonic Temple at Prince and Screven Streets was built in 1740 and long used as an inn. Washington addressed the Masons here in 1790.

The Georgetown Chamber of Commerce provides local historic site information through its website, newsletter, and pamphlets. Website: www.georgetownchamber.com; phone: (843) 546-8436.

Givhan's Ferry State Park

Givhan's Ferry State Park, Edisto River, Colleton and Dorchester Counties, about 35 miles northwest of Charleston. One of the principal ferry sites on the Edisto from prehistoric times, Givhan's Ferry is mentioned frequently in literature of the American Revolution. It is preserved as a picturesque place of moss-draped oaks on high bluffs overlooking the dark waters of the Edisto. Fishing, hiking, camping, and picnicking are available. Phone: (843) 873-0692.

Goose Creek (St. James) Church

Goose Creek (St. James) Church, Berkeley County, Vestry Lane, off U.S. 52, about 15 miles northwest of Charleston. Built in 1719 in a prosperous region of old plantations, this parish church was the center of many skirmishes during the Revolution. According to tradition it was spared by the British because local Patriots had not vandalized the royal coat of arms, a re-creation of which may still be seen above the pulpit (the original having been destroyed in the earthquake of 1886). Wade Hampton raided the town on Sunday 15 July 1781, surrounding the church during services and taking several Loyalists prisoners. The pretty little pink-stuccoed brick chapel, which closed in the nineteenth century for lack of parishioners, is well preserved and of exceptional interest. Its cemetery has twenty-seven graves dating back to the mid-eighteenth century.

Great Cane Brake

Great Cane Brake, Reedy River, about 6 miles southwest of Fountain Inn, Greenville County. The successful conclusion of Colonel Richard Richardson's "Snow Campaign" to break up Loyalist mobilization in this backcountry region took place here in late 1775. Reinforced by militia from North Carolina, Richardson had more than four thousand Patriot troops by December, and Loyalist strength started fading away. Only Patrick Cunningham's band of about two hundred men remained in the field. At dawn on 22 December a force under Colonel William Thompson surprised the Loyalists in camp about 4 miles east of the Cherokee boundary line. Cunningham and a few others escaped, but five Loyalists were killed and about 130 captured at a cost of one Patriot wounded.

The "great cane brake" still covers the area, and a highway marker indicates the traditional location of the battle nearby. To find the highway marker, start at Fountain Inn on S.C. 418 and from its intersection with U.S. 276 drive southwest 5.5 miles (just short of the bridge across Reedy River). Turn right on the blacktopped road for a little more than half a mile, and the marker is at a house on the left. The battlefield supposedly is about 500 yards to the northwest, on the south side of the creek that feeds into Reedy River.

Great Savannah

Great Savannah. Seenelson's ferry.

Halfway Swamp

Halfway Swamp. About 10 miles downstream from where the Congaree and Wateree Rivers join to form the Santee there was a "Halfway Swamp" on each side of the Santee. Each was about halfway from Moncks Corner to the Congarees and Camden on main colonial routes. The name survives for the swamp on the right (west) bank, but the Halfway Swamp astride the Old Santee Road to Camden is now Spring Grove Creek. This is the place where Marion had the skirmish in December 1780 that is covered under singleton's mill.

Hammond's Store

Hammond's Store (lost site), Laurens County. On 28 December 1780 Colonel William Washington led his 80 dragoons and 200 mounted militia on a 40-mile ride to Hammond's Store, where they found and brutally cut up a force of 250 Loyalist raiders, killing or wounding 150 and taking 40 prisoner. The next day Colonel Joseph Hayes rode westward and forced Patrick Cunningham to abandon a little fort at Williams' Plantation, only 15 miles north-northeast of Ninety Six. This caused Cornwallis to send Tarleton in pursuit of Morgan, which led ultimately to the dramatic American victory at Cowpens. The sites of Williams' Plantation and Hammond's Store (house) have been lost. If the former was 15 miles north-northeast of Ninety Six, its location would be around where S.C. 72 is intersected 2 miles northeast of Mountville by S.C. 49. Hammond's Storehouse was probably the site of the village of Huntsville that existed in the 1820s about 3 miles due south of the center of modern Clinton.

Hampton Plantation State Historic Site

Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, lower Santee River, Charleston County. Heretofore open only on special occasions, this stately home is known to millions from its photographs. The home of South Carolina's first poet laureate (1934), Archibald Rutledge, a descendant of the original owners, Hampton House and the adjoining 322 acres were purchased by the state for development into a park. The surrounding grounds feature garden-lined paths, and a picnic shelter is included. A gift shop is located inside the house; a special feature there are the poetry books of Mr. Rutledge.

The existing mansion evolved from a small frame structure built in 1735 by Noë Serré. This passed in 1757 to his son-in-law, Daniel Huger Horry, who added a two-story ballroom on one end and a lofty bedchamber on the other. This Horry (there were many famous members of the family) was commissioned in the Second South Carolina Regiment at the start of the Revolution and commanded a company in the defense of Charleston in 1776, but took the oath of allegiance to the crown after the fall of Charleston to the British in May 1780. Little as we may admire his patriotism, we must acknowledge Colonel Horry as a pioneer conservationist, because his political agility is probably what saved Hampton House from destruction by the British.

Daniel Horry's successors, notably