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Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Maritime province in se Canada, consisting of a mainland peninsula, the adjacent Cape Breton Island and a few smaller islands; the capital is Halifax. The first settlement of Nova Scotia was made by the French in 1605. The mainland was awarded to Britain in 1713, and Cape Breton Island was seized from the French in 1758. Nova Scotia joined New Brunswick, Québec and Ontario to form the Dominion of Canada in 1867. The land is generally low-lying, rolling country and there are extensive forests. The principal crops are hay, apples, grain and vegetables. There are coal deposits on Cape Breton Island. Fishing is very important. Industries: shipbuilding, pulp and paper, steelmaking, food processing. Area: 55,490sq km (21,425sq mi). Pop. (2001) 908,007.

http://www.gov.ns.ca

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Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia owes its name to a 17th-cent. Scottish attempt at colonization. France ceded its claims to Britain in 1713. Halifax was founded in 1749, and an assembly introduced in 1758. British garrisons discouraged temptations to join the American Revolution. In the 19th cent. Nova Scotians exploited their timber resources and Atlantic orientation to create a trading economy based on the sailing ship. Self-government was achieved in 1848. After heated controversy, Nova Scotia joined the dominion of Canada in 1867. Historians attribute subsequent sluggish development to the decline of the ‘wood, wind, and water’ economy. Nova Scotians, who retain a pronounced ‘Bluenose’ patriotism, blame the indifference of Canadian governments.

Ged Martin

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Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia a province of eastern Canada, originally settled by the French in the early 18th century as Acadia, which became one of the original four provinces in the Dominion of Canada in 1867.

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