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Nebraska

Nebraska

State of Nebraska

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Derived from the Oto Indian word nebrathka, meaning "flat water" (for the Platte River).

NICKNAME: The Cornhusker State.

CAPITAL: Lincoln.

ENTERED UNION: 1 March 1867 (37th).

SONG: "Beautiful Nebraska."

MOTTO: Equality Before the Law.

FLAG: The great seal appears in the center, in gold and silver, on a field of blue.

OFFICIAL SEAL: Agriculture is represented by a farmer's cabin, sheaves of wheat, and growing corn; the mechanic arts, by a blacksmith. Above is the state motto; in the background, a steamboat plies the Missouri River and a train heads toward the Rockies. The scene is surrounded by the words "Great Seal of the State of Nebraska, March 1st 1867."

BIRD: Western meadowlark.

FLOWER: Goldenrod.

TREE: Western cottonwood.

GEM: Blue agate.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year's Day, 1 January; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Presidents' Day, 3rd Monday in February; Arbor Day, last Friday in April; Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Columbus Day, 2nd Monday in October; Veterans' Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving, 4th Thursday in November and following Friday; Christmas Day, 25 December. Other days for special observances include Pioneers' Memorial Day, 2nd Sunday in June; Nebraska Czech Day, 1st Sunday in August; and American Indian Day, 4th Monday in September.

TIME: 6 AM CST = noon GMT; 5 AM MST = noon GMT.

LOCATION, SIZE, AND EXTENT

Located in the western north-central United States, Nebraska ranks 15th in size among the 50 states. The total area of the state is 77,355 sq mi (200,349 sq km), of which land takes up 76,644 sq mi (198,508 sq km) and inland water 711 sq mi (1,841 sq km). Nebraska extends about 415 mi (668 km) e-w and 205 mi (330 km) n-s.

Nebraska is bordered on the n by South Dakota (with the line formed in part by the Missouri River), on the e by Iowa and Missouri (the line being defined by the Missouri River), on the s by Kansas and Colorado, and on the w by Colorado and Wyoming. The boundary length of Nebraska totals 1,332 mi (2,143 km). The state's geographic center is in Custer County, 10 mi (16 km) nw of Broken Bow.

TOPOGRAPHY

Most of Nebraska is prairie; more than two-thirds of the state lies within the Great Plains proper. The elevation slopes upward gradually from east to west, from a low of 840 ft (256 m) in the southeast along the Missouri River to 5,424 ft (1,654 m) in Johnson Twp. of Kimball County. The mean elevation of the state is approximately 2,600 ft (793 m). Rolling alluvial lowlands in the eastern portion of the state give way to the flat, treeless plain of central Nebraska, which in turn rises to a tableland in the west. The Sand Hills of the north-central plain is an unusual region of sand dunes anchored by grasses that cover about 18,000 sq mi (47,000 sq km).

The Sand Hills region is dotted with small natural lakes; in the rest of the state, the main lakes are artificial. The Missouri Riverwhich, with its tributaries, drains the entire stateforms the eastern part of the northern boundary of Nebraska. Three rivers cross the state from west to east: the wide, shallow Platte River flows through the heart of the state for 310 mi (499 km), the Niobrara River traverses the state's northern region, and the Republican River flows through southern Nebraska.

CLIMATE

Nebraska has a continental climate, with highly variable temperatures from season to season and year to year. The central region has an annual normal temperature of 50°f (10°c), with a normal monthly maximum of 76°f (24°c) in July and a normal monthly minimum of 22°f (6°c) in January. The record low for the state is 47°f (44°c), registered in Morrill County on 12 February 1899; the record high of 118°f (48°c) was recorded at Minden on 24 July 1936.

Average yearly precipitation in Omaha is about 30 in (76 cm); in the semiarid panhandle in the west, 17 in (43 cm); and in the southeast, 30 in (76 cm). Snowfall in the state varies from about 21 in (53 cm) in the southeast to about 45 in (114 cm) in the northwest corner. Blizzards, droughts, and windstorms have plagued Nebraskans throughout their history.

FLORA AND FAUNA

Nebraska's deciduous forests are generally oak and hickory; conifer forests are dominated by western yellow (ponderosa) pine. The tallgrass prairie may include various slough grasses and needle-grasses, along with big bluestem and prairie dropseed. Mixed prairie regions abound with western wheatgrass and buffalo grass. The prairie region of the Sand Hills supports a variety of blue-stems, gramas, and other grasses. Common Nebraska wildflowers are wild rose, phlox, petunia, columbine, goldenrod, and sunflower. Rare species of Nebraska's flora include the Hayden penstemon, yellow ladyslipper, pawpaw, and snow trillium. Three species were threatened as of 2006: Ute ladies' tresses, western prairie fringed orchid, and Colorado butterfly plant. The blowout penstemon was listed as endangered that year.

Common mammals native to the state are the pronghorn sheep, white-tailed and mule deer, badger, kit fox, coyote, striped ground squirrel, prairie vole, and several skunk species. There are more than 400 kinds of birds, the mourning dove, barn swallow, and western meadowlark (the state bird) among them. Three main wetland areas (Rainwater Basin wetlands, Big Bend reach of the Platte River, and the Sandhills wetlands) serve as important migrating and breeding grounds for waterfowl and nongame birds. Carp, catfish, trout, and perch are fished for sport. Rare animal species include the least shrew, least weasel, and bobcat. The US Fish and Wildlife Service listed nine animal species (vertebrates and invertebrates) as threatened or endangered in 2006, including the American burying beetle, bald eagle, whooping crane, black-footed ferret, Topeka shiner, pallid sturgeon, and Eskimo curlew.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

The Department of Environmental Quality was established in 1971 to protect and improve the quality of the state's water, air, and land resources. The Agricultural Pollution Control Division of the Department regulates disposal of feedlot wastes and other sources of water pollution by agriculture. The Water and Waste Management Division is responsible for administering the Federal Clean Water Act, the Federal Resources Conservation and Recovery Act, portions of the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act, and the Nebraska Environmental Protection Act as it relates to water, solid waste, and hazardous materials. In 2003, Nebraska had 255 hazardous waste sites listed in the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) database, 12 of which were on the National Priorities List as of 2006. In 2005, the EPA spent over $15 million through the Superfund program for the cleanup of hazardous waste sites in the state. The same year, federal EPA grants awarded to the state included $8.2 million for its drinking water state revolving fund and $5.4 million for the clean water revolving fund.

A program to protect groundwater from such pollutants as nitrates, synthetic organic compounds, hydrocarbons, pesticides, and other sources was outlined in 1985. In 1996, the state spent $3.2 million on its Soil and Water Conservation Program. In 1994, the state imposed a tax on commercial fertilizers to create the Natural Resources Enhancement Fund, which distributes funds to local natural resource districts for water quality improvement programs. The Engineering Division regulates wastewater treatment standards and assists municipalities in securing federal construction grants for wastewater facilities. The Air Quality Division is responsible for monitoring and securing compliance with national ambient air quality standards. In 2003, 51.5 million lb of toxic chemicals were released in the state.

The state has three main wetland areas: Rainwater Basin wetlands, Big Bend reach of the Platte River, and the Sandhills wetlands. While these areas are protected, the state has lost about 1 million acres (405,000 hectares) of wetlands since pre-European settlement times.

POPULATION

Nebraska ranked 38th in population in the United States with an estimated total of 1,758,787 in 2005, an increase of 2.8% since 2000. Between 1990 and 2000, Nebraska's population grew from 1,578,385 to 1,711,263, an increase of 8.4%. The population was projected to reach 1.78 million by 2015 and 1.81 million by 2025. The population density in 2004 was 22.7 persons per sq mi. In 2004, the median age of all Nebraskans was 36. In the same year, 24.9% of the populace were under age 18 while 13.3% was age 65 or older. The largest cities in 2004 were Omaha, which ranked 43rd among the nation's cities with an estimated population of 409,416, and Lincoln, with 236,146 residents.

ETHNIC GROUPS

Among Nebraskans reporting at least one specific ancestry in the 2000 census, 661,133 identified their ancestry as German, 163,651 as English, 229,805 as Irish, 93,286 as Czech, and 84,294 as Swedish. The 2000 population also included 68,541 black Americans 21,931 Asians, and 836 Pacific Islanders. There were 94,425 Hispanics and Latinos in 2000, representing 5.5% of the total population. In 2004, 4.3% of the population was black, 1.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 6.9% Hispanic or Latino, and 1.1% of the population claimed origin of two or more races. Foreign-born residents numbered 74,638, or 4.4% of the total population, in 2000.

There were 14,896 American Indians in Nebraska as of 2000, down from around 16,000 in 1990. The three Indian reservations maintained for the Omaha, Winnebago, and Santee Sioux tribes had the following populations as of 2000: Omaha, 5,194, and Winnebago, 2,588, and Santee Sioux, 603. In 2004, 0.9% of the population was American Indian.

LANGUAGES

Many Plains Indians of the Macro-Siouan family once roamed widely over what is now Nebraska. Place names derived from the Siouan language include Omaha, Ogallala, Niobrara, and Keya Paha. In 1990, about 1,300 Nebraskans claimed Indian tongues as their first languages.

In 2000, 1, 469,046 Nebraskans92.1% of the resident population five years old or olderspoke only English at home, down from 95.2% in 1990.

The following table gives selected statistics from the 2000 Census for language spoken at home by persons five years old and over. The category "Other Slavic languages" includes Czech, Slovak, and Ukrainian. The category "African languages" includes Amharic, Ibo, Twi, Yoruba, Bantu, Swahili, and Somali.

LANGUAGE NUMBER PERCENT
  Population 5 years and over 1,594,700 100.0Speak only
  English 1,469,046 92.1
  Speak a language other than English 125,654 7.9
Speak a language other than English 125,654 7.9
  Spanish or Spanish Creole 77,655 4.9
  German 8,865 0.6
  Vietnamese 5,958 0.4
  Other Slavic languages 4,236 0.3
  French (incl. Patois, Cajun) 3,631 0.2
  Chinese 2,409 0.2
  Arabic 1,628 0.1
  Russian 1,559 0.1
  African languages 1,472 0.1
  Polish 1,420 0.1
  Italian 1,419 0.1
  Tagalog 1,311 0.1
  Japanese 1,274 0.1

Nebraska English, except for a slight South Midland influence in the southwest and some Northern influence from Wisconsin and New York settlers in the Platte River Valley, is almost pure North Midland. A few words, mostly food terms like kolaches (fruit-filled pastries), are derived from the language of the large Czech population. Usual pronunciation features are on and hog with the /o/, cow and now as /kaow/ and /naow/, because with the /ah/ vowel, cot and caught as sound-alikes, and a strong final /r/. Fire sounds almost like far, and our like are; greasy is pronounced /greezy/.

RELIGIONS

Nebraska's religious history derives from its patterns of immigration. German and Scandinavian settlers tended to be Lutheran; Irish, Polish, and Czech immigrants were mainly Roman Catholic. Methodism and other Protestant religions were spread by settlers from other Midwestern states.

Though Protestants collectively outnumber Catholics, the Roman Catholic Church is the largest single Christian denomination within the state with about 376,843 adherents in 2004; of which 229,952 belong to the archdiocese of Omaha. As of a 2000 general survey, Lutherans constituted the largest Protestant group with 117,419 adherents of the Missouri Synod, 128,570 of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and 5,829 of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod. In 2004, there were 84,337 members of the United Methodist Church. In 2000, there were 39,420 Presbyterians-USA. In 2006, there were 20,910 members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons); a Mormon temple was opened in Winter Quarters in 2001. As of 2005, there were 18,119 members of the United Church of Christ. The Jewish population was estimated at 7,100 in 2000 and Muslims numbered about 3,115. That year, there were 704,403 people (about 41% of the population) who were not counted as members of any religious organization.

TRANSPORTATION

Nebraska's development was profoundly influenced by two major railroads, the Union Pacific and the Chicago Burlington and Quincy (later merged along with the Great Northern and Northern Pacific railroads into the Burlington Northern in 1970), both of which were major landowners in the state in the late 1800s. As of 2003, the Union Pacific and the former railroads that make up the Burlington Northern (now the Burlington Northern Santa Fe) still operated in Nebraska, and constitute the state's two Class I railroads. Altogether, in that year, there were 11 railroads in the state with 3,548 rail mi (5,712 km) of track. As of 2006, Amtrak provided east-west service to five stations in Nebraska via its Chicago to Emreyville/San Francisco California Zephyr train

Nebraska's road system which totaled 93,245 mi (150,124 km) in 2004, is dominated by Interstate 80, the major east-west route and the largest public investment project in the state's history. Some 1.678 million motor vehicles were registered in 2004, of which around 829,000 were automobiles and about 820,000 were trucks of all types. There were 1,315,819 licensed drivers in the state that same year.

In 2005, Nebraska had a total of 303 public and private-use aviation-related facilities. This included 266 airports, 36 heliports, and one seaplane base. Eppley Airfield, Omaha's airport, is by far the busiest in the state. In 2004, Epply had 1,892,379 passengers enplaned.

Nebraska in 2004 had 318 mi (512 km) of navigable waterways. In 2003, waterborne shipments totaled only 50,000 tons.

HISTORY

Nebraska's first inhabitants, from about 10,000 bc, were nomadic Paleo-Indians. Successive groups were more sedentary, cultivating corn and beans. Archaeological excavations indicate that prolonged drought and dust storms before the 16th century caused these inhabitants to vacate the area. In the 16th and 17th centuries, other Indian tribes came from the East, some pushed by enemy tribes, others seeking new hunting grounds. By 1800, se-misedentary Pawnee, Ponca, Omaha, and Oto, along with several nomadic groups, were in the region.

The Indians developed amiable relations with the first white explorers, French and Spanish fur trappers and traders who traveled through Nebraska in the 18th century using the Missouri River as a route to the West. The area was claimed by both Spain and France and was French territory at the time of the Louisiana Purchase, when it came under US jurisdiction. It was explored during the first half of the 19th century by Lewis and Clark, Zebulon Pike, Stephen H. Long, and John C. Frémont.

The Indian Intercourse Act of 1834 forbade white settlement west of the Mississippi River, reserving the Great Plains as Indian Territory. Nothing prevented whites from traversing Nebraska, however, and from 1840 to 1866, some 350,000 persons crossed the area on the Oregon, California, and Mormon trails, following the Platte River Valley, which was a natural highway to the West. Military forts were established in the 1840s to protect travelers from Indian attack.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 established Nebraska Territory, which stretched from Kansas to Canada and from the Missouri River to the Rockies. The territory assumed its present shape in 1861. Still sparsely populated, Nebraska escaped the violence over the slavery issue that afflicted Kansas. The creation of Nebraska Territory heightened conflict between Indians and white settlers, however, as Indians were forced to cede more and more of their land. From mid-1860 to the late 1870s, western Nebraska was a battleground for Indians and US soldiers. By 1890, the Indians were defeated and moved onto reservations in Nebraska, South Dakota, and Oklahoma.

Settlement of Nebraska Territory was rapid, accelerated by the Homestead Act of 1862, under which the US government provided 160 acres (65 hectares) to a settler for a nominal fee, and the construction of the Union Pacific, the first transcontinental railroad. The Burlington Railroad, which came to Nebraska in the late 1860s, used its vast land grants from Congress to promote immigration, selling the land to potential settlers from the East and from Europe. The end of the Civil War brought an influx of Union veterans, bolstering the Republican administration, which began pushing for statehood. On 1 March 1867, Nebraska became the 37th state to join the Union. Farming and ranching developed as the state's two main enterprises. Facing for the first time the harsh elements of the Great Plains, homesteaders in central and western Nebraska evolved what came to be known as the sod-house culture, using grassy soil to construct sturdy insulated homes. They harnessed the wind with windmills to pump water, constructed fences of barbed wire, and developed dry-land farming techniques.

Ranching existed in Nebraska as early as 1859, and by the 1870s it was well established in the western part of the state. Some foreign investors controlled hundreds of thousands of acres of the free range. The cruel winter of 188687 killed thousands of cattle and bankrupted many of these large ranches.

By 1890, depressed farm prices, high railroad shipping charges, and rising interest rates were hurting the state's farmers, and a drought in the 1890s exacerbated their plight. These problems contributed to the rise of populism, a pro-agrarian movement. Many Nebraska legislators embraced populism, helping to bring about the first initiative and referendum laws in the United States, providing for the regulation of stockyards and telephone and telegraph companies, and instituting compulsory education.

World War I created a rift among Nebraskans as excessive patriotic zeal was directed against residents of German descent. German-language newspapers were censored, ministers were ordered to preach only in English (often to congregations that understood only German), and three university professors of German origin were fired. A Nebraska law (1919) that prohibited the teaching of any foreign language until high school was later declared unconstitutional by the US Supreme Court.

Tilling of marginal land to take advantage of farm prices that had been inflated during World War I caused economic distress during the 1920s. Nebraska's farm economy was already in peril when the dust storms of the 1930s began, and conditions worsened as drought, heat, and grasshopper invasions plagued the state. Thousands of people, particularly from the southwest counties in which dust-bowl conditions were most severe, fled Nebraska for the west coast. Some farmers joined protest movementsdumping milk, for example, rather than selling at depressed priceswhile others marched on the state capital to demand a moratorium on farm debts, which they received. In the end, federal aid saved the farmers.

The onset of World War II brought prosperity to other sectors. Military airfields and war industries were placed in the state because of its safe inland location, bringing industrial growth that extended into the postwar years. Much of the new industry that developed during the postwar era was agriculture-related, including the manufacture of mechanized implements and irrigation equipment.

Farm output and income increased dramatically into the 1970s through wider use of hybrid seed, pesticides, fungicides, chemical fertilizers, close-row planting, and irrigation, but contaminated runoff adversely affected water quality and greater water use drastically lowered water-table levels. Many farmers took on large debt burdens to finance expanded output, their credit buoyed by strong farm-product prices and exports. When prices began to fall in the early 1980s, many found themselves overextended. By spring 1985, an estimated 10% of all farmers were reportedly close to bankruptcy. In the early 1990s farm prices rose; the average farm income in Nebraska rose more than 10% between 1989 and the mid-1990s. Increasingly, the state had fewer, larger, and more-mechanized farms. The growth of small industries and tourism also bolstered Nebraska's economy in the 1990s. By 1999 the state enjoyed one of the lowest unemployment rates in the nation2.9%. But farmers were struggling again. A wildfire in the Sandhills of Nebraska's panhandle in 1999 scorched 74,840 acres and claimed 25,000 trees; it was the largest fire in the state's history. In the summer of 2000, areas of the state had had no substantial rain in a year. The previous autumn and winter were the driest on record. Drought conditions prevailed. Even with mitigation efforts, much of the state's corn crop was lost.

Challenges still facing the state have included a loss of population in rural areas, urban decay, and tension among various ethnic groups. In 1998 there were more Hispanics, accounting for 4.4% of the population, in the state than there were African Americans; Nebraska also has a small Native American population. Water conservation to avoid depletion of the state's aquifers for irrigation purposes remains a major priority. Nebraska was facing its worst recession since the 1980s in 2003. By 2004, the state was in its fifth straight year of severe drought conditions.

Lt. Governor Dave Heineman became Nebraska's governor in January 2005 when former Governor Mike Johanns resigned to serve as US Secretary of Agriculture. Heineman upon coming to office focused on four priorities: education, economic vitality, efficiency in government, and protecting families.

STATE GOVERNMENT

The first state constitution was adopted in 1866; a second, adopted in 1875, is still in effect. A 191920 constitutional convention proposedand voters passed41 amendments; by January 2005, the document had been revised an additional 222 times.

Nebraska's legislature is unique among the states; since 1934, it has been a unicameral body of 49 members elected on a nonpartisan basis. Members, who go by the title of senator, are chosen in even-numbered years for four-year terms. Legislative sessions begin in early January each year and are limited to 90 legislative days in odd-numbered years and to 60 legislative days in even-numbered years. Special sessions, not formally limited in duration, may be called by petition of two-thirds of the legislators. Legislators must be qualified voters, at least 21 years old, and should have lived in their district for a year prior to election. The legislative salary was $12,000 in 2004, unchanged from 1999.

Elected executives are the governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, auditor, treasurer, and attorney general, all of whom serve four-year terms. The governor and lieutenant governor are jointly elected; each must be a US citizen for at least five years, at least 30 years old, and have been a resident and citizen of Nebraska for at least five years. After serving two consecutive terms, the governor is ineligible for the office for four years. As of December 2004, the governor's salary was $85,000.

A bill becomes law when passed by a majority of the legislature and signed by the governor. If the governor does not approve, the bill is returned with objections, and a three-fifths vote of the members of the legislature is required to override the veto. A bill automatically becomes law if the governor does not take action within five days of receiving it.

A three-fifths majority of the legislature is required to propose an amendment to the state constitution. The people may propose an amendment by presenting a petition signed by 10% of total votes for governor at last election. The amendments are then submitted for approval at the next regular election or at a special election in which a majority of the votes tallied must be at least 30% of the total number of registered voters.

Nebraska Presidential Vote by Major Political Parties, 19482004
YEAR ELECTORAL VOTE NEBRASKA WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN
*Won US presidential election.
**IND. candidate Ross Perot received 174,687 votes in 1992 and 71,278 votes in 1996.
1948 6 Dewey (R) 224,165 264,774
1952 6 *Eisenhower (R) 188,057 421,603
1956 6 *Eisenhower (R) 199,029 378,108
1960 6 Nixon (R) 232,542 380,553
1964 5 *Johnson (D) 307,307 276,847
1968 5 *Nixon (R) 170,784 321,163
1972 5 *Nixon (R) 169,991 406,298
1976 5 Ford (R) 233,692 359,705
1980 5 *Reagan (R) 166,424 419,214
1984 5 *Reagan (R) 187,866 460,054
1988 5 *Bush (R) 259,235 397,956
1992** 5 Bush (R) 217,344 344,346
1996** 5 Dole (R) 236,761 363,467
2000 5 *Bush, G. W. (R) 231,780 433,862
2004 5 *Bush, G. W. (R) 254,328 512,814

Voters in Nebraska must be US citizens, at least 18 years old, and state residents. Restrictions apply to convicted felons and those officially found mentally incompetent.

POLITICAL PARTIES

In the 2000 presidential elections, Republican candidate George W. Bush secured 63% of the vote; Democrat Al Gore, 33%; and Green Party candidate Ralph Nader, 3%. In 2004, Bush again dominated, with 66% of the vote to Democratic challenger John Kerry's 33%. In 2004 there were 1,160,000 registered voters. In 1998, 37% of registered voters were Democratic, 49% Republican, and 14% unaffiliated or members of other parties. The state had five electoral votes in the 2004 presidential election.

In the 2000 elections, Democrat Ben Nelson was elected to the Senate; Republican Chuck Hagel won election to the Senate in 1996 and was reelected in 2002. In 1998 Republican Mike Johanns was elected to succeed Nelson as governor; Johanns was reelected in 2002, but resigned before completing his term to become the US secretary of agriculture. Johanns was succeeded by Lieutenant Governor Dave Heineman in January 2005. Republicans won all three of the state's seats in the US House of Representatives in 1994, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2004. Nebraska's unicameral state legislature is nonpartisan.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

In 2005, Nebraska had 93 counties, 531 municipalities, and 576 public school districts. Some 1,146 special districts covered such services as fire protection, housing, irrigation, and sewage treatment. In 2002, there were 446 townships. Boards of supervisors or commissioners, elected by voters, administer at the county level. Municipalities are generally governed by a mayor (or city manager) and council. Villages elect trustees to governing boards.

In 2005, local government accounted for about 79,114 full-time (or equivalent) employment positions.

STATE SERVICES

To address the continuing threat of terrorism and to work with the federal Department of Homeland Security, homeland security in Nebraska operates under executive order; the lieutenant governor is designated as the state homeland security advisor.

As of 1 June 1971, the Office of Public Counsel (Ombudsman) was empowered to investigate complaints from citizens in relation to the state government. The Accountability and Disclosure Commission, established in 1977, regulates the organization and financing of political campaigns and investigates reports of conflicts of interest involving state officials.

The eight-member state Board of Education, elected on a non-partisan basis, oversees elementary and secondary public schools and vocational education. The Board of Regents, which also consists of eight elected members, governs the University of Nebraska system. Special examining boards license architects, engineers, psychologists, and land surveyors. The Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education works to develop a statewide plan for an educationally and economically sound, progressive, and coordinated system of postsecondary education.

The Department of Roads maintains and builds highways, and the Department of Aeronautics regulates aviation, licenses airports, and registers aviators. The Department of Motor Vehicles provides vehicle and driver services. Natural resources are protected by the Forest Service, Energy Office, Game and Parks Commission, and the Natural Resources Department.

Public assistance, child welfare, medical care for the indigent, and a special program of services for children with disabilities are the responsibility of the Health and Human Service System, which also operates community health services, provides nutritional services, and is responsible for disease control.

The state's huge agricultural industry is aided and monitored by the Department of Agriculture, which is empowered to protect livestock, inspect food-processing areas, conduct research into crop development, and encourage product marketing. The Nebraska Corn Board works to enhance the profitability of the corn producer.

JUDICIAL SYSTEM

The Nebraska Supreme Court is the state's highest court, which consists of a chief justice and six other justices, all of whom are initially appointed by the governor. They must be elected after serving three years, and every six years thereafter, running unopposed on their own record. Below the Supreme Court are the district courts of which 53 judges serve 21 districts in the state. These are trial courts of general jurisdiction. County courts handle criminal misdemeanors and civil cases involving less than $5,000. In addition, there are a court of industrial relations, a worker's compensation court, two conciliation courts (family courts), two municipal courts (in Omaha and Lincoln), and juvenile courts in three counties.

As of 31 December 2004, a total of 4,130 prisoners were held in Nebraska's state and federal prisons, an increase from 4,040 of 2.2% from the previous year. As of year-end 2004, a total of 369 inmates were female, up from 323 or 14.2% from the year before. Among sentenced prisoners (one year or more), Nebraska had an incarceration rate of 230 per 100,000 population in 2004.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Nebraska in 2004 had a violent crime rate (murder/nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault) of 308.7 reported incidents per 100,000 population, or a total of 5,393 reported incidents. Crimes against property (burglary, larceny/theft, and motor vehicle theft) in that same year totaled 61,512 reported incidents or 3,520.6 reported incidents per 100,000 people. Nebraska has a death penalty, of which electrocution is the sole method of execution. From 1976 through 5 May 2006, the state had executed only three people, the most recent of which was in December 1997. As of 1 January 2006, Nebraska had 10 inmates on death row.

In 2003, Nebraska spent $42,004,625 on homeland security, an average of $24 per state resident.

ARMED FORCES

The US military presence in the state is concentrated near Omaha, where Offutt Air Force Base serves as the headquarters of the US Strategic Air Command. In 2004, Nebraska firms were awarded $401.2 million in defense contracts, and defense payroll outlays were $925 million. In the same year, there were 7,332 active-duty military personnel and 3,769 civilian personnel stationed in Nebraska.

A total of 159,487 veterans of US military service resided in Nebraska as of 2003. Of these, 22,241 served in World War II, 20,282 in the Korean conflict, 48,499 in the Vietnam era, and 25,391 during the Persian Gulf War. For the fiscal year 2004, total Veterans Affairs expenditures in Nebraska amounted to $538 million.

As of 31 October 2004, the Nebraska State Patrol employed 498 full-time sworn officers.

MIGRATION

The pioneers who settled Nebraska in the 1860s consisted mainly of Civil War veterans from the North and foreign-born immigrants. Some of the settlers migrated from the East and easterly parts of the Midwest, but many came directly from Europe to farm the land. The Union Pacific and Burlington Northern railroads, which sold land to the settlers, actively recruited immigrants in Europe. Germans were the largest group to settle in Nebraska (in 1900, 65,506 residents were German-born), then Czechs from Bohemia, and Scandinavians from Sweden, Denmark, and Norway. The Irish came to work on the railroads in the 1860s and stayed to help build the cities. Another wave of Irish immigrants in the 1880s went to work in the packinghouses of Omaha. The city's stockyards also attracted Polish workers. The 1900 census showed that over one-half of all Nebraskans were either foreign-born or the children of foreign-born parents. For much of the 20th century, Nebraska was in a period of out-migration. From 1930 to 1960, the state suffered a net loss of nearly 500,000 people through migration, with more than one third of the total leaving during the dust-bowl decade, 193040. This trend continued, with Nebraska experiencing a net out-migration of 27,400 for the period 198590. Between 1990 and 1998, the state had net gains of 2,000 in domestic migration and 14,000 in international migration. In 1998, 1,267 foreign immigrants arrived in Nebraska. The state's overall population increased 5.3% between 1990 and 1998. In the period 200005, net international migration was 22,199 and net internal migration was 26,206, for a net loss of 4,007 people.

INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERATION

Nebraska's Commission on Intergovernmental Cooperation represents the state in the Council of State Governments. As an oil-producing state, Nebraska is a member of the Interstate Compact to Conserve Oil and Gas. In addition, the state belongs to several regional commissions. Of particular importance are the Republican River Compact with Colorado and Kansas, the Big Blue River Compact with Kansas, the South Platte River Compact with Colorado, the Ponca Creek Nebraska-South Dakota-Wyoming Water Compact, and the Upper Niobrara River Compact with Wyoming. The Nebraska Boundary Commission was authorized in 1982 to enter into negotiations to more precisely demarcate Nebraska's boundaries with Iowa, South Dakota, and Missouri. Nebraska is also a member of the Central Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact, under which Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Arkansas have located a suitable disposal site for such waste. Boundary pacts are in effect with Iowa, Missouri, and South Dakota. In fiscal year 2005, the state received $1.893 billion in federal grants, an estimated $1.927 billion in fiscal year 2006, and an estimated $1.994 billion in fiscal year 2007.

ECONOMY

Agriculture has historically been the backbone of Nebraska's economy, with cattle, corn, hogs, and soybeans leading the state's list of farm products. However, Nebraska is attempting to diversify its economy and has been successful in attracting new business, in large part because of its location near western coal and oil deposits.

The largest portion of the state's labor force is employed in agriculture, either directly or indirectlyas farm workers, as factory workers in the food-processing and farm-equipment industries, or as providers of related services. The service sector, which includes not only the servicing of equipment but also the high growth areas of health and business services and telemarketing, expanded at an annual rate of 4.4% during the 1980s. The trend intensified in the late 1990s, as general services grew at an average annual rate of 7.7% from 1998 to 2001, and financial services grew at an average rate of 5.7%. Nebraska was not deeply involved in the information technology (IT) boom of the 1990s, and therefore was not deeply affected by its bust in 2001. Coming into the 21st century, the state economy grew a moderate average rate of about 4.1% (1998 to 2000), which fell to 2.4% in 2001. In 2001, declines in manufacturing employment were off-set by increases in the services and government sectors. The job losses became more severe in 2002, by the fourth quarter, the unemployment rate had eased to 3.3%, down from 3.9% in April 2002.

With technological advances in farming and transportation, and consolidation in the agricultural sector, Nebraska's rural counties have been losing population since the 1970s. In 2002, sixty six of Nebraska's 93 counties had lower populations than in the 1970s, and population loss accelerated during the 1990s. Drought conditions in 2002 disrupted cattle production because of shortages of hay and pasture. Drought persisted into the winter of 200203, and the state is likely to face long-term water shortages.

Nebraska's gross state product (GSP) in 2004 was $68.183 billion, of which manufacturing (durable and nondurable goods) accounted for the largest share at $8.305 billion or 12.1% of GSP, fol-lowed by the real estate sector at $5.872 billion (8.6% of GSP), and health care and social assistance at $4.919 billion (7.2% of GSP). In that same year, there were an estimated 151,088 small businesses in Nebraska. Of the 46,161 businesses that had employees, an estimated total of 44,703 or 96.8% were small companies. An estimated 4,849 new businesses were established in the state in 2004, up 12.5% from the year before. Business terminations that same year came to 5,051, unchanged from 2003. There were 207 business bankruptcies in 2004, down 13% from the previous year. In 2005, the state's personal bankruptcy (Chapter 7 and Chapter 13) filing rate was 485 filings per 100,000 people, ranking Nebraska as the 28th highest in the nation.

INCOME

In 2005 Nebraska had a gross state product (GSP) of $70 billion which accounted for 0.6% of the nation's gross domestic product and placed the state at number 37 in highest GSP among the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, in 2004 Nebraska had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $32,341. This ranked 21st in the United States and was 98% of the national average of $33,050. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of PCPI was 4.5%. Nebraska had a total personal income (TPI) of $56,523,179,000, which ranked 36th in the United States and reflected an increase of 5.8% from 2003. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of TPI was 5.2%. Earnings of persons employed in Nebraska increased from $41,452,474,000 in 2003 to $43,923,337,000 in 2004, an increase of 6.0%. The 200304 national change was 6.3%.

The US Census Bureau reports that the three-year average median household income for 2002 to 2004 in 2004 dollars was $44,623 compared to a national average of $44,473. During the same period an estimated 9.9% of the population was below the poverty line as compared to 12.4% nationwide.

LABOR

According to the US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), in April 2006 the seasonally adjusted civilian labor force in Nebraska numbered 988,200, with approximately 33,700 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 3.4%, compared to the national average of 4.7% for the same period. Preliminary data for the same period placed nonfarm employment at 947,100. Since the beginning of the BLS data series in 1976, the highest unemployment rate recorded in Nebraska was 6.8% in February 1983. The historical low was 2.2% in February 1998. Preliminary nonfarm employment data by occupation for April 2006 showed that approximately 4.9% of the labor force was employed in construction; 10.9% in manufacturing; 21.2% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 6.9% in financial activities; 10.4% in professional and business services; 13.7% in education and health services; 8.5% in leisure and hospitality services; and 17.1% in government.

The BLS reported that in 2005, a total of 69,000 of Nebraska's 830,000 employed wage and salary workers were formal members of a union. This represented 8.3% of those so employed, which was unchanged from 2004, and below the national average of 12%. Overall in 2005, a total of 79,000 workers (9.5%) in Nebraska were covered by a union or employee association contract, which includes those workers who reported no union affiliation. Nebraska is one of 22 states with a right-to-work law.

As of 1 March 2006, Nebraska had a state-mandated minimum wage rate of $5.15 per hour. In 2004, women in the state accounted for 47.1% of the employed civilian labor force.

AGRICULTURE

Territorial Nebraska was settled by homesteaders. Farmers easily adapted to the land and the relatively rainy eastern region, and corn soon became their major crop. In the drier central and western prairie regions, settlers were forced to learn new farming methods to conserve moisture in the ground. Droughts in the 1890s provided impetus for water conservation. Initially, oats and spring wheat were grown along with corn, but by the end of the 19th century, winter wheat became the main wheat crop. The drought and dust storms of the 1930s, which devastated the state's agricultural economy, once again drove home the need for water and soil conservation. In 2002, a total of 7.5 million acres (3 million hectares) were irrigated, a 21% increase from 1992. In 2004, there were 48,300 farms covering 45.9 million acres (18.6 million hectares).

With total cash receipts from farm marketings at over $11.2 billion in 2005, Nebraska ranked fourth among the 50 states. About $7.3 billion of all farm marketings came from livestock production, and $3.9 billion from cash crops (9.9% of US total). In 2004, corn accounted for 22% of farm receipts.

Crop production in 2004 (in bushels) included: corn, 1.3 billion; sorghum grain, 33.6 million; wheat, 61 million; oats, 3.7 million; and barley, 162,000. Hay production was 6.1 million tons and potato production, 9.3 million hundredweight (422 million kg). During 200004, Nebraska ranked third among the states in production of corn for grain and sorghum for grain, and fifth in sorghum for beans.

Farms in Nebraska are major businesses requiring large land holdings to justify investments. The average value of an acre of cropland in 2004 was $1,750. Nebraska farms still tend to be owned by individuals or families rather than by large corporations. The strength of state support for the family farm was reflected in the passage of a 1982 constitutional amendment, initiated by petition, prohibiting the purchase of Nebraska farm and ranch lands by other than a Nebraska family farm corporation.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

In 2005, Nebraska ranked third behind Texas and Kansas in the total number of cattle on farms (6.35 million), including 61,000 milk cows. Nebraska farmers had around 2.85 million hogs and pigs, valued at $313.5 million in 2004. During 2003, the state produced an estimated 10.3 million lb (4.7 million kg) of sheep and lambs, which grossed $10.8 million in income for Nebraska farmers. Dairy products included 1.13 billion lb (0.51 billion kg) of milk produced.

FISHING

Commercial fishing is negligible in Nebraska. The US Fish and Wildlife Service maintains 87 public fishing areas. In 2004, the state had 176,619 fishing license holders. There are five state hatcheries producing a variety of stock fish that includes large-mouth bass, bluegill, black crappie, channel catfish, yellow perch, walleye, trout, and tiger musky.

FORESTRY

Arbor Day, now observed throughout the United States, originated in Nebraska in 1872 as a way of encouraging tree planting in the sparsely forested state. Forestland occupies 1,275,000 acres (516,000 hectares), or 2.6% of all Nebraska. Ash, boxelder, hackberry, cottonwood, honey locust, red and bur oaks, walnut, elm, and willow trees are common to eastern and central Nebraska, while ponderosa pine, cottonwood, eastern red cedar, and Rocky Mountain juniper prevail in the west. Lumber production amounted to only 15 million board ft in 2004. The state's two national forestsNebraska and Samuel R. McKelvieare primarily grassland and are managed for livestock grazing. In 2005, the National Forest Service maintained 257,628 acres (104,262 hectares) of forestland.

MINING

According to preliminary data from the US Geological Survey (USGS), the estimated value of nonfuel mineral production by Nebraska in 2003 was $94.2 million, a decrease from 2002 of about 4%.

According to the preliminary data for 2003, by value and in descending order, cement (portland and masonry), crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel were the state's top nonfuel minerals.

Preliminary data for 2003 showed crushed stone production totaling 6.9 million metric tons, with a value of $51.1 million, while construction sand and gravel output stood at 12.2 million metric tons, with a value of $42.1 million.

Most clay mining occurs in the southeast region, but sand and gravel mining takes place throughout the state. Industrial sand was used in the production of glass and had some applications outside of construction activities. Nebraska in 2003 was also a producer of common clays and lime.

ENERGY AND POWER

Nebraska is the only state with an electric power system owned by the public through regional, cooperative, and municipal systems. As of 2003, Nebraska had 162 electrical power service providers, of which 151 were publicly owned, 23 were cooperatives and one was federally operated. As of that same year there were 930,822 retail customers. Of that total, 909,089 received their power from publicly owned service providers. Cooperatives accounted for 21,721 customers and 12 were 48 federal customers.

Total net summer generating capability by the state's electrical generating plants in 2003 stood at 6.685 million kW, with total production that same year at 30.455 billion kWh. Of the total amount generated, 99.7% came from electric utilities, with the remainder coming from independent producers and combined heat and power service providers. The largest portion of all electric power generated, 20.954 billion kWh (68.8%), came from coalfired plants, with nuclear plants in second place at 7.996 billion kWh (26.3%) and hydroelectric plants in third at 980.110 million kWh (3.2%). Other renewable power sources, natural gas fueled plants, and petroleum fired plants accounted for the remainder.

As of 2006, Nebraska had two operating nuclear power plants: the Cooper plant in Brownville and the Fort Calhoun Station near Omaha.

As of 2004, Nebraska had proven crude oil reserves of 15 million barrels, or less than 1% of all proven US reserves, while output that same year averaged 8,000 barrels per day. Including federal offshore domains, the state that year ranked 22nd (21st excluding federal offshore) in proven reserves and 23rd (22nd excluding federal offshore) in production among the 31 producing states. In 2004, Nebraska had 1,639 producing oil wells and accounted for under 1% of all US production. The state has no refineries.

In 2004, Nebraska had 111 producing natural gas and gas condensate wells. In that same year, marketed gas production (all gas produced excluding gas used for repressuring, vented and flared, and nonhydrocarbon gases removed) totaled 1.454 billion cu ft (0.041 billion cu m). There was no data available on the state's proven reserves of natural gas.

Nebraska has no commercial coal industry.

INDUSTRY

According to the US Census Bureau's Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) for 2004, Nebraska's manufacturing sector covered some 15 product subsectors. The shipment value of all products manufactured in the state that same year was $34.433 billion. Of that total, food manufacturing accounted for the largest share at $19.037 billion. It was followed by machinery manufacturing at $2.061 billion, transportation equipment manufacturing at $2.034 billion, chemical manufacturing at $1.904 billion, and miscellaneous manufacturing at $1.623 billion.

In 2004, a total of 99,706 people in Nebraska were employed in the state's manufacturing sector, according to the ASM. Of that total, 76,578 were actual production workers. In terms of total employment, the food manufacturing industry accounted for the largest portion of all manufacturing employees at 36,190, with 29,537 actual production workers. It was followed by machinery manufacturing at 8,590 employees (5,617 actual production workers), fabricated metal product manufacturing at 8,306 employees (6,112 actual production workers), transportation equipment manufacturing at 7,841 employees (6,508 actual production workers), plastics and rubber products manufacturing at 5,159 employees (4,078 actual production workers), and miscellaneous manufacturing with 5,025 employees (4,070 actual production workers).

ASM data for 2004 showed that Nebraska's manufacturing sector paid $3.532 billion in wages. Of that amount, the food manufacturing sector accounted for the largest share at $1.131 billion. It was followed by machinery manufacturing at $350.037 million, fabricated metal product manufacturing at $307.681 million, transport equipment manufacturing at $291.760 million, and plastics and rubber products manufacturing at $184.551 million.

Nebraska has a small but growing manufacturing sector, the largest portion of which is in the Omaha metropolitan area. Other manufacturing centers are located in Lincoln and the Sioux City, Iowa, metropolitan area that is located in Nebraska.

COMMERCE

According to the 2002 Census of Wholesale Trade, Nebraska's wholesale trade sector had sales that year totaling $26.1 billion from 2,907 establishments. Wholesalers of durable goods accounted for 1,542 establishments, followed by nondurable goods wholesalers at 1,193 and electronic markets, agents, and brokers accounting for 172 establishments. Sales by durable goods wholesalers in 2002 totaled $6.2 billion, while wholesalers of nondurable goods saw sales of $16.5 billion. Electronic markets, agents, and brokers in the wholesale trade industry had sales of $3.3 billion.

In the 2002 Census of Retail Trade, Nebraska was listed as having 8,157 retail establishments with sales of $20.2 billion. The leading types of retail businesses by number of establishments were: motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers (1,126), gasoline stations (1,116), building material/garden equipment and supplies dealers (1,022), and food and beverage stores (892). In terms of sales, motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers accounted for the largest share of retail sales at $5.07 billion, followed by general merchandise stores at $2.8 billion, food and beverage stores at $2.4 billion, and building material/garden equipment and supplies dealers at $2.1 billion. A total of 105,634 people were employed by the retail sector in Nebraska that year.

Nebraska's exports of goods produced within the state totaled $3 billion in 2005. Major export items included: food, electronic equipment, agricultural crops, transport equipment, and chemicals. The majority of exports went to Japan, Canada, and Mexico.

CONSUMER PROTECTION

Nebraska's consumer protection activities are generally the responsibility of the Office of the Attorney General's Consumers Protection Division. The Division also operates a mediation service to help the state's consumers to resolve complaints against business. Consumer protection involving railroads, telephone companies motor transport and other common carriers within the state is the responsibility of the Nebraska Public Service Commission.

When dealing with consumer protection issues, the state's attorney general's office can initiate civil and criminal proceedings, represent the state before state and federal regulatory agencies, administer consumer protection and education programs, handle formal consumer complaints, and exercise broad subpoena powers. In antitrust actions, the attorney general's office can act on behalf of those consumers who are incapable of acting on their own; initiate damage actions on behalf of the state in state courts; initiate criminal proceedings; and represent counties, cities and other governmental entities in recovering civil damages under state or federal law. However, the state's attorney general's office cannot provide private legal advice.

The offices of the Consumer Protection Division are located in Lincoln, the state capital.

BANKING

As of June 2005, Nebraska had 262 insured banks, savings and loans, and saving banks, plus 25 state-chartered and 53 federally chartered credit unions (CUs). Excluding the CUs, the Omaha-Council Bluffs market area accounted for the largest portion of the state's financial institutions and deposits in 2004, with 74 institutions and $14.442 billion in deposits. As of June 2005, CUs accounted for 5.3% of all assets held by all financial institutions in the state, or some $2.577 billion. Banks, savings and loans, and savings banks collectively accounted for the remaining 94.7% or $46.120 billion in assets held.

In 2004, the median net interest margin (NIM)the difference between the lower rates offered to savers and the higher rates charged on loanswas 4.18%, down from 4.19% in 2003. In fourth quarter 2005, the median NIM was 4.15%. The median percentage of past-due/nonaccrual loans to total loans in 2004 was 1.68%, down from 1.85% in 2003and was 1.47% in fourth quarter 2005.

Regulation of Nebraska's state-chartered banks and other financial institutions is the responsibility of the Nebraska Department of Banking and Finance.

INSURANCE

The insurance industry is important in Nebraska's economy. The major company in the state is Mutual of Omaha. In 2004, there were about 1.2 million individual life insurance policies in force with a total value of over $91.9 billion; total value for all categories of life insurance (individual, group, and credit) was over $145 billion. The average coverage amount is $76,500 per policy holder. Death benefits paid that year totaled at over $399 million.

In 2003, there were 29 life and health and 38 property and casualty insurance companies domiciled in the state. Direct premiums for property and casualty insurance totaled $3 billion in 2004. That year, there were 13,617 flood insurance policies in force in the state, with a total value of $1.49 billion.

In 2004, 57% of state residents held employment-based health insurance policies, 8% held individual policies, and 22% were covered under Medicare and Medicaid; 11% of residents were uninsured. In 2003, employee contributions for employment-based health coverage averaged at 29% for family coverage. The employee contribution for single coverage averaged at 25%, the highest rate in the nation. The state offers a six-month health benefits expansion program for small-firm employees in connection with the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA, 1986), a health insurance program for those who lose employment-based coverage due to termination or reduction of work hours.

In 2003, there were over 1.3 million auto insurance policies in effect for private passenger cars. Required minimum coverage includes bodily injury liability of up to $25,000 per individual and $50,000 for all persons injured in an accident, as well as property damage liability of $25,000. In 2003, the average expenditure per vehicle for insurance coverage was $624.26.

SECURITIES

The Bureau of Securities within the Department of Banking and Finance regulates the sale of securities. There are no stock exchanges in the state. In 2005, there were 410 personal financial advisers employed in the state and 1,440 securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents. In 2004, there were over 29 publicly traded companies within the state, with over 11 NASDAQ companies, 9 NYSE listings, and 1 AMEX listing. In 2006, the state had five Fortune 500 companies; Berkshire Hathaway ranked first in the state and 13th in the nation with revenues of over $81.6 billion, followed by ConAgra Foods, Union Pacific, Peter Kiewit Sons', Inc, and Mutual of Omaha Insurance. Peter Kiewit Sons', Inc. is an employee-owned company that does not trade in public stock. The other four companies listed are on the NYSE.

PUBLIC FINANCE

Nebraska's constitution prohibits the state from incurring debt in excess of $100,000. However, there is a provision in the constitution that permits the issuance of revenue bonds for highway and water conservation and management structure construction. There are $10 million of bonds payable by a separate legal entity that has been blended into the financial activity of the state. These bonds do not represent a general obligation of the state and are secured by revenues from the equipment that the debt was incurred to purchase.

NebraskaState Government Finances
(Dollar amounts in thousands. Per capita amounts in dollars.)
AMOUNT PER CAPITA
Abbreviations and symbols:zero or rounds to zero; (NA) not available; (X) not applicable.
source: U.S. Census Bureau, Governments Division, 2004 Survey of State Government Finances, January 2006.
Total Revenue 8,316,470 4,757.71
  General revenue 7,337,829 4,197.84
   Intergovernmental revenue 2,383,391 1,363.50
   Taxes 3,639,811 2,082.27
     General sales 1,524,591 872.19
     Selective sales 463,487 265.15
     License taxes 201,921 115.52
     Individual income tax 1,242,603 710.87
     Corporate income tax 167,429 95.78
     Other taxes 39,780 22.76
   Current charges 652,712 373.41
   Miscellaneous general revenue 661,915 378.67
  Utility revenue - -
  Liquor store revenue - -
  Insurance trust revenue 978,641 559.86
Total expenditure 6,979,917 3,993.09
  Intergovernmental expenditure 1,695,613 970.03
  Direct expenditure 5,284,304 3,023.06
    Current operation 4,072,878 2,330.02
    Capital outlay 652,374 373.21
    Insurance benefits and repayments 334,290 191.24
    Assistance and subsidies 128,728 73.64
    Interest on debt 96,034 54.94
Exhibit: Salaries and wages 1,827,865 1,045.69
Total expenditure 6,979,917 3,993.09
  General expenditure 6,645,627 3,801.85
   Intergovernmental expenditure 1,695,613 970.03
   Direct expenditure 4,950,014 2,831.82
  General expenditures, by function:
   Education 2,324,444 1,329.77
   Public welfare 1,899,089 1,086.44
   Hospitals 202,775 116.00
   Health 308,713 176.61
   Highways 595,128 340.46
   Police protection 69,651 39.85
   Correction 188,457 107.81
   Natural resources 146,969 84.08
   Parks and recreation 30,384 17.38
   Government administration 178,182 101.93
   Interest on general debt 96,034 54.94
   Other and unallocable 605,801 346.57
  Utility expenditure - -
  Liquor store expenditure - -
  Insurance trust expenditure 334,290 191.24
Debt at end of fiscal year 1,949,654 1,115.36
Cash and security holdings 10,272,986 5,876.99

The constitution also authorizes the Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska, the Board of Trustees of the Nebraska State Colleges, and the State Board of Education to issue revenue bonds to construct, purchase, or remodel educational buildings and facilities. The payment of these bonds is generally made from revenue collected from use of the buildings and facilities. The legislature has authorized the creation of two financing authorities that are not subject to state constitutional restrictions on the incurrence of debt. These financing authorities were organized to assist in providing funds for the construction of capital improvement projects at the colleges and the University. Although the state has no legal responsibility for the debt of these financing authorities, they are considered part of the reporting entity.

The Nebraska state budget is prepared by the Budget Division of the Department of Administrative Services and is submitted annually by the governor to the legislature. The fiscal year runs from 1 July to 30 June.

Fiscal year 2006 general funds were estimated at $3.3 billion for resources and $2.9 billion for expenditures. In fiscal year 2004, federal government grants to Nebraska were $2.5 billion.

In the fiscal year 2007 federal budget, Nebraska was slated to receive $5 million to co-locate the Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) in Lincoln with the TRACON in Omaha.

TAXATION

In 2005, Nebraska collected $3,797 million in tax revenues or $2,158 per capita, which placed it 24th among the 50 states in per capita tax burden. The national average was $2,192 per capita. Property taxes accounted for 0.1% of the total, sales taxes 39.9%, selective sales taxes 12.0%, individual income taxes 36.7%, corporate income taxes 5.2%, and other taxes 6.0%.

As of 1 January 2006, Nebraska had four individual income tax brackets ranging from 2.56 to 6.84%. The state taxes corporations at rates ranging from 5.58 to 7.81% depending on tax bracket.

In 2004, state and local property taxes amounted to $2,007,118,000 or $1,148 per capita. The per capita amount ranks the state 16th highest nationally. Local governments collected $2,004,782,000 of the total and the state government $2,336,000.

Nebraska taxes retail sales at a rate of 5.5%. In addition to the state tax, local taxes on retail sales can reach as much as 1.5%, making for a potential total tax on retail sales of 7%. Food purchased for consumption off-premises is tax exempt. The tax on cigarettes is 64 cents per pack, which ranks 30th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Nebraska taxes gasoline at 27 cents per gallon. This is in addition to the 18.4 cents per gallon federal tax on gasoline.

According to the Tax Foundation, for every federal tax dollar sent to Washington in 2004, Nebraska citizens received $1.07 in federal spending.

ECONOMIC POLICY

The Department of Economic Development (DED) was created in 1967 to plan, promote, and develop the economy of the state. Nebraska offers loans for businesses which create or maintain employment for persons of low and moderate income. It provides tax credits to companies which increase investment and add jobs. The Bio Nebraska Life Sciences Association was formed in 2005 to coordinate and expand life sciences in the state. Grow Nebras-ka is a nonprofit marketing program whose mission is to expand the state's arts and craft industry. The Nebraska "Edge" programs are rural entrepreneurial training programs that are hosted by local communities, organizations and associations. The Nebraska Investment Finance Authority provides tax-exempt bond financing and technical assistance for agriculture, business, housing, and community development. In 2006, the US Chamber of Commerce ranked all 50 states on legal fairness towards business. The chamber found Nebraska to be one of five states with the best legal environment for business. The other four were Iowa, Virginia, Connecticut, and Delaware.

HEALTH

The infant mortality rate in October 2005 was estimated at 5.7 per 1,000 live births. The birth rate in 2003 was 14.9 per 1,000 population. The abortion rate stood at 11.6 per 1,000 women in 2000. In 2003, about 83.4% of pregnant woman received prenatal care beginning in the first trimester. In 2004, approximately 82% of children received routine immunizations before the age of three.

The crude death rate in 2003 was 8.9 deaths per 1,000 population. As of 2002, the death rates for major causes of death (per 100,000 resident population) were: heart disease, 245.3; cancer, 189.5; cerebrovascular diseases, 63.8; chronic lower respiratory diseases, 54; and diabetes, 22.7. The mortality rate from HIV infection was 1.2 per 100,000 population. In 2004, the reported AIDS case rate was at about 3.9 per 100,000 population. In 2002, about 57% of the population was considered overweight or obese. As of 2004, about 20.2% of state residents were smokers.

University Hospital and University of Nebraska Medical Center are in Omaha. In 2003, Nebraska had 85 community hospitals with about 7,500 beds. There were about 212,000 patient admissions that year and 3.7 million outpatient visits. The average daily inpatient census was about 4,400 patients. The average cost per day for hospital care was $1,043. Also in 2003, there were about 228 certified nursing facilities in the state with 16,378 beds and an overall occupancy rate of about 83%. In 2004, it was estimated that about 75.3% of all state residents had received some type of dental care within the year. Nebraska had 243 physicians per 100,000 resident population in 2004 and 936 nurses per 100,000 in 2005. In 2004, there were a total of 1,114 dentists in the state.

About 15% of state residents were enrolled in Medicaid programs in 2003; 15% were enrolled in Medicare programs in 2004. Approximately 11% of the state population was uninsured in 2004. In 2003, state health care expenditures totaled $2.1 million.

SOCIAL WELFARE

In 2004, about 43,000 people received unemployment benefits, with the average weekly unemployment benefit at $220. In fiscal year 2005, the estimated average monthly participation in the food stamp program included about 117,415 persons (46,948 households); the average monthly benefit was about $84.83 per person. That year, the total of benefits paid through the state for the food stamp program was about $119.5 million.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the system of federal welfare assistance that officially replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) in 1997, was reauthorized through the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. TANF is funded through federal block grants that are divided among the states based on an equation involving the number of recipients in each state. Nebraska's TANF program is called Employment First. In 2004, the state program had 27,000 recipients; state and federal expenditures on this TANF program totaled $59 million in fiscal year 2003.

In December 2004, Social Security benefits were paid to 290,580 Nebraska residents. This number included 190,650 retired workers, 29,720 widows and widowers, 31,910 disabled workers, 18,070 spouses, and 20,230 children. Social Security beneficiaries represented 16.6% of the total state population and 94.3% of the state's population age 65 and older. Retired workers received an average monthly payment of $937; widows and widowers, $927; disabled workers, $847; and spouses, $475. Payments for children of retired workers averaged $510 per month; children of deceased workers, $648; and children of disabled workers, $240. Federal Supplemental Security Income payments in December 2004 went to 22,100 Nebraska residents, averaging $368 a month. An additional $519,000 of state-administered supplemental payments were distributed to 5,574 residents.

HOUSING

In 2004, there were an estimated 757,743 housing units in Nebraska, 687,456 of which were occupied; 68.4% were owner-occupied. About 73.8% of all units were single-family, detached homes. Utility gas and electricity were the most common heating energy sources. It was estimated that 35,566 units lacked telephone service, 1,426 lacked complete plumbing facilities, and 3,513 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household had 2.47 members.

In 2004, 10,900 new privately owned units were authorized for construction. The median home value was $106,656. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $1,051. Renters paid a median of $547 per month. In 2006, the state received over $12.3 million in community development block grants from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

EDUCATION

In 2004, 91.3% of Nebraskans age 25 and older were high school graduates, exceeding the national average of 84%. Some 24.8% had obtained a bachelor's degree or higher, lower than the national average of 26%.

The total enrollment for fall 2002 in Nebraska's public schools stood at 285,000. Of these, 195,000 attended schools from kindergarten through grade eight, and 90,000 attended high school. Approximately 79.5% of the students were white, 7.1% were black, 10.1% were Hispanic, 1.7% were Asian/Pacific Islander, and 1.6% were American Indian/Alaskan Native. Total enrollment was estimated at 282,000 in fall 2003 and expected to be 285,000 by fall 2014, a decline of 0.2% during the period 2002 to 2014. there were 39,454 students enrolled in 242 private schools in fall 2003. Expenditures for public education in 2003/04 were estimated at $2.6 billion. Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has tested public school students nationwide. The resulting report, The Nation's Report Card, stated that in 2005 eighth graders in Nebraska scored 284 out of 500 in mathematics compared with the national average of 278.

As of fall 2002, there were 116,737 students enrolled in college or graduate school; minority students comprised 9.8% of total post-secondary enrollment. In 2005, Nebraska had 39 degree-granting institutions, including 7 public four-year schools, 8 public two-year schools, and 16 nonprofit, private four-year institutions. The University of Nebraska is the state's largest postsecondary institution, with campuses in Kearney, Lincoln, and Omaha.

ARTS

The 15-member Nebraska Arts Council (NAC), appointed by the governor, is empowered to receive federal and state funds and to plan and administer statewide and special programs in all the arts. Funds are available for arts education, organizational support, multicultural arts projects, special arts-related programs, touring, and fellowships. Affiliation with the Mid-America Arts Alliance allows the council to help sponsor national and regional events. In 2005, the NAC and other Nebraska arts organizations received nine grants totaling $747,800 from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Nebraska Humanities Council, founded in 1972, sponsors two annual festivals: The Great Plains Chautauqua and the Nebraska Book Festival. The Nebraska Book Festival celebrates local writers and books, but also emphasizes the importance of reading and writing worldwide; the 2005 theme "Local Wonders" featured US Poet Laureate and 2005 Pulitzer Prize winner, Ted Kooser, and his title, Local Wonders: Seasons in the Bohemian Alps. In 2005, the National Endowment for the Humanities contributed $782,580 to seven programs in the state.

The Omaha Theater Company for Young People sponsors a number of theatrical performances as well as the Omaha Theater Ballet Company. The Omaha Symphony was founded in 1921, and Opera Omaha was founded in 1958. In their 2006/07 season, the Omaha Symphony hosted special guest performances by pop and Christian music artist, Amy Grant, and Tony-Award winning actress, Bernadette Peters.

The Lied Center for Performing Arts in Lincoln was created in 1990 and sponsors a wide variety of dance, theater, and musical programs. The facility brings major regional, national, and international events to the state and works with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, providing opportunities in teaching and training in the performing arts departments. Offering a wide variety of events, in 2006, performances included Cuban-American recording artist, Maria Del Rey and the musical Sweeney Todd performed by local musical company, TADA.

LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS

For the fiscal year ending in December 2001, Nebraska had 272 public library systems, with 289 libraries, of which 17 were branches. In that same year, there was a total of 6,004,000 volumes of books and serial publications in the public library system, while total circulation was 11,366,000. The system also had 209,000 audio and 175,000 video items, 15,000 electronic format items (CD-ROMs, magnetic tapes, and disks), and nine bookmobiles. In fiscal year 2001, operating income for the state's public library system came to $37,036,000 and included $289,000 in federal grants and $511,000 in state grants. The Omaha public library system had 916,560 books and 2,471 periodical subscriptions in nine branches.

The Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha is the state's leading museum. Other important museums include the Nebraska State Museum of History, the University of Nebraska State Museum (natural history), and the Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, all in Lincoln; the Western Heritage Museum in Omaha; the Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer in Grand Island; and the Hastings Museum in Hastings. In all, the state had 107 museums in 2000. The Agate Fossil Beds National Monument in northwestern Nebraska features mammal fossils from the Miocene era and a library of pale-ontological and geologic material.

COMMUNICATIONS

Telephone service is regulated by the Public Service Commission. About 95.7% of the state's occupied housing units had telephones in 2004. Additionally, by June of that same year there were 984,355 mobile wireless telephone subscribers. In 2003, 66.1% of Nebraska households had a computer and 55.4% had Internet access. By June 2005, there were 253,974 high-speed lines in Nebraska, 228,965 residential and 25,009 for business. In 2005, 52 major FM stations and 19 major AM stations were operating. There were 8 major network TV stations. A total of 23,752 Internet domain names were registered in the state in 2000.

PRESS

In 2005, Nebraska had 6 morning dailies, 12 evening dailies, and 6 Sunday newspapers. The leading newspaper is the Omaha World-Herald, with a daily circulation in 2005 of 192,607 and a Sunday circulation of 242,964. The Lincoln Journal-Star had a daily circulation of 74,893 and a Sunday circulation of 84,149.

ORGANIZATIONS

In 2006, there were over 2,835 nonprofit organizations registered within the state, of which about 1,874 were registered as charitable, educational, or religious organizations. Among the national organizations based in Nebraska are the Great Plains Council at the University of Nebraska (Lincoln), the American Shorthorn Society (Omaha), the Morse Telegraph Club (Lincoln), Girls and Boys Town (Boys Town), Wellness Councils of America (Omaha), USA Roller Sports (Lincoln), and the National Arbor Day Foundation (Nebraska City). The state's arts, culture, and history are represented in part by the Nebraska Humanities Council and the Nebraska State Historical Society. Special interest and hobbyist associations include the Antique Barbed Wire Society based in Kearney and the Centennial Model T Club of Omaha.

TOURISM, TRAVEL, AND RECREATION

Tourism is Nebraska's third-largest source of outside revenue (after agriculture and manufacturing). In 2004, the state hosted some 19.6 million travelers. Out-of-state visitors were primarily from Kansas, Iowa, Colorado, Missouri, South Dakota, Illinois, and Minnesota. Total travel expenditures were at $2.9 billion. The industry supports nearly 43,000 jobs.

The 8 state parks, 9 state historical parks, 12 federal areas, and 55 recreational areas are main tourist attractions; fishing, swimming, picnicking, and sightseeing are the principal activities. The most attended Nebraska attractions in 2002 were: Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo (1,420,556 visitors), Cabela's in Sidney (1,025,000), Eugene T. Mahoney State Park (1,100,000), Lake McConaughy State Recreation Area (859,624), Fort Robinson State Park (357,932), Joslyn Art Museum (186,646), Strategic Air and Space Museum (173,889), the Great Platte River Road Archway Monument (163,000), University of Nebraska State Museum (133,343), and Scotts Bluff National Monument (111,293). There is a Lewis and Clark Discovery Center in Crofton. An unusual exhibit, called Carhenge is a re-creation of Stonehenge made with wrecked cars.

SPORTS

There are no major professional sports teams in Nebraska. Minor league baseball's Omaha Royals play in the Triple-A Pacific Coast League. The most popular spectator sport is college football. Equestrian activities, including racing and rodeos, are popular. Major annual sporting events are the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) College Baseball World Series at Rosenblatt Stadium and the River City Roundup and Rodeo, both held in Omaha. Pari-mutuel racing is licensed by the state.

The University of Nebraska Cornhuskers compete in the Big Twelve Conference. The football team often places high in national rankings and was named National Champion in 1970 (with Texas), 1971, 1994, 1995, and 1997. The Cornhuskers won the Orange Bowl in 1964, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1983, 1995, 1997, and 1998; the Cotton Bowl in 1974 (January); the Sugar Bowl in 1974 (December), 1985, and 1987; the Alamo Bowl in 2001; and the Fiesta Bowl in 1996 and 2000. The basketball team won the National Invitational Tournament in 1996.

FAMOUS NEBRASKANS

Nebraska was the birthplace of only one US president, Gerald R. Ford (Leslie King Jr., b.1913). When Spiro Agnew resigned the vice presidency in October 1973, President Richard M. Nixon appointed Ford, then a US representative from Michigan, to the post. Upon Nixon's resignation on 9 August 1974, Ford became the first nonelected president in US history.

Four native and adoptive Nebraskans have served in the presidential cabinet. J. Sterling Morton (b.New York, 18321902), who originated Arbor Day, was secretary of agriculture under Grover Cleveland. William Jennings Bryan (b.Illinois, 18601925), a US representative from Nebraska, served as secretary of state and was three times the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for president. Frederick A. Seaton (b.Washington, 190974) was Dwight Eisen-hower's secretary of the interior, and Melvin Laird (b.1922) was Richard Nixon's secretary of defense.

George W. Norris (b.Ohio, 18611944), the "fighting liberal," served 10 years in the US House of Representatives and 30 years in the Senate. Norris's greatest contributions were in rural electrification (his efforts led to the creation of the Tennessee Valley Authority), farm relief, and labor reform; he also promoted the unicameral form of government in Nebraska. Theodore C. Sorensen (b.1928) was an adviser to President John F. Kennedy.

Indian leaders important in Nebraska history include Oglala Sioux chiefs Red Cloud (18221909) and Crazy Horse (1849?77). Moses Kinkaid (b.West Virginia, 18541920) served in the US House and was the author of the Kinkaid Act, which encouraged homesteading in Nebraska. Educator and legal scholar Roscoe Pound (18701964) was also a Nebraskan. In agricultural science, Samuel Aughey (b.Pennsylvania, 18311912) and Hardy W. Campbell (b.Vermont, 18501937) developed dry-land farming techniques. Botanist Charles E. Bessey (b.Ohio, 18451915) encouraged forestation. Father Edward Joseph Flanagan (b.Ireland, 18861948) was the founder of Boys Town, a home for underprivileged youth. Two native Nebraskans became Nobel laureates in 1980: Lawrence R. Klein (b.1920) in economics and Val L. Fitch (b.1923) in physics.

Writers associated with Nebraska include Willa Cather (b.Virginia, 18731947), who used the Nebraska frontier setting of her childhood in many of her writings and won a Pulitzer Prize in 1922; author and poet John G. Neihardt (b.Illinois, 18811973), who incorporated Indian mythology and history in his work; Mari Sandoz (190166), who wrote of her native Great Plains; writer-photographer Wright Morris (191098); and author Tillie Olsen (b.1912). Rollin Kirby (18751952) won three Pulitzer Prizes for political cartooning. Composer-conductor Howard Hanson (18961982), born in Wahoo, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1944.

Nebraskans important in entertainment include actor-dancer Fred Astaire (Fred Austerlitz, 18991984); actors Harold Lloyd (18941971), Henry Fonda (190582), Robert Taylor (Spangler Arlington Brugh, (191169), Marlon Brando (19242004), and Sandy Dennis (193793); television stars Johnny Carson (b.Iowa, 19252005) and Dick Cavett (b.1936); and motion-picture producer Darryl F. Zanuck (190279).

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Calloway, Bertha W., and Alonzo N. Smith. Visions of Freedom on the Great Plains: An Illustrated History of African Americans in Nebraska. Virginia Beach, Va.: Donning Co., 1998.

Council of State Governments. The Book of the States, 2006 Edition. Lexington, Ky.: Council of State Governments, 2006.

Iowa Nebraska Travel-Smart. Santa Fe: John Muir Publications, 2000.

Luebke, Frederick C. Nebraska: An Illustrated History. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1995.

McArthur, Debra. The Kansas-Nebraska Act and "Bleeding Kansas" in American History. Berkeley Heights, N.J.: Enslow, 2003.

Mobil Travel Guide. Great Plains 2006: Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma. Lincolnwood, Ill.: ExxonMobil Travel Publications, 2006.

Olson, James C., and Ronald C. Naugle. History of Nebraska. 3rd ed. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1997.

Preston, Thomas. Great Plains: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Vol. 4 in The Double Eagle Guide to 1,000 Great Western Recreation Destinations. Billings, Mont.: Discovery Publications, 2003.

State of Nebraska. Department of Economic Development. Nebraska Statistical Handbook, 19931994. Lincoln, 1994.

US Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, US Census Bureau. Nebraska, 2000. Summary Social, Economic, and Housing Characteristics: 2000 Census of Population and Housing. Washington, D.C.: US Government Printing Office, 2003.

Wishart, David J. An Unspeakable Sadness: The Dispossession of the Nebraska Indians. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1994.

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Nebraska

NEBRASKA

NEBRASKA looks like a diesel locomotive facing eastward. When it became a territory of the United States in 1854, its northern border extended all the way to Canada and its western border extended deep into the Rocky Mountains, but between 1854 and statehood in 1867, it was whittled down by Congress to please its various constituencies. It is now bounded to the north by South Dakota. The Missouri River flows southeastward out of South Dakota, forming part of Nebraska's border with South Dakota and its eastern border with Iowa and then northwest Missouri. Nebraska's southern border forms Kansas's northern border, meets Colorado, makes a sharp corner northward to southeast of Ogallala, Nebraska, and then turns sharply westward along Colorado's border until meeting Wyoming. The border then goes north until meeting South Dakota, where it turns sharply eastward.

The climate and land of Nebraska can be divided into four parts. The eastern part of Nebraska, along the Missouri, is part of the Central Lowlands of the Missouri River region. It is usually moist, prone to flooding, and rich for agriculture. West of the Lowlands, in south central Nebraska, are the Loess Hills. Loess is fine-grained silt deposited on the land by winds. The Loess Hills region has many rivers that have carved the land into hills and valleys; it is prone to drought, and even the rivers may go dry. The Sand Hills are in the western part of the state. In the early era of Nebraska's settlement, they were often mistakenly thought to be just part of the High Plains farther to the west because of their vast expanses of sand dunes, the third largest expanse of sand dunes in the world, behind only the Sahara Desert and the Arabian Desert. Yet the Sand Hills harbor lakes and streams that

enabled those who knew about them to farm and survive even during droughts. The High Plains fill the far western part of Nebraska and are highlands that begin the continent's westward rise into the Rocky Mountains. The High Plains have Nebraska's highest spot, Panorama Point, at 5,424 feet above sea level. This is part of a steady westward rise from 480 feet above sea level at the Missouri River, meaning that Nebraska is tilted. The High Plains tend to be dry and windy, but irrigation and pumping water from underground aquifers have made it good land for raising cattle.

Prehistory

There have been several significant migrations from northeast Asia into North America, the first probably occurring over 100,000 years ago. There is evidence that people were on the land that is now Nebraska 25,000 years ago, probably migratory people who did not settle in one place. When the last glacial era was ending around 11,000 b.c., nomads known as Paleo-Indians, likely a mix of several cultures, judging by the distinct varieties of their spearheads, lived in or migrated through the Nebraska area. These people hunted the big game that was abundant in the Great Plains of the time.

The region of Nebraska gradually warmed, and a great forest grew. About 7000 b.c., new cultures were evolving; archaeologists call the people of those cultures Archaic Indians. These people moved into and off of the land over several thousand years. Most of the really big game had disappeared. Thus the Archaic Indians hunted small game as well as what big game they could find, such as deer, and they foraged for fruits and vegetables. They made advancements in technology that made their survival easier.

About 2000 b.c., a revolution in how people lived in Nebraska began with the migration into the area of people who had lived east of the Missouri River, sometimes called the "Plains Woodland" culture. Perhaps originally attracted by Nebraska's woodlands, they adjusted to a climate change that diminished the forest and generated open grasslands. One of their important contributions to life in the region was the development of pottery, especially vessels in which food or water could be stored. Some large vessels were used for cooking. They probably moved encampments with the seasons, but they were a fairly settled people who built dwellings and even villages that they would return to as the seasons dictated. Some evidence indicates that near the end of their era, the Plains Woodlanders were experimenting with agriculture. Burial mounds from this era indicate a society that was becoming larger and more complex.

In about a.d. 1000, the climate seems to have become drier. The Native Americans in Nebraska of that era often were farmers. Maize had been imported from the southwest, probably along an ancient trading route that extended all the way into Mexico, and it was cultivated along with varieties of squash and beans. Hunting and foraging for wild food plants was still very important for survival. Probably most of the native Nebraskans of the time lived in villages, in rectangular lodges with wooden frames, wattle-and-daub walls, and roofs plastered with mud and covered by grass and tree branches. The pottery became varied and was often simply decorated by carved incisions made before firing.

By the time Europeans were taking an interest in the area of Nebraska, the Native Americans there were in flux, rapidly moving in and out of the area in response to wars and invasions. The Pawnees were in the middle of what became Nebraska; they were settled farmers who probably had been there longer than any of their neighbors. The Poncas occupied the northeast part of modern Nebraska; the Cheyennes were moving in from the west; the Otos had recently settled into the southeast corner; and the Arapahos were hanging onto lands to the southwest. Wars far to the north were sending refugees southward, and the Brule and Oglala Dakota (aka Lakota) Sioux tribes had been forced into northern Nebraska from the other side of the Missouri River by the Chippewas. The Dakotas were violent nomads who raided the villages of the settled peoples of Nebraska; they were very suspicious of outsiders. In addition, the Apaches were following the herds of bison and were pressing the Arapahos and some Pawnees out of their homes.

Frontier

In 1682, René Robert Cavalier, Sieur de La Salle, led a French expedition down the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico, claiming for France all the land that drained water into the Mississippi, which included the territory that became Nebraska. The region was named "Louisiana" for Louis XIV. At the time, Spain had already laid claim to most of the same land, including Nebraska. Many French trappers and traders visited the Nebraska region without arousing much interest until 1714, when Étienne Veniard de Bourgmont, something of a reprobate adventurer, traveled to the Platte River, which flowed through the middle of what is now Nebraska. Alarmed by this, Spain sent a military expedition north to drive out the French, but there were no French to be found. A couple of years later, in 1720, another Spanish expedition was sent, led by Pedro de Villasur, with forty or so Spanish soldiers and about sixty Native American warriors. They found no French, but they managed to thoroughly antagonize the local population, including the Pawnees, who were on a war footing because of their conflicts with the Dakotas; the Pawnees attacked the Spanish and only thirteen members of the Spanish expedition survived to return south.

In 1739, the French explorers Paul and Pierre Mallet named the Platte River and traveled its length westward and beyond, past the western border of modern Nebraska. French traders continued to visit Nebraska's tribes. In 1800, France forced Spain to surrender its claims to Louisiana, and in 1803 the United States purchased Louisiana from France. In 1804, the Lewis and Clark Expedition stopped briefly in Nebraska while traveling up the Missouri River, gathered some local tribesmen, and offered American friendship; the tribesmen listened patiently, but they had no authority—the leaders who could have made a pact with the explorers were away on other business. In 1812, trader Manuel Lisa established a trading post near the same spot. Robert Stuart led an expedition that trekked eastward from Oregon, reaching the Platte River in 1813 and following the river to the Missouri; his route became the Oregon Trail on which hundreds of thousands of people traveled through Nebraska to the Far West. Major Stephen Long led an expedition into the Great Plains in 1820, and what he saw seemed "barren and uncongenial" to him. He therefore called it a "Great Desert."

Even so, in 1823, Americans established the town of Bellevue across the Missouri River from Council Bluffs in Iowa. It was the first permanent American settlement in the future Nebraska. In 1834, the United States Congress passed the Indian Intercourse Act, forbidding Americans from settling in Nebraska's lands and providing that the United States Army would remove people who violated the law. The Native Americans of the area also reached an agreement whereby they would be compensated annually for Americans using roads and establishing forts in their territory. Beginning with Moses and Eliza Merrill in

1833, missionaries came to live with the Native Americans. In the 1830s, two trails in addition to the Oregon Trail became important in the mass migration of Americans to the West: the Mormon Trail that followed the north bank of the Platte River, and the Denver Trail, which followed the Blue River and the Platte River and then went to Denver.

The Oto name for the Platte River was Nebrathka, which meant "flat water," because even though very long, the Platte River was shallow and easy to cross on foot in many places. Explorer Lieutenant John C. Frémont referred to the river as the Nebraska in a report in 1842, and in 1844 Secretary of War William Wilkins said that given the river's importance, either Nebraska or Platte should be the official name of the region. An effort in Congress on 17 December 1844 to recognize Nebraska as a territory failed, but on 30 May 1854 Nebraska was recognized as an American territory in the Kansas-Nebraska Act. In the Missouri Compromise of 6 March 1820, all lands from Kansas northward were supposed to become free states—no slavery allowed; the Kansas-Nebraska Act repealed the Missouri Compromise and left it up to the citizens of the Kansas and Nebraska to decide whether to be free or slave states.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act gave Nebraska a vast territory, from Kansas to Canada, from the Missouri River into the Rocky Mountains. A census in 1854 found 2,732 Americans living in Nebraska. The citizens of Bellevue and much of southern Nebraska were upset when Omaha was chosen to be the territorial capital instead of Bellevue. In 1863, Congress divided the territory into smaller ones, leaving Nebraska close to its modern form. The Civil War (1861–1865) was going on at the time, but Nebraska felt the effect primarily in the 3,000 troops it contributed to the Union. From 1865 to 1867, the Union Pacific Railroad built a line out from Omaha, westward past the Nebraska border.

In 1866, Nebraska submitted a proposal for a state constitution to Congress. It included a clause that said only white males could vote, which outraged a Congress controlled by the Radical Republicans, who opposed racial discrimination. The offending clause had to be eliminated in order for the constitution to be acceptable; the change was made, allowing Nebraska to become the thirty-seventh state in the Union on 1 March 1867. The new state government resolved to build a new city for its capital, naming it "Lincoln" because it was unlikely that anyone would complain about the name of the martyred President. In 1875, a new state constitution was approved to replace the first one, because the first one had been put together in haste and had not provided a clear framework for laws.

Early Statehood

Although Arbor Day was begun by Nebraska on 10 April 1872, the 1870s were difficult times, with droughts and plagues of locusts between 1874 and 1877. The 1880s, however, saw a boom in the economy. During that decade, the population increased from 453,402 to 1,062,656, an amazing jump in ten years. By 1885, the bison of Nebraska had been exterminated. The 1890s saw a severe reversal of fortune because the United States was hit by a depression that lasted most of the decade. Land prices plummeted, crop prices dropped, and water was scarce. The population only increased to 1,066,300 during the decade. During the 1890s and 1900s, dry land farming techniques and irrigation opened the High Plains to farming, but growing crops there proved to be too difficult for farmers, and thus much of the land became pasture for cattle. Congress's Reclamation Act of 1902 proved especially helpful to Nebraska by providing funds for the development of state water projects.

During the 1890s, one of Nebraska's most famous public figures rose in prominence: William Jennings Bryan, "the Boy Orator of the Platte," from Lincoln. He served Nebraska in the House of Representatives from 1890 to 1894. In 1896, 1900, and 1908, he won the Democrats' presidential nomination. His public speaking was galvanizing, thrilling his listeners. He advocated farmers' rights, and in his best-known speech, he declared that farmers should not be crucified "on a cross of gold."

In the 1920s, Nebraska had another boom. Like that of the 1880s, it was cut down by a depression, the Great Depression that lasted until America entered World War II (1939–1945). In the 1930s, a drought dried the land in most of Nebraska. The soil was composed of fine grains from decades of tilling, and high winds out of the southwest would pick it up and blow tons of it into the sky, blotting out the sun and penetrating everything from clothing to stored food. This was the era of the dust bowl. During Nebraska's worst year, 1935, Congress passed the Tri-County Pact, a federal irrigation project designed to help Nebraskans. By 1954, 1,300,000 acres were irrigated.

In 1937, Nebraska revised its constitution to create a unicameral legislature. Until 1937, Nebraska had a bicameral legislature, meaning it had two houses, a senate and a house of representatives, but the new unicameral legislature had only one house, the Senate. The constitution was further amended to make the Senate nonpartisan. The idea was to streamline the process of making laws and to minimize partisan bickering. The amendment became law partly because Nebraska's very popular United States Senator George W. Norris supported it. He went so far as to leave the Republican Party and run as an independent for reelection to the United States Senate, winning a fifth term.

Modern Era

In 1944, near the end of World War II, the Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Project was passed by Congress, authorizing hydroelectric plants and reservoirs in states along the Missouri River. This contributed to the expansion of irrigation in Nebraska and to a boom in the 1950s that managed to defy another drought. This boom attracted investors, and corporations began buying farms, with farm sizes nearly doubling from 1950 to 2000, while the number of farms dropped by about 40 percent. People who had worked on farms moved to cities to work in manufacturing plants. In 1960, 54.3 percent of the population of 1,411,921 lived in cities, the first time a census recorded more Nebraskans living in urban areas than in rural areas. African Americans in Nebraskan cities began civil rights protests in 1963. The nationally recognized civil rights leader Malcolm X was born in Omaha.

In 1966, the state property tax seemed too much of a burden for small farmers, and Nebraska was trying to discourage out-of-staters from owning farms in the state and to encourage family ownership of farms. Thus, it revamped its tax structure, eliminating the state property tax while beginning an income tax and a sales tax to finance the state government.

During the 1970s, times were generally good, but in the 1980s, Nebraska went into a recession. Many people lost their farms. The Family Farm Preservation Act of 1982 passed by Nebraska's legislature was intended to help the small farmers with low-interest loans and tax breaks. In 1987, the legislature passed tax incentives to encourage more manufacturing in the state, hoping to create jobs. In 1986, Nebraska's race for governor featured for the first time two female nominees for the Republican and Democratic Parties, with Republican Kay Orr winning over Helen Boosalis.

In the 1990s, Nebraska slowly pulled out of its recession. Advances in farm equipment made it easier for a few people to manage a large farm or ranch, and investments in expensive new equipment were being paid off in an average of three years. This brought with it a significant increase in population, from 1,578,417 in 1990 to 1,713,235 in 2002.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Andreas, A. T. History of Nebraska. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, 1976 (circa 1882).

Creigh, Dorothy Weyer. Nebraska: A Bicentennial History. New York: Norton, 1977.

Johnson, J. R. Representative Nebraskans. Lincoln, Nebr.: Johnsen Publishing, 1954.

Mattes, Merrill J. The Great Platte River Road: The Covered Wagon Mainline Via Fort Kearney to Fort Laramie. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, 1969. About the Overland Trail.

McNair, Sylvia. Nebraska. New York: Children's Press, 1999.

Nebraska State Historical Society. Home page at http://www.nebraskahistory.org.

Olson, James C. History of Nebraska. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1955.

Wills, Charles A. A Historical Album of Nebraska. Brookfield, Conn.: Millbrook Press, 1994.

Kirk H.Beetz

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Nebraska

Nebraska (nəbrăs´kə), Great Plains state of the central United States. It is bordered by Iowa and Missouri, across the Missouri River (E), Kansas (S), Colorado (SW), Wyoming (NW), and South Dakota (N).

Facts and Figures

Area, 77,227 sq mi (200,018 sq km). Pop. (2010) 1,826,341, a 6.7% increase since the 2000 census. Capital, Lincoln. Largest city, Omaha. Statehood, Mar. 1, 1867 (37th state). Highest pt., 5,426 ft (1,655 m), Kimball Co.; lowest pt., 840 ft (256 m), SE corner of state. Nickname, Cornhusker State. Motto, Equality before the Law. State bird, Western meadowlark. State flower, goldenrod. State tree, cottonwood. Abbr., Nebr.; NE

Geography

Nebraska is roughly rectangular, except in the northeast and the east where the border is formed by the irregular course of the Missouri River and in the southwest where the state of Colorado cuts out a squared corner. The land rises more or less gradually from 840 ft (256 m) in the east to 5,300 ft (1,615 m) in the west. The great but shallow Platte River, formed in W Nebraska by the junction of the North Platte and the South Platte, flows across the state from west to east to join the Missouri S of Omaha. The Platte and the Missouri, together with their tributaries, give Nebraska all-important water sources that are essential to farming in this agrarian state. Underground water sources are also widely used for irrigation. The river valleys have long provided routes westward, and today the transcontinental railroads and highways follow the valleys.

From the Missouri westward over about half the state stretch undulating farm lands, where the fertile silt is underlaid by deep loess soil. Nebraska's population is concentrated there; many are farmers who produce grains for the consumer market or for feeding hogs and dairy cattle. In this region also lie Nebraska's two major cities—Lincoln, the capital and an important insurance center, and Omaha, the state's largest city and an important meat and grain distribution center—as well as many of the state's larger towns.

To the west and northwest the Sand Hills of Nebraska fan out, their wind-eroded contours now more or less stabilized by grass coverage. Cattle graze on the slopes and tablelands, protected in the severe winters by the sand bluffs and the valleys. The climate is severely continental throughout Nebraska; a low of -40°F (-40°C) in the winter is not unusual, and during the short intense summers temperatures may easily reach 110°F (43°C). Rainfall is almost twice as heavy in the east as in the west. Yet in the west along the river valleys the mixture of silt and sand is watered enough to yield abundantly to cultivation, even under semiarid conditions. In the far west the land rises to the foothills of the Rocky Mts. and displays spectacular bedrock foundations.

Hundreds of fresh and alkali lakes in the state attract sportsmen and campers. The pioneers' migration west over the Oregon Trail is commemorated by the Scotts Bluff National Monument and the Chimney Rock National Historic Site. Other points of interest to the traveler include Father Flanagan's Boys Town, near Omaha; the Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge, near Valentine; and the Homestead National Monument, near Beatrice.

Economy

Agriculture is Nebraska's dominant occupational pursuit. The state's chief farm products are cattle, corn, hogs, soybeans, and wheat. Nebraska ranked second among the states in cattle production in 1997. Wheat farming flourishes on the southwest plateaus, while irrigation along the Platte and its tributaries has increased the sugar-beet crop. The Univ. of Nebraska maintains agricultural experiment stations throughout the state. A program of soil conservation includes a shelter belt running across the state to check the effect of wind erosion, and dryland-farming techniques have been encouraged. Forest conservation is stressed, and the state (the birthplace of Arbor Day) has been very active in planting forests.

Nebraska's largest industry is food processing, notably including beef production. The state has diversified its industries since World War II, and the manufacture of electrical machinery, primary metals, and transportation equipment is also important. Deposits of oil (discovered in Cheyenne co. in 1949–50) contribute to the state's economy. Omaha and Lincoln are centers for insurance and telecommunications industries, and Offutt Air Force Base, near Omaha, was the cold-war center of the Strategic Air Command.

Government and Higher Education

Nebraska's constitution was adopted in 1875. It was amended in 1982 to ensure that rangeland and farmland could be sold only to a Nebraska family-farm corporation. The executive branch is headed by a governor elected for a four-year term. By constitutional amendment in 1934 the legislature was made unicameral (it is unique in the United States), with 49 members elected on a nonpartisan basis for terms of four years. The state elects three representatives and two senators to the U.S. Congress and has five electoral votes in presidential elections. In 1986, Nebraska's Kay A. Orr became the first Republican woman to be elected governor of a state. E. Benjamin Nelson, a Democrat elected governor in 1990 and 1994, was succeeded by Mike Johanns, a Republican elected in 1998 and 2002. Johanns resigned in 2005 to become U.S. secretary of education, and was succeeded by fellow Republican Dave Heineman, who won election to the governorship in 2006 and reelection in 2010. Pete Ricketts, a Republican, won in 2014.

The state's leading institution of higher education is the Univ. of Nebraska, at Lincoln, Omaha, and Kearney. Creighton Univ. is at Omaha.

History

Hunters, Explorers, and Fur Traders

Nebraska's soil has been farmed since prehistoric times, but the Native Americans of the plains—notably the Pawnee—devoted themselves more to hunting the buffalo than to farming, since buffalo, as well as the pronghorn antelope and smaller animals, were then abundant in the area. The Spanish explorer Francisco Vásquez de Coronado and his men were the first Europeans to visit the region. They probably passed through Nebraska in 1541.

The French also came and in the 18th cent. engaged in fur trading, but development began only after the area passed from France to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804) and the explorations of Zebulon M. Pike (1806) increased knowledge of the country, but the activities of the fur traders were more immediately valuable in terms of settlement. Manuel Lisa, a fur trader, probably established the first trading post in the Nebraska area in 1813. Bellevue, the first permanent settlement in Nebraska, first developed as a trading post.

Steamboats and Wagon Trains

Steamboating on the Missouri River, initiated in 1819, brought business to the river ports of Omaha and Brownville. The natural highway formed by the Platte valley was used extensively by pioneers going west over the Oregon Trail and also the California Trail and the Mormon Trail. Nebraska settlers made money supplying the wagon trains with fresh mounts and pack animals as well as food.

Nebraska became a territory after passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854. The territory, which initially extended from lat. 40°N to the Canadian border, was firmly Northern and Republican in sympathy during the Civil War. In 1863 the territory was reduced to its present-day size by the creation of the territories of Dakota and Colorado. Congress passed an enabling act for statehood in 1864, but the original provision in the state constitution limiting the franchise to whites delayed statehood until 1867.

Railroads, Ranches, and the Growth of Populism

In 1867 the Union Pacific RR was built across the state, and the land boom, already vigorous, became a rush. Farmers settled on free land obtained under the Homestead Act of 1862, and E Nebraska took on a settled look. The population rose from 28,841 in 1860 to 122,993 in 1870. The Pawnee were defeated in 1859, and by 1880 war with the Sioux and other Native American resistance was over. With the coming of the railroads, cow towns, such as Ogallala and Schuyler, were built up as shipping points on overland cattle trails. Buffalo Bill's Wild West Shows opened in Nebraska in 1882.

Farmers had long been staking out homestead claims across the Sand Hills to the high plains, but ranches also prospered in the state. The ranchers, trying to preserve the open range, ruthlessly opposed the encroachment of the farmers, but the persistent farmers won. Many conservationists believe that much of the land that was plowed under should have been left with grass cover to prevent erosion in later dust storms.

Nature was seldom kind to the people of Nebraska. Ranching was especially hard hit by the ruinous cold of the winter of 1880–81, and farmers were plagued by insect hordes from 1856 to 1875, by prairie fires, and by the recurrent droughts of the 1890s. Many farmers joined the Granger movement in the lean 1870s and the Farmers' Alliances of the 1880s. In the 1890s many beleaguered farmers, faced with ruin and angry at the monopolistic practices of the railroads and the financiers, formed marketing and stock cooperatives and showed their discontent by joining the Populist party. The first national convention of the Populist party was held at Omaha in 1892, and Nebraska's most famous son, William Jennings Bryan, headed the Populist and Democratic tickets in the presidential election of 1896. Populists held the governorship of the state from 1895 to 1901.

Twentieth-Century Changes

Improved conditions in the early 1900s caused Populism to decline in the state, and the return of prosperous days was marked by progressive legislation, the building of highways, and conservation measures. The flush of prosperity, largely caused by the demand for foodstuffs during World War I, was almost feverish. Overexpansion of credits and overconfidence made the depression of the 1920s and 30s all the more disastrous (see Great Depression). Many farmers were left destitute, and many others were able to survive only because of the moratorium on farm debts in 1932. They received federal aid in the desperate years of drought in the 1930s.

Better weather and the huge food demands of World War II renewed prosperity in Nebraska. After the war, efforts continued to make the best use of the water supply, notably in such federal plans as the Missouri River basin project, a vast dam and water-diversion scheme.

Recent attempts to diversify Nebraska's economic base to reduce dependence on meat processing and agriculture have made Lincoln, where state government and the Univ. of Nebraska generate many jobs, a business center, along with Omaha. Among noted Nebraskans have been the pioneer and historian Julius Sterling Morton, who originated Arbor Day, and authors Willa Cather, Mari Sandoz, John G. Neihardt, Loren Eisley, and Wright Morris, all of whom have vividly described the state.

Bibliography

See J. C. Olson, History of Nebraska (2d ed. 1966, repr. 1974); M. P. Lawson and R. E. Lonsdale, Economic Atlas of Nebraska (1977); D. W. Creigh, Nebraska: A History (1977); Nebraska (1985), "Geographies of the United States" series.

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Nebraska

NEBRASKA


Lincoln . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385

Omaha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397

The State in Brief

Nickname: Cornhusker State

Motto: Equality before the law

Flower: Goldenrod

Bird: Western meadowlark

Area: 77,353 square miles (2000; U.S. rank: 16th)

Elevation: Ranges from 840 feet to 5,426 feet above sea level

Climate: Continental, with wide variations of temperature: intensely hot summers, and severely cold winters. Rainfall twice as heavy in east as in west

Admitted to Union: March 1, 1867

Capital: Lincoln

Head Official: Governor David Heineman (R) (until 2007)

Population

1980: 1,570,000

1990: 1,578,385

2000: 1,711,263

2004 estimate: 1,747,214

Percent change, 19902000: 8.4%

U.S. rank in 2004: 38th

Percent of residents born in state: 67.1% (2000)

Density: 22.3 people per square mile (2000)

2002 FBI Crime Index Total: 73,606

Racial and Ethnic Characteristics (2000)

White: 1,533,261

Black or African American: 68,541

American Indian and Alaska Native: 14,896

Asian: 21,931

Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 836

Hispanic or Latino (may be of any race): 94,425

Other: 47,845

Age Characteristics (2000)

Population under 5 years old: 117,048

Population 5 to 19 years old: 387,288

Percent of population 65 years and over: 13.6%

Median age: 35.3 years (2000)

Vital Statistics

Total number of births (2003): 25,760

Total number of deaths (2003): 15,444 (infant deaths, 145)

AIDS cases reported through 2003: 598

Economy

Major industries: Finance, insurance, and real estate; trade; agriculture; manufacturing; services

Unemployment rate: 3.9% (April 2005)

Per capita income: $30,331 (2003; U.S. rank: 24)

Median household income: $44,357 (3-year average, 2001-2003)

Percentage of persons below poverty level: 9.9% (3-year average, 2001-2003)

Income tax rate: Graduated from 2.56% to 6.84% (2000; rate set yearly by state legislature)

Sales tax rate: 5.5%

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Nebraska

NEBRASKA


Admitted to the Union as the thirty-seventh state on March 1, 1867, Nebraska is located in the western north-central United States, midway between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Nebraska shares boundaries with South Dakota in the north, Kansas in the south, Iowa, Missouri, and the Missouri River in the east, and Wyoming and Colorado in the west. Nebraska is spread across 77,335 square miles, making it the sixteenth largest state. Its population of approximately 1.6 million people ranks thirty-sixth among the fifty states. Omaha is the state's most populous city, while Lincoln is its capital.

Nebraska was acquired by the United States in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase. In 1804 the federal government commissioned Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to map the newly acquired territory, catalog its wildlife, and establish relations with local inhabitants. Lewis and Clark's expedition took them along Nebraska's eastern border. Two years later Zebulon Pike crossed southern Nebraska during his own expedition. These expeditions stimulated fur trade in the region, and the U.S. Army built a fort in Nebraska to protect traders from hostile Native Americans.

Native Americans grew more hostile as white settlers began encroaching upon their lands. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 opened land for white settlement in the Atlantic states by authorizing federal troops to relocate Native Americans from the southeastern United States to the so-called Indian Territory comprised of land in Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma. Thousands of Native Americans suffered great hardships as they were forcibly uprooted from their homelands and driven westward in what has become known as the Trail of Tears.

Native Americans were next forced to cede land for white settlement within the Indian Territory. In 1854 most Native Americans were excluded from eastern Nebraska, while the Sioux and the Cheyenne peoples remained in the western half. Skirmishes between the two tribes and federal troops broke out when the U.S. Army opened a trail to Montana that crossed Sioux and Cheyenne hunting grounds in the west. In 1869 Congress ratified a treaty agreeing to abandon the trail in exchange for the Sioux's promise to leave Nebraska and relocate their peoples to a reservation in what is now South Dakota.

But many Sioux refused to move, arguing that the federal government had deceived them into signing the treaty. Fighting resumed between U.S. troops and the two tribes. On June 25, 1876, General George Armstrong Custer (18391876) led a Seventh Cavalry attack against the Sioux camps of Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse on the banks of Little Bighorn in Montana. Custer and most of his cavalry were killed during the attack. However the army chased down Crazy Horse in northwestern Nebraska, where the Sioux leader surrendered. All but approximately 12,000 Native Americans were ultimately removed from Nebraska, with small numbers of Santee Sioux, Omaha, and Winnebago tribes remaining.

Nebraska also played a role in the events preceeding the American Civil War (18611865). The 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act created the territories of Kansas and Nebraska, and allowed the residents of each territory to decide for themselves whether to permit slavery. The act repealed the Missouri Compromise of 1820, which had outlawed slavery in the North. But following the act's passage Nebraska showed little interest in establishing slavery. However violence erupted in Kansas between slavery proponents and abolitionists. The slavery debate eventually divided the nation as a whole, leading eleven southern states to secede from the Union.

Nebraska voters rejected statehood during the Civil War, but narrowly approved a state constitution in 1866. In 1867 Congress admitted Nebraska to the Union over the veto of President Andrew Johnson (18291837), who contended that the state's admission process was unconstitutional. Two federal laws attracted settlers to the new state. The Homestead Act of 1862 gave 160 acres of land to families that resided in the state for five years and paid a nominal fee. The 1862 Pacific Railroad Act authorized construction of a transcontinental railroad passing through Nebraska. Huge tracts of land along the proposed railway were sold to settlers. The Union Pacific Railroad debuted in 1869 with an eastern terminus at Omaha. Nebraska's population swelled from 30,000 in 1860 to almost a million by 1890.

Most of the families that settled in Nebraska during this period were of European descent. Throngs of immigrants from Germany, Czechoslovakia, Ireland, and Italy made Nebraska their home in the late 1800s. A century later little had changed in the state's demographics. The 1990 census revealed that approximately 90 percent of Nebraska residents identified themselves as white persons descending from German, Irish, Czech, Swedish, or Danish ancestry. For the most part these ethnic groups have acclimated well within the state; they have formed closely-knit, thriving communities. However, during World War I (19141918) a number of German Americans in Nebraska had their loyalty and patriotism questioned by state officials who feared they might be spies or saboteurs.

Once primarily a rural state, nearly two-thirds of Nebraska residents now live in urban areas. Yet 95 percent of the state's land is used for agricultural purposes, and close to one-half of the state's labor force work in farm-related fields. Known as the Cornhusker State, Nebraska produces 4 billion bushels of corn each year, second only to Iowa. It is also a leading cattle-raising state. But Nebraska's strong economy is bolstered by non-agricultural businesses as well. The state's tourism industry generates about $2 billion a year in gross revenue, while the insurance, telecommunications, real-estate, and healthcare sectors help keep Nebraska's unemployment rate among the nation's lowest.

In terms of political institutions, the Cornhusker State's most distinctive feature may be the government's unicameral legislature, the only one of its kind in the United States. The single house has 49 senators who are elected in even-numbered years to serve four-year terms without designation of political party. The state maintained a bicameral legislature for 68 years before amending its constitution in 1934. Voters hoped the amendment would rein in governmental spending during the Great Depression (19291939).

See also: Kansas-Nebraska Act, Missouri Compromise, Railroad Industry


FURTHER READING

Federal Writer's Project. 1993. Nebraska: A Guide to the Cornhusker State, Reprint, New York: Somerset, n.d.

Luebke, Frederick C. Nebraska: An Illustrated History. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1995.

Olson, James C., and Ronald C. Naugle. History of Nebraska, 3d ed. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1997.

State of Nebraska. Department of Economic Development. Nebraska Statistical Handbook, 1993-1994. Lincoln, 1994.

Wishart, Davis J. An Unspeakable Sadness: The Disposition of the Nebraska Indians. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1994.

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Nebraska

Nebraska State in w central USA, in the Great Plains; the capital is Lincoln. Omaha is the largest city. The region was acquired under the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and was unexplored until the Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804). The territory of Nebraska was created in 1854. Nebraska was admitted to the union in 1867. The land rises gradually from the e to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in the w, and is drained chiefly by the Platte River, a tributary of the Missouri. The e half of the state is farmland, where farmers grow grain and raise cattle and pigs. Nebraska's economy is overwhelmingly agricultural. Industries: food processing, oil, and sand, gravel and stone quarrying. Area: 199,113sq km (76,878sq mi). Pop. (2000) 1,711,263.

http://www.state.ne.us

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Nebraska

Nebraskaalpaca, attacker, backer, clacker, claqueur, cracker, Dhaka, hacker, Hakka, knacker, lacquer, maraca, paca, packer, sifaka, slacker, smacker, stacker, tacker, tracker, whacker, yakka •Kafka •anchor, banker, Bianca, canker, Casablanca, Costa Blanca, flanker, franker, hanker, lingua franca, Lubyanka, rancour (US rancor), ranker, Salamanca, spanker, Sri Lanka, tanka, tanker, up-anchor, wanker •Alaska, lascar, Madagascar, Nebraska •Kamchatka • linebacker • outbacker •hijacker, skyjacker •Schumacher • backpacker •safecracker • wisecracker •nutcracker • firecracker • ransacker •scrimshanker • bushwhacker •barker, haka, Kabaka, Lusaka, marker, moussaka, nosy parker, Oaxaca, Osaka, parka, Shaka, Zarqa •asker, masker •backmarker • waymarker •Becker, checker, Cheka, chequer, Dekker, exchequer, Flecker, mecca, Neckar, Necker, pecker, Quebecker, Rebecca, Rijeka, trekker, weka, wrecker •sepulchre (US sepulcher) • Cuenca •burlesquer, Francesca, Wesker •woodpecker

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Nebraska

NEBRASKA

NEBRASKA , state on the Great Plains located near the geographical center of continental United States. Its population in 2005 was 1,729,000 of whom approximately 7,200 are Jews, a decline of some 10% in three decades. Most live in Omaha, the home of four synagogues, a Jewish community center, and a mikveh; the majority of the other Jews in the state live in Lincoln, the home of the state university and two synagogues.

Nebraska was organized as a territory in 1854, and within a year the stream of Jewish settlement had begun. The first Jewish settlers are believed to have been two brothers, Lewis and Henry Wessel, who went to Nebraska City from St. Louis in 1855. The next few decades brought a steady trickle of Jews who were predominantly of Central European origin (Alsace-Lorraine, Germany, Bohemia). Many had settled briefly in cities on the eastern seaboard before moving to the west, where, especially after the Civil War, the Homestead Act and railroad construction attracted new settlement. The early Jews in Nebraska were mainly merchants, such as Aaron Cahn and Meyer Hellman, who established a clothing business in Omaha to supply pioneers striking out on the Oregon Trail, and Carl Ernest Louis Golding, who was an Indian trader in Plattsmouth.

One of the most colorful figures in early Jewish life in Nebraska was Julius Meyer, who settled in Omaha in 1866 and became a successful Indian trader. He mastered at least six tribal dialects, was adopted into the Pawnee tribe, and was given the name "curly-headed-white-chief-with-one-tongue." He later became a government interpreter for the Indians and accompanied a party of them to the Paris Exposition. Another early Indian merchant, Harris L. Levi, was less fortunate. In 1869 he joined a surveying party, all of whom were massacred

by the Indians in retaliation for the slaying of two Indian youths by the surveyors.

The most important early Jewish settler was Edward *Rosewater, who went to Omaha in 1863 as manager of the Western Union, and then became active as a journalist, founding the Omaha Evening Bee News (1871). Rosewater was a leading and controversial figure in Republican Party affairs in the state, served as National Republican Committeeman from Nebraska, and was twice defeated for the U.S. Senate.

After 1881 Russian Jews began to arrive in large numbers, many of whom were systematically sent out west by the Industrial Removal Aid Society of New York. Some abortive attempts were made to settle the newcomers on the soil, and the Jewish Agricultural Society tried to found a colony in Cherry County in 1908, but by 1916 the experiment was abandoned.

With the exception of a handful of ranchers, the Jewish population of Nebraska, by 1970, was almost entirely concentrated in business and the professions. Scattered groups of Jews live in some of the smaller Nebraska towns (Grand Island, Norfolk, Scottsbluff, Beatrice), but only *Omaha and Lincoln sustain organized community life. Lincoln has two congregations, one Conservative and one Reform, and a Jewish Welfare Federation. The Esther K. Newman Camp, between the two cities, serves the Jewish youth of the state during the summer.

Jews have served in a wide variety of public offices in the state since its inception. Many have been mayors of their municipalities, and as early as 1863 Aaron Cahn served in the legislature. Henry *Monsky of Omaha gained national importance in the B'nai B'rith. Ben Greenberg of York was chairman of the Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska. Edward Zorinksy was a United States Senator (1976–87) after serving as mayor of Omaha and defeating long-time incumbent Roman Hruska.

bibliography:

B. Postal and L. Koppman, Jewish Tourists' Guide to the U.S. (1954), 289–92.

[Sanford Ragins /

Renee Corcoran (2nd ed.)]

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Nebraska

Nebraska

■ BELLEVUE UNIVERSITY F-16

1000 Galvin Rd. South
Bellevue, NE 68005-3098
Tel: (402)291-8100
Free: 800-756-7920
Admissions: (402)505-5512
Fax: (402)293-2020
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bellevue.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1965. Setting: 35-acre suburban campus with easy access to Omaha. Endowment: $22.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2350 per student. Total enrollment: 5,929. Faculty: 398 (72 full-time, 326 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. Full-time: 2,849 students, 47% women, 53% men. Part-time: 1,598 students, 53% women, 47% men. Students come from 42 states and territories, 66 other countries, 28% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 6% Hispanic, 10% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 6% international, 82% 25 or older. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; health professions and related sciences; security and protective services. Core. Calendar: semesters for day division, trimesters for evening division. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Tuition: $5250 full-time, $175 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $95 full-time, $45 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Major annual events: Student Appreciation Days, Halloween, Christmas. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Freeman/Lozier Library plus 1 other with 100,904 books, 6,500 microform titles, 12,468 serials, 4,200 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $718,428. 1,000 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The oldest continuous settlement in Nebraska, Bellevue is located on the bluffs of the Missouri River, just south of Omaha and adjoining Offutt Air Force Base, the headquarters of the Strategic Air Command. The Fontenelle Forest Nature Center between Bellevue and the Missouri River contains displays of regional habitats.

■ CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE-COLUMBUS CAMPUS F-13

4500 63rd St., PO Box 1027
Columbus, NE 68602-1027
Tel: (402)564-7132
Admissions: (402)562-1296
Fax: (402)562-1201
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cccneb.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Central Community College. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 90-acre small town campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3156 per student. Total enrollment: 1,999. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. Full-time: 445 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 1,554 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 21 states and territories, 4% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 7% Hispanic, 1% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 50% 25 or older, 17% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters plus six-week summer session. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: 3 recommendations, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1860 full-time, $62 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2790 full-time, $93 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $120 full-time, $4 per credit part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group. Social organizations: 12 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Drama Club, Art Club, Cantari, Chorale. Major annual events: East Central Nebraska College Fair, Ethnic Festival, plays. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, night security. 106 college housing spaces available; 93 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. Learning Resources Center with 22,000 books, 118 serials, 1,390 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $87,621. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Columbus was originally an agricultural area, but in the late 1940s, as the town was dying from the loss of young people to the larger cities, a concerted effort was begun to introduce industry to the community. This effort has been very successful, and to date the area has more industrial workers per capita than any other city in the Midwest. Products range from agricultural equipment to medical equipment. Commercial transportation is available. Pawnee Park offers swimming, tennis, picnic grounds, and athletic fields. Lake North offers swimming, water skiing, and boating. Lake Babcok offers fishing and boating, plus free camp grounds equipped with electrical outlets and tables. Columbus is 85 miles from Omaha and 80 miles from Lincoln. The community facilities include 22 churches and one library.

■ CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE-GRAND ISLAND CAMPUS G-12

PO Box 4903
Grand Island, NE 68802-4903
Tel: (308)398-4222
Admissions: (308)398-7406
Fax: (308)398-7398
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cccneb.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Central Community College. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1976. Setting: 64-acre small town campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2566 per student. Total enrollment: 2,916. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. Full-time: 399 students, 67% women, 33% men. Part-time: 2,517 students, 66% women, 34% men. Students come from 22 states and territories, 1 other country, 4% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 9% Hispanic, 1% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.1% international, 57% 25 or older, 10% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters plus six-week summer session. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: 3 recommendations, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1860 full-time, $62 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2790 full-time, $93 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $120 full-time, $4 per credit part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 3 open to all. Most popular organizations: Mid-Nebraska Users of Computers, Student Activities Organization, intramurals. Major annual events: Christmas Party, Spring Picnic, Halloween Party. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. 40 college housing spaces available; 12 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Option: coed housing available. Central Community College-Grand Island Campus Library with 5,700 books, 94 serials, 150 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $80,609. 156 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Grand Island is located in Central Nebraska and is a leading agricultural center for retailing and industry. Due to agricultural production, industry has quickly expanded, with a resulting rapid population growth. There are many recreational opportunities available to residents and visitors, including swimming, golfing, horse racing, bowling, hunting, and a variety of health-related activities. A large museum complex is located at Grand Island and reflects the Old West tradition. More than 40 churches, two hospitals, a children's zoo and a major library are available.

■ CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE-HASTINGS CAMPUS H-11

PO Box 1024
Hastings, NE 68902-1024
Tel: (402)463-9811
Admissions: (402)461-2428
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cccneb.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Central Community College. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1966. Setting: 600-acre small town campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3265 per student. Total enrollment: 2,534. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. Full-time: 933 students, 47% women, 53% men. Part-time: 1,601 students, 62% women, 38% men. Students come from 36 states and territories, 4% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 5% Hispanic, 0.4% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.04% international, 44% 25 or older, 26% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters plus six-week summer session. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: 3 recommendations, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1860 full-time, $62 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2790 full-time, $93 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $120 full-time, $4 per credit part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run radio station. Social organizations: 13 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Senate, Central Dormitory Council, Judicial Board, Seeds and Soils, Young Farmers and Ranchers. Major annual events: back-to-school week events, Christmas Party. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, controlled dormitory access. 320 college housing spaces available; 311 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. Nuckolls Library with 4,025 books, 52 serials, 150 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $35,176. 190 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Hastings College.

■ CHADRON STATE COLLEGE B-3

1000 Main St.
Chadron, NE 69337
Tel: (308)432-6000
Admissions: (308)432-6263
Fax: (308)432-6229
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.csc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Nebraska State College System. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1911. Setting: 281-acre small town campus. Endowment: $6.3 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $147,715. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3565 per student. Total enrollment: 2,636. Faculty: 110 (101 full-time, 9 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 2% from top 10% of their high school class, 19% from top quarter, 47% from top half. Full-time: 1,634 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 682 students, 68% women, 32% men. Students come from 36 states and territories, 5 other countries, 34% from out-of-state, 2% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 1% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 15% 25 or older, 65% live on campus, 7% transferred in. Retention: 70% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: electronic application, early admission. Required: high school transcript, health forms. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $2933 full-time, $97.25 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5865 full-time, $195.50 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $729 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, location, and program. Part-time tuition varies according to course load, location, and program. College room and board: $4074. College room only: $1924. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Major annual events: Spring Days, Homecoming. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. 1,200 college housing spaces available; 774 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Reta King Library with 593,140 books, 381,890 microform titles, 619 serials, 5,596 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $662,266. 75 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Chadron, located in northwestern Nebraska, is near the Nebraska National Forest where hunting is popular as well as trout fishing. Chadron is also a short drive from snow skiing, water skiing, and the Black Hills of South Dakota. The community facilities include a public library, hospital, churches, and numerous civic organizations.

■ CLARKSON COLLEGE F-16

101 South 42nd St.
Omaha, NE 68131-2739
Tel: (402)552-3100
Free: 800-647-5500
Fax: (402)552-6057
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.clarksoncollege.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed. Part of Nebraska Health System. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1888. Setting: 3-acre urban campus. Endowment: $2.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5525 per student. Total enrollment: 507. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 30% from top quarter, 70% from top half. Full-time: 260 students, 92% women, 8% men. Part-time: 161 students, 89% women, 11% men. Students come from 35 states and territories, 33% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 6% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 41% 25 or older, 20% live on campus, 20% transferred in. Retention: 85% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA. Recommended: minimum 3.0 high school GPA. Required for some: 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. Comprehensive fee: $15,030 includes full-time tuition ($10,350), mandatory fees ($690), and college room and board ($3990). Part-time tuition: $345 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $22 per credit hour, $15 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 10 open to all. Most popular organizations: Clarkson Student Nurses Association, Clarkson Radiology Student Association, Student Government Association, Student Ambassadors, Clarkson Fellows Program. Major annual events: Alcohol Awareness Week, Student Leadership Convention, staff vs. student softball game. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 78 college housing spaces available; 70 were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Clarkson College Library with 8,807 books, 25,000 microform titles, 262 serials, 530 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $258,319. 40 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ COLLEGE OF SAINT MARY F-16

1901 South 72nd St.
Omaha, NE 68124-2377
Tel: (402)399-2400
Free: 800-926-5534
Admissions: (402)399-2407
Fax: (402)399-2412
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.csm.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic, 4-year, women only. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1923. Setting: 25-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $6.3 million. Total enrollment: 1,015. Faculty: 54 (all full-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 417 applied, 56% were admitted. 11% from top 10% of their high school class, 46% from top quarter, 75% from top half. Full-time: 641 students. Part-time: 358 students. Students come from 14 states and territories, 8 other countries, 10% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 7% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 53% 25 or older, 17% live on campus, 23% transferred in. Retention: 71% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; health professions and related sciences; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 8/24.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $24,010 includes full-time tuition ($17,750), mandatory fees ($360), and college room and board ($5900). Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $550 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $12 per credit hour. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group. Social organizations: 16 open to all; 2% of eligible undergrads are members. Most popular organizations: Student Senate, Campus Activities Board, Student Education Association of Nebraska, Student Occupational Therapy Club, Sigma Rho Lambda. Major annual events: Senate Casino Night, service-learning projects, Queen of Hearts Formal. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, external cameras at residence hall entrances. 250 college housing spaces available; 150 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Option: women-only housing available. College of Saint Mary Library with 81,268 books, 12,800 serials, 2,398 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $270,119. 153 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY G-14

800 North Columbia Ave.
Seward, NE 68434-1599
Tel: (402)643-3651
Free: 800-535-5494
Admissions: (402)643-7233
Fax: (402)643-4073
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cune.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. Part of Concordia University System. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1894. Setting: 120-acre small town campus with easy access to Omaha. Endowment: $15 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3565 per student. Total enrollment: 1,317. 728 applied, 89% were admitted. 25% from top 10% of their high school class, 52% from top quarter, 85% from top half. Full-time: 1,122 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 80 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 38 states and territories, 59% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 1% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 3% 25 or older, 3% transferred in. Retention: 80% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: 4-4-1. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA, interview. Required for some: recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 7/31.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $22,434 includes full-time tuition ($17,724) and college room and board ($4710). Room and board charges vary according to board plan.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 25 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Activities Council, musical groups, men's and women's C-Club, Student Senate, Concordia Youth Ministry. Major annual events: homecoming, Spring Weekend, LEAD Conference. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, controlled dormitory access. 903 college housing spaces available; 793 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Link Library with 171,688 books, 11,093 microform titles, 575 serials, 12,068 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $346,633. 75 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ THE CREATIVE CENTER F-16

10850 Emmet St.
Omaha, NE 68164
Tel: (402)898-1000; 888-898-1789
Fax: (402)898-1301
Web Site: http://www.thecreativecenter.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards terminal associate degrees. Setting: urban campus. Calendar: semesters.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: essay, high school transcript, 1 recommendation, interview.

■ CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY F-16

2500 California Plaza
Omaha, NE 68178-0001
Tel: (402)280-2700
Free: 800-282-5835
Admissions: (402)280-2162
Fax: (402)280-2685
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.creighton.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic (Jesuit), university, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1878. Setting: 110-acre urban campus. Endowment: $239.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $15,545 per student. Total enrollment: 6,791. Faculty: 649 (475 full-time, 174 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 3,435 applied, 87% were admitted. 40% from top 10% of their high school class, 73% from top quarter, 95% from top half. 155 class presidents, 69 valedictorians, 350 student government officers. Full-time: 3,731 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 257 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 45 states and territories, 52 other countries, 55% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 3% black, 7% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 4% 25 or older, 56% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 87% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: health professions and related sciences; business/marketing; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Creighton University; West Omaha Campus. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.75 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $29,918 includes full-time tuition ($21,576), mandatory fees ($802), and college room and board ($7540). College room only: $4250. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $675 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $134 per semester hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 190 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 23% of eligible men and 28% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Bird Cage, Freshman Leadership Program, Alpha Pi Omega, Alpha Kappa Psi, Omecron Delta Kappa. Major annual events: Spring Fling, J Jam, Fallapalooza. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 2,000 college housing spaces available; 1,969 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, women-only housing available. Reinert Alumni Memorial Library plus 2 others with 481,848 books, 823,736 microform titles, 1,666 serials, 2,500 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 505 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Metropolitan Omaha has a population of over 650,000 and serves as a communication and cultural center for the Plains States. Urban Omaha is in a period of rapid renewal through publicly and privately supported programs. It is a major insurance center of the nation, other industries such as railroads, telecommunications, creative enterprises, and health care institutions are well represented. It is best known, however, as a food processing center because of its location in the area known as the "bread basket of America". Cultural attractions include the Omaha Symphony Orchestra, Ballet and Opera Company, Community Playhouse, the Joslyn Art Museum, and the Henry Dvorly Zoo, rated the no. 1 family attraction in America by Family Life Magazine.

■ DANA COLLEGE E-16

2848 College Dr.
Blair, NE 68008-1099
Tel: (402)426-9000
Free: 800-444-3262
Admissions: (402)426-7220
Fax: (402)426-7386
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.dana.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1884. Setting: 150-acre small town campus with easy access to Omaha. Endowment: $11.6 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7286 per student. Total enrollment: 676. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 901 applied, 76% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 35% from top quarter, 66% from top half. Full-time: 653 students, 45% women, 55% men. Part-time: 23 students, 65% women, 35% men. Students come from 35 states and territories, 1 other country, 45% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 5% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 4% 25 or older, 67% live on campus, 7% transferred in. Retention: 58% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; parks and recreation. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at Consortium of Eastern Nebraska Colleges. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: ACT. Required for some: essay, 1 recommendation, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $22,770 includes full-time tuition ($16,850), mandatory fees ($600), and college room and board ($5320). College room only: $2060. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $510 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $35 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 25 open to all. Most popular organizations: Residence Hall Association, Social Awareness Organization, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, campus ministry, HOPE (Helping Our People Expand). Major annual events: homecoming, Sights and Sounds of Christmas, Winterfest. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 600 college housing spaces available; 422 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, women-only housing available. C. A. Dana-Life Library plus 1 other with 145,909 books, 16,274 microform titles, 12,577 serials, 6,979 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $222,305. 110 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Blair is a suburban community located in a large farming area. Small industries contribute to the economic stability of the community. The college provides transportation to Omaha for the train and bus, and to Eppley Airfield, 25 minutes away. Community facilities include 11 churches, a public library, community theatre, hospital, and clinics as well as many civic, fraternal, and veterans' organizations. Recreational facilities provide for golf, swimming, tennis, and hiking; the DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge is 3 miles from Blair; the Missouri River near Blair provides boating and fishing opportunities. Student employment opportunities are good.

■ DOANE COLLEGE H-14

1014 Boswell Ave.
Crete, NE 68333-2430
Tel: (402)826-2161
Free: 800-333-6263
Admissions: (402)826-8222
Fax: (402)826-8600
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.doane.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with United Church of Christ. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees (non-traditional undergraduate programs and graduate programs offered at Lincoln campus). Founded 1872. Setting: 300-acre small town campus with easy access to Omaha. Endowment: $79.1 million. Total enrollment: 2,394. Faculty: 140 (77 full-time, 63 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 1,144 applied, 80% were admitted. 23% from top 10% of their high school class, 52% from top quarter, 80% from top half. Full-time: 1,349 students, 46% women, 54% men. Part-time: 247 students, 62% women, 38% men. Students come from 23 states and territories, 2 other countries, 17% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 3% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.3% international, 1% transferred in. Retention: 71% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Association of Nebraska Interterm Colleges. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. Comprehensive fee: $22,458 includes full-time tuition ($17,186), mandatory fees ($350), and college room and board ($4922). College room only: $1850. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to location. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location. Part-time tuition: $573 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $120 per year. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level and location.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 60 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities; 31% of eligible men and 28% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Activities Council, Hansen Leadership Program, band/choir, Doane Ambassadors. Major annual events: Homecoming, Big Event, Stop Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: student patrols, evening patrols by trained security personnel. 900 college housing spaces available; 96 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Option: coed housing available. Perkins Library plus 1 other with 299,471 books, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $533,750. 240 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Crete, a community of 5,000 persons, is located 25 miles southwest of Lincoln. The community includes nine churches of different denominations, a hospital, library, and numerous civic, fraternal and veterans' organizations. Recreation includes bowling, fishing, hunting, golf, and numerous other activities.

■ GRACE UNIVERSITY F-16

1311 South Ninth St.
Omaha, NE 68108
Tel: (402)449-2800
Free: 800-383-1422
Admissions: (402)449-2831
Fax: (402)341-9587
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.graceuniversity.edu/

Description:

Independent interdenominational, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1943. Setting: 15-acre urban campus. Endowment: $890,668. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3885 per student. Total enrollment: 513. 325 applied, 46% were admitted. Full-time: 375 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 52 students, 52% women, 48% men. Students come from 30 states and territories, 4 other countries, 36% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 5% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 61% live on campus, 11% transferred in. Retention: 68% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Iowa Western Community College, Metropolitan Community College (NE), University of Nebraska at Omaha, Bellevue University, Clarkson College. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 3 recommendations, ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $17,380 includes full-time tuition ($11,700), mandatory fees ($280), and college room and board ($5400). College room only: $2400. Part-time tuition: $390 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $15 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group, student-run radio station. Social organizations:; 12% of eligible men and 20% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: choral group, band, radio station, yearbook. Major annual events: Spiritual Orientation (Welcome Week), Bible Conference, World Christian Conference. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 322 college housing spaces available; 244 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Grace University Library with 46,736 books, 623 microform titles, 3,721 serials, 3,882 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $116,023. 45 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Grace University adheres to four values that revolve around community living: honesty, integrity, responsibility, and accountability.

■ HAMILTON COLLEGE-LINCOLN G-15

1821 K St., PO Box 82826
Lincoln, NE 68501-2826
Tel: (402)474-5315
Fax: (402)474-5302
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hamiltonlincoln.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of Quest Education Corporation. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1884. Setting: 5-acre urban campus with easy access to Omaha. Total enrollment: 1,000. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 40% from top quarter, 50% from top half. Students come from 3 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 4% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 38% 25 or older. Core. Services for LD students, accelerated degree program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: early admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, recommendations, interview, CPAt. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 7 open to all. Most popular organizations: Travel Club, Secretarial Club, Business Club, Court Reporting Club, Legal Assistant Club. Major annual events: Spring Picnic, Fall Picnic, Spring Dance. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. 140 college housing spaces available; 120 were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Lincoln School of Commerce Library with 7,500 books, 1,872 serials, 300 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. 99 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ HAMILTON COLLEGE-OMAHA F-16

3350 North 90th St.
Omaha, NE 68134
Tel: (402)572-8500
Free: 800-642-1456
Fax: (402)573-1341
Web Site: http://www.hamiltonomaha.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of Educational Medical, Inc. Awards diplomas, terminal associate, and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1891. Setting: 3-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 700. 850 applied. Full-time: 700 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 5 states and territories, 60% 25 or older, 0% transferred in. Core. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview, CPAt. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Nebraska College of Business Library with 4,800 books, 50 serials, and a Web page. 110 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ HASTINGS COLLEGE H-11

800 North Turner Ave.
Hastings, NE 68901-7696
Tel: (402)463-2402
Free: 800-532-7642
Admissions: (402)461-7320
Fax: (402)463-3002
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hastings.edu/

Description:

Independent Presbyterian, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1882. Setting: 109-acre small town campus. Endowment: $56.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6414 per student. Total enrollment: 1,189. Faculty: 121 (79 full-time, 42 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 1,413 applied, 79% were admitted. 14% from top 10% of their high school class, 37% from top quarter, 72% from top half. 21 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,121 students, 49% women, 51% men. Part-time: 23 students, 52% women, 48% men. Students come from 22 states and territories, 8 other countries, 20% from out-of-state, 0.4% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 2% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 3% 25 or older, 67% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 78% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; psychology. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, counselor's recommendation, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay, 2 recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $22,218 includes full-time tuition ($16,578), mandatory fees ($690), and college room and board ($4950). College room only: $2116. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $686 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $182 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course level, course load, and program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 60 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities; 20% of eligible men and 30% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Association, Student Alumni Ambassadors, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Hastings College Singers. Major annual events: homecoming, Boar's Head Dinner, Greek Dinner Dance. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, security cameras at entrances and parking lots. 760 college housing spaces available; 721 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Perkins Library with 113,318 books, 120,500 microform titles, 636 serials, 1,875 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $550,309. 181 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located in the south central section of the state, Hastings is in the heart of an important irrigated agricultural and stock-raising area. All commercial transportation is available. Part-time jobs are available for students. Community facilities include a library, churches of all denominations and numerous fraternal organizations. Prospect Park contains the Aquacourt, an ultramodern swimming pool, fishing and skiing. A municipal pool is in Libs Park. Lake Hastings, one mile north, offers water sports and fishing. Points of interest are the Fisher Rainbow Fountain, the Hastings Museum, which includes the J.M. McDonald Planetarium, and the Imax theater.

■ ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE F-16

9814 M St.
Omaha, NE 68127-2056
Tel: (402)331-2900
Free: 800-677-9260
Fax: (402)331-9495
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Part of ITT Educational Services, Inc. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1991. Setting: 1-acre urban campus. Core.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Recommended: recommendations. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available.

■ LITTLE PRIEST TRIBAL COLLEGE

PO Box 270
Winnebago, NE 68071
Tel: (402)878-2380
Fax: (402)878-2355
Web Site: http://www.lptc.bia.edu/

Description:

Independent, 2-year. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Setting: rural campus. Total enrollment: 130. 24 applied, 100% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 10% from top quarter, 70% from top half. Full-time: 67 students, 73% women, 27% men. Part-time: 63 students, 83% women, 17% men. 83% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 1% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander.

■ METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE F-16

PO Box 3777
Omaha, NE 68103-0777
Tel: (402)457-2400
Free: 800-228-9553
Admissions: (402)457-2717
Fax: (402)457-2564
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.mccneb.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1974. Setting: 172-acre urban campus. Endowment: $1.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2551 per student. Total enrollment: 12,461. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 3,674 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 4,798 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 7,663 students, 56% women, 44% men. 3% from out-of-state, 47% 25 or older, 9% transferred in. Retention: 46% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, early admission. Recommended: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1733 full-time, $38.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2610 full-time, $71 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $135 full-time, $3 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, security on duty 9 pm to 6 am. College housing not available. Metropolitan Community College plus 2 others with 41,161 books, 1,325 microform titles, 544 serials, 10,702 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $891,473. 1,700 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Creighton University.

■ MID-PLAINS COMMUNITY COLLEGE G-7

601 West State Farm Rd.
North Platte, NE 69101
Tel: (308)535-3600
Free: 800-658-4348
Admissions: (308)535-3610
Fax: (308)532-8590
Web Site: http://www.mpcca.cc.ne.us/

Description:

District-supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Setting: small town campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7134 per student. Total enrollment: 3,084. 816 applied, 77% were admitted. 4% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 51% from top half. Full-time: 1,083 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 2,001 students, 57% women, 43% men. Students come from 11 states and territories, 0.1% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 1% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.4% international, 67% 25 or older, 8% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT COMPASS required; ACT recommended. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 10 open to all; local fraternities. Most popular organizations: Student Senate, Phi Theta Kappa, Phi Beta Lamda, SEAN. Campus security: controlled dormitory access, patrols by trained security personnel. 300 college housing spaces available; 180 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. McDonald-Belton L R C plus 1 other with 64,284 books, 65,119 microform titles, 277 serials, and 6,318 audiovisual materials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $189,260. 300 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

A rural and agricultural community, North Platte is a railroad division point with extensive railroad shops. Important crops raised are corn, wheat, and alfalfa. Maloney Reservoir, six miles south of North Platte, offers boating, fishing and hunting. Community facilities include many churches, a regional medical center, shopping areas, a community playhouse, civic music association and numerous social and service organizations. Part-time employment opportunities are good.

■ MIDLAND LUTHERAN COLLEGE F-15

900 North Clarkson St.
Fremont, NE 68025-4200
Tel: (402)721-5480
Free: 800-642-8382
Admissions: (402)941-6521
Fax: (402)721-0250
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.mlc.edu/

Description:

Independent Lutheran, 4-year, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1883. Setting: 27-acre small town campus with easy access to Omaha. Endowment: $25.6 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4325 per student. Total enrollment: 909. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 898 applied, 86% were admitted. 9% from top 10% of their high school class, 26% from top quarter, 57% from top half. 17 valedictorians. Full-time: 888 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 21 students, 76% women, 24% men. Students come from 25 states and territories, 4 other countries, 19% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 3% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 8% 25 or older, 62% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 80% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Concordia University, Doane College, Dana College, Hastings College, Central College. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, early admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, recommendations. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 9/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $24,460 includes full-time tuition ($19,510) and college room and board ($4950). College room only: $2190.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 48 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities; 40% of eligible men and 40% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Nurses Association, Student Education Association, Phi Beta Lambda, Fellowship of Christian Athletics (FCA), Circle K. Major annual events: homecoming, Snow Days, Spring Fling. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 650 college housing spaces available; 592 were occupied in 2003-04. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Luther Library with 110,000 books, 900 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $277,877. 180 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Situated near the Platte River, Fremont, the trading center of a dairying and livestock area, is located 35 miles northwest of Omaha and 51 miles north of Lincoln, Nebraska. Fremont is also recognized as the hybrid seed corn center of the state. Some of the products of industry are poultry, butter, flour, soybeans, and animal food. Some nationally known manufacturers such as Campbell Soup, Fel-Tex Ammonia, Magnus Metal, and Hormel Meats have plants in the area. Part-time employment is available. Boating, fishing and hunting are some of the outdoor sports available.

■ MYOTHERAPY INSTITUTE H-5

6020 South 58th St.
Lincoln, NE 68516
Tel: (402)421-7410
Free: 800-896-3363
Fax: (402)421-6736
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.myotherapy.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed.

■ NEBRASKA CHRISTIAN COLLEGE D-13

1800 Syracuse Ave.
Norfolk, NE 68701-2458
Tel: (402)379-5000
Web Site: http://www.nechristian.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Christian Churches and Churches of Christ. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1944. Setting: 85-acre small town campus. Endowment: $324,000. Total enrollment: 167. 175 applied, 45% were admitted. 14% from top 10% of their high school class, 28% from top quarter, 67% from top half. Full-time: 152 students, 49% women, 51% men. Part-time: 15 students, 40% women, 60% men. Students come from 15 states and territories, 3 other countries, 49% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 0% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 10% 25 or older, 85% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 63% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Part-time degree program, internships. Off campus study at Northeast Community College, Wayne State College, York College (NE), Fort Hays State University.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: Peterson's Universal Application. Required: high school transcript, 2 recommendations, ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 9/1.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 4 open to all. Major annual events: Fall Formal, Challenge Week, Spring Formal. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. 165 college housing spaces available. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Swedberg Library with 250,000 books and 149 serials. 10 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Primarily a rural community, Norfolk depends very heavily on agriculture and the raising of beef as its primary industries. The livestock business is valued at almost a $40 million industry. Community facilities include a public library, 20 churches representing 16 denominations, a YMCA and civic organizations such as Rotary, Kiwanis and the Lions Club. Part-time employment is available. Lewis and Clark Lake and other facilities provide swimming, boating, fishing and golf. The Norfolk Historical Museum exhibits a collection of local historical relics.

■ NEBRASKA COLLEGE OF TECHNICAL AGRICULTURE

RR3, Box 23A
Curtis, NE 69025-9205
Tel: (308)367-4124
Free: 800-3CU-RTIS
Fax: (308)367-5203
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ncta.unl.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of University of Nebraska System. Awards transfer associate and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1965. Setting: small town campus. Endowment: $80,000. Total enrollment: 189. 161 applied, 100% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 30% from top half. Students come from 8 states and territories, 24% 25 or older, 44% live on campus. Core. Calendar: 8-week modular system. Academic remediation for entering students, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: early admission. Required: high school transcript. Recommended: interview. Placement: ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $10. State resident tuition: $3006 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $6012 full-time. Mandatory fees: $433 full-time. College room and board: $4149. College room only: $1824.

Collegiate Environment:

Social organizations: local fraternities; 10% of men are members. Most popular organizations: Aggie Livestock Association, Student Technicians Veterinary Medicine Association, Activities Without Alcohol and Drugs, Business Club, Phi Theta Kappa. Major annual event: Annual Open House. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, controlled dormitory access. Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture Library with 5,500 books, 230 serials, and a Web page. 60 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NEBRASKA INDIAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 428
Macy, NE 68039-0428
Tel: (402)837-5078; 888-843-6432
Admissions: (402)344-8428
Fax: (402)878-2522
Web Site: http://www.thenicc.edu/

Description:

Federally supported, 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1979. Setting: 2-acre rural campus with easy access to Omaha, NE. Endowment: $68,020. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4066 per student. Total enrollment: 190. Full-time: 97 students, 62% women, 38% men. Part-time: 93 students, 75% women, 25% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 13% from out-of-state, 82% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 4% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 66% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, certificate of tribal enrollment if applicable. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. College housing not available. 10 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NEBRASKA METHODIST COLLEGE F-16

720 N. 87th St.
Omaha, NE 68114
Tel: (402)354-4879
Free: 800-335-5510
Admissions: (402)354-7205
Fax: (402)354-4819
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.methodistcollege.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with United Methodist Church. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1891. Setting: 5-acre urban campus. Endowment: $30.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $10,400 per student. Total enrollment: 524. Faculty: 57 (33 full-time, 24 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 119 applied, 50% were admitted. 15% from top 10% of their high school class, 25% from top quarter, 100% from top half. Full-time: 333 students, 92% women, 8% men. Part-time: 126 students, 89% women, 11% men. Students come from 5 states and territories, 3 other countries, 25% from out-of-state, 0% Native American, 0.4% Hispanic, 2% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.4% international, 25% 25 or older, 20% live on campus, 13% transferred in. Retention: 74% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic area with the most degrees conferred: health professions and related sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, internships. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 3 recommendations, interview, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 4/1. Notification: 4/15.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Tuition: $11,340 full-time, $378 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $600 full-time, $20 per credit hour part-time. College room only: $2270.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 5 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Senate, Student Nurses Association, Methodist Allied Health Student Association, Student Ambassadors, Residence Hall Council. Major annual events: holiday events, Welcome Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 70 college housing spaces available; 65 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. Option: coed housing available. John Moritz Library plus 1 other with 8,656 books, 181 microform titles, 475 serials, 985 audiovisual materials, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $300,000. 45 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ NEBRASKA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY G-15

5000 Saint Paul Ave.
Lincoln, NE 68504-2796
Tel: (402)466-2371
Free: 800-541-3818
Admissions: (402)465-2218
Fax: (402)465-2179
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1887. Setting: 50-acre suburban campus with easy access to Omaha. Endowment: $35.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6505 per student. Total enrollment: 2,016. Faculty: 225 (102 full-time, 123 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 1,508 applied, 84% were admitted. 22% from top 10% of their high school class, 57% from top quarter, 88% from top half. 28 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,606 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 236 students, 67% women, 33% men. Students come from 24 states and territories, 9 other countries, 8% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 1% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.1% international, 2% 25 or older, 54% live on campus, 3% transferred in. Retention: 82% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; health professions and related sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Chicago Urban Life Center, Capitol Hill Internship Program. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, early decision, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Recommended: interview. Required for some: essay, resume of activities. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: 8/15, 11/15 for early decision. Notification: continuous, 12/15 for early decision.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $23,425 includes full-time tuition ($18,100), mandatory fees ($310), and college room and board ($5015). Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $683 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to class time, course load, degree level, location, and program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 65 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 24% of eligible men and 22% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Affairs Senate, Union programs, Ambassadors, FCA. Major annual events: Wesleyan Weekend (Homecoming), Jim Wand Hypnotist (annual orientation event), Big Event (comedian). Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,108 college housing spaces available; 988 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Cochrane Woods Library with 178,531 books, 4,309 microform titles, 743 serials, 7,951 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $703,739. 336 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The capital, Lincoln, in southeastern Nebraska, is in a vast agricultural area where irrigation is an important factor. Many insurance firms have their home offices here. Major forms of transportation are available. Pershing Municipal Auditorium and the Bob Devaney Sports Center is used for conventions, concerts and athletic activities. Recreational facilities and sporting events are numerous. Some of the points of interest are Antelope Park, the Sunken Garden, Fairview, a home occupied by the William Jennings Bryan family for 15 years, Pioneer Park, Holmes Lake with bike trails, Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, the University of Nebraska State Museum, and the Haymarket District. Part-time jobs are available on and off campus.

■ NORTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE D-13

801 East Benjamin Ave, PO Box 469
Norfolk, NE 68702-0469
Tel: (402)371-2020
Admissions: (402)844-7258
Fax: (402)644-0650
Web Site: http://www.northeastcollege.com/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1973. Setting: 205-acre small town campus. Endowment: $1.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2975 per student. Total enrollment: 5,101. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. Full-time: 2,127 students, 48% women, 52% men. Part-time: 2,974 students, 45% women, 55% men. Students come from 15 states and territories, 15 other countries, 4% from out-of-state, 39% 25 or older, 11% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: electronic application, early admission. Recommended: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1770 full-time, $59 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2,212 full-time, $73.75 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $315 full-time, $10.50 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $4586.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 42 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Campus Crusade for Christ, Diversified Ag Club, Electricians Club, Utility Line Club. Major annual events: Welcome Back Breakfast, Extreme Bowling Hypnotist, Fall Student/Staff Picnic. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, controlled dormitory access. 204 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. Resource Center plus 1 other with 28,000 books, 3,025 serials, 1,298 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $200,000. 300 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Nebraska Christian College.

■ PERU STATE COLLEGE

PO Box 10
Peru, NE 68421
Tel: (402)872-3815
Admissions: (402)872-2221
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.peru.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Nebraska State College System. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1867. Setting: 104-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 1,959. Faculty: 130 (40 full-time, 90 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. 740 applied, 29% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 45% from top half. Full-time: 1,017 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 693 students, 52% women, 48% men. Students come from 27 states and territories, 7 other countries, 12% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 4% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.2% international, 32% 25 or older, 12% transferred in. Retention: 65% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; engineering technologies. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, freshman honors college, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $97.75 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $2933 full-time, $195.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5865 full-time. Mandatory fees: $706 full-time. Part-time tuition varies according to course load, location, and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $4486. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 13 open to all. Most popular organizations: Peru Chorus, Campus Activities Board, marching band, student government, Peru Players. Major annual events: homecoming, Spring Fling. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. 365 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Peru State College Library with 177,373 books, 450,631 microform titles, 232 serials, and a Web page. 120 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Peru is situated in an agricultural region of southeast Nebraska on bluffs overlooking the Missouri River. Corn, wheat, apples, and many other crops are raised in the area. The town is 65 miles from Omaha and 75 miles from Lincoln.

■ SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE, BEATRICE CAMPUS I-15

4771 W. Scott Rd.
Beatrice, NE 68310-7042
Tel: (402)228-3468
Free: 800-233-5027
Fax: (402)228-2218
Web Site: http://www.southeast.edu/

Description:

District-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Southeast Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1976. Setting: 640-acre small town campus. Total enrollment: 1,220. Students come from 9 states and territories, 7 other countries, 3% from out-of-state, 40% 25 or older, 22% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Peru State College.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT, ACT ASSET, ACT COMPASS. Required for some: ACT ASSET, ACT COMPASS. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 12 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Senate, Agricultural Club, Residence Hall Association, Licensed Practical Association of Nebraska, International Student Association. Major annual events: homecoming, All Campus Spaghetti Feed, Bowling Night. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: controlled dormitory access, evening security. 250 college housing spaces available; 230 were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Learning Resource Center with 13,287 books, 40,762 microform titles, 225 serials, 1,681 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $53,639. 75 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE, LINCOLN CAMPUS G-15

8800 O St.
Lincoln, NE 68520-1299
Tel: (402)471-3333
Free: 800-642-4075
Admissions: (402)437-2619
Web Site: http://www.southeast.edu/

Description:

District-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Southeast Community College System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1973. Setting: 115-acre suburban campus with easy access to Omaha. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3115 per student. Total enrollment: 7,917. Full-time: 4,095 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 3,822 students, 60% women, 40% men. Students come from 23 states and territories, 4% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 3% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.1% international, 35% 25 or older. Core. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: SAT or ACT recommended. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1755 full-time, $39 per quarter hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2138 full-time, $47.50 per quarter hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $45 full-time, $1 per quarter hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 5 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Senate, Phi Theta Kappa, Multicultural Student Organization, Single Parents Club, Vocational Industrial Clubs of America. Major annual event: open house. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Lincoln Campus Learning Resource Center with 14,081 books, 375 serials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $392,525. 380 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE, MILFORD CAMPUS G-14

600 State St.
Milford, NE 68405-8498
Tel: (402)761-2131
Free: 800-933-7223
Web Site: http://www.southeast.edu/

Description:

District-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Southeast Community College System. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1941. Setting: 50-acre small town campus with easy access to Omaha. Total enrollment: 922. Full-time: 890 students, 6% women, 94% men. Part-time: 32 students, 3% women, 97% men. 1% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 20% 25 or older, 33% live on campus. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, distance learning, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: Common Application. Required: high school transcript. Recommended: SAT, ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Major annual events: Convocation, dances, Orientation. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service. 330 college housing spaces available; 310 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Milford Campus Learning Resource Center with 10,000 books and 300 serials. 72 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNION COLLEGE G-15

3800 South 48th St.
Lincoln, NE 68506-4300
Tel: (402)486-2600
Free: 800-228-4600
Admissions: (402)486-2504
Fax: (402)486-2895
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ucollege.edu/

Description:

Independent Seventh-day Adventist, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1891. Setting: 26-acre suburban campus with easy access to Omaha. Endowment: $8.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5881 per student. Total enrollment: 930. Faculty: 98 (57 full-time, 41 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 635 applied, 43% were admitted. 14% from top 10% of their high school class, 17% from top quarter, 57% from top half. Full-time: 757 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 128 students, 54% women, 46% men. Students come from 42 states and territories, 29 other countries, 89% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 6% Hispanic, 2% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 10% international, 14% 25 or older, 13% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 72% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: health professions and related sciences; business/marketing; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at University of Nebraska, Southeast Community College. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, 3 recommendations, ACT. Required for some: essay, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $19,448 includes full-time tuition ($14,790), mandatory fees ($440), and college room and board ($4218). College room only: $2898. Part-time tuition: $625 per semester hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. 547 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Ella Johnson Crandall Library with 147,813 books, 1,026 microform titles, 1,357 serials, 3,278 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $471,957. 520 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AT KEARNEY H-10

905 West 25th St.
Kearney, NE 68849-0001
Tel: (308)865-8441
Free: 800-532-7639
Admissions: (308)865-8702
Fax: (308)865-8987
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.unk.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of University of Nebraska System. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1903. Setting: 235-acre small town campus. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $494,232. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4179 per student. Total enrollment: 6,445. Faculty: 380 (306 full-time, 74 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 2,443 applied, 84% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 37% from top quarter, 72% from top half. Full-time: 4,895 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 486 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 38 states and territories, 46 other countries, 6% from out-of-state, 0.3% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 1% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 7% international, 11% 25 or older, 33% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 84% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; communications/journalism; English; security and protective services. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at National Student Exchange. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: electronic application. Required: high school transcript, SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT. Required for some: 3 recommendations. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $3668 full-time, $122.25 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7508 full-time, $250.25 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $825 full-time, $16.25 per hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and degree level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and degree level. College room and board: $5326. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 153 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 9% of eligible men and 9% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Activities Council, Intramurals Council, Residence Hall Association, International Student Association. Major annual events: Midwest Conference on World Affairs, Homecoming, Blue and Gold Welcome Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 2,313 college housing spaces available; 1,965 were occupied in 2003-04. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Calvin T. Ryan Library with 320,915 books, 1 million microform titles, 1,657 serials, 75,881 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 277 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA-LINCOLN G-15

14th and R Sts.
Lincoln, NE 68588
Tel: (402)472-7211
Free: 800-742-8800
Admissions: (402)472-2030
Fax: (402)472-0670
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.unl.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Part of University of Nebraska System. Awards associate, bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1869. Setting: 623-acre urban campus with easy access to Omaha. Endowment: $179.8 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $116.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7691 per student. Total enrollment: 21,675. Faculty: 1,058 (1,048 full-time, 10 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 7,474 applied, 75% were admitted. 27% from top 10% of their high school class, 54% from top quarter, 84% from top half. 65 National Merit Scholars. Full-time: 15,768 students, 47% women, 53% men. Part-time: 1,269 students, 42% women, 58% men. Students come from 52 states and territories, 110 other countries, 20% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 2% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 8% 25 or older, 24% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 84% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; engineering. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at University of Missouri, Kansas State University, University of South Dakota. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT. Recommended: ACT. Required for some: rank in upper 50% of high school class. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 5/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $4530 full-time, $151 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,440 full-time, $448 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1010 full-time, $8.50 per credit hour part-time, $202.10 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $6008. College room only: $3239. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 335 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 14% of eligible men and 18% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Alumni Association, University Ambassadors, University Program Council, Golden Key. Major annual events: homecoming, Big Red Welcome, UPC Lecture Series. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 5,558 college housing spaces available; 4,115 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Love Memorial Library plus 10 others with 3.3 million books, 4.6 million microform titles, 22,774 serials, 303,120 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $13.4 million. 600 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

UNL is located in the capital city of Lincoln, a community of more than 209,000 that combines a college-town atmosphere with the entertainment and nightlife of a larger city. Lincoln boasts a thriving arts community with dozens of art galleries and the Lied Center for Performing Arts, which hosts major productions such as Les Miserables, Cats, and performances by the Russian Ballet, Celine Dion, and cellist Yo-yo Ma. Lincoln has more parks per capita than any other U.S. city and a growing network of bike paths that extend far beyond the city limits. There are 16 golf courses, hundreds of restaurants, more than 30 movie screens, major shopping malls, and a restored downtown historic district complete with specialty shops, coffeehouses, and a dinner theater. Major metropolitan cities like Omaha, Kansas City, Chicago, and Denver are within a day's driving distance, and Lincoln is easily accessible by plane, train, and bus.

■ UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA MEDICAL CENTER F-16

Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, NE 68198
Tel: (402)559-4000
Free: 800-626-8431
Admissions: (402)559-6409
Fax: (402)559-6796
Web Site: http://www.unmc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, upper-level, coed. Part of University of Nebraska System. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's and first professional certificates. Founded 1869. Setting: 51-acre urban campus. Endowment: $7.7 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $73.8 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $37,932 per student. Total enrollment: 2,995. Faculty: 1,007 (783 full-time, 224 part-time). Full-time: 779 students, 90% women, 10% men. Part-time: 72 students, 93% women, 7% men. Students come from 15 states and territories, 6 other countries, 9% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 1% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 30% 25 or older, 25% transferred in. Academic area with the most degrees conferred: health professions and related sciences. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, accelerated degree program, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships, graduate courses open to under-grads. Off campus study at University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Nebraska at Omaha, University of Nebraska at Kearney. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $6685 full-time, $191 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $16,591 full-time, $559.75 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $733 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level, course load, and program. Part-time tuition varies according to program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Social organizations: 5 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities. Most popular organizations: student government, Toastmasters, Student Alliance for Global Health, Christian Medical Society, Student Research Group. Major annual event: Spring Dance. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. McGoogan Medical Library with 241,551 books, 9 microform titles, 4,280 serials, 2,908 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.2 million. 65 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Creighton University.

■ UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AT OMAHA F-16

6001 Dodge St.
Omaha, NE 68182
Tel: (402)554-2200
Admissions: (402)554-2416
Fax: (402)554-3472
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.unomaha.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Part of University of Nebraska System. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1908. Setting: 158-acre urban campus. Endowment: $180 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $14 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5613 per student. Total enrollment: 14,093. Faculty: 842 (482 full-time, 360 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. 3,732 applied, 89% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 35% from top quarter, 68% from top half. Full-time: 8,532 students, 53% women, 47% men. Part-time: 2,797 students, 54% women, 46% men. Students come from 32 states and territories, 68 other countries, 7% from out-of-state, 0.5% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 6% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 21% 25 or older, 9% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 75% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; security and protective services. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at other units of the University of Nebraska System. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum ACT score of 20 or rank in upper 50% of high school class, SAT or ACT. Placement: SAT or ACT required for some. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadlines: 8/1, 8/1 for nonresidents. Notification: continuous, continuous for nonresidents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $4133 full-time, $137.75 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,180 full-time, $406 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $692 full-time, $19.55 per semester hour part-time, $81.50 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and student level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and student level. College room and board: $6140. College room only: $3690. Room and board charges vary according to board plan.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 126 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 2% of eligible men and 2% of eligible women are members. Most popular organization: Student Programming Organization. Major annual events: Homecoming, Magical Dinner, Welcome Back Week. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,212 college housing spaces available; 927 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. University Library with 700,000 books, 2 million microform titles, 3,000 serials, 7,000 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $4.8 million. 2,000 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ VATTEROTT COLLEGE (OMAHA) F-16

225 North 80th St.
Omaha, NE 68114
Tel: (402)392-1300
Fax: (402)392-2828
Web Site: http://www.vatterott-college.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards diplomas and transfer associate degrees. Founded 1967. Setting: 1-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 414. 230 applied, 81% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 40% from top quarter, 50% from top half. Students come from 5 states and territories, 12% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 29% black, 0.2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 58% 25 or older. Calendar: semesters. Summer session for credit, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, Wonderlic aptitude test. Recommended: SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. Main library plus 1 other with 1,900 books, 22 serials, and an OPAC. 50 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ VATTEROTT COLLEGE (OMAHA-SPRING VALLEY)

11818 I St.
Omaha, NE 68137
Tel: (402)891-9411
Fax: (402)891-9413
Web Site: http://www.vatterott-college.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Calendar: semesters.

■ WAYNE STATE COLLEGE D-14

1111 Main St.
Wayne, NE 68787
Tel: (402)375-7000
Admissions: (402)375-7234
Fax: (402)375-7204
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wsc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Nebraska State College System. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1910. Setting: 128-acre small town campus. Endowment: $8.7 million. Total enrollment: 3,322. Faculty: 205 (126 full-time, 79 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. 1,202 applied, 100% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 33% from top quarter, 64% from top half. Full-time: 2,483 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 223 students, 68% women, 32% men. Students come from 28 states and territories, 13 other countries, 14% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 3% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 12% 25 or older, 42% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 67% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; psychology. Core. Calendar: semesters. Services for LD students, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Northeast Community College, Central Community College. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $2933 full-time, $97.75 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5865 full-time, $195.50 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $870 full-time, $34.75 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. College room and board: $4300. College room only: $2080. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 92 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,587 college housing spaces available; 1,170 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, women-only housing available. U. S. Conn Library plus 1 other with 147,205 books, 650,000 microform titles, 656 serials, 5,300 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 365 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Located 45 miles southwest of Sioux City, Iowa, Wayne is the county seat. Bus transportation and chartered air service are available. Dormitories, motels, and rooming houses provide housing for students. Community facilities include churches of most denominations and a hospital. Hunting, swimming and golf are some of the outdoor activities available.

■ WESTERN NEBRASKA COMMUNITY COLLEGE F-3

371 College Dr.
Sidney, NE 69162
Tel: (308)254-5450
Free: 800-348-4435
Admissions: (308)635-6015
Fax: (308)254-7444
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wncc.net/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Western Community College Area System. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1926. Setting: 20-acre rural campus. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $35,512. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3881 per student. Total enrollment: 3,151. 613 applied, 100% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 18% from top quarter, 50% from top half. Students come from 18 states and territories, 10% from out-of-state, 43% 25 or older, 5% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, electronic application. Recommended: high school transcript. Placement: ACT ASSET required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 8/21.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 6 open to all; national sororities; 2% of women are members. Most popular organizations: Choices, Phi Theta Kappa, student government, SEAN. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, patrols by trained security personnel from 12:30 a.m. to 6 a.m. 100 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Western Nebraska Community College Library with 34,539 books, 19 microform titles, 2,631 serials, 2,631 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $373,391. 355 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

In the valley of the North Platte River, Scottsbluff is an agriculture center. It is also called the Capital of America's Valley of the Nile. This is the location of the largest continuous area of irrigated land in the country. Recreational activities include hunting, fishing, golf, swimming and winter sports nearby.

■ YORK COLLEGE G-13

1125 East 8th St.
York, NE 68467
Tel: (402)363-5600
Free: 800-950-9675
Admissions: (402)363-5608
Fax: (402)363-5666
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.york.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Church of Christ. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1890. Setting: 44-acre small town campus. Endowment: $6.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3921 per student. Total enrollment: 450. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 10:1. 206 applied, 99% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 21% from top quarter, 46% from top half. Full-time: 412 students, 50% women, 50% men. Part-time: 38 students, 55% women, 45% men. Students come from 30 states and territories, 14 other countries, 66% from out-of-state, 0.2% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 5% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 3% 25 or older, 60% live on campus, 10% transferred in. Retention: 68% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: engineering; business/marketing; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Naval (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 2 recommendations, SAT or ACT. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $16,330 includes full-time tuition ($11,400), mandatory fees ($1030), and college room and board ($3900). Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $355 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $177 per credit hour. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 8 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities; 46% of eligible men and 64% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: concert choir, Student Association, Promethians, Marksmen. Major annual events: Homecoming, Songfest, All-School Banquet. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, student patrols, controlled dormitory access. 472 college housing spaces available; 282 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Levitt Library with 106,994 books, 21,075 microform titles, 338 serials, 5,867 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $234,848. 57 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

York is located about 50 miles from Lincoln, where all forms of commercial transportation are available. Various civic and service organizations are active here as well as churches of many denominations. Recreational facilities include parks, playgrounds, a swimming pool, baseball park, basketball courts, and a community center.

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Nebraska

Nebraska

BELLEVUE UNIVERSITY

1000 Galvin Rd. South
Bellevue, NE 68005-3098
Tel: (402)291-8100
Free: 800-756-7920
Admissions: (402)505-5512
Fax: (402)293-2020
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.bellevue.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John B. Muller
Registrar: Phillip Chapman
Admissions: Brian Sandusky
Financial Aid: Jon Dotterer
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. Tuition: $5250 full-time, $175 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $95 full-time, $45 per term part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,849, PT 1,598, Grad 1,482 Faculty: FT 72, PT 326 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 % Receiving Financial Aid: 87 Library Holdings: 100,904 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 127 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Volleyball W

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE-COLUMBUS CAMPUS

4500 63rd St., PO Box 1027
Columbus, NE 68602-1027
Tel: (402)564-7132
Admissions: (402)562-1296
Fax: (402)562-1201
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cccneb.edu/
President/CEO: Jim Fisher
Registrar: Ronda Ryan
Admissions: Mary Young
Financial Aid: Lisa Gdowski
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Central Community College Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For nursing program: High school diploma required; GED not accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1860 full-time, $62 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2790 full-time, $93 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $120 full-time, $4 per credit part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 445, PT 1,554 Faculty: FT 38, PT 51 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 17 Library Holdings: 22,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M; Volleyball W

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE-GRAND ISLAND CAMPUS

PO Box 4903
Grand Island, NE 68802-4903
Tel: (308)398-4222
Admissions: (308)398-7406
Fax: (308)398-7398
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cccneb.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Lynn C. Black
Registrar: Don Richards
Admissions: Liz Kohout
Financial Aid: Steve Millnitz
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Central Community College Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For nursing program: High school diploma required; GED not accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1860 full-time, $62 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2790 full-time, $93 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $120 full-time, $4 per credit part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 399, PT 2,517 Faculty: FT 43, PT 69 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 10 Library Holdings: 5,700 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: ADA, NLN

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE-HASTINGS CAMPUS

PO Box 1024
Hastings, NE 68902-1024
Tel: (402)463-9811
Admissions: (402)461-2428
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cccneb.edu/
President/CEO: William Hitesman
Registrar: Don Richards
Admissions: Robert Glenn
Financial Aid: Vicki Kucera
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Central Community College Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For nursing, dental hygiene, truck driving, medical laboratory technology programs: High school diploma required; GED not accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1860 full-time, $62 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2790 full-time, $93 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $120 full-time, $4 per credit part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 933, PT 1,601 Faculty: FT 61, PT 29 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 26 Library Holdings: 4,025 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: AAMAE, ADA, AHIMA, NAACLS

CHADRON STATE COLLEGE

1000 Main St.
Chadron, NE 69337
Tel: (308)432-6000
Admissions: (308)432-6263
Fax: (308)432-6229
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.csc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Thomas L. Krepel
Registrar: Dale Williamson
Admissions: Tena Cook Gould
Financial Aid: Sherry Douglas
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Nebraska State College System Scores: 53% ACT 18-23; 28% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $2933 full-time, $97.25 per credit part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5865 full-time, $195.50 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $729 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, location, and program. Part-time tuition varies according to course load, location, and program. College room and board: $4074. College room only: $1924. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,634, PT 682, Grad 320 Faculty: FT 101, PT 9 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 % Receiving Financial Aid: 97 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 65 Library Holdings: 593,140 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 125 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AAFCS, ACBSP, CSWE, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Football M; Golf W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

CLARKSON COLLEGE

101 South 42nd St.
Omaha, NE 68131-2739
Tel: (402)552-3100
Free: 800-647-5500
Fax: (402)552-6057
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.clarksoncollege.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. J. W. Upright
Registrar: Michele Stirtz
Admissions: Nicole Wegenast
Financial Aid: Margie Harris
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Nebraska Health System Scores: 65% ACT 18-23; 22% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. Comprehensive fee: $15,030 includes full-time tuition ($10,350), mandatory fees ($690), and college room and board ($3990). Part-time tuition: $345 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $22 per credit hour, $15 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 260, PT 161, Grad 86 Faculty: FT 62, PT 2 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 75 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 20 Library Holdings: 8,807 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 70 credits, Associates; 128 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: APTA, JRCERT, NLN

COLLEGE OF SAINT MARY

1901 South 72nd St.
Omaha, NE 68124-2377
Tel: (402)399-2400
Free: 800-926-5534
Admissions: (402)399-2407
Fax: (402)399-2412
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.csm.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Maryanne Stevens
Registrar: Deb Nugen
Admissions: Lori Werth
Financial Aid: Caprice Calamaio
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Women Affiliation: Roman Catholic Scores: 68% ACT 18-23; 13% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 56 Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $24,010 includes full-time tuition ($17,750), mandatory fees ($360), and college room and board ($5900). Room and board charges vary according to housing facility. Part-time tuition: $550 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $12 per credit hour. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to class time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 641, PT 358, Grad 16 Faculty: FT 54, PT 0 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 65 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 17 Library Holdings: 81,268 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AHIMA, AOTA, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball W; Cross-Country Running W; Soccer W; Softball W; Volleyball W

CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY

800 North Columbia Ave.
Seward, NE 68434-1599
Tel: (402)643-3651
Free: 800-535-5494
Admissions: (402)643-7233
Fax: (402)643-4073
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cune.edu/
President/CEO: Rev. Brian Friedrich
Registrar: Edward Siffring
Admissions: Don Vos
Financial Aid: Gloria Hennig
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod; Concordia University System Scores: 92.9% SAT V 400+; 95.2% SAT M 400+; 38% ACT 18-23; 43.8% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $22,434 includes full-time tuition ($17,724) and college room and board ($4710). Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Miscellaneous, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,122, PT 80, Grad 115 Faculty: FT 62, PT 58 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 80 Library Holdings: 171,688 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

THE CREATIVE CENTER

10850 Emmet St.
Omaha, NE 68164
Tel: (402)898-1000; 888-898-1789
Fax: (402)898-1301
Web Site: http://www.thecreativecenter.com/
President/CEO: Kent Carlson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Application Fee: $100.00 Calendar System: Semester Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY

2500 California Plaza
Omaha, NE 68178-0001
Tel: (402)280-2700
Free: 800-282-5835
Admissions: (402)280-2162
Fax: (402)280-2685
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.creighton.edu/
President/CEO: Rev. John P. Schlegel, SJ
Registrar: John A. Krecek
Admissions: Don Bishop
Financial Aid: Robert D. Walker
Type: University Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic (Jesuit) Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 99% SAT M 400+; 26% ACT 18-23; 56% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 87 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. Comprehensive fee: $29,918 includes full-time tuition ($21,576), mandatory fees ($802), and college room and board ($7540). College room only: $4250. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $675 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $134 per semester hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,731, PT 257, Grad 474 Faculty: FT 475, PT 174 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 57 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 56 Library Holdings: 481,848 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credits, Associates; 128 credits, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, AACN, ABA, ACPhE, ADA, AOTA, APTA, AALS, CSWE, JRCEMT, LCMEAMA, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Crew W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

DANA COLLEGE

2848 College Dr.
Blair, NE 68008-1099
Tel: (402)426-9000
Free: 800-444-3262
Admissions: (402)426-7220
Fax: (402)426-7386
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.dana.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Myrvin Christopherson
Registrar: Melinda Stoner
Admissions: James Lynes
Financial Aid: Amy Lyons
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Scores: 77.78% SAT V 400+; 88.89% SAT M 400+; 62.5% ACT 18-23; 29.5% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 76 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $22,770 includes full-time tuition ($16,850), mandatory fees ($600), and college room and board ($5320). College room only: $2060. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $510 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $35 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 653, PT 23 Faculty: FT 42, PT 33 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 83 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 66 Library Holdings: 145,909 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, CSWE, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

DOANE COLLEGE

1014 Boswell Ave.
Crete, NE 68333-2430
Tel: (402)826-2161
Free: 800-333-6263
Admissions: (402)826-8222
Fax: (402)826-8600
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.doane.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Fred D. Brown
Registrar: Paula Valenta
Admissions: Kim Jacobs
Financial Aid: Janet Dodson
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Church of Christ Scores: 50.38% ACT 18-23; 35.38% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 80 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. Comprehensive fee: $22,458 includes full-time tuition ($17,186), mandatory fees ($350), and college room and board ($4922). College room only: $1850. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to location. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location. Part-time tuition: $573 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $120 per year. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level and location. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,349, PT 247, Grad 798 Faculty: FT 77, PT 63 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 78 Library Holdings: 299,471 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 132 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

GRACE UNIVERSITY

1311 South Ninth St.
Omaha, NE 68108
Tel: (402)449-2800
Free: 800-383-1422
Admissions: (402)449-2831
Fax: (402)341-9587
E-mail: [email protected]university.edu
Web Site: http://www.graceuniversity.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James P. Eckman
Admissions: Diane V. Lee
Financial Aid: Lydia Thompson
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: interdenominational Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $17,380 includes full-time tuition ($11,700), mandatory fees ($280), and college room and board ($5400). College room only: $2400. Part-time tuition: $390 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $15 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 375, PT 52, Grad 86 Faculty: FT 25, PT 25 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 77 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 61 Library Holdings: 46,736 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AABC Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Soccer M; Volleyball W

HAMILTON COLLEGE-LINCOLN

1821 K St., PO Box 82826
Lincoln, NE 68501-2826
Tel: (402)474-5315
Fax: (402)474-5302
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hamiltonlincoln.com/
President/CEO: Todd J. Lardenoit
Registrar: Krystal Gabel
Admissions: Andy Bossler
Financial Aid: Jami Frazier
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Quest Education Corporation Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 13, PT 23 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 7,500 Credit Hours For Degree: 112 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W

HAMILTON COLLEGE-OMAHA

3350 North 90th St.
Omaha, NE 68134
Tel: (402)572-8500
Free: 800-642-1456
Fax: (402)573-1341
Web Site: http://www.hamiltonomaha.edu/
President/CEO: Ken Sigmon
Registrar: Linda Smith
Admissions: Mark Stoltenberger
Financial Aid: Sharon McDonald
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Educational Medical, Inc Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 700 Faculty: FT 17, PT 18 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 4,800 Credit Hours For Degree: 113 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS, AAMAE

HASTINGS COLLEGE

800 North Turner Ave.
Hastings, NE 68901-7696
Tel: (402)463-2402
Free: 800-532-7642
Admissions: (402)461-7320
Fax: (402)463-3002
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hastings.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Phillip L. Dudley, Jr.
Registrar: James Smith
Admissions: Mary Molliconi
Financial Aid: Ian Roberts
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Presbyterian Scores: 99% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 38% ACT 18-23; 47% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 79 Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $22,218 includes full-time tuition ($16,578), mandatory fees ($690), and college room and board ($4950). College room only: $2116. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $686 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $182 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course level, course load, and program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,121, PT 23, Grad 45 Faculty: FT 79, PT 42 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 75 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 67 Library Holdings: 113,318 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 127 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

9814 M St.
Omaha, NE 68127-2056
Tel: (402)331-2900
Free: 800-677-9260
Fax: (402)331-9495
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/
President/CEO: Jerome S. Padak
Admissions: Jerome S. Padak
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: ITT Educational Services, Inc Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Not available Exams: Other Credit Hours For Degree: 96 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACICS

LITTLE PRIEST TRIBAL COLLEGE

PO Box 270
Winnebago, NE 68071
Tel: (402)878-2380
Fax: (402)878-2355
Web Site: http://www.lptc.bia.edu/
President/CEO: Louis LaRose
Admissions: Karen Kemling
Type: Two-Year College Scholarships: Available Enrollment: FT 67, PT 63 Faculty: FT 4, PT 12 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools

METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 3777
Omaha, NE 68103-0777
Tel: (402)457-2400
Free: 800-228-9553
Admissions: (402)457-2717
Fax: (402)457-2564
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.mccneb.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Jerry Moskus
Admissions: Becky Nicks
Financial Aid: Danni Warrick
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For allied health programs, pre-professional associate of science: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1733 full-time, $38.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2610 full-time, $71 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $135 full-time, $3 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,798, PT 7,663 Faculty: FT 177, PT 541 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Library Holdings: 41,161 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 96 quarter hours, Associates ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ACF, ADA, ACBSP, CARC, NLN

MID-PLAINS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

601 West State Farm Rd.
North Platte, NE 69101
Tel: (308)535-3600
Free: 800-658-4348
Admissions: (308)535-3610
Fax: (308)532-8590
Web Site: http://www.mpcca.cc.ne.us/
President/CEO: Michael Chipps
Registrar: Mari Jo Widger
Admissions: Brenda Costin
Financial Aid: Ted Fellers
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,083, PT 2,001 Faculty: FT 62, PT 131 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: ACT, Other % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 8 Library Holdings: 64,284 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ADA, NAACLS Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Golf M; Softball W; Volleyball W

MIDLAND LUTHERAN COLLEGE

900 North Clarkson St.
Fremont, NE 68025-4200
Tel: (402)721-5480
Free: 800-642-8382
Admissions: (402)941-6521
Fax: (402)721-0250
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.mlc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Steven E. Titus
Registrar: Jennifer Verhein
Admissions: Doug G. Watson
Financial Aid: Michelle Reeson
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Lutheran % Accepted: 86 Admission Plans: Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $24,460 includes full-time tuition ($19,510) and college room and board ($4950). College room only: $2190. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 888, PT 21 Faculty: FT 61, PT 31 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 84 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 62 Library Holdings: 110,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

MYOTHERAPY INSTITUTE

6020 South 58th St.
Lincoln, NE 68516
Tel: (402)421-7410
Free: 800-896-3363
Fax: (402)421-6736
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.myotherapy.edu/
President/CEO: Sue Kozisek
Admissions: Gerri Allen
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

NEBRASKA CHRISTIAN COLLEGE

1800 Syracuse Ave.
Norfolk, NE 68701-2458
Tel: (402)379-5000
Web Site: http://www.nechristian.edu/
President/CEO: Rich Milliken
Registrar: June Pieper
Financial Aid: Chris Lahm
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Christian Churches and Churches of Christ Scores: 42% ACT 18-23; 46% ACT 24-29 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 152, PT 15 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 88 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 85 Library Holdings: 250,000 Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 130 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AABC Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Soccer M; Volleyball W

NEBRASKA COLLEGE OF TECHNICAL AGRICULTURE

RR3, Box 23A
Curtis, NE 69025-9205
Tel: (308)367-4124
Free: 800-3CU-RTIS
Fax: (308)367-5203
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ncta.unl.edu/
President/CEO: Gerald Sundquist
Registrar: Gerald Sunduquist
Admissions: Gerald Sundquist
Financial Aid: David Jibben
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of Nebraska System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $10.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $10. State resident tuition: $3006 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $6012 full-time. Mandatory fees: $433 full-time. College room and board: $4149. College room only: $1824. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Miscellaneous, Summer Session Not available Faculty: FT 17, PT 3 Exams: ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 44 Library Holdings: 5,500 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 72 semester hours, Associates Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W

NEBRASKA INDIAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PO Box 428
Macy, NE 68039-0428
Tel: (402)837-5078; 888-843-6432
Admissions: (402)344-8428
Fax: (402)878-2522
Web Site: http://www.thenicc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Ross Primm
Registrar: Sarah Smith
Admissions: Ed Stevens
Financial Aid: Shelly Baxter
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $10.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 97, PT 93 Faculty: FT 6, PT 32 Student-Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 90 quarter hours, Associates

NEBRASKA METHODIST COLLEGE

720 N. 87th St.
Omaha, NE 68114
Tel: (402)354-4879
Free: 800-335-5510
Admissions: (402)354-7205
Fax: (402)354-4819
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.methodistcollege.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Dennis Joslin
Registrar: Lanny Morgan
Admissions: Deann Sterner
Financial Aid: Brenda Boyd
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Church Scores: 70% ACT 18-23; 20% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 50 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: April 01 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Tuition: $11,340 full-time, $378 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $600 full-time, $20 per credit hour part-time. College room only: $2270. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 333, PT 126, Grad 65 Faculty: FT 33, PT 24 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 72 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 20 Library Holdings: 8,656 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 82 credit hours, Associates; 127 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AACN, CARC, JRCEDMS, NLN

NEBRASKA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

5000 Saint Paul Ave.
Lincoln, NE 68504-2796
Tel: (402)466-2371
Free: 800-541-3818
Admissions: (402)465-2218
Fax: (402)465-2179
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Jeanie Watson
Registrar: Patricia Hall
Admissions: Patty Karthauser
Financial Aid: Claire D. Fredstrom
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Scores: 47% ACT 18-23; 45% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 84 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Decision Plan; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 15 Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $23,425 includes full-time tuition ($18,100), mandatory fees ($310), and college room and board ($5015). Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $683 per credit hour. Part-time tuition varies according to class time, course load, degree level, location, and program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,606, PT 236, Grad 174 Faculty: FT 102, PT 123 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 68 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 54 Library Holdings: 178,531 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 126 hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

NORTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE

801 East Benjamin Ave, PO Box 469
Norfolk, NE 68702-0469
Tel: (402)371-2020
Admissions: (402)844-7258
Fax: (402)644-0650
Web Site: http://www.northeastcollege.com/
President/CEO: Dr. Bill R. Path Registrar: Kathy Stover
Admissions: Maureen Baker
Financial Aid: Joan Zanders
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1770 full-time, $59 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2,212 full-time, $73.75 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $315 full-time, $10.50 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $4586. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,127, PT 2,974 Faculty: FT 101, PT 236 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 11 Library Holdings: 28,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: APTA, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cheerleading W

PERU STATE COLLEGE

PO Box 10
Peru, NE 68421
Tel: (402)872-3815
Admissions: (402)872-2221
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.peru.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Ben Johnson
Registrar: Dr. DiAnna Loy
Admissions: Micki Willis
Financial Aid: Diana Lind
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Nebraska State College System Scores: 51% ACT 18-23; 15% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 29 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Area resident tuition: $97.75 per credit hour part-time. State resident tuition: $2933 full-time, $195.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5865 full-time. Mandatory fees: $706 full-time. Part-time tuition varies according to course load, location, and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $4486. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,017, PT 693, Grad 249 Faculty: FT 40, PT 90 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 177,373 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 125 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running W; Football M; Golf W; Softball W; Volleyball W

SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE, BEATRICE CAMPUS

4771 W. Scott Rd.
Beatrice, NE 68310-7042
Tel: (402)228-3468
Free: 800-233-5027
Fax: (402)228-2218
Web Site: http://www.southeast.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Dennis Headrick
Registrar: Lila Thomas
Admissions: Mary Ann Harms
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southeast Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 65, PT 20 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 22 Library Holdings: 13,287 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Golf M; Volleyball W

SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE, LINCOLN CAMPUS

8800 O St.
Lincoln, NE 68520-1299
Tel: (402)471-3333
Free: 800-642-4075
Admissions: (402)437-2619
Web Site: http://www.southeast.edu/
President/CEO: Jeanette Volker
Registrar: Robin Moore
Admissions: David Sonenberg
Financial Aid: David Sonenberg
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southeast Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1755 full-time, $39 per quarter hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $2138 full-time, $47.50 per quarter hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $45 full-time, $1 per quarter hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,095, PT 3,822 Faculty: FT 138, PT 410 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 14,081 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 90 quarter credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: ARCEST, ACF, ADA, ACBSP, CARC, JRCERT, NAACLS, NLN

SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE, MILFORD CAMPUS

600 State St.
Milford, NE 68405-8498
Tel: (402)761-2131
Free: 800-933-7223
Web Site: http://www.southeast.edu/
President/CEO: Larry Shaw
Registrar: Donna Havener
Admissions: Larry E. Meyer
Financial Aid: Merlyn Williams
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southeast Community College System Admission Plans: Open Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Quarter, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 890, PT 32 Faculty: FT 86, PT 3 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 33 Library Holdings: 10,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 108 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACBSP

UNION COLLEGE

3800 South 48th St.
Lincoln, NE 68506-4300
Tel: (402)486-2600
Free: 800-228-4600
Admissions: (402)486-2504
Fax: (402)486-2895
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ucollege.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. David Smith
Registrar: Osa Berg
Admissions: Robert Weaver
Financial Aid: Jack Burdick
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Seventh-day Adventist Scores: 50.32% ACT 18-23; 33.55% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 43 Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. Comprehensive fee: $19,448 includes full-time tuition ($14,790), mandatory fees ($440), and college room and board ($4218). College room only: $2898. Part-time tuition: $625 per semester hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 757, PT 128, Grad 45 Faculty: FT 57, PT 41 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 61 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 13 Library Holdings: 147,813 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACN, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Volleyball W

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AT KEARNEY

905 West 25th
St. Kearney, NE 68849-0001 Tel: (308)865-8441
Free: 800-532-7639
Admissions: (308)865-8702
Fax: (308)865-8987
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.unk.edu/
President/CEO: Douglas Kristensen
Registrar: Kim Schipporeit
Admissions: Disty Newton
Financial Aid: Mary Sommers
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of Nebraska System Scores: 84% SAT V 400+; 83% SAT M 400+; 55% ACT 18-23; 30% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 84 Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $3668 full-time, $122.25 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7508 full-time, $250.25 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $825 full-time, $16.25 per hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and degree level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and degree level. College room and board: $5326. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,895, PT 486, Grad 1,064 Faculty: FT 306, PT 74 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I and SAT II or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 59 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 33 Library Holdings: 320,915 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 125 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AAFCS, ACA, ASLHA, CSWE, JRCEPAT, NAIT, NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA-LINCOLN

14th and R Sts.
Lincoln, NE 68588
Tel: (402)472-7211
Free: 800-742-8800
Admissions: (402)472-2030
Fax: (402)472-0670
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.unl.edu/
President/CEO: Harvey Perlman
Registrar: Dr. Earl W. Hawkey
Admissions: Alan Cerveny
Financial Aid: Craig Munier
Type: University Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of Nebraska System Scores: 97% SAT V 400+; 98% SAT M 400+; 38% ACT 18-23; 43% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 75 Application Deadline: May 01 Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $4530 full-time, $151 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $13,440 full-time, $448 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1010 full-time, $8.50 per credit hour part-time, $202.10 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $6008. College room only: $3239. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 15,768, PT 1,269, Grad 4,241 Faculty: FT 1,048, PT 10 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I and SAT II or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 46 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 24 Library Holdings: 3,317,154 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 71 credit hours, Associates; 125 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEJMC, AAMFT, AAFCS, ABA, ACCE, ADA, ADtA, ACSP, APA, ASLHA, AALS, FIDER, NASAD, NASM, NAST, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Bowling M; Crew M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Fencing M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Gymnastics M & W; Riflery W; Soccer W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA MEDICAL CENTER

Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha, NE 68198
Tel: (402)559-4000
Free: 800-626-8431
Admissions: (402)559-6409
Fax: (402)559-6796
Web Site: http://www.unmc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Harold M. Maurer
Registrar: Judith D. Walker
Admissions: Judith Walker
Financial Aid: Judith Walker
Type: Two-Year Upper Division Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of Nebraska System Admission Plans: Preferred Admission Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $6685 full-time, $191 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $16,591 full-time, $559.75 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $733 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level, course load, and program. Part-time tuition varies according to program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 779, PT 72, Grad 1,225 Faculty: FT 783, PT 224 % Receiving Financial Aid: 70 Library Holdings: 241,551 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 131 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ACPE, AACN, ACPhE, ADA, ADtA, APTA, CEPH, JRCEDMS, JRCERT, JRCNMT, LCMEAMA, NAACLS

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AT OMAHA

6001 Dodge St.
Omaha, NE 68182
Tel: (402)554-2200
Admissions: (402)554-2416
Fax: (402)554-3472
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.unomaha.edu/
President/CEO: Nancy Belck
Registrar: Dr. Wade Robinson
Admissions: Jolene Adams
Financial Aid: Randy Sell
Type: University Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of Nebraska System Scores: 95.7% SAT V 400+; 94.2% SAT M 400+; 53.7% ACT 18-23; 32.3% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 89 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 01 Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45. State resident tuition: $4133 full-time, $137.75 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $12,180 full-time, $406 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $692 full-time, $19.55 per semester hour part-time, $81.50 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and student level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and student level. College room and board: $6140. College room only: $3690. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 8,532, PT 2,797, Grad 2,764 Faculty: FT 482, PT 360 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 44 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 9 Library Holdings: 700,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 125 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACA, ASLHA, CAA, CEPH, CSWE, JRCEPAT, NASAD, NASM, NASPAA, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running W; Football M; Golf W; Ice Hockey M; Soccer W; Softball W; Swimming and Diving W; Tennis W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

VATTEROTT COLLEGE (OMAHA)

225 North 80th St.
Omaha, NE 68114
Tel: (402)392-1300
Fax: (402)392-2828
Web Site: http://www.vatterott-college.edu/
President/CEO: John Vatterott, Sr.
Registrar: Kathy Gilfillan
Admissions: Dr. James G. Hadley
Financial Aid: Bradley Dolittle
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 20, PT 1 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 1,900 Credit Hours For Degree: 100 quarter hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABHES, ACCSCT, ADA

VATTEROTT COLLEGE (OMAHA-SPRING VALLEY)

11818 I St.
Omaha, NE 68137
Tel: (402)891-9411
Fax: (402)891-9413
Web Site: http://www.vatterott-college.edu/
President/CEO: Scott Broady
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Semester Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

WAYNE STATE COLLEGE

1111 Main St.
Wayne, NE 68787
Tel: (402)375-7000
Admissions: (402)375-7234
Fax: (402)375-7204
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wsc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Richard Collings
Registrar: Lynette Lentz
Admissions: R. Lincoln Morris
Financial Aid: Kyle Rose
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Nebraska State College System Scores: 50% ACT 18-23; 30% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. State resident tuition: $2933 full-time, $97.75 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5865 full-time, $195.50 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $870 full-time, $34.75 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. College room and board: $4300. College room only: $2080. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,483, PT 223, Grad 616 Faculty: FT 126, PT 79 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 % Receiving Financial Aid: 62 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 42 Library Holdings: 147,205 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 125 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AAFCS, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Rugby M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

WESTERN NEBRASKA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

371 College Dr.
Sidney, NE 69162
Tel: (308)254-5450
Free: 800-348-4435
Admissions: (308)635-6015
Fax: (308)254-7444
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.wncc.net/
President/CEO: Deanna Trowbridge
Registrar: Roger Hovey
Admissions: Troy Archuleta
Financial Aid: Penny James
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Western Community College Area System Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 66, PT 292 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: Other, SAT I and SAT II or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 5 Library Holdings: 34,539 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: AHIMA Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Volleyball W

YORK COLLEGE

1125 East 8th St.
York, NE 68467
Tel: (402)363-5600
Free: 800-950-9675
Admissions: (402)363-5608
Fax: (402)363-5666
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.york.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Wayne Baker
Admissions: Tod Martin
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Church of Christ Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 83% SAT M 400+; 57% ACT 18-23; 28% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 99 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $16,330 includes full-time tuition ($11,400), mandatory fees ($1030), and college room and board ($3900). Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $355 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $177 per credit hour. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 412, PT 38 Faculty: FT 33, PT 25 Student-Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 81 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 60 Library Holdings: 106,994 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

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Nebraska

Nebraska

BELLEVUE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Communication and Media Studies, BM

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Health Services Administration, M

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

Human Services, M

Information Science/Studies, BM

Information Technology, B

Management, M

Management Information Systems and Services, BM

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Securities Services Administration/Management, M

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, B

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE-COLUMBUS CAMPUS

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology, A

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Information Technology, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Quality Control Technology/Technician, A

System Administration/Administrator, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE-GRAND ISLAND CAMPUS

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Child Development, A

Clinical/Medical Social Work, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Information Technology, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

System Administration/Administrator, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE-HASTINGS CAMPUS

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Applied Horticulture/Horticultural Operations, A

Autobody/Collision and Repair Technology/Technician, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Child Development, A

Clinical/Medical Social Work, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Dental Assisting/Assistant, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Diesel Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator Production, A

Health Information/Medical Records Technology/Technician, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Hospital and Health Care Facilities Administration/Management, A

Hospitality Administration/Management, A

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Information Technology, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Radio and Television Broadcasting Technology/Technician, A

System Administration/Administrator, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

CHADRON STATE COLLEGE

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Education, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Corrections and Criminal Justice, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Drama and Dance Teacher Education, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Education, MO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Economics and Related Services, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Health/Medical Preparatory Programs, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Industrial Production Technologies/Technicians, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Library Science, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Physics Teacher Education, B

Psychology, B

Range Science and Management, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, M

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Subject Areas, B

Technology Teacher Education/Industrial Arts Teacher Education, B

CLARKSON COLLEGE

Business Administration and Management, B

Nursing, M

Nursing - Advanced Practice, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nursing Administration, BM

Nursing Education, M

Nursing Science, B

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, AB

COLLEGE OF SAINT MARY

Accounting, A

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, AB

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

General Studies, AB

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, AB

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, AB

Mathematics, B

Natural Sciences, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, B

CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Behavioral Sciences, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Commerce, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, B

Computer Teacher Education, B

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Drama and Dance Teacher Education, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, BM

Education, BM

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Geography, B

Geography Teacher Education, B

Health and Physical Education, B

Health Teacher Education, B

Health/Medical Preparatory Programs, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Natural Sciences, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, BM

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Sciences, B

Physics Teacher Education, B

Piano and Organ, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Nursing Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Theology/Pre-Ministerial Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Religious Education, BM

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Sciences, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language/ESL Language Instructor, B

Technology Teacher Education/Industrial Arts Teacher Education, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

THE CREATIVE CENTER

Computer Graphics, A

Design and Visual Communications, A

Illustration, A

CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Allied Health and Medical Assisting Services, MDPO

Allopathic Medicine, PO

American Indian/Native American Studies, B

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Ancient/Classical Greek Language and Literature, B

Applied Mathematics, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology, BM

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MDO

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MO

Chemistry, B

Classical, Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies and Archaeology, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer Science, AB

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Dentistry, P

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, M

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Electronic Commerce, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), AB

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

Finance, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

Graphic Design, B

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

History, B

Immunology, MD

International Affairs, M

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Journalism, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Latin Language and Literature, B

Law and Legal Studies, PO

Liberal Studies, M

Management Information Systems and Services, BM

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, AB

Medical Microbiology and Bacteriology, MD

Music, B

Nursing, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, D

Organizational Communication, A

Pharmaceutical Sciences, MO

Pharmacology, MD

Pharmacy, P

Philosophy, B

Physical Therapy/Therapist, D

Physics, BM

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Psychology, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, M

Theology/Theological Studies, AB

DANA COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer Science, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Drama and Dance Teacher Education, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Environmental Studies, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, B

German Language and Literature, B

Health and Physical Education, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Organizational Communication, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, B

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, B

DOANE COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

Health and Physical Education, B

History, B

Human Services, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Natural Sciences, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Sciences, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Public Administration, B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language/ESL Language Instructor, B

GRACE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Airline/Commercial/Professional Pilot and Flight Crew, B

Avionics Maintenance Technology/Technician, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, AB

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Programming/Programmer, B

Computer Science, B

Counseling Psychology, M

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Marriage and Family Therapy/Counseling, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, B

Music, AB

Music Teacher Education, B

Music Theory and Composition, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, BM

Piano and Organ, B

Pre-Theology/Pre-Ministerial Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religious Education, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, M

Voice and Opera, B

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, B

Youth Ministry, B

HAMILTON COLLEGE-LINCOLN

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Programming, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Information Technology, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Tourism and Travel Services Management, A

Word Processing, A

HAMILTON COLLEGE-OMAHA

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

HASTINGS COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Advertising, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biopsychology, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Communications Technology/Technician, B

Comparative Literature, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, B

Corrections and Criminal Justice, B

Creative Writing, B

Drama and Dance Teacher Education, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Economics, B

Education, BM

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, B

Foreign Languages and Literatures, B

German Language and Literature, B

German Language Teacher Education, B

Health and Physical Education, B

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Human Services, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Journalism, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music History, Literature, and Theory, B

Music Pedagogy, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Physics Teacher Education, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Public Administration, B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Radio and Television, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Violin, Viola, Guitar and Other Stringed Instruments, B

Voice and Opera, B

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

Accounting and Business/Management, B

Animation, Interactive Technology, Video Graphics and Special Effects, B

Business Administration and Management, B

CAD/CADD Drafting and/or Design Technology/Technician, A

Computer and Information Systems Security, B

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Software Technology/Technician, B

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

E-Commerce/Electronic Commerce, B

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, AB

System, Networking, and LAN/WAN Management/Manager, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, A

METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Child Development, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Culinary Arts/Chef Training, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator Production, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Heavy Equipment Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Human Services, A

Interior Design, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Law and Legal Studies, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Mental Health/Rehabilitation, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Ornamental Horticulture, A

Photography, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

MID-PLAINS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Autobody/Collision and Repair Technology/Technician, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Building/Construction Finishing, Management, and Inspection, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Dental Assisting/Assistant, A

Diesel Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Fire Science/Firefighting, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Transportation and Materials Moving, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

MIDLAND LUTHERAN COLLEGE

Accounting, AB

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Behavioral Sciences, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Community Organization and Advocacy, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, AB

Computer Science, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminology, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

History, B

Human Services, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, AB

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Natural Sciences, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Sciences, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, AB

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, B

Sociology, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, B

Tourism and Travel Services Management, A

NEBRASKA CHRISTIAN COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), AB

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, AB

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, AB

Religious/Sacred Music, AB

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sign Language Interpretation and Translation, A

Theology/Theological Studies, B

NEBRASKA COLLEGE OF TECHNICAL AGRICULTURE

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Agricultural Mechanization, A

Agronomy and Crop Science, A

Animal Sciences, A

Heavy Equipment Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Horticultural Science, A

Natural Resources and Conservation, A

Natural Resources Management/Development and Policy, A

Soil Science and Agronomy, A

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

NEBRASKA INDIAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

American Indian/Native American Studies, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Carpentry/Carpenter, A

Corrections and Criminal Justice, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, A

Human Services, A

Information Technology, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Natural Resources and Conservation, A

Social Work, A

NEBRASKA METHODIST COLLEGE

Cardiovascular Technology/Technologist, AB

Diagnostic Medical Sonography/Sonographer and Ultrasound Technician, AB

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), AB

Health Promotion, M

Nursing, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, AB

NEBRASKA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biochemistry, B

Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biopsychology, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services, B

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer Science, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Dramatic/Theatre Arts and Stagecraft, B

Economics, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Forensic Science and Technology, M

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

Health and Physical Education, B

History, B

Industrial and Organizational Psychology, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

International/Global Studies, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing, M

Nursing Administration, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Communication, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Women's Studies, B

NORTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Agricultural Mechanization, A

Agricultural Production Operations, A

Agriculture, A

Agronomy and Crop Science, A

Animal Sciences, A

Applied Horticulture/Horticultural Operations, A

Art Teacher Education, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Audio Engineering, A

Autobody/Collision and Repair Technology/Technician, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Broadcast Journalism, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business Teacher Education, A

Carpentry/Carpenter, A

Chemistry, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Science, A

Corrections, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Crop Production, A

Diesel Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electrician, A

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering, A

English Language and Literature, A

Entrepreneurship/Entrepreneurial Studies, A

Farm/Farm and Ranch Management, A

General Studies, A

Health and Physical Education, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Horticultural Science, A

Journalism, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Lineworker, A

Livestock Management, A

Marketing, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, A

Mathematics, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Music, A

Music Management and Merchandising, A

Music Performance, A

Music Teacher Education, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Physics, A

Pre-Law Studies, A

Radio and Television, A

Real Estate, A

Retailing and Retail Operations, A

Social Sciences, A

Social Work, A

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

PERU STATE COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Applied Art, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Education, BM

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Music Management and Merchandising, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Natural Resources and Conservation, B

Natural Sciences, B

Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physician Assistant, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Voice and Opera, B

Wildlife and Wildlands Science and Management, B

Wind and Percussion Instruments, B

SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE, BEATRICE CAMPUS

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Agricultural Mechanization, A

Agriculture, A

Agronomy and Crop Science, A

Animal Sciences, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Biology Technician/BioTechnology Laboratory Technician, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Broadcast Journalism, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Computer Science, A

Education, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Finance, A

Journalism, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Physical Sciences, A

Soil Science and Agronomy, A

SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE, LINCOLN CAMPUS

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Child Development, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Culinary Arts/Chef Training, A

Dietetics/Dieticians, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Environmental Studies, A

Fire Science/Firefighting, A

Food Technology and Processing, A

Human Services, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

SOUTHEAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE, MILFORD CAMPUS

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Carpentry/Carpenter, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Technician, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drafting/Design Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Design, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Metallurgical Technology/Technician, A

Physical Sciences, A

Pipefitting/Pipefitter and Sprinkler Fitter, A

Plastics Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Quality Control Technology/Technician, A

Solar Energy Technology/Technician, A

Survey Technology/Surveying, A

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, A

Transportation and Materials Moving, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

UNION COLLEGE

Accounting, AB

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biochemistry, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Computer Science, B

Computer Teacher Education, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, A

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Entrepreneurship/Entrepreneurial Studies, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

Graphic Design, AB

Health/Medical Preparatory Programs, A

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Information Science/Studies, AB

International Relations and Affairs, B

Journalism, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, AB

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physician Assistant, B

Physics, B

Physics Teacher Education, B

Psychology, B

Public Health (MPH, DPH), A

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AT KEARNEY

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Art Education, M

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Aviation/Airway Management and Operations, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Communication Disorders, BM

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MO

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Dietetics/Dieticians, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, MO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English, M

English Language and Literature, B

Exercise and Sports Science, M

Family and Consumer Economics and Related Services, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, M

French Language and Literature, B

General Studies, B

Geography, B

German Language and Literature, B

History, BM

International Relations and Affairs, B

Journalism, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, M

Operations Management and Supervision, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

School Psychology, MO

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Statistics, B

Technical Teacher Education, B

Therapeutic Recreation/Recreational Therapy, B

Writing, M

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA-LINCOLN

Accounting, BMDO

Actuarial Science, BM

Advertising, B

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Agricultural Communication/Journalism, B

Agricultural Economics, BMD

Agricultural Education, M

Agricultural Engineering, M

Agricultural Mechanization, B

Agricultural Sciences, MD

Agricultural Teacher Education, B

Agricultural/Biological Engineering and Bioengineering, B

Agriculture, B

Agronomy and Crop Science, B

Agronomy and Soil Sciences, MD

Analytical Chemistry, D

Ancient/Classical Greek Language and Literature, B

Animal Sciences, BMD

Anthropology, BM

Apparel and Textiles, B

Architectural Engineering, BM

Architecture, BMO

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, BM

Art Teacher Education, B

Astronomy, MD

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology, B

Biochemistry, BMD

Bioengineering, M

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MD

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biomedical/Medical Engineering, B

Biometry/Biometrics, M

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MDO

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BMD

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Child and Family Studies, MD

Civil Engineering, BMDO

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, BM

Clothing and Textiles, M

Communication and Media Studies, MD

Communication Disorders, M

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Community Health Services/Liaison/Counseling, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering, BMD

Computer Science, MD

Computer Teacher Education, B

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Consumer Economics, MD

Curriculum and Instruction, MDO

Dance, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, BMDO

Education, MDO

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Hearing Impairments, Including Deafness, B

Educational Administration and Supervision, MDO

Educational Psychology, MO

Electrical Engineering, MD

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MDO

English, MD

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Entomology, MD

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, MD

Environmental Studies, B

Family and Consumer Economics and Related Services, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, MD

Film/Cinema Studies, B

Finance, B

Finance and Banking, MD

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Fire Protection and Safety Technology/Technician, A

Food Science, B

Food Science and Technology, MD

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, B

French Language and Literature, BMD

French Language Teacher Education, B

Geography, BMD

Geology/Earth Science, B

Geosciences, MD

German Language and Literature, BMD

German Language Teacher Education, B

Health Education, M

Health Teacher Education, B

History, BMD

History Teacher Education, B

Horticultural Science, BMD

Housing and Human Environments, B

Industrial Engineering, B

Industrial Production Technologies/Technicians, AB

Industrial Technology/Technician, B

Industrial/Management Engineering, MD

Inorganic Chemistry, D

Interior Architecture, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Journalism, BM

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Landscaping and Groundskeeping, B

Latin American Studies, B

Latin Language and Literature, B

Law and Legal Studies, MPO

Legal and Justice Studies, M

Legal Professions and Studies, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management, M

Management Science, B

Manufacturing Engineering, MD

Marketing, MD

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, M

Mathematics, BMD

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Mechanical Engineering, BMD

Mechanics, MD

Medieval and Renaissance Studies, B

Museology/Museum Studies, M

Music, BMD

Music Teacher Education, B

Natural Resources and Conservation, BMD

Natural Resources Management/Development and Policy, B

Nutritional Sciences, MD

Office Management and Supervision, B

Organic Chemistry, D

Philosophy, BMD

Physical Chemistry, D

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physics, BMD

Physics Teacher Education, B

Plant Protection and Integrated Pest Management, B

Political Science and Government, BMDO

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, BMDO

Range Science and Management, B

Reading Teacher Education, B

Recreation and Park Management, M

Russian Language and Literature, B

Sales and Marketing Operations/Marketing and Distribution Teacher Education, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Sociology, BMD

Soil Science and Agronomy, B

Spanish Language and Literature, BMD

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Statistics, MD

Survey Methodology, M

System Management, M

Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Subject Areas, B

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, B

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language/ESL Language Instructor, B

Technology Teacher Education/Industrial Arts Teacher Education, B

Theater, MD

Toxicology, MD

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

Urban and Regional Planning, MO

Veterinary Sciences, MD

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, B

Western European Studies, B

Women's Studies, B

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA MEDICAL CENTER

Allied Health and Medical Assisting Services, MDO

Allopathic Medicine, PO

Anatomy, MD

Biochemistry, MD

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MD

Cancer Biology/Oncology, MD

Cell Biology and Anatomy, MD

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Clinical Laboratory Sciences, M

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, B

Dentistry, PO

Diagnostic Medical Sonography/Sonographer and Ultrasound Technician, B

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, B

Medical Technology, O

Microbiology, MD

Molecular Biology, MD

Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Nursing, MD

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nutritional Sciences, O

Pathology/Experimental Pathology, MD

Pharmaceutical Sciences, MD

Pharmacology, MD

Pharmacy, P

Physical Therapy/Therapist, D

Physician Assistant, M

Physiology, MD

Public Health, M

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, B

Toxicology, MD

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AT OMAHA

Accounting, BM

Aeronautics/Aviation/Aerospace Science and Technology, B

African-American/Black Studies, B

Architectural Engineering, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Banking and Financial Support Services, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

BioTechnology, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business/Commerce, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Civil Engineering, B

Communication and Media Studies, M

Communication Disorders, M

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Community Health Services/Liaison/Counseling, B

Computer Engineering, B

Computer Science, BM

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Creative Writing, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Criminology, MD

Developmental Psychology, D

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, M

Education, MDO

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Speech or Language Impairments, A

Educational Administration and Supervision, MDO

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, O

Educational Psychology, M

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

Engineering Physics, B

English, MO

English as a Second Language, O

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

Experimental Psychology, D

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences Communication, B

Family Resource Management Studies, B

Finance, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

General Studies, B

Geography, BMO

Geology/Earth Science, B

German Language and Literature, B

Gerontology, BMO

Health and Physical Education, B

Health Education, M

History, BM

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Industrial and Organizational Psychology, MD

Industrial Technology/Technician, B

Information Science/Studies, D

International/Global Studies, B

Journalism, B

Latin American Studies, B

Library Science, B

Management Information Systems and Services, BMD

Manufacturing Technology/Technician, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, BM

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, BM

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Music Theory and Composition, B

Natural Sciences, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, BM

Psychology, BMDO

Public Administration, MD

Public Health, M

Reading Teacher Education, M

Real Estate, B

Recreation and Park Management, M

Religion/Religious Studies, B

School Psychology, O

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Work, BM

Sociology, BM

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, M

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Technical Communication, O

Theater, M

Urban Education and Leadership, O

Voice and Opera, B

Women's Studies, B

Writing, O

VATTEROTT COLLEGE (OMAHA)

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

WAYNE STATE COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Advertising, B

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Applied Mathematics, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Child Care Provider/Assistant, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Communication and Media Studies, M

Comparative Literature, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Counseling Psychology, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Creative Writing, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminal Justice/Police Science, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Drama and Dance Teacher Education, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Education, BMO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English as a Second Language, M

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Exercise and Sports Science, M

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Fashion Merchandising, B

Finance, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, B

French Language and Literature, B

Geography, B

Geography Teacher Education, B

German Language and Literature, B

Graphic Design, B

Health Education, M

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Home Economics Education, M

Industrial Production Technologies/Technicians, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, BM

Interior Design, B

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, BM

Modern Languages, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, BM

Natural Sciences, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BM

Physical Sciences, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Psychology Teacher Education, B

Public Administration, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, BM

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, M

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Special Products Marketing Operations, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, BM

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

Vocational and Technical Education, M

WESTERN NEBRASKA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Agriculture, A

Anthropology, A

Art Teacher Education, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Chemistry, A

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Community Psychology, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Dietetics/Dieticians, A

Drama and Dance Teacher Education, A

Ecology, A

Economics, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

English Language and Literature, A

Forest Management/Forest Resources Management, A

French Language and Literature, A

General Studies, A

Geography, A

German Language and Literature, A

Health and Physical Education, A

History, A

Information Technology, A

Interdisciplinary Studies, A

Journalism, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mathematics, A

Music Teacher Education, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Physics, A

Political Science and Government, A

Pre-Dentistry Studies, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Pre-Law Studies, A

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, A

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, A

Pre-Veterinary Studies, A

Psychology, A

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, A

Secondary Education and Teaching, A

Social Work, A

Sociology, A

Spanish Language and Literature, A

YORK COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Ancient Near Eastern and Biblical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

General Studies, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Natural Sciences, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physiological Psychology/Psychobiology, B

Psychology, B

Psychology Teacher Education, B

Reading Teacher Education, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, B

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Nebraska

NEBRASKA

STATE EDUCATION OFFICE

Dean Folkers, Assistant Director
Career and Technical Education Office
State Department of Education
P.O. Box 94987
301 Centennial Mall S.
Lincoln, NE 68509-4987
(402)471-4808

STATE REGULATORY INFORMATION

The 1990 laws governing solicitation of students in the state of Nebraska and the licensing of private postsecondary career schools in the state went into effect July 10, 1990. Any person representing a privately owned business, trade, technical and/or correspondence school located outside the state of Nebraska soliciting or selling in Nebraska any correspondence course and/or any business, trade or technical school providing training in residence, is required to secure a permit for operation from the Commissioner.
Such application is made on forms furnished by the Department of Education and accompanied by appropriate fees and surety bonds in the penal sum of $5,000.00 per agent. The school must show evidence of licensure in the state in which it is located or evidence of accreditation by a regional or national accrediting agency. The bonds are provided for indemnification of any student suffering loss as a result of fraud or misrepresentation used in securing enrollment.
The permit required is valid for the calendar year in which it is issued, irrespective of the date issued. The 1990 Private Postsecondary Career School Authorization Act mandates Nebraska resident schools to apply to the Department of Education for course accreditation within five years of operation or lose authority to operate. An accredited school may petition the Department for authority to award an Associate degree.

ALLIANCE

Western Nebraska Community College, Practical Nursing Program in Alliance

1750 Sweetwater, Ste. 102, Alliance, NE 69301. Nursing, Two-Year College. Founded 1958. Contact: Royce Ammon, Director, (308)763-2000, 888-559-9622, Fax: (308)763-2012, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.wncc.net. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Trisemester. Tuition: $59/credit hour (tuition and fees) state resident; $68/credit non-resident. Enrollment: men 1, women 30. Degrees awarded: Diploma, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (1 Yr)

BEATRICE

Joseph's Colleges of Beauty and Barbering (Beatrice)

618 Court St., Beatrice, NE 68310. Cosmetology, Barber. Founded 1967. Contact: Bruce Nims, CEO, (402)223-3588, 800-742-7827, Fax: (402)223-3932, Web Site: http://josephscollege.com; Web Site: http://josephscollege.com/contact_us.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $7,435-$16,195; $1,000 books and supplies. Enrollment: women 20. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Barbering (1100-2100H); Cosmetology (2100 Hr)

Southeast Community College, Beatrice Campus

4771 W. Scott Rd., Beatrice, NE 68310-7042. Contact: Jack Huck, President, (402)228-3468, 800-233-5027, Fax: (402)228-2218, Web Site: http://www.southeast.edu. Public. Housing available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $1,620 in-state; $1,957 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

COLUMBUS

Central Community College - Columbus Campus

4500 63rd St., PO Box 1027, Columbus, NE 68602-1027. Two-Year College. Founded 1969. Contact: Mary Young, Admissions Dir., (402)564-7132, 877-CCC-0780, Fax: (402)562-1201, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.cccneb.edu; Kelly Faltys, Recruiter, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $62 per credit in-state; $93 per credit out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 523. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: NCA-HLC; ADA; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Agribusiness; Art; Automotive Technology; Biological Technology; Business Administration; Commercial Art; Data Processing; Drafting Technology; Early Childhood Education; Electro-Mechanical Technology; Electronics Technology; Home Economics; Industrial Technology; Language; Machine Shop; Mid-Management; Music; Nursing, Practical; Office Technology; Physical Therapy Aide; Quality Control; Radiologic Technology; Recreation Leadership; Respiratory Therapy; Surgical Technology; Theatre Arts; Welding Technology

CURTIS

Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture

404 E. 7th, RR 3 Box 23A, Curtis, NE 69025. Two-Year College. Founded 1965. Contact: Gerald Sundquist, Dir., (308)367-4124, 800-328-7847, Fax: (308)367-5203, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://ncta.unl.edu/. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $54 per credit hour, state resident. Enrollment: Total 450. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agribusiness (20 Mo); Agriculture - Production (20 Mo); Agri-Engineering & Mechanics (20 Mo); Horticulture (20 Mo); Livestock Management (20 Mo); Veterinary Technology (20 Mo)

FREMONT

La James International College

1660 N. Grant St., Fremont, NE 68025. Cosmetology, Barber. Founded 1958. Contact: Jerry Hendrickson, (402)721-6500, 800-334-4528, Fax: (402)721-6502, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://lajames.net. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $10,950 cosmetology or barbering. Enrollment: men 0, women 88. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Barbering (2100 Hr); Cosmetology (2100 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Massage Therapy (625 Hr); Nail Technology (350 Hr)

GRAND ISLAND

Central Community College - Grand Island Campus

3134 W. Hwy. 34, PO Box 4903, Grand Island, NE 68802-4903. Two-Year College. Founded 1966. Contact: Liz Kohout, Admissions Dir., (308)398-4222, (308)398-7305, 877-CCC-0780, Fax: (308)398-7590, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.cccneb.edu; Michelle Dannelly, Recruiter, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $62 per credit in-state; $93 per credit out-of-state. Enrollment: men 227, women 460. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ADA; CAAHEP; NLNAC; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Biological Technology (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Technology (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education; Economics & Business Administration (2 Yr); Education (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Industrial Technology; Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Machine Technology; Management (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Paralegal (2 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide; Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (2 Yr); Teacher Assistant; Welding Technology (2 Yr)

Joseph's Colleges of Beauty and Barbering (Grand Island)

305 West 3rd, Grand Island, NE 68801. Barber, Cosmetology. Contact: Bruce Nims, CEO, (308)381-8848, 800-742-7827, Web Site: http://josephscollege.com; Web Site: http://josephscollege.com/contact_us.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Tuition: $7,435-$16,195; $1,000 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Barbering (1100-2100H); Cosmetology (2100 Hr)

HASTINGS

Central Community College - Hastings Campus

East Hwy. 6, PO Box 1024, Hastings, NE 68902-1024. Two-Year College. Founded 1966. Contact: Bob Glenn, Admissions Dir., (402)463-9811, 877-222-0780, Fax: (308)398-7590, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.cccneb.edu; Jannelle Wells, Recruiter, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $62 per credit in-state; $93 per credit out-of-state. Enrollment: men 566, women 554. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ADA; CAAHEP; NLNAC; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Agribusiness; Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration; Art, Advertising - Commercial; Auto Body & Fender Repair; Automotive Management; Automotive Technology; Auto Parts Management; Business Administration; Business Technology; Construction Technology; Dental Assisting; Dental Hygiene; Diesel Technology; Drafting, Architectural; Early Childhood Education; Electrical Technology; Electronics Technology; Health Information Technology; Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning; Horticulture; Hotel & Restaurant Management; Human Services; Industrial Technology; Information Sciences Technology; Machinist, General; Marketing Management; Mechanical Drafting; Media Technology; Medical Assistant; Truck Driving; Welding Technology

Joseph's Colleges of Beauty and Barbering (Hastings)

828 W. 2nd St., Hastings, NE 68901. Cosmetology, Barber. Founded 1965. Contact: Carol Sullivan, Dir., (402)463-1357, (402)463-1389, 800-742-7827, Fax: (402)463-1389, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://josephscollege.com; Web Site: http://josephscollege.com/contact_us.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $7,435-$16,195; $1,000 books and supplies. Enrollment: women 14. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Barbering (1100-2100H); Cosmetology (2100 Hr)

Mary Lanning Memorial Hospital School of Radiologic Technology

715 N. Saint Joseph, Hastings, NE 68901. Allied Medical. Founded 1953. Contact: Jean Korth, Program Director, (402)461-5177, (402)461-5087, Fax: (402)461-5059, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://mlmh.org. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Other. Tuition: $2,400/year; $250/year fees; $650 books and supplies; $175/month dorm. Enrollment: Total 20. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: CAAHEP; JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology (24 Mo)

KEARNEY

Joseph's Colleges of Beauty and Barbering (Kearney)

2213 Central Ave., Kearney, NE 68847. Barber, Cosmetology. Contact: Bruce Nims, CEO, (308)234-6594, 800-742-7827, Web Site: http://josephscollege.com; Web Site: http://josephscollege.com/contact_us.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Tuition: $7,435-$16,195; $1,000 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Barbering (1100-2100H); Cosmetology (2100 Hr)

LINCOLN

Bryan School of Nursing

5035 Everett St., Lincoln, NE 68506. Nursing. Founded 1926. Contact: Phyllis Hollamon, Dir., (402)481-8697, 800-742-7844, Fax: (402)481-8404, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bryanlghcollege.org/son/son_index.htm; Debra Border, Dean of Students, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $19,370; 1,600 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 305. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC; CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Medical Sonography (16 Mo); Nursing, R.N. (33 Mo)

College of Hair Design

304 S. 11th St., Lincoln, NE 68508. Cosmetology, Barber. Founded 1959. Contact: Chris Hobbs, Admissions Representative, (402)474-4244, (402)477-4040, 800-798-4247, Fax: (402)474-4075, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://collegeofhairdesign.com; Greg Howard, Owner/Dir., E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Hour. Tuition: $12,650 cosmetology plus $1,200 books and supplies for cosmetology; $4,000-$12,650 plus books and supplies for barbering. Enrollment: men 7, women 165. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Barbering (1100-2100H); Cosmetology (2100 Hr)

Hamilton College

1821 K St., PO Box 82826, Lincoln, NE 68508. Two-Year College. Founded 1884. Contact: Dr. Todd Lardenoit, Dir., (402)474-5315, 800-742-7738, Fax: (402)474-5302. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $19,275 per year; $5,904 room and board. Enrollment: men 174, women 404. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Advanced (18 Mo); Administrative Assistant (18 Mo); Business Administration (18 Mo); Computer Programming (18 Mo); Court Reporting (24 Mo); Fashion Merchandising (18 Mo); Legal Assistant (18 Mo); Secretarial, Legal (12 Mo); Secretarial, Medical (12 Mo); Secretarial, Travel (12 Mo); Word Processing (12 Mo)

Joseph's Colleges of Beauty and Barbering (Lincoln)

2241 O St., Ste. 2, Lincoln, NE 68510-1340. Cosmetology, Barber. Founded 1965. Contact: Bruce Nims, CEO, (402)435-2333, 800-742-7827, Fax: (402)475-5390, Web Site: http://www.josephscollege.com; Web Site: http://josephscollege.com/contact_us.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $7,435-$16,195; $1,000 books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 65. Degrees awarded: Diploma, Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Barbering (1100-2100H); Cosmetology (2100 Hr)

Myotherapy Institute

6020 S.58th St., Lincoln, NE 68516.(402)421-7410, Web Site: http://www.myotherapyinstitute.com. Private. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $9,100 in-state; $9,100 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Associate.

Nebraska Wesleyan University

5000 St. Paul, Lincoln, NE 68504. Other. Founded 1887. Contact: Brett Balak, Assoc. Dir. Admissions, (402)466-2371, (402)465-2218, 800-541-3818, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.nebrwesleyan.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $200/credit undergraduate; $275/credit graduate. Enrollment: Total 1,586. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NCATE; NLNAC; NCA-HLC; NASM; ACBSP; CSWE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available.

Southeast Community College, Lincoln Campus

8800 O St., Lincoln, NE 68520. Two-Year College. Founded 1973. Contact: Jeanette Volker, (402)471-3333, 800-642-4075, Fax: (402)437-2404. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $36 per credit (per quarter). Enrollment: men 3,176, women 4,371. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: AAMAE; JRCRTE; NLNAC; CAAHEP. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Auto Mechanics; Business Administration; Child Care & Guidance; Dental Assisting; Drafting Technology; Electronics Technology; Environmental Technology; Fire Science; Food Service & Management; Human Services; Machine Tool & Die; Medical Assistant; Medical Laboratory Technology; Microcomputers; Nursing, Practical; Nursing, R.N.; Office Technology; Printing; Radiologic Technology; Respiratory Therapy; Small Engine Repair; Surgical Technology; Truck Driving; Welding Technology

MACY

Nebraska Indian Community College

101 College Hill, PO Box 428, Macy, NE 68039. Two-Year College. Founded 1972. Contact: Michael P. Oltrogge, Pres., (402)837-5078, 888-843-6422, Fax: (402)837-4183, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.thenicc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,428/academic year. Enrollment: Total 97. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Alcohol Counseling (1 Yr); Business (2 Yr); Carpentry (1 Yr); Casino Operations (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (1 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (2 Yr); Geriatric Care (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Maintenance, Building (1 Yr); Masonry (1 Yr); Office Technology (1 Yr); Paralegal (2 Yr); Plumbing (1 Yr); Public Affairs (2 Yr); Secretarial, General (2 Yr)

MCCOOK

McCook Community College

1205 E. 3rd St., McCook, NE 69001. Two-Year College. Founded 1926. Contact: George Mihel, (308)345-6303, 800-859-1105. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $600 per semester. Enrollment: Total 1,600. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agribusiness; Business Administration; Child Care & Guidance; Criminal Justice; Data Processing - Business; Dental Hygiene; Engineering; Food Service & Management; Food Store Marketing; Geriatric Care; Home Economics; Human Services; Journalism; Medical Technology; Nurse, Assistant; Nursery School Assistant; Nursing, R.N.; Optometric Assistant; Pharmacy Technician; Physical Therapy Aide; Real Estate, Basic; Secretarial, Executive; Secretarial, General; Secretarial, Legal; Secretarial, Medical; Teacher Assistant; Travel & Tourism; Veterinary Technology; Wild Life Management

MILFORD

Southeast Community College, Milford Campus

600 State St., Milford, NE 68405-8498. Two-Year College. Founded 1941. Contact: Larry E. Meyer, (402)761-2131, 800-933-7223, Fax: (402)761-2324, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.southeast.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $39/credit hr. resident; $48/credit hr. non-resident; room and board varies, starts at $1,500/quarter. Enrollment: Total 900. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma, Associate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (18 Mo); Architectural Technology (18 Mo); Auto Body & Fender Repair (18 Mo); Automotive Service (21 Mo); Automotive Technology (18 Mo); Auto Parts Management (21 Mo); Auto Parts Specialist (12 Mo); Auto Parts Trade (21 Mo); Building Construction Technology (18 Mo); Commercial Art (18 Mo); Computer Aided Design (18 Mo); Computer Aided Drafting (18 Mo); Computer Aided Manufacturing (18 Mo); Computer Programming (18 Mo); Diesel Technology (18 Mo); Drafting, Industrial (12 Mo); Electrical Technology (18 Mo); Electro-Mechanical Technology (18 Mo); Electronic Engineering Technology (24 Mo); Engineering Technology, Electronic (24 Mo); Farm Equipment Repair & Maintenance (18 Mo); Machine Tool & Die (18 Mo); Machine Tool & Die Design (18 Mo); Machine Tool Programming Technology (18 Mo); Machinist, General (12 Mo); Manufacturing Technology (18 Mo); Mechanics, Heavy Equipment (18 Mo); Mechanics, Truck (18 Mo); Metallurgical Technology (18 Mo); Moldmaking (18 Mo); Nondestructive Testing Technology (18 Mo); Surveying (18 Mo); Technician, Electronic Service (18 Mo); Welding Technology (18 Mo)

NORFOLK

Joseph's Colleges of Beauty and Barbering (Norfolk)

202 Madison Ave., Norfolk, NE 68701. Barber, Cosmetology. Contact: Bruce Nims, CEO, (402)371-3358, 800-742-7827, Web Site: http://josephscollege.com; Web Site: http://josephscollege.com/contact_us.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Tuition: $7,435-$16,195; $1,000 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Barbering (1100-2100H); Cosmetology (2100 Hr)

Northeast Community College

801 East Benjamin Ave., P.O. Box 469, Norfolk, NE 68702-0469. Two-Year College. Founded 1969. Contact: Dr. Karen Severson, VP Student Svcs., (402)371-2020, 800-348-9033, Fax: (402)644-0650, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://northeastcollege.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $57 per credit hour, resident; $71 per credit hour, non-resident. Enrollment: Total 4,800. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: AVMA; NLNAC; CAPTE; NATEF; NCAHLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Administrative Assistant; Agribusiness; Agricultural Science; Agriculture, General; Agri-Engineering & Mechanics; Animal Science, General; Art; Audio Technology; Auto Body & Fender Repair; Automotive Technology; Banking; Broadcasting, Nontechnical; Broadcasting Technology; Building Construction Technology; Business Administration; Business, International; Computer Information Science; Computer Networking; Computer Programming; Computer Science; Correctional Science; Dairy Technology; Diesel Technology; Dietician Training; Drafting, Architectural; Early Childhood Education; Education; Electrical Construction; Electro-Mechanical Technology; Electronics Technology; Engineering; Entrepreneur-ship; Fire Science; Food Service & Management; Funeral Service Education; General Studies; Health Information Technology; Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning; Horticulture; Industrial Technology; Insurance, General; Irrigation Engineering Technology; Journalism; Law Enforcement; Machinist, General; Marketing; Masonry; Mathematics; Medical Technology; Medical Transcription; Merchandising, Retail; Music; Music Instructor; Nurses Aide; Nursing, Practical; Office Administration; Paralegal; Paramedic; Physical Education; Physical Fitness; Physical Therapy Aide; Physicians Assistant; Public Speaking; Radiologic Technology; Real Estate, Basic; Surgical Technology; Theatre Arts; Truck Driving; Veterinary Technology; Welding Technology

NORTH PLATTE

Joseph's Colleges of Beauty and Barbering (North Platte)

107 West 6th St, North Platte, NE 69101. Barber, Cosmetology. Contact: Bruce Nims, CEO, (308)532-4664, 800-742-7827, Web Site: http://josephscollege.com; Web Site: http://josephscollege.com/contact_us.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Tuition: $7,435-$16,195; $1,000 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Barbering (1100-2100H); Cosmetology (2100 Hr)

Mid-Plains Community College

1101 Halligan Dr., North Platte, NE 69101. Two-Year College. Founded 1967. Contact: Kelly Rippen, Admissions Coordinator/Recruiter, (308)535-3600, 800-658-4308, Fax: (308)535-3790, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.mpcc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $54/credit hour in-state, $68/credit hour out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 1,026. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: CAAHEP; NLNAC; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (1 Yr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (1 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Building Construction Technology (1 Yr); Building Maintenance (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Criminology - Identification Technology (2 Yr); Dental Assisting (1 Yr); Diesel Technology (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (1 Yr); Electronics Technology (1 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology; Fire Science (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Liberal Arts (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Secretarial, Advanced (2 Yr); Secretarial, General (1 Yr); Upholstering (1 Yr)

North Platte Beauty Academy

107 W. 6th, North Platte, NE 69101. Cosmetology. Founded 1956. Contact: Robin Brown, (308)532-4664, 800-742-7827, Fax: (308)532-6090, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://josephscollege.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $8,150 1st year; $7,350 2nd year. Enrollment: men 1, women 26. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (2100 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor

OMAHA

Alegent Health School of Radiologic Technology

7500 Mercy Rd., Omaha, NE 68124. Allied Medical. Founded 1956. Contact: L. Baylor, (402)398-5527, Fax: (402)398-5583, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.alegent.org. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Year. Tuition: $5,175 for 2 yrs & includes books. Enrollment: men 7, women 20. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology (2 Yr)

Capitol School of Hairstyling

2819 S. 125th Ave., Omaha, NE 68144-3873. Cosmetology. Founded 1930. Contact: Scott McCaig, (402)333-3329, 800-352-1331, Fax: (402)333-9614, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.capitollook.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Hour. Tuition: Varies by program. Enrollment: men 1, women 87. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (2100 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (300-925 Hr); Esthetician (600 Hr); Nail Technology (300 Hr)

Creative Center, The

10850 Emmet St., Omaha, NE 68164. Art, Two-Year College. Founded 1993. Contact: Kim Guyer, Exec.Dir., (402)898-1000, 888-898-1789, Fax: (402)898-1301, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.thecreativecenter.com; Sandy LaRocca, Admissions and Placement Coord.. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $31,600. Enrollment: Total 100. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Graphic Design (2 Yr)

ITT Technical Institute

9814 M St., Omaha, NE 68127-9812. Trade and Technical, Two-Year College, Other. Founded 1991. Contact: Jerome S Padak, (402)331-2900, 800-677-9260, Fax: (402)331-9495, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Enrollment: Total 449. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting & Business Administration (96 Credits); Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Engineering (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Computer Programming, Games (96 Credits); Criminal Justice (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Information Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits); Software Development/Engineering (96 Credits); Web Development (96 Credits)

Joseph's Colleges of Beauty and Barbering (Omaha)

3724 Farnam St., Omaha, NE 68131. Barber, Cosmetology. Contact: Bruce Nims, CEO, (402)435-4152, 800-742-7827, Web Site: http://josephscollege.com; Web Site: http://josephscollege.com/contact_us.html. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Tuition: $7,435-$16,195; $1,000 books and supplies. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Barbering (1100-2100H); Cosmetology (2100 Hr)

Metropolitan Community College

PO Box 3777, Omaha, NE 68103-0777. Two-Year College. Founded 1974. Contact: Becky Nicks, Dir. of Admissions and Records, (402)457-2400, 800-228-9553, Fax: (402)457-2265, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.mccneb.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $39/credit resident; $58/credit non-resident. Enrollment: men 4,616, women 6,143. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: JRCRTE; ADA; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Administrative Assistant (2 Yr); Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration (1 Yr); Architectural Design Technology (2 Yr); Auto Air Conditioning (1 Yr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics Tune Up (1 Yr); Automotive Collision Repair (1 Yr); Banking & Finance (2 Yr); Bookkeeping (1 Yr); Building Maintenance (1 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Chef Training (2 Yr); Child Care - Nanny (2 Yr); Civil Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Commercial Art (2 Yr); Computer Graphics (2 Yr); Computer Programming (1 Yr); Construction Technology (1 Yr); Cook, Short Order (1 Yr); Culinary Arts (2 Yr); Dental Assisting (1 Yr); Dietician Training (1 Yr); Drafting, Architectural (2 Yr); Drafting, Electro-Mechanical (2 Yr); Drafting, Machine Design (2 Yr); Drug & Alcohol Counseling (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (1 Yr); Floriculture (2 Yr); Food Preparation & Service (1 Yr); Food Processing Technology (1 Yr); Food Service & Management (2 Yr); Horticulture, Ornamental (2 Yr); Industrial Management & Supervision (1 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (1 Yr); Insurance, General (2 Yr); Interior Design (2 Yr); Landscaping (2 Yr); Law Enforcement (2 Yr); Legal Assistant (2 Yr); Maintenance, Machine Tool (2 Yr); Management, Production (2 Yr); Medical Assistant (1 Yr); Medical Insurance Specialist (1 Yr); Merchandising (2 Yr); Microcomputers (1 Yr); Nursery Management (1 Yr); Nursing Home Administration (1 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office, General (2 Yr); Operating Room Technology (1 Yr); Ophthalmic Assistant (1 Yr); Paralegal (2 Yr); Personal Computing (1 Yr); Photography (2 Yr); Power Lineman (1 Yr); Printing (2 Yr); Purchasing (2 Yr); Real Estate, Basic (1 Yr); Real Estate Management (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Retail Management (1 Yr); Secretarial, Executive (2 Yr); Secretarial, General (2 Yr); Secretarial, Legal (2 Yr); Secretarial, Medical (2 Yr); Security Training (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (1 Yr); Teacher Assistant (1 Yr); Video Production (2 Yr); Welding Technology (2 Yr); Word Processing (1 Yr)

Metropolitan Community College Area

5730 N. 30th St., Omaha, NE 68111-1610. Contact: Dr. Jerry Moskus, President, (402)457-2400, (402)457-2418, Web Site: http://www.mccneb.edu. Public. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $1,598 in-state; $2,610 out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

Midwest Bartender's School

4957 NW Radial Hwy., Omaha, NE 68104. Trade and Technical. Founded 1972. Contact: William Bade, Pres., (402)551-2351, Fax: (402)551-2351. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $950. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Bartending

Nancy Bounds Studios

11915 Pierce Plaza, Omaha, NE 68144. Trade and Technical. Founded 1959. Contact: Jill Klae, (402)697-9292, (402)813-3850, Fax: (402)697-9272, Web Site: http://www.nancyboundsstudios.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $2,400. Enrollment: men 15, women 80. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Modeling & Personal Improvement (30 Wk); Modeling, Professional (15 Wk)

Nebraska College of Business

3350 N. 90th St., Omaha, NE 68134. Trade and Technical. Founded 1891. (402)572-8500, 800-642-1456, Fax: (402)573-1341, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://ncbedu.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $10,200 per year. Enrollment: men 200, women 450. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (18 Mo); Business Administration (18 Mo); Computer Networking (9-18 Mo); Criminal Justice (18 Mo); Legal Assistant (18 Mo); Medical Assistant (18 Mo); Nursing, Practical (12 Mo); Travel & Tourism (10 Mo)

Nebraska Methodist College

8501 W. Dodge Rd, Omaha, NE 68114. Nursing, Allied Medical. Founded 1891. Contact: Deann Sterner, (402)354-4879, 800-335-5510, Fax: (402)354-8875, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.methodistcollege.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $332 credit hr. undergraduate; $401 credit hr. graduate. Enrollment: men 45, women 397. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: JRCERT; NLNAC; CAAHEP; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Health Occupations (2 Yr); Medical Assistant (1 Yr); Medical Technology - Phlebotomy (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (4 Yr); Paramedic (1 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (1 Yr); Ultrasonography (2 Yr)

Travel Careers Institute

210 Commercial Federal Tower, 2120 S. 72nd St., Omaha, NE 68124-6310. Trade and Technical. Founded 1979. Contact: Dawn Smyser, (402)399-4600, 800-626-7360, Fax: (402)343-4027, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tandt.com/tci.asp. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $1,200. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Travel Agents (1 Yr); Travel & Tourism (1 Yr)

University of Nebraska College of Medicine School of Allied Health Professions

985150 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5150. Allied Medical. Founded 1972. Contact: Mary Haven, Dean, (402)559-7428, (402)559-6680, Fax: (402)559-8696, Web Site: http://www.unmc.edu/alliedhealth; Vergie Powers, Staff Asst., E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $144 per semester credit hour for resident undergrads, $190 for resident graduates. Enrollment: Total 330. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: APTA; CAAHEP; NAACLS; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Dietetic Technology (1 Yr); Medical Technology (1 Yr); Nuclear Medical Technology (2 Yr); Physical Therapy Technology (3 Yr); Physicians Assistant (2.5 Yr); Radiation Therapy Technology (1 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Ultrasonography (1 Yr)

Vatterott College

11818 I St., Omaha, NE 68137. Business, Trade and Technical. Founded 1987. Contact: Lisa Machado, (402)891-9411, 888-886-3856, Fax: (402)891-9413, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.vatterott-college.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,820 (60 wk.); $22,677 (90 wk.); $42,118 (170 wk.). Enrollment: men 149, women 42. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (60-90 Wk); Computer Aided Drafting (60-90 Wk); Computer Programming (60-90 Wk); Computer Technology (60-170 Wk); Construction Management (60-90 Wk); Geographic Information Systems (60-90 Wk); Graphic Arts (60-90 Wk); Graphic Design (60-90 Wk); Pharmacy Technician (60-90 Wk)

Xenon International School of Hair Design II Inc.

8516 Park Dr., Omaha, NE 68127-3622. Cosmetology, Barber. Contact: Jackie Hornig, Dir., (402)393-2933, (402)393-1008, 800-434-2214, Web Site: http://xenonintl.com. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $1,750-$11,600 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 2, women 142. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Curriculum: Cosmetology (2100 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (300-925 Hr); Esthetician (600 Hr); Nail Technology (300 Hr)

SCOTTSBLUFF

Fullen School of Hair Design

1909 Broadway, Scottsbluff, NE 69361. Cosmetology. Contact: Kim Fullen, Manager, (308)632-3731. Private. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $750-$2,175 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 1, women 24. Degrees awarded: Associate. Curriculum: Cosmetology (925-2100Hr)

Regional West Medical Center School of RAD Technology

3700 Ave. D, Scottsbluff, NE 69361. Contact: Todd Sorensen, Chief Executive Officer, (308)630-1155. Private. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,250 in-state; $1,250 out-of-state.

School of Radiologic Technology

4021 Ave. B, Scottsbluff, NE 69361. Allied Medical. Founded 1951. Contact: Daniel R. Gilbert, (308)630-1155, (308)635-3711, Fax: (308)630-1983, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.rwmc.net. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $1,250 first year; $1,525 second year. Enrollment: men 2, women 8. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: JRCERT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Radiologic Technology (2 Yr)

Western Nebraska Community College (Scottsbluff)

1601 E. 27th St., Scottsbluff, NE 69361. Two-Year College. Founded 1970. Contact: Anne Hippe, MSN, CNS, RN, (308)635-6060, (308)635-6181, 800-348-4435, Fax: (308)635-6100, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.wncc.net. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $59/credit hour (tuition and fees) state resident; $68/credit non-resident. Enrollment: Total 978. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC; ABHES. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Nursing, Practical (3 Sem)

SIDNEY

Western Nebraska Community College (Sidney)

371 College Dr., Sidney, NE 69162. Trade and Technical. Founded 1966. (308)254-5450, 800-222-9682, Fax: (308)254-7444, Web Site: http://www.wncc.net. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 550. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: FAA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Aircraft Airframe Maintenance (1 Yr); Aircraft Powerplant Maintenance (1 Yr); Aviation Maintenance Technology (2 Yr); Clerk, Typist (1 Yr); Computer Programming, Business (2 Yr); Computer Repair (2 Yr); Computer Servicing - Theory & Systems (2 Yr); Cosmetology (2 Yr); Cosmetology Instructor (1 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Secretarial, Science (2 Yr); Small Business Management (2 Yr)

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Nebraska

Nebraska

1 Location and Size

2 Topography

3 Climate

4 Plants and Animals

5 Environmental Protection

6 Population

7 Ethnic Groups

8 Languages

9 Religions

10 Transportation

11 History

12 State Government

13 Political Parties

14 Local Government

15 Judicial System

16 Migration

17 Economy

18 Income

19 Industry

20 Labor

21 Agriculture

22 Domesticated Animals

23 Fishing

24 Forestry

25 Mining

26 Energy and Power

27 Commerce

28 Public Finance

29 Taxation

30 Health

31 Housing

32 Education

33 Arts

34 Libraries and Museums

35 Communications

36 Press

37 Tourism, Travel & Recreation

38 Sports

39 Famous Nebraskans

40 Bibliography

State of Nebraska

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Derived from the Oto Indian word nebrathka, meaning “flat water” (for the Platte River).

NICKNAME : The Cornhusker State.

CAPITAL: Lincoln.

ENTERED UNION: 1 March 1867 (37th).

OFFICIAL SEAL: Agriculture is represented by a farmer’s cabin, sheaves of wheat, and growing corn; the mechanic arts, by a blacksmith. Above is the state motto; in the background, a steamboat plies the Missouri River and a train heads toward the Rockies. The scene is surrounded by the words “Great Seal of the State of Nebraska, March 1st 1867.”

FLAG: The great seal appears in the center, in gold and silver, on a field of blue.

MOTTO: Equality Before the Law.

SONG: “Beautiful Nebraska.”

FLOWER: Goldenrod.

TREE: Western cottonwood.

ANIMAL: White-tailed deer.

BIRD: Western meadowlark.

INSECT: Honeybee.

GEM: Blue agate.

FOSSIL: Mammoth.

ROCK OR STONE: Prairie agate.

GRASS: Little bluestem.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year’s Day, 1 January; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Presidents’ Day, 3rd Monday in February; Arbor Day, last Friday in April; Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Columbus Day, 2nd Monday in October; Veterans’ Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving, 4th Thursday in November and following Friday; Christmas Day, 25 December. Other days for special observances include Pioneers’ Memorial Day, 2nd Sunday in June; Nebraska Czech Day, 1st Sunday in August; and American Indian Day, 4th Monday in September.

TIME: 6 AM CST = noon GMT; 5 AM MST = noon GMT.

1 Location and Size

Located in the western north-central United States, Nebraska ranks 15th in size among the 50 states. The total area of the state is 77,355 square miles (200,349 square kilometers), of which land takes up 76,644 square miles (198,508 square kilometers) and inland water 711 square miles (1,841 square kilometers). Nebraska extends about 415 miles (668 kilometers) from east to west and 205 miles (330 kilometers) from north to south. The boundary length of Nebraska totals 1,332 miles (2,143 kilometers).

2 Topography

Most of Nebraska is prairie, since more than two-thirds of the state lies within the Great Plains. The elevation slopes upward gradually from east to west, from a low of 840 feet (256 meters) in the southeast to 5,424 feet (1,654 meters) in Kimball County. The Sand Hills of the north-central plain is an unusual region of sand dunes anchored by grasses that cover about 18,000 square miles (47,000 square kilometers).

The Sand Hills region is dotted with small natural lakes, but in the rest of the state, the main lakes are artificial. The Missouri River forms the eastern part of the northern boundary of Nebraska. Three rivers cross the state from west to east: the wide, shallow Platte River; the Niobrara River; and the Republican River.

3 Climate

Nebraska has a continental climate with highly variable temperatures. The central region has a normal monthly maximum of 76°f (24°c) in July and a minimum of 22°f (-6°c) in January. The record low for the state is -47°f (-44°c), registered in Morrill County on 12 February 1899. The record high of 118°f (48°c) was recorded at Minden on 24 July 1936. Normal yearly precipitation ranges from 17 inches (43 centimeters) in the west to 30 inches (76 centimeters) in the southeast. Snowfall in the state varies from about 21 inches (53 centimeters) in the southeast to about 45 inches (114 centimeters) in the northwest corner. Blizzards, drought, and wind-storms

Nebraska Population Profile

Total population estimate in 2006:1,768,331
Population change, 2000–06:3.3%
Hispanic or Latino†:7.2%
Population by race 
One race:98.5%
White:89.6%
Black or African American:4.0%
American Indian /Alaska Native:0.8%
Asian:1.5%
Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander:0.0%
Some other race:2.6%
Two or more races:1.5%

Population by Age Group

Major Cities by Population
City Population % change 2000–05
Notes: †A person of Hispanic or Latino origin may be of any race. NA indicates that data are not available.
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey and Population Estimates. www.census.gov/ (accessed March 2007).
Omaha414,5216.3
Lincoln239,2136.0
Bellevue47,3346.7
Grand Island44,5463.7
Kearney28,9585.6
Hastings25,4375.7
Fremont25,3140.6
North Platte24,3241.9
Norfolk23,9461.8
Columbus20,909-0.3

have plagued Nebraskans throughout their history.

4 Plants and Animals

Nebraska’s deciduous forests are generally oak and hickory. Conifer forests are dominated by western yellow (ponderosa) pine. Slough grasses, needlegrasses, western wheatgrass, and buffalo grass are found in the prairies. Common Nebraska wildflowers include wild rose, columbine, and sunflower. Three plant species were threatened as of 2006, Ute ladies’-tresses, western prairie fringed orchid, and Colorado butterfly plant. The blowout penstemon was listed as endangered that same year.

Common mammals native to the state include the pronghorn sheep, white-tailed and mule deer, and coyote. There are more than 400 kinds of birds, the mourning dove and the western meadowlark (the state bird) among them. Carp, catfish, and trout are fished for sport. Rare animal species include the least shrew, least weasel, and bobcat. In 2006, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed nine animal species as threatened or endangered, including the American burying beetle, bald eagle, whooping crane, black-footed ferret, Topeka shiner, pallid sturgeon, and Eskimo curlew.

5 Environmental Protection

The Department of Environmental Quality was established in 1971 to protect and improve the quality of the state’s water, air, and land resources. In 2003, Nebraska had 255 hazardous waste sites

Nebraska Population by Race

Census 2000 was the first national census in which the instructions to respondents said, “Mark one or more races.” This table shows the number of people who are of one, two, or three or more races. For those claiming two races, the number of people belonging to the various categories is listed. The U.S. government conducts a census of the population every ten years.

 Number Percent
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Census 2000: Redistricting Data. Press release issued by the Redistricting Data Office. Washington, D.C., March, 2001. A dash (—) indicates that the percent is less than 0.1.
Total population1,711,263100.0
One race1,687,31098.6
Two races22,5911.3
White and Black or African American4,6510.3
White and American Indian/Alaska Native5,2850.3
White and Asian3,3440.2
White and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander310
White and some other race6,0570.4
Black or African American and American Indian/Alaska Native704
Black or African American and Asian302
Black or African American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander50
Black or African American and some other race669
American Indian/Alaska Native and Asian113
American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander15
American Indian/Alaska Native and some other race356
Asian and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander181
Asian and some other race461
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and some other race93
Three or more races1,3620.1

listed in the Environmental Protection Agency’s database, 12 of which were on the National Priorities List as of 2006.

The state has three wetlands of international importance as migrational and breeding grounds for waterfowl and nongame birds. While these areas are protected, the state has lost about 1 million acres (405,000 hectares) of wetlands since pre-European settlement times.

6 Population

In 2005, Nebraska ranked 38th in population in the United States with an estimated total of 1,768,331residents. The population is projected to reach 1.78 million by 2015 and 1.81 million by 2025. The population density in 2004 was 22.7 persons per square mile (8.76 persons per square kilometer). The median age of the state’s population was 36 for that same year. In 2005, of all Nebraska residents, 13% were 65 or older, while 25% were 18 or younger.

The largest cities in 2005 were Omaha, with an estimated population of 414,521, and Lincoln, with 239,213 residents.

7 Ethnic Groups

According to the 2000 census, the population of Nebraska included 94,425 Hispanics and Latinos, 68,541 black Americans, 21,931 Asians, and 836 Pacific Islanders. There were 14,896 Native Americans residing in the state, primarily from the Omaha, Winnebago, and Santee Sioux tribes. Among those of European descent who reported at least one specific ancestry 661,133 were German, 163,651 were English, 229,805 were Irish, 93,286 were Czech, and 84,294 were Swedish. About 74,638 residents, or 4.4% of the total population, were foreign born.

In 2006, black Americans accounted for 4.0% of the state’s population, while 1.5% were Asian, and 7.2% were Hispanic or Latino.

8 Languages

Nebraska English is almost pure North Midland, except for slight South Midland and Northern influences. A few words, mostly food terms like kolaches (fruit-filled pastries), are derived from the language of the large Czech population. Usual pronunciation features cot and caught as soundalikes and a strong final /r/. Fire sounds almost like far, and our like are. Greasy is pronounced greezy.

In 2000, of the resident population five years old or older, 92.1% spoke only English at home. The number of residents who spoke other languages at home included Spanish, 77,655 and German, 8,865.

9 Religions

Nebraska’s religious history derives from its patterns of immigration. German and Scandinavian settlers tended to be Lutheran, while Irish, Polish, and Czech immigrants were mainly Roman Catholic. Methodism and other Protestant religions were spread by settlers from other Midwestern states.

Although Protestants outnumber Catholics, the Roman Catholic Church was the largest single Christian denomination in the state with about 376,843 adherents in 2004. As of 2000, Lutherans constituted the largest Protestant group with 117,419 adherents of the Missouri Synod, while there were 128,570 members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and 5,829 belonged to the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod. In 2004, a total of 84,337 people were United Methodists. In 2000, there were 39,420 Presbyterians–USA. The Jewish population was estimated at 7,100 in 2000, and Muslims numbered about 3,115. There were 704,403 people (about 41% of the population) who were not counted as members of any religious organization.

10 Transportation

Nebraska’s development was profoundly influenced by two major railroads, the Union Pacific and the Burlington Northern Santa Fe, both of which were major landowners in the state in the late 1800s. As of 2003, these railroads still operated in the state. In that same year, there were 11 railroads operating in Nebraska, with 3,548 miles (5,712 kilometers) of track in the state. As of 2006, Amtrak provided east-west service to Chicago or Emeryville/San Francisco, to five stations in Nebraska

In 2004, the state’s road system totaled 93,245 miles (150,124 kilometers), and is dominated by Interstate 80, the major east–west route, and the largest public investment project in the state’s history. A total of 1.678 million motor vehicles were registered in 2004, of which 829,000 were automobiles and about 820,000 were trucks. A total of 1,315,819 people held driver’s licenses in that same year.

In 2005, there were 266 airports in the state, along with 36 heliports and 1 seaplane base.

Eppley Airfield, Omaha’s airport, is by far the busiest in the state, with 1,892,379 passenger boardings in 2004.

11 History

By 1800, the Pawnee, Ponca, Omaha, and Oto tribes, along with several others, were living in what became present-day Nebraska. The area was claimed by both Spain and France and was French territory at the time of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, when it came under US jurisdiction. During the first half of the 19th century, the area was explored by Lewis and Clark, Zebulon Pike, and others.

Military forts were established in the 1840s to protect travelers from attack by Native Americans. The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 established the Nebraska Territory, which assumed its present shape in 1861. Still sparsely populated, Nebraska escaped the violent clash over slavery that afflicted Kansas. From 1860 to the late 1870s, however, western Nebraska was a battleground for US soldiers and Native Americans, who were moved to reservations in Nebraska, South Dakota, and Oklahoma by 1890.

Statehood Settlement of Nebraska Territory was rapid, escalated by the Homestead Act of 1862, under which the US government provided 160 acres (65 hectares) to a settler for a small fee. On 1 March 1867, Nebraska became the 37th state to join the Union. Farming and ranching developed as the state’s two main enterprises. However, by 1890, depressed farm prices, high railroad

Nebraska Governors: 1867–2007

1867–1871David C. ButlerRepublican
1871–1873William Hartford JamesRepublican
1873–1875Robert Wilkinson FurnasRepublican
1875–1879Silas GarberRepublican
1879–1883Albinus NanceRepublican
1883–1887James William DawesRepublican
1887–1891John Milton ThayerRepublican
1891James E. BoydDemocrat
1891–1892John Milton ThayerRepublican
1892–1893James E. BoydDemocrat
1893–1895Lorenzo CrounseRepublican
1895–1899Silas Alexander HalcombPopulist
1899–1901William Amos PoynterFusion
1901Charles Henry DietrichRepublican
1901–1903Ezra Perin SavageRepublican
1903–1907John Hopwood MickeyRepublican
1907–1909George Lawson SheldonRepublican
1909–1911Ashton Cockayne ShallenbergerDemocrat
1911–1913Chester Hardy AldrichRepublican
1913–1917John Henry MoreheadDemocrat
1917–1919M. Kieth NevilleDemocrat
1919–1923Samuel Roy McKelvieRepublican
1923–1925Charles Wayland BryanDemocrat
1925–1929Adma McMullenRepublican
1929–1931Arthur J. WeaverRepublican
1931–1935Charles Wayland BryanDemocrat
1935–1941Robert LeRoy CochranDemocrat
1941–1947Dwight Palmer GriswoldRepublican
1947–1953Val Frederick Demar PetersonRepublican
1953–1955Robert Berkey CrosbyRepublican
1955–1959Victor Emanuel AndersonRepublican
1959–1960Ralph Gilmour BrooksDemocrat
1960–1961Dwight Willard BurneyRepublican
1961–1967Frank Brenner MorrisonDemocrat
1967–1971Norbert Theodore TiemannRepublican
1971–1979John James ExonDemocrat
1979–1983Charles ThoneRepublican
1983–1987Robert KerreyDemocrat
1987–1991Kay A. OrrRepublican
1991–1999Earl Benjamin NelsonDemocrat
1999–2005Michael JohannsRepublican
2005–Dave HeinemanRepublican

shipping charges, and rising interest rates were hurting the state’s farmers, and a drought in the 1890s worsened their plight.

When the dust storms of the 1930s began, thousands of people fled Nebraska for the West Coast. The onset of World War II, however, brought prosperity in many areas. Military airfields and war industries were placed in the state because of its safe inland location, bringing industrial growth that extended well into the postwar years. Much of the new industry developed since that time is agriculture-related, including the manufacture of farm machinery and irrigation equipment.

Farm output and income increased dramatically into the 1970s. Many farmers took on large debt burdens to finance expanded output, with their credit supported by strong farm-product prices and exports. When prices began to fall in the early 1980s, many found themselves in trouble. A 1982 state constitutional amendment prohibits the sale of land used for farming or ranching to anyone other than a Nebraska family farm corporation.

The average farm income in Nebraska rose more than 10% between 1989 and the mid-1990s. Farms in the state were fewer in number by the late 1990s, but they were larger and more mechanized. But farmers were struggling again by June 2000, when drought struck and most of the corn crop was lost. Some areas of the state had received no substantial rain in a year. The previous autumn and winter were the driest on record. Water conservation to avoid depletion of the state’s aquifers for irrigation purposes remained a major priority into 2004, as the state faced its fifth straight year of severe drought conditions.

Although the state’s farm sector was being hit by drought and falling farm prices, Nebraska’s nonfarm sector saw the growth of small industries and tourism, which acted to bolster the state’s economy.

In January 2005, Lieutenant Governor Dave Heineman became governor, following the resignation of Governor Mike Johanns, who left to become the US Secretary of Agriculture. In the 2006 election, Heineman retained the governorship.

12 State Government

Nebraska’s legislature is unique among the states. It is a single-chamber body of 49 members not elected by political party. Members go by the title of senator, and are elected for four-year terms. In 2002, there was one African American and one Latino senator serving in the state legislature. Elected executives are the governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, auditor, treasurer, and attorney general. They all serve four-year terms. The governor is limited to two consecutive terms, after which the governor is ineligible to serve in office for four years. A bill becomes law when passed by a majority of the legislature and signed by the governor. If the governor does not approve, the bill is returned with objections, and a three-fifths vote of the legislature is required to override a veto. A bill automatically becomes law if the governor does not take action within five days after receiving it.

The legislative salary in 2004 was $12,000 and the governor’s salary was $85,000.

The current state constitution was adopted in 1875. As of January 2005, it had been amended 222 times.

Nebraska Presidential Vote by Major Political Parties, 1948–2004

YEAR NEBRASKA WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN
* Won US presidential election.
** Independent candidate Ross Perot received 174,687 votes in 1992 and 71,278 votes in 1996.
1948Dewey (R)224,165264,774
1952*Eisenhower (R)188,057421,603
1956*Eisenhower (R)199,029378,108
1960Nixon (R)232,542380,553
1964*Johnson (D)307,307276,847
1968*Nixon (R)170,784321,163
1972*Nixon (R)169,991406,298
1976Ford (R)233,692359,705
1980*Reagan (R)166,424419,214
1984*Reagan (R)187,866460,054
1988*Bush (R)259,235397,956
1992**Bush (R)217,344344,346
1996**Dole (R)236,761363,467
2000*Bush, G. W. (R)231,780433,862
2004*Bush, G. W. (R)254,328512,814

13 Political Parties

In 2004 there were 1,160,000 registered voters. In 1998, 37% of registered voters were Democratic, 49% Republican, and 14% unaffiliated or members of other parties. In the 2000 presidential election, Republican candidate George W. Bush secured 63% of the vote while Democrat Al Gore received a 33% share. In the 2004 presidential election, Bush carried the state with 66% of the vote to John Kerry’s 33%. In the 2006 elections, Democrat Ben Nelson was reelected to the US Senate, while Republican Chuck Hagel was reelected to the US Senate in 2002. In that same year, Republican Mike Johanns was reelected governor. However in January 2005, Lieutenant Governor Dave Heineman became governor after Johanns resigned to become the US Secretary of Agriculture. Heineman was elected governor in his own right in 2006.

In the 2006 election, all three of the state’s seats in the US House of Representatives were won by Republicans. Nebraska’s unicameral state legislature is nonpartisan. Twelve women were elected to the state legislature in 2006, or 24.5%.

14 Local Government

In 2005, Nebraska had 93 counties, 531 municipalities, and 575 public school districts. In 2002, the state had 446 townships. Municipalities are governed by a mayor (or city manager) and a council. Counties are administered by elected boards of supervisors or commissioners.

15 Judicial System

The state’s highest court is the Nebraska Supreme Court, which consists of a chief justice and six other justices. Below the supreme court are the district courts, which are the trial courts of general jurisdiction. County courts handle criminal misdemeanors and civil cases involving less than $5,000. Nebraska’s crime rate is well below the national average. In 2004, the state’s rate for violent crime (murder/nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault) was 308.7 incidents per 100,000 people. As of 31 December 2004, a total of 4,130 prisoners were being held in Nebraska’s state and federal prisons. Nebraska has a death penalty law, for which electrocution is the sole method of execution. As of 1 January 2006, there were 10 inmates on death row.

16 Migration

The pioneers who settled Nebraska in the 1860s consisted mainly of Civil War veterans from the North and foreign-born immigrants. The Union Pacific and Burlington Northern Santa Fee railroads, which sold land to the settlers, actively recruited immigrants in Europe. Germans were the largest group to settle in Nebraska, then Czechs from Bohemia, and Scandinavians from Sweden, Denmark, and Norway. The Irish came to work on the railroads in the 1860s and stayed to help build the cities. Another wave of Irish immigrants in the 1880s went to work in the packinghouses of Omaha. The city’s stockyards also attracted Polish workers. By the 1900 census, over one-half of all Nebraskans were either foreign-born or the children of foreign-born parents.

For much of the 20th century, Nebraska was in a period of out-migration. Between 1990 and 1998, the state had net gains of 2,000 in domestic migration and 14,000 in international migration. In the period 2000–05, net international migration was 22,199, while net domestic migration was -26,206, for a net loss of 4,007 people.

17 Economy

Agriculture remains the backbone of Nebraska’s economy. Cattle, corn, hogs, and soybeans lead the state’s list of farm products, and the largest portion of the state’s workforce is either directly employed in agriculture as farm workers, or indirectly as workers in the farm equipment and food processing industries. However in more recent years, the state has attempted to diversify its economy and has been successful in attracting new business, in large part because of its location near western coal and oil deposits.

Nebraska’s agricultural sector has been deeply affected by consolidation, technical advances in farming and transportation, and a prolonged drought. As of 2004, the drought was in its fifth consecutive year. Although water conservation was imposed to avoid depletion of the state’s aquifers, it appears likely that the state is facing long-term water shortages. In addition to the drought, the state’s rural counties have been steadily losing population since the 1970s, a trend that increased in the 1990s. In 2002, of the state’s 93 counties, 66 had lost population.

Nebraska’s gross state product (GSP) in 2004 was $68.183 billion, of which manufacturing accounted for the largest share of GSP at $8.305 billion, or 12.1%, and was followed by real estate at 8.6% of GSP, and by health care and social assistance at 7.2%. Of the 46,161 businesses in Nebraska that had employees, 96.8% were small companies.

18 Income

In 2004, Nebraska ranked 21st among the 50 states and the District of Columbia with a per capita (per person) income of $32,341, compared to the national average of $33,050. For period 2002–04, the median household income was $44,623 compared to the national average of $44,473. In that same period, 9.9% of the state’s residents lived below the federal poverty level, compared to 12.4% nationwide.

19 Industry

Nebraska has a small but growing industrial sector. In 2004, the shipment value of all goods manufactured in the state was $34.433 billion. Of that total, food manufacturing accounted for the largest portion at $19.037 billion, followed by machinery manufacturing at $2.061 billion, and transportation equipment manufacturing at $2.034 billion.

20 Labor

In 2004, a total of 99,706 people were employed in the state’s manufacturing sector, of which food manufacturing accounted for the largest portion at 36,190. The largest portion of the state’s manufacturing is concentrated in the Omaha metropolitan area. Other industrial centers are Lincoln, and in the portion of the Sioux City, Iowa metropolitan area that is in Nebraska.

In April 2006, the labor force in Nebraska numbered 988,200, with approximately 33,700 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 3.4%, compared to the national average of 4.7% for the same period. In April 2006, nonfarm employment data showed that about 4.9% of the labor force was employed in construction; 10.9% in manufacturing; 21.2% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 6.9% in financial activities; 10.4% in professional and business services; 13.7% in educational and health services; 8.5% in leisure and hospitality services; and 17.1% in government.

In 2005, a total of 69,000 of Nebraska’s 830,000 employed wage and salary workers were members of a union, representing 8.3% of those so employed, compared to the national average of 12%.

21 Agriculture

With total cash receipts from farm marketings at over $11.2 billion in 2005, Nebraska ranked fourth among the 50 states. About $7.3 billion of all farm marketings came from livestock production, and $3.9 billion from cash crops. In 2004, corn accounted for 22% of farm receipts.

Crop production in 2004 (in bushels) included: corn, 1.3 billion; sorghum grain, 33.6 million; wheat, 61 million; oats, 3.7 million; and barley, 162,000. Hay production was 6.1 million tons; and potato production, 9.3 million hundredweight, (422 million kilograms). In the period 2000–04, Nebraska ranked third among the states in the production of corn and sorghum for grain, and fifth in sorghum for beans.

Nebraska farms still tend to be owned by single persons or families rather than by large corporations. The strength of state support for the family farm was reflected in the passage of a 1982 constitutional amendment, initiated by petition, prohibiting the purchase of Nebraska farm and ranch lands by any group other than a Nebraska family farm corporation.

22 Domesticated Animals

In 2005, Nebraska ranked third behind Texas and Kansas in the total number of cattle on farms (6.35 million), including 61,000 milk cows. Nebraska farmers had around 2.85 million hogs and pigs, valued at $313.5 million in 2004. During 2003, the state produced an estimated 10.3 million pounds (4.7 million kilograms) of sheep and lambs, which grossed $10.8 million in income for Nebraska farmers. Dairy products included 1.13 billion pounds (0.51 billion kilograms) of milk produced.

23 Fishing

Commercial fishing is negligible in Nebraska. The US Fish and Wildlife Service maintains 87 public fishing areas. In 2004, the state issued 176,619 fishing licenses. There are five state hatcheries producing a variety of stock fish that include largemouth bass, bluegill, black crappie, channel catfish, yellow perch, walleye, trout, and tiger musky

24 Forestry

Arbor Day, now observed throughout the United States, originated in Nebraska in 1872 as a way of encouraging tree planting in the sparsely forested state. Forestland occupies 1,275,000 acres (516,000 hectares), or 2.6% of the state. Ash, boxelder, hackberry, cottonwood, honey locust, red and bur oaks, walnut, elm, and willow trees are common to eastern and central Nebraska, while ponderosa pine, cottonwood, eastern red cedar, and Rocky Mountain juniper prevail in the west. The state’s two national forests, Nebraska and Samuel R. McKelvie, are primarily grassland and are managed for livestock grazing. In 2005, the National Forest Service maintained 257,628 acres (104,262 hectares) of forestland. Lumber production in 2004 totaled 15 million board feet.

25 Mining

The value of nonfuel mineral production in Nebraska in 2003 was estimated at $94.2 million. All minerals produced in Nebraska, with the exception of gemstones, were basic construction materials. Most clay mining occurs in the southeast region, but sand and gravel mining takes place throughout the state. Industrial sand was used in the production of glass and had some applications outside of construction activities. In 2003, the top minerals were, in descending order of value, cement (portland and masonry), crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel.

26 Energy and Power

Nebraska is the only state with an electric power system owned by the public through regional, cooperative, and municipal systems. The state’s net summer generating capacity in 2003 was 6.685 million kilowatts. Total electricity output in that same year was 30.455 billion kilowatt hours. Electricity from coal accounted for 68.8% of the total (20.954 billion kilowatt hours), followed by nuclear power at 26.3% (7.996 billion kilowatt hours), and hydropower at 3.2%. The remaining 1.7% came from natural gas or oil fired plants, and from other renewable fuel sources.

As of 2006, there were two operating nuclear power plants in Nebraska, the Cooper plant in Brownsville and the Fort Calhoun Station near Omaha.

Crude oil production for 2004 in Nebraska averaged 8,000 barrels per day. In that same year Nebraska had proven crude oil reserves of 15 million barrels. In 2004, marketed natural gas production in Nebraska totaled 1.454 billion cubic feet (0.041 billion cubic meters). Nebraska has no commercial coal industry, nor any crude oil refineries.

27 Commerce

In 2002, Nebraska’s wholesale trade sector had sales totaling $26.1 billion, while the state’s retail trade sector that year had sales totaling $20.2 billion. Motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers accounted for the largest share of retail sales in 2002, at $5.07 billion, followed by general merchandise stores at $2.8 billion, and food and beverage stores at $2.4 billion. Nebraska’s exports of goods produced within the state totaled $3 billion in 2005.

28 Public Finance

The Nebraska state budget is prepared by the Budget Division of the Department of Administrative Services and is submitted annually by the governor to the legislature. The fiscal year runs from 1 July to 30 June.

Total revenues for the year 2004 were $8.3 billion, while total expenditures that year were $6.979 billion. The largest general expenditures were for education ($2.3 billion), public welfare ($1.899 billion), and highways ($595 million). The state’s outstanding debt in 2004 was $1.949 billion, or $1,115.36 per capita (per person).

29 Taxation

As of 1 January 2006, Nebraska had a state personal income tax with tax brackets ranging between 2.56% to 6.84%. The corporate tax rate ranges from 5.58% to 7.81%. The state sales tax rate was 5.5%. Food consumed off premises (such as at home) is exempt from the sales tax. Local sales taxes range from 0 to 1.5%. The state imposes excise taxes on gasoline and on cigarettes. Property taxes are collected locally and by the state.

The state collected $3.797 billion in taxes in 2005, of which 36.7% came from individual income taxes, 39.9% from the general sales tax, 12% from selective sales taxes, 5.2% from corporate income taxes, 0.1% from property taxes, and 6% from other types of taxes. In 2005, Nebraska ranked 24th among the states in terms of its combined state and local tax burden, which came to $2,158 per person, compared to the national average of $2,192.

In October 2005, Nebraska’s infant mortality rate was estimated at 5.7 per 1,000 live births. The crude death rate in 2003 was 8.9 per 1,000 population. Major causes of death in 2002 were heart disease, cancer, cerebrovascular diseases, chronic lower respiratory diseases, and diabetes. About 20.2% of the state’s residents were smokers in 2004. The rate of HIV-related deaths was 1.2 per 100,000. The reported AIDS case rate in 2004 was around 3.9 per 100,000 people.

University Hospital and the University of Nebraska Medical Center are in Omaha. Nebraska’s 85 community hospitals in 2003 had about 7,500 beds. In 2004, there were 243 physicians per 100,000 people, and a total of 1,114 dentists in Nebraska. In 2005, the state had 936 nurses per 100,000 population. The average expense for community hospital care was $1,043 per day. In 2004, about 11% of Nebraskans were uninsured.

31 Housing

In 2004, there were an estimated 757,743 housing units in Nebraska, of which 687,456 were occupied, and 68.4% were owner-occupied. About 73.8% of all units were single-family, detached homes. Utility gas and electricity were the most common heating energy sources. It was estimated that 35,566 units lacked telephone service, 1,426 lacked complete plumbing facilities, and 3,513 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household size was 2.47 people.

In 2004, authorization was given to build 10,900 new privately owned units. The median home value was $106,656. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $1,051. Renters paid a median of $547 per month.

32 Education

In 2004, of all Nebraskans age 25 and older, 91.3% were high school graduates and 24.8% had obtained a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Total public school enrollment was estimated at 282,000 in fall 2003, and was expected to rise to 285,000 by fall 2014. Enrollment in private schools in fall 2003 was 39,454 students. Expenditures for public education in 2003/2004 were estimated at $2.6 billion.

As of fall 2002, there were 116,737 students enrolled in college or graduate school. In 2005, Nebraska had 39 degree-granting institutions, including 7 public four-year colleges, 16 nonprofit, private 4-year colleges and universities, and 8 public 2-year schools. The University of Nebraska is the state’s largest postsecondary institution, with campuses in Kearney, Lincoln, and Omaha.

33 Arts

The 15-member Nebraska Arts Council (NAC), appointed by the governor, is empowered to receive federal and state funds, and to plan and administer statewide and special programs in all the arts. Affiliation with the Mid-America Arts Alliance allows the council to help sponsor national and regional events. The Nebraska Humanities Council, founded in 1972, sponsors two annual festivals: The Great Plains Chautauqua and the Nebraska Book Festival.

The Omaha Theater Company for Young People sponsors a number of theatrical performances, as does as the Omaha Theater Ballet Company. The Omaha Symphony was founded in 1921, and Opera Omaha was founded in 1958. The Lied Center for Performing Arts in Lincoln sponsors a wide variety of dance, theater, and musical programs.

34 Libraries and Museums

As of December 2001, the state had 289 libraries, of which 17 were branches. For that same period, there were a total of 6 million volumes and a total circulation of 11.36 million. The Omaha public library system had 916,560 books and 2,471 periodical subscriptions in 9 branches. The state had 107 museums in 2000. The Roslyn Art Museum in Omaha is the state’s leading museum. Other important museums include the Nebraska State Museum of History, the Stir Museum of the Prairie Pioneer in Grand Island, and the University of Nebraska State Museum.

35 Communications

In 2004, about 95.7% of the state’s occupied housing units had telephones. In June of that same year, there were 984,355 wireless telephone service subscribers, while 66.1% of all households in the state had a computer and 55.4% had access to the Internet, in 2003. In 2005, there were 52 major FM and 19 major AM radio stations in operation. There were eight major network TV stations. A total of 23,752 Internet domain names were registered in the state by 2000.

36 Press

In 2005, Nebraska had 6 morning dailies, 12 evening dailies, and 6 Sunday newspapers.

The leading newspaper in 2005 was the Omaha World–Herald, with a daily circulation that year of 192,607 and a Sunday circulation of 242,964. The Lincoln Journal–Star had a daily circulation of 74,893 and a Sunday circulation of 84,149.

37 Tourism, Travel & Recreation

Tourism is Nebraska’s third largest source of outside revenue (after agriculture and manufacturing). In 2004, the state hosted about 19.6 million travelers. Total travel expenditures came to $2.9 billion. The industry supports nearly 43,000 jobs.

The 8 state parks, 9 state historical parks, 12 federal areas, and 55 recreational areas are main tourist attractions. Fishing, swimming, picnicking, and sightseeing are the principal activities. The most attended Nebraska attractions in 2002 were: Omaha’s Henry Dourly Zoo (1,420,556 visitors), Cabala’s in Sidney (1,025,000), Eugene T. Mahoney State Park (1,100,000), Lake McDonough State Recreation Area (859,624), Fort Robinson State Park (357,932), Roslyn Art Museum (186,646), Strategic Air and Space Museum (173,889), the Great Platte River Road Archway Monument (163,000), University of Nebraska State Museum (133,343), and Scotts Bluff National Monument (111,293).

38 Sports

There are no professional major league sports teams in Nebraska. Minor league baseball’s Omaha Golden Spikes play in the AAA Pacific Coast League. Equestrian activities, including racing and rodeos, are also popular. Pari-mutuel racing is licensed by the state. Major annual sporting events are the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) College Baseball World Series at Rosenblatt Stadium, and the River City Roundup and Rodeo, both held in Omaha.

The most popular spectator sport is college football. The University of Nebraska Cornhuskers compete in the Big 12 football conference. The Cornhuskers have won numerous bowl games, including the Fiesta Bowl in 1996 and 2000, and the Alamo Bowl in 2001.

39 Famous Nebraskans

Nebraska was the birthplace of only one US president, Gerald R. Ford (Leslie King Jr., 1913–2006). William Jennings Bryan (b.Illinois, 1860–1925), a US representative from Nebraska, served as secretary of state and was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for president three times.

Native American leaders important in Nebraska history include Oglala Sioux chiefs Red Cloud (1822–1909) and Crazy Horse (1849?–1877), and Ponca chief Standing Bear (1829–1908). Father Edward Joseph Flanagan (b.Ireland, 1886–1948) was the founder of Boys Town, a home for underprivileged youth. Two native Nebraskans became Nobel laureates in 1980: Lawrence R. Klein (b.1920) in economics and Val L. Fitch (b.1923) in physics.

Writers associated with Nebraska include Willa Cather (b.Virginia, 1873–1947), who used the Nebraska frontier setting of her childhood in many of her writings, and won a Pulitzer Prize in 1922; Mari Sandoz (1896–1966), who wrote of her native Great Plains; and author Tillie Olsen (1912–2007). Composer-conductor Howard Hanson (1896–1982), born in Wahoo, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1944.

Nebraskans important in entertainment include actor-dancer Fred Astaire (Fred Austerlitz, 1899–1984); actors Henry Fonda (1905–1982), and Marlon Brando (1924–2004); and television star Johnny Carson (b.Iowa, 1925–2005).

40 Bibliography

BOOKS

Bristow, M. J. State Songs of America. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2000.

Brown, Jonatha A. Nebraska. Milwaukee, WI: Gareth Stevens, 2007.

Heinrichs, Ann. Nebraska. Minneapolis, MN: Compass Point Books, 2004.

McAuliffe, Emily. Nebraska Facts and Symbols. Rev. ed. Mankato, MN: Capstone, 2003.

Murray, Julie. Nebraska. Edina, MN: Abdo Publishing, 2006.

Nichols, John. Big Red: The Nebraska Cornhuskers Story. Mankato, MN: Creative Education, 1999.

WEB SITES

Nebraska Division of Travel and Tourism. Nebraska, possibilities…endless. visitnebraska.org (accessed March 1, 2007).

State of Nebraska. Nebraska.gov: The Official Website of Nebraska. www.state.ne.us (accessed March 1, 2007).

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Nebraska

Nebraska

Nebraska was admitted to the Union as the thirty-seventh state on March 1, 1867. Nicknamed the Cornhusker State, it lies in the north-central United States and is bordered by South Dakota , Iowa , Missouri , Kansas , Colorado , and Wyoming . Two-thirds of the state lies within the Great Plains. Its northcentral region includes the Sand Hills, a prairie with dunes anchored by grasses that covers nearly 18,000 square miles (47,000 square kilometers).

The United States acquired the region from France as part of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Many tribes lived in present-day Nebraska in the 1800s, including the Omaha, Pawnee, and Ponca. Largely because it was sparsely populated, Nebraska escaped the vehement arguments over slavery that occurred shortly before and throughout the American Civil War (1861–65). But much blood was shed by both Native Americans and U.S. soldiers as tribal members were forced onto reservations throughout the late 1800s.

During the devastating dust storms of the 1930s, many Nebraskans left for the West Coast. (See Dust Bowl .) World War II (1939–45), however, brought prosperity to the prairie as military airfields and war industries developed in the state. Situated far inland, Nebraska was ideal for these endeavors. After the war and well into the 1970s, farm output and income were on the rise. Later in the century, small industries and tourism became important to the stabilization of the state's economy.

More than 1.7 million people lived in Nebraska in 2006, the majority (89.6 percent) white. Another 7.2 percent were Hispanic, and 4 percent were African American. The most heavily populated cities were Omaha (414,521) and the capital, Lincoln (239,213).

Agriculture remains the cornerstone of Nebraska's economy in the early twenty-first century. The largest percentage of workers are employed as farm workers or in farm equipment and food processing industries. Food manufacturing accounted for the largest portion of industrial shipments in 2004. Most manufacturing is located in Omaha, Lincoln, and the portion of Sioux City belonging to Nebraska.

The tourism industry provides nearly 43,000 jobs. Tourists visit Nebraska's state and historical parks, museums, and recreational areas.

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Nebraska

NEBRASKA

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Nebraska

Nebraska

Equality before the law.

At a Glance

Name: Nebraska is from the Oto Indian word nebrathka, meaning "flat water."

Nickname: Cornhusker State

Capital: Lincoln

Size: 77,358 sq. mi. (200,358 sq km)

Population: 1,711,263

Statehood: Nebraska became the 37th state on March 1, 1867.

Electoral votes: 5 (2004)

U.S. representatives: 3 (until 2003)

State tree: cottonwood

State flower: goldenrod

State animal: white-tailed deer

Highest point: Johnson Township, 5,426 ft. (1,654 m)

The Place

Nebraska is one of the Midwest states. Thousands of years ago, glaciers covered the eastern part of the state. These slow-moving ice forms left behind a rich layer of soil. Today, this fertile area is used for growing crops such as corn, soybeans, and sorghum.

The elevation of Nebraska rises gradually from southeast to southwest in a series of rolling plateaus. The central region, called the Sand Hills, is an area of sand drifts covered with grass and small lakes. Western Nebraska is an area of plains, slightly drier than the plains of eastern Nebraska. This area is used for growing corn.

There are very few trees in Nebraska; only about 2 percent of the state is forested. Tall prairie grasses, especially bluestem, grow in eastern Nebraska, while short grasses grow in the drier western region. Nebraska's mineral products include natural gas, petroleum, sand, and gravel.

Nebraska's weather can be extreme. In the summer, the climate is hot and humid. Winters are cold and snowy. The region sometimes experiences violent thunderstorms, tornadoes, hailstorms, and blizzards.

The Past

Stone tools found in Nebraska's soil suggest that Native American people lived there as long as 10,000 to 25,000 years ago. More recent groups, such as the Missouri, Oto, Pawnee, Sioux, and Omaha, were living in the region when Spanish explorers first arrived there in the late 1500s.

The area of Nebraska was alternately under Spanish and French control until it was sold to the United States in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase. The government maintained Nebraska as a territory and prohibited white settlement until passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854. That act allowed the newly established territories of Kansas and

Nebraska: Facts and Firsts

  1. Kearney is located exactly halfway between Boston and San Francisco.
  2. Nebraska has more miles of river than any other state.
  3. The world's largest known woolly mammoth fossil was found in Lincoln County in 1922.
  4. The world's largest indoor rain forest is the Lied Jungle in Omaha.
  5. Nebraska is the only state with a unicameral (one-house) legislature.
  6. The Reuben sandwich originated in Nebraska.
  7. Lincoln was the first city to use the 911 emergency system.

Nebraska to choose whether they would permit slavery.

Settlers moved to the region and built houses out of prairie sod because there were so few trees. After the Homestead Act of 1862, which promised settlers free land if they would farm it, Nebraska's population grew steadily. In 1867, Nebraska entered the Union.

Insects were a problem for farmers. Drought was also a problem until the 1890s, when farms began to use improved irrigation methods. Nebraska's farming industry continued to grow until the Great Depression of the 1930s, when the state again suffered from drought. During World War II, Nebraska's agricultural industry rebounded as farmers produced corn, oats, potatoes, and wheat in great quantities to contribute to the war effort.

Nebraska: State Smart

Nebraska has the largest population of sandhill cranes of any state. For five weeks every year, about 500,000 cranes (75% of the world's total population) rest at the Platte River in Nebraska before continuing their migration.

The discovery of oil in the late 1930s also helped Nebraska's economy. New farm technology in the 1950s put many farmers out of work, though, and as they began to move to the cities, Nebraska became more urban. Manufacturing and other urban industries expanded.

The Present

Today, farming continues to be the most important economic activity in Nebraska. About 95 percent of the state's land is used for growing crops, including wheat and corn, and raising cattle and hogs.

The food-processing industry, which prepares Nebraska's agricultural products for market, is very important to the state's economy. Meat and grain processing are centered in the Omaha area.

Nebraska companies manufacture scientific, medical, and surgical equipment as well as farm equipment. Omaha and Lincoln have become financial and transportation centers of the Midwest. Mutual of Omaha, one of the nation's largest health insurance companies, is headquartered in Omaha. Both Omaha and Lincoln have railroad and trucking companies that move products from the Midwest all over the country.

Born in Nebraska

  1. Grover Cleveland Alexander , baseball player
  2. Fred Astaire , dancer and actor
  3. George Beadle , Nobel Prize winner and geneticist
  4. Marlon Brando , actor
  5. Warren Buffett , investor
  6. James Coburn , actor
  7. Henry Fonda , actor
  8. Gerald Ford , U.S. president
  9. Bob Gibson , baseball player
  10. Malcolm X , civil rights advocate
  11. Nick Nolte , actor
  12. Red Cloud , Native American rights advocate
  13. Mari Sandoz , author

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  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Nebraska

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"Nebraska." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Nebraska." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/nebraska-1

"Nebraska." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/nebraska-1

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Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Nebraska

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Nebraska." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Nebraska." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/nebraska-0

"Nebraska." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/nebraska-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Nebraska

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Nebraska." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Nebraska." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/nebraska

"Nebraska." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/nebraska

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.