Skip to main content
Select Source:

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

State of Oklahoma

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Derived from the Choctaw Indian words okla humma, meaning "land of the red people."

NICKNAME: The Sooner State.

CAPITAL: Oklahoma City.

ENTERED UNION: 16 November 1907 (46th).

SONG: "Oklahoma!"

MOTTO: Labor omnia vincit (Labor conquers all things).

FLAG: On a blue field, a peace pipe and an olive branch cross an Osage warrior's shield, which is decorated with small crosses and from which seven eagle feathers descend. The word "Oklahoma" appears below.

OFFICIAL SEAL: Each point of a five-pointed star incorporates the emblem of a Native American nation: (clockwise from top) Chickasaw, Choctaw, Seminole, Creek, and Cherokee. In the center, a frontiersman and Native American shake hands before the goddess of justice; behind them are symbols of progress, including a farm, train, and mill. Surrounding the large star are 45 small ones and the words "Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma 1907."

BIRD: Scissor-tailed flycatcher.

FISH: White bass (sand bass).

FLOWER: Mistletoe.

TREE: Redbud.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year's Day, 1 January; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Presidents' Day, 3rd Monday in February; Confederate Memorial Day, May 10; National Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Veterans' Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving Day, 4th Thursday in November and the following day; Christmas Day, 25 December and the day following.

TIME: 6 AM CST = noon GMT.

LOCATION, SIZE, AND EXTENT

Situated in the western south-central United States, Oklahoma ranks 18th in size among the 50 states.

The total area of Oklahoma is 69,956 sq mi (181,186 sq km), of which land takes up 68,655 sq mi (177,817 sq km) and inland water 1,301 sq mi (3,369 sq km). Oklahoma extends 464 mi (747 km) e-w including the panhandle in the nw, which is about 165 mi (266 km) long. The maximum n-s extension is 230 mi (370 km).

Oklahoma is bordered on the n by Colorado and Kansas; on the e by Missouri and Arkansas; on the s and sw by Texas (with part of the line formed by the Red River); and on the extreme w by New Mexico. The total estimated boundary length of Oklahoma is 1,581 mi (2,544 km). The state's geographic center is in Oklahoma County, 8 mi (13 km) n of Oklahoma City.

TOPOGRAPHY

The land of Oklahoma rises gently to the west from an altitude of 289 ft (88 m) at Little River in the southeastern corner (the lowest point in the state) to a height of 4,973 ft (1,517 m) at Black Mesa, the highest elevation, on the tip of the panhandle. The mean elevation of the state is approximately 1,300 ft (397 m). Four mountain ranges cross this Great Plains state: the Boston Mountains (part of the Ozark Plateau) in the northeast, the Quachitas in the southeast, the Arbuckles in the south-central region, and the Wichitas in the southwest. Much of the northwest belongs to the High Plains, while northeastern Oklahoma is mainly a region of buttes and valleys.

Not quite two-thirds of the state is drained by the Arkansas River, and the remainder by the Red River. Within Oklahoma, the Arkansas is joined by the Verdigris, Grand (Neosho), and Illinois rivers from the north and northeast, and by the Cimarron and Canadian rivers from the northwest and west. The Red River, which marks most of the state's southern boundary, is joined by the Washita, Salt Fork, Blue, Kiamichi, and many smaller rivers. There are few natural lakes but many artificial ones, of which the largest is Lake Eufaula, covering 102,500 acres (41,500 hectares).

CLIMATE

Oklahoma has a continental climate with cold winters and hot summers. Normal daily average temperatures in Oklahoma City range from 37°f (2°c) in January to 82°f (27°c) in July. The record low temperature of 27°f (33°c) was set at Watts on 18 January 1930; the record high, 120°f (49°c), occurred at Tipton on 27 June 1994.

Dry, sunny weather generally prevails throughout the state. Precipitation varies from an average of 15 in (38 cm) annually in the panhandle to over 50 in (127 cm) in the southeast. Average annual precipitation in Oklahoma City is about 33.3 in (84 cm). Snowfall averages 9 in (23 cm) a year in Oklahoma City, which is also one of the windiest cities in the United States, with an average annual wind speed of 13 mph (20 km/hr).

Oklahoma is tornado-prone. One of the most destructive windstorms was the tornado that tore through Ellis, Woods, and Woodward counties on 9 April 1947, killing 101 people and injuring 782 others.

FLORA AND FAUNA

Grasses grow in abundance in Oklahoma. Bluestem, buffalo, sand lovegrass, and grama grasses are native, with the bluestem found mostly in the eastern and central regions, and buffalo grass most common in the western counties, known as the "short grass country." Deciduous hardwoods stand in eastern Oklahoma, and red and yellow cactus blossoms brighten the Black Mesa area in the northwest. The eastern prairie fringed orchid was listed as threat-ened in 2006; there were no plant species listed as endangered that year in Oklahoma.

The white-tailed deer is found in all counties, and Rio Grande wild turkeys are hunted across much of the state. Pronghorn antelope inhabit the panhandle area, and elk survive in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, where a few herds of American buffalo (bison) are also preserved. The bobwhite quail, ring-necked pheasant, and prairie chicken are common game birds. Native sport fish include largemouth, smallmouth, white, and spotted bass; catfish; crappie; and sunfish.

In April 2006, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed 18 species of animals (vertebrates and invertebrates) as threatened or endangered. These included three species of bat (Ozark big-eared, Indiana, and gray), bald eagle, whooping crane, black-capped vireo, red-cockaded woodpecker, Eskimo curlew, and Neosho madtom.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

The Oklahoma Department of Environment Quality has overall responsibility for coordinating all pollution control activities by other state agencies and for developing a comprehensive water quality management program for Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Conservation Commission is responsible for conservation of renewable natural resources through land use planning, small watershed upstream flood control, reclamation of abandoned mine land, water quality monitoring and soil and water conservation, as well as environmental education and wetlands conservation. The Department of Wildlife Conservation manages wildlife resources and habitat specifically for hunters, anglers, and others who appreciate wildlife.

The Department of Health is responsible for the monitoring of air quality standards; the enforcement of regulations covering control of industrial and solid waste; the enforcement of regulations covering radioactive materials at the Kerr-McGee processing facility at Gore and elsewhere; and the maintenance of standards at all public waterworks and sewer systems. The Water Resources Board has broad statutory authority to protect the state's waters.

Toxic industrial wastes remain an environmental concern, and old mines in the Tar Creek area of northeastern Oklahoma still exude groundwater contaminated by zinc, iron, and cadmium. In 2003, 30 million lb of toxic chemicals were released in the state. Also in 2003, Oklahoma had 165 hazardous waste sites listed in the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) database, 10 of which were on the National Priorities List as of 2006; among these were Tar Creek in Ottawa County and Tinker Air Force Base. In 2005, the EPA spent over $8.8 million through the Superfund program for the cleanup of hazardous waste sites in the state. The same year, federal EPA grants awarded to the state included $10.7 million for wastewater system improvements. A special grant of $4.96 million was awarded for the Oklahoma Plan Demonstration Project in Tar Creek, Ottawa County, which is designed to offer demonstration programs for land restoration and environmental management.

Lands devastated by erosion during the droughts of the 1930s were purchased by the federal government and turned over to the Soil Conservation Service for restoration. When grasses were firmly established in the mid-1950s, the land was turned over to the US Forest Service and is now leased for grazing. In 2003, the state had about 890,000 acres of wetlandsabout 2% of the land.

POPULATION

Oklahoma ranked 28th in population in the United States with an estimated total of 3,547,884 in 2005, an increase of 2.8% since 2000. Between 1990 and 2000, Oklahoma's population grew from 3,145,585 to 3,450,654, an increase of 9.7%. The population is projected to reach 3.6 million by 2015 and 3.8 million by 2025. The population density in 2004 was 51.3 persons per sq mi. In 2004 the median age in Oklahoma was 36.5; 24.4% of the on under age 18 while 13.2% was age 65 or older.

The largest city is Oklahoma City, which in 2004 had an estimated 528,042 inhabitants in the city proper and an estimated population of 1,144,327 in the metropolitan statistical area. Tulsa, the second-largest city, had an estimated population of 383,764 in the city proper and a 881,815 in the metropolitan area. Norman ranked third with a population of 100,923 in 2004. The Lawton metropolitan area had a population of about 110,514.

ETHNIC GROUPS

According to the 1990 Census, Oklahoma had more American Indians252,420than any other state, but by 1998 its estimated American Indian population of 281,000 had been surpassed by California's (292,000), and it remained in second place in 2000, with an Indian population of 273,230, or 7.9% of the state's total populationthe fourth-highest percentage ranking in the United States. Oklahoma was also home to some of the nation's largest Indian reservations, including those of the Creek, Cherokee, Chickasaw, and Choctaw Indians. By 2004, the state's American Indian population had increased to 8.1% of the total population.

Black slaves came to Oklahoma (then known as Indian Territory) with their Indian masters after Congress forced the resettlement of Indians from the southeast to lands west of the Mississippi River in 1830. By the time of the Civil War, there were 7,000 free Negroes in Oklahoma. After the depression of the 1930s, blacks left the farms and small towns and concentrated in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. In 2000, the black population of 260,968 was smaller than the American Indian population. It remained thus in 2004, when the black population accounted for 7.7% of the state's total population.

Mexicans came to Oklahoma during the 19th century as laborers on railroads and ranches, and in coal mines. Later they worked in the cotton fields until the depression of the 1930s and subsequent mechanization reduced the need for seasonal labor. Today, most first- and second-generation Mexicans live in Oklahoma City, Tulsa, and Lawton. In 2000, Oklahomans who were classified as Hispanics or Latinos numbered 179,304 and represented 5.2% of the state's total population. Of this total, 132,813 were Mexican. In 2004, 6.3% of the state's population was Hispanic or Latino.

Italians, Czechs, Germans, Poles, Britons, Irish, and others of European stock also came to Oklahoma during the 19th century. Foreign immigration has been small since that time, however, and in 2000, less than 4% of the population consisted of the foreign born (who numbered 131,747). Persons claiming at least one specific ancestry group in 2000 included English, 291,553; German, 435,245; and Irish, 354,802. In 2000, the Asian population numbered 46,767 and there were 2,372 Pacific Islanders. In 2004, 1.5% of the population was Asian, and 0.1% of the population was Pa- cific Islander. A full 4% of the population reported origin of two or more races that year.

LANGUAGES

Once the open hunting ground of the Osage, Comanche, and Apache Indians, what is now Oklahoma later welcomed the deported Cherokee and other transferred eastern tribes. The diversity of tribal and linguistic backgrounds is reflected in numerous place-names such as Oklahoma itself, Kiamichi, and Muskogee. Almost equally diverse is Oklahoma English, with its uneven blending of features of North Midland, South Midland, and Southern dialects.

In 2000, 2,977,187 Oklahomans92.6% of the resident population five years or olderspoke only English at home, down from 95% in 1990.

The following table gives selected statistics from the 2000 Census for language spoken at home by persons five years old and over. The category "Other Native North American languages" includes Apache, Cherokee, Choctaw, Dakota, Keres, Pima, and Yupik. The category "Other Asian languages" includes Dravidian languages, Malayalam, Telugu, Tamil, and Turkish. The category "African languages" includes Amharic, Ibo, Twi, Yoruba, Bantu, Swahili, and Somali.

LANGUAGE NUMBER PERCENT
Population 5 years and over 3,215,719 100.0
  Speak only English 2,977,187 92.6
  Speak a language other than English 238,532 7.4
Speak a language other than English 238,532 7.4
  Spanish or Spanish Creole 141,060 4.4
  Other Native North, American languages 18,817 0.6
  German 13,445 0.4
  Vietnamese 11,330 0.4
  French (incl. Patois, Cajun) 8,258 0.3
  Chinese 6,413 0.2
  Korean 3,948 0.1
  Arabic 3,265 0.1
  Other Asian languages 3,134 0.1
  Tagalog 2,888 0.1
  Japanses 2,546 0.1
  African languages 2,546 0.1

RELIGIONS

Evangelical Protestant groups predominate in Oklahoma with adherents representing about 41.4% of the total population in 2000. This group was influential in keeping the state "dry"that is, banning the sale of all alcoholic beveragesuntil 1959 and resisting legalization of public drinking until 29 counties voted to permit the sale of liquor by the drink in 1985.

The leading Protestant group in 2000 was the Southern Baptist Convention with 967,223 adherents; in 2002 there were 16,563 new baptized members. Other leading Evangelical Protestant denominations in 2000 included the Assemblies of God, 88,301 adherents; the Churches of Christ, 83,047; the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 53,729; and the Christian Churches, 42,708. Free Will Baptists, Nazarenes, Missouri Synod Lutherans, and those of various other Pentecostal traditions are also fairly well represented. The largest Mainline Protestant denominations are the United Methodist Church, with 253,375 adherents (in 2004), and the Presbyterian Church USA, with 35,211 adherents (in 2000) In 2006, there were 38,011 members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) in 75 congregations. In 2004, there were about 169,045 Roman Catholics in the state, of which 112,951 reside in the archdiocese of Oklahoma City. In 2000, there were 6,145 Muslims and about 5,050 Jews throughout the state. About 39.2% of the population did not claim any religious affiliation.

Oral Roberts, a popular minister, has established a college and faith-healing hospital in Tulsa, and his "Tower of Faith" broadcasts by radio and television have made him a well-known preacher throughout the United States. A Mormon temple was built in Oklahoma City in 2000. The offices of the Unitarian Universalist Christian Fellowship are in Turley.

TRANSPORTATION

In 1930, the high point for railroad transportation in Oklahoma, there were 6,678 mi (10,747 km) of railroad track in the state. In 2003, there were 3,853 rail mi (6,201 km) of track. As of that same year, there were three Class I railroads operating in Oklahoma: the Burlington Northern Santa Fe; the Union Pacific; and the Kansas City Southern. Together, they operated 2,536 mi (4,82 km) of right-of-way in the state as of 2003. As of 2006, Amtrak provided passenger service to five stations in Oklahoma via its Oklahoma City to Fort Worth Heartland Flyer train. Inter-urban transit needs, formerly served by streetcars (one of the most popular routes operated between Oklahoma City and Norman), are now supplied by buses.

The Department of Transportation is responsible for construction and maintenance of the state road system, which in 2004 included state roads and highways, and interstate highways. The main east-west highways are I-44, connecting Tulsa and Oklahoma City, and I-40; the major north-south route is I-35, which links Oklahoma City with Topeka, Kansas and Dallas-Ft. Worth, Texas. Overall in 2004, Oklahoma had 112,713 mi (181,467 km) of roadway. A total of some 3.156 million motor vehicles were registered in the state that same year, including 1.622 million automobiles and 1.448 million trucks of all types. There were 2,369,621 licensed drivers in 2004.

The opening of the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System in 1971 linked Oklahoma with the Mississippi River and thus to Gulf coast ports. Tulsa, Port of Catoosa, is the chief port on the system, handling 2.159 million tons of cargo in 2004. In 2003, waterborne shipments totaled 4.895 million tons. In 2004, Oklahoma had 150 mi (241 km) of navigable inland waterways.

In 2005, Oklahoma had a total of 439 public and private-use aviation-related facilities. This included 346 airports, 91 heliports, 1 STOLport (Short Take-Off and Landing), and 1 seaplane base. Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City and Tulsa International Airport are the state's largest airports. In 2004, Will Rogers had 1,695,096 passengers enplaned, while Tulsa International had 1,462,799 enplanements.

HISTORY

There is evidencechiefly from the Spiro Mound in eastern Oklahoma, excavated in 1930that an advanced Indian civilization inhabited the region around ad 9001100. By the time the Spanish conquistadores, led by Hernando de Soto and Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, arrived there in the 16th century, however, only a few scattered tribes remained. Two centuries later, French trappers moved up the rivers of Oklahoma.

Except for the panhandle, which remained a no-man's-land until 1890, all of present-day Oklahoma became part of US territory with the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Under the Indian Removal Act of 1830, Indian tribes from the southeastern United States were resettled in what was then known as Indian Country. Although 4,000 Indians died along the "Trail of Tears" (from Georgia to Oklahoma) between the time of removal and the Civil War, the Five Civilized TribesCherokees, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminoleprospered in the new land. The eastern region that they settled, comprising not quite half of modern Oklahoma and known as Indian Territory since the early 19th century (although not formally organized under that name until 1890), offered rich soil and luxurious vegetation. White settlers also came to farm the land, but their methods depleted the soil, preparing the way for the dust bowl of the 1930s. Meanwhile, the increasing movement of people and goods between Santa Fe and New Orleans spurred further growth in the region. Military posts such as Ft. Gibson, Ft. Supply, and Ft. Towson were established between 1824 and the 1880s, with settlements growing up around them.

During the early Civil War period, the Five Civilized Tribessome of whose members were slaveholdersallied with the Confederacy. After Union troops captured Ft. Gibson in 1863, the Union Army controlled one-half of Indian Territory. From the end of the Civil War to the 1880s, the federal government removed the eastern tribes from certain lands that were especially attractive to the railroads and to interested white settlers. Skirmishes between the Indians and the federal troops occurred, culminating in a massacre of Cheyenne Indians on 27 November 1868 by Colonel George Custer and his 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Washita.

Amid a clamor for Indian lands, Congress opened western Oklahomaformerly reserved for the Cherokee, Cheyenne, Fox, and other tribesto homesteaders in 1889. Present-day Oklahoma City, Norman, Guthrie, Edmond, and Stillwater represent the eastern boundary for the 1889 "run" on Oklahoma lands; eight more runs were to follow. The greatest was in 1893, when about 100,000 people stormed onto the newly opened Cherokee outlet. The drive to get a land claim was fierce, and thousands of "Sooners" staked their claims before the land was officially opened. The western region became Oklahoma Territory, governed by a territorial legislature and a federally appointed governor in 1890; Guthrie was named the capital. Most of eastern Oklahoma continued to be governed by the Five Civilized Tribes.

Although an Oklahoma statehood bill was introduced in Congress as early as 1892, the Five Civilized Tribes resisted all efforts to unite Indian Territory until their attempt to form their own state was defeated in 1905. Congress passed an enabling act in June 1906, and Oklahoma became the 46th state on 16 November 1907 after a vote of the residents of both territories. Oklahoma City was named the state capital in 1910.

When President Theodore Roosevelt signed the statehood proclamation, Oklahoma's population was about 1,500,00075% rural, 25% urbanmost of them drawn by the state's agricultural and mineral resources. The McAlester coal mines had opened in 1871, and lead and zinc were being mined in Ottawa County. But it was oil that made the state prosperous. Prospecting began in 1882, and the first commercial well was drilled at Bartlesville in 1897. The famous Glenn Pool gusher, near Tulsa, was struck in 1905. Oil wells were producing more than 40 million barrels annually when Oklahoma entered the Union, and the state led all others in oil production until 1928.

Generally, the decade of the 1920s was a tumultuous period for Oklahoma. A race riot in Tulsa in 1921 was put down by the National Guard. (In February 2001, a state commission recommended that the surviving victims be compensated for what has been called the nation's most violent instance of racial oppression. The recommendation launched an intense debate over whether today's taxpayers should have to pay restitution for yesterday's crimes.) Also in 1921, the Ku Klux Klan claimed close to 100,000 Oklahomans. The Klan was outlawed when Governor John C. Walton declared martial law in 1923, during a period of turmoil and violence that culminated in Walton's impeachment and conviction on charges of incompetence, corruption, and abuse of power. The 1930s brought a destructive drought, dust storms, and an exodus of "Okies," many of them to California. Colorful Governor William "Alfalfa Bill" Murray led the call for federal relief for the distressed dust bowl regionthough he insisted on his right to administer the funds. When Oklahoma oil fields were glutting the market at 15 cents a barrel, Murray placed 3,106 producing wells under martial law from August 1931 to April 1933. Kansas, New Mexico, and Texas also agreed to control their oil production and under the leadership of Governor E. W. Marland, the Interstate Oil Compact was created in 1936 to conserve petroleum and stabilize prices.

Oklahoma's first native-born governor, Robert Kerr (later a senator for 14 years) held the statehouse during World War II and brought the state national recognition by promoting Oklahoma as a site for military, industrial, and conservation projects. Under early postwar governors Roy Turner, Johnston Murray, and Raymond Gary, tax reductions attracted industry, major highways were built, a loyalty oath for state employees was declared unconstitutional, and Oklahoma's higher educational facilities were integrated. The term of Governor Howard Edmondson saw the repeal of prohibition in 1959, the establishment of merit and central purchasing systems, and the introduction of a state income tax withholding plan.

Oil and gas again brought increased wealth to the state in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s, as state revenues from oil and gas increased from $72 million in 1972 to $745 million in 1982. Nearly $1 billion was spent for new highways, schools, and state offices; new police were hired; and teacher salaries were raised to nationally competitive levels. Unemployment fell to 3.6% in 1981 while an influx of job seekers from other states made Oklahoma one of the fastest-growing states in the nation in the early 1980s.

In 1983, as oil prices fell in the face of a growing worldwide oil glut, the oil boom suddenly ended. Between 1982 and 1986, jobs in the extraction of oil and gas dropped by 50%. The failure of 24 banks, home mortgage foreclosures, and mounting distress among the state's farmers added to Oklahoma's financial woes. Falling state revenues and a balanced budget requirement in the state constitution compelled Governor George Nigh in 1983 to cut appropriations and to preside over a series of tax increases that lost for Oklahoma its claim to one of the lowest tax burdens in the nation.

The oil bust did not entirely devastate the Oklahoma economy. Those industries with a national rather than a regional base, such as distribution, transportation, food processing, and light man- ufacturing, continued to prosper, and the state's leaders made a concerted effort to diversify Oklahoma's industries even further by attracting both private enterprise and defense contracts. By the end of the decade, the economy had begun to recover, and recovery continued into the 1990s. By 1999 the unemployment rate had dropped to 3.4%, below the national average. Poverty was on the decline in the state: 15.6% of Oklahomans lived below the federal poverty level in 1990; in 1998 the rate dipped to 14.1%. But with the tenth-lowest median income in the nation, the state's income levels lagged behind, causing some analysts to predict that Oklahoma might have problems competing in a strong economy.

On 19 April 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was destroyed in a bomb blast that claimed 168 lives and constituted the most serious act of terrorism in the history of the United States until the events of 11 September 2001. Governor Frank Keating was commended for his strong leadership during the crisis. A memorial to the victims was unveiled in April 2000, the five-year anniversary of the tragedy. Timothy McVeigh was executed in 2001 for his part in the Oklahoma bombing.

In 2003 Oklahoma faced its largest budget deficit in state history ($600 million). Democratic Governor Brad Henry pledged to eliminate taxes on retirement income for senior citizens, provide access to affordable prescription drugs, retain jobs in the state, improve Oklahoma schools, and increase teachers' salaries. Henry proposed a state lottery to fund education; voters overwhelmingly passed the lottery in November 2004. He secured a state vote to fund healthcare initiatives through an increase in the tobacco tax. Henry promoted tort reform, Medicaid screening for breast and cervical cancer, voluntary relocation assistance for the troubled Tar Creek region, and expansion of pre-school programs. He secured a workers' compensation reform package that business groups applauded, worked on funding for road and bridge repair, created a successful anti-methamphetamine program, and ensured that assistance went to Oklahoma National Guard members and their families. The projected 2005 fiscal year budget gap in Oklahoma was $5.3 billion.

STATE GOVERNMENT

Oklahoma's first and only constitution became effective on 16 November 1907. By January 2005, that document had been amended 171 times (including five amendments that were subsequently nullified by the courts).

The Oklahoma legislature consists of two chambers, a 48-member Senate and a 101-member House of Representatives. To serve in the legislature one must be a qualified voter, US citizen, and district resident; also, senators must be at least 25 years old and representatives at least 21. Senators hold office for four years, representatives for two. The legislature meets annually, beginning on the first Monday in February; the regular session ends on the last Friday in May. Special sessions may be called by a vote of two-thirds of the members of each house. The legislative salary in 2004 was $38,400, unchanged from 1999.

State elected officials are the governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, auditor, state treasurer, superintendent of public instruction, commissioner of labor, and commissioner of insurance, all of whom serve four-year terms, and three corporation commissioners, who serve staggered six-year terms. The governor is limited to serving two consecutive terms. A candidate for governor must be at least 31 years old and a qualified voter in Oklahoma. As of December 2004, the governor's salary was $110,298.

Any member of either house may introduce legislation. A bill passed by the legislature becomes law if signed by the governor, if left unsigned by the governor for five days while the legislature is in session, or if passed over the governor's veto by two-thirds of the elected members of each house (three-fourths in the case of emergency bills). A bill dies after 15 days if the governor takes no action and the legislature has adjourned. Constitutional amendments may be placed on the ballot by majority vote in both houses, by initiative petition of 15% of the electorate, or by constitutional convention. To be ratified, proposed amendments must receive a majority vote of the electorate.

To vote in Oklahoma, one must be a US citizen, at least 18 years old, and a state resident. Restrictions apply to convicted felons and those declared mentally incapacitated by the court.

POLITICAL PARTIES

The history of the two major political groups in Oklahoma, the Democratic and Republican parties, dates back to 1890, when Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory were separately organized. Indian Territory was dominated by Democrats, reflecting the influence of southern immigrants, while Oklahoma Territory was primarily Republican because of immigration from the northern states. When the two territories joined for admission to the Union in 1907, Democrats outnumbered Republicans, as they have ever since. Democrats have continued to dominate the lesser state offices, but the Republicans won the governorship three times between 1962 and 1990, and the Republican presidential nominee out-polled his Democratic counterpart in ten of twelve presidential elections between 1948 and 1992. The best showing by a minor party in a recent presidential race was 25% garnered by Independent Ross Perot in 1992.

Oklahomans cast 60% of their popular vote for Republican George W. Bush in the 2000 presidential election, and 38% for Al Gore. In 2004, 65.6% of the vote went for the incumbent President Bush, with 32.4% to the challenger, Democrat John Kerry. In 2004 there were 2,143,000 registered voters. In 1998, 57% of registered

Oklahoma Presidential Vote by Political Parties 19482004
YEAR ELECTORAL VOTE OKLAHOMA WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN
*Won US presidential election.
**IND. candidate Ross Perot received 319,878 votes in 1992 and 130,788 votes in 1996.
1948 10 *Truman (D) 452,782 2687,817
1952 8 *Eisenhower (R) 430,939 518,045
1956 8 *Eisenhower (R) 385,581 473,769
1960 8 Nixon (R) 370,111 533,039
1964 8 *Johnson (D) 519,834 412,665
1968 8 *Nixon (R) 301,658 449,697
1972 8 *Nixon (R) 247,147 759,025
1976 8 Ford (R) 532,442 545,708
1980 8 *Reagan (R) 402,026 695,570
1984 8 *Reagan (R) 385,080 861,530
1988 8 *Bush (R) 483,423 876,367
1992** 8 Bush (R) 473,066 592,929
1996** 8 Dole (R) 488,105 582,315
2000*** 8 *Bush, G. W. (R) 474,276 744,337
2004 7 *Bush, G. W. (R) 503,966 950,792

voters were Democratic, 35% Republican, and 8% unaffiliated or members of other parties. The state had seven electoral votes in the 2000 presidential election, a loss of one vote over 2000.

Democrat Brad Henry was elected governor in 2002. Republican senator James Inhofe, first elected in a special election in 1994, was reelected to full terms in 1996 and 2002. Republican senator Don Nickles, first elected in 1980, was reelected in 1998 to a fourth term; in 2004, Republican Tom Coburn won a seat in the US Senate. In 2004, Oklahoma sent four Republicans and one Democrat to the US House of Representatives. In 2005, there were 26 Democrats and 20 Republicans in the state House, and 44 Democrats and 57 Republicans in the state Senate.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

As of 2005, local governmental units in Oklahoma included 77 counties, 590 municipal governments, 544 public school districts and 560 special districts.

County government consists of three commissioners elected by districts, a county clerk, assessor, treasurer, sheriff, surveyor, and (in most counties) superintendent of schools. Towns of 1,000 residents or more may incorporate as cities. Any city of 2,000 or more people may vote to become a home-rule city, determining its own form of government, by adopting a home-rule charter. Cities electing not to adopt a home-rule charter operate under alder-manic, mayor-council, or council-manager systems. A large majority of home-rule cities have council-manager systems.

In 2005, local government accounted for about 140,324 full-time (or equivalent) employment positions.

STATE SERVICES

To address the continuing threat of terrorism and to work with the federal Department of Homeland Security, homeland security in Oklahoma operates under state statute and executive order; the homeland security director is designated as the state homeland security advisor.

The Oklahoma Department of Education, functioning under a six-member appointed Board of Education and an elected superintendent of public instruction, has responsibility for all phases of education through the first 12 grades. Postsecondary study is under the general authority of the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education and other separate boards of regents associated with one or more institutions. Vocational and technical education, a federal-state cooperative program, is administered in Oklahoma under the Department of Career and Technology Education. The Department of Transportation has authority over the planning, construction, and maintenance of the state highway system. The Oklahoma Corporation Commission regulates transportation and transmission companies, public utilities, motor carriers, and the oil and gas industry, while the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission participates in financing airports.

The Department of Health has as a major function the control and prevention of communicable diseases; it administers community health program funds and licenses most health-related facilities. The Department of Human Services oversees the care of neglected children, delinquent youths, and the developmentally disabled and operates various facilities and programs for the handicapped, the elderly, and the infirm.

Protective services are supplied through the Oklahoma Military Department, which administers the Army and Air National Guard; the Department of Corrections, overseeing the state penitentiary and reformatory, adult correctional centers, and community treatment centers; and the Department of Public Safety, with general safety and law enforcement responsibilities, among which are licensing drivers and patrolling the highways. Natural resource protection services are centered principally in the Oklahoma Conservation Commission. The Department of Wildlife Conservation administers the game and fish laws.

JUDICIAL SYSTEM

In 1967, following some of the worst judicial scandals in the history of the state, in which one supreme court justice was imprisoned for income tax evasion and another impeached on charges of bribery and corruption, Oklahoma approved a constitutional amendment to reform the state's judicial system. Under the new provisions, the Supreme Court, the state's highest court, consists of nine justices initially elected to six-year terms, but with additional terms pursuant to nonpartisan, noncompetitive elections. If a justice is rejected by the voters, the vacancy is filled by gubernatorial appointment, subject to confirmation by the electorate. The court's appellate jurisdiction includes all civil cases (except those which it assigns to the courts of appeals), while its original jurisdiction extends to general supervisory control over all lesser courts and agencies created by law.

The highest appellate court for criminal cases is the Court of Criminal Appeals, a five-member body filled in the same manner as the Supreme Court. Courts of Civil Appeals, created by the legislature in 1968, are located in Tulsa and Oklahoma City. Each has six elective judges with powers to hear civil cases assigned to them by the Supreme Court. When final, their decisions are not appealable to any other state court, a system unique to Oklahoma.

District courts have original jurisdiction over all judicial matters and some review powers over administrative actions. There are 26 districts with 131 district judges who are elected to four-year terms. Municipal courts hear cases arising from local ordinances.

As of 31 December 2004, a total of 23,319 prisoners were held in Oklahoma's state and federal prisons, an increase from 22,821 of 2.2% from the previous year. As of year-end 2004, a total of 2,361 inmates were female, up from 2,320 or 1.8% from the year before. Among sentenced prisoners (one year or more), Oklahoma had an incarceration rate of 649 per 100,000 population in 2004.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Oklahoma in 2004, had a violent crime rate (murder/nonnegligent manslaughter; forcible rape; robbery; aggravated assault) of 500.5 reported incidents per 100,000 population, or a total of 17,635 reported incidents. Crimes against property (burglary; larceny/theft; and motor vehicle theft) in that same year totaled 149,472 reported incidents or 4,242.1 reported incidents per 100,000 people. Oklahoma has a death penalty, of which lethal injection is the sole method of execution. However, should lethal injection be declared unconstitutional, electrocution would be authorized, and if electrocution was found to be unconstitutional, the law authorizes the use of a firing squad. From 1976 through 5 May 2006, the state has carried out 80 executions, of which four were carried out in 2005 and one in 2006 (as of 5 May). As of 1 January 2006, Oklahoma had 91 inmates on death row.

In 2003, Oklahoma spent $75,847,874 on homeland security, an average of $22 per state resident.

ARMED FORCES

In 2004, there were 23,476 active-duty military personnel and 21,860 civilian personnel stationed in Oklahoma, the majority of whom were at Ft. Sill, near Lawton, the training facility for the Artillery Branch. A total of nearly $1.5 billion in prime military contracts was received by local businesses in 2004. Defense Department payroll outlays were $2.97 billion.

In 2003, 355,312 veterans were living in Oklahoma, of whom 45,491 saw service in World War II; 36,837 in the Korean conflict; 113,616 during the Vietnam era; and 59,264 during the Gulf War. In 2004, the Veterans Administration expended more than $1.2 billion in pensions, medical assistance, and other major veterans' benefits.

As of 31 October 2004, the Oklahoma Department of Public Safety employed 808 full-time sworn officers.

MIGRATION

Early immigrants to what is now Oklahoma included explorers, adventurers, and traders who made the country conscious of the new territory, and Indian tribes forcibly removed from the East and Midwest. The interior plains of Oklahoma remained basically unchanged until white settlers came in the late 1880s.

Coal mining brought miners from Italy to the McAlester and Krebs area in the 1870s, and Poles migrated to Bartlesville to work in the lead and zinc smelters. British and Irish coal miners came to Indian Territory because they could earn higher wages there than in their native countries, and Czechs and Slovaks arrived from Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, and Texas when railroad construction began. Mexicans also worked as railroad laborers, ranch hands, and coal miners before statehood. The oil boom of the early 20th century brought an influx of workers from the eastern and Midwestern industrial regions. In 1907, the population of Oklahoma was 75% rural and 25% urban; by 1990, however, 67.7% of all inhabitants resided in urban areas. Oklahoma lost population during the 1930s because of dust bowl and drought conditions, and the trend toward out-migration continued after World War II; from 1940 through 1960, the net loss from migration was 653,000. Migration patterns were reversed, however, after 1960. From 1960 to 1970 nearly 21,000 more people moved into the state than out of it. In the period 197080, a total of 293,500 more people came than left, the migration accounting for nearly two-thirds of Oklahoma's total increase of 466,000 persons in that decade. From 1980 to 1983, Oklahoma ranked fourth among the states with a total net gain from migration of 186,000 people. From 1985 to 1990, a net migration loss of about 95,500 was reported. Between 1990 and 1998, the state had net gains of 48,000 in domestic migration and 26,000 in international migration. In 1998, 2,273 foreign immigrants arrived in Oklahoma. The state's overall population increased 6.4% between 1990 and 1998. In the period 200005, net international migration was 36,546 and net internal migration was 15,418, for a net gain of 21,128 people.

INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERATION

Oklahoma participates in a number of regional intergovernmental agreements, among them the Arkansas River Compact, Arkansas River Basin Compact, Canadian River Compact, Interstate Oil and Gas Compact, Red River Compact, South Central Interstate Forest Fire Protection Compact, Southern Growth Policies Board, Southern States Energy Board, Southern Regional Education Board, Interstate Mining Compact Commission, and the Central Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact. Federal grants in fiscal year 2005 totaled $4.047 billion, an estimated $4.197 billion in fiscal year 2006, and an estimated $4.424 billion in fiscal year 2007.

ECONOMY

Primarily an agricultural state through the first half of the 20th century, Oklahoma has assumed a broader economic structure since the 1950s. Manufacturing heads the list of growth sectors, followed by wholesale and retail trade, services, finance, insurance, and real estate. Oil and gas extraction continues to play a major role. The oil industry boomed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s. In 1985, however, the boom ended. Prices dropped from $27 a barrel to $13 a barrel within a month in 1985. In 1998, gas and oil production was valued at only $3.4 billion; one-third of what it was worth in the mid-1980s. Oklahoma's unemployment rate, which averaged about 3% in the early 1980s, jumped to 9% in 1983, and then fell to 7% in 1985, and rose again, to 8%, in 1986. Since then, the economy has undergone a slow but steady recovery. Unemployment was at 3.4% in 1999. Gains in manufacturing made up for the losses in mining. Manufacturing output, however, peaked in 1999, and by 2001 had fallen 9.2%. The state's overall growth rate, which accelerated from 3.5% in 1998 to 3.9% in 1999 to 6.5% in 2000, fell back to 3.2% in the national recession and slowdown of 2001. The main growth sectors in terms of output coming into the 21st century (1997 to 2001) were general services (up 26.8%), government (up 24.2%), financial services (up 2.5%) and trade (up 21.3%). Oklahoma's military installations, Fort Sill and Tinder Air Force Base, are two of the state's top five employers and with rising defense spending, and oil and gas prices, the state's economy is seen as heading upward.

In 2004, Oklahoma's gross state product (GSP) was $107.600 billion, of which manufacturing (durable and nondurable goods) accounted for the largest share at $11.981 billion or 11.1% of GSP, followed by the real estate sector at $10.494 billion (9.7% of GSP), and healthcare and social assistance services at $7.518 billion (6.9% of GSP). In that same year, there were an estimated 303,135 small businesses in Oklahoma. Of the 77,027 businesses that had employees, an estimated total of 75,058 or 97.4% were small companies. An estimated 9,263 new businesses were established in the state in 2004, up 5.2% from the year before. Business terminations that same year came to 8,018, down 4.9% from 2003. There were 659 business bankruptcies in 2004, up 7.7% from the previous year. In 2005, the state's personal bankruptcy (Chapter 7 and Chapter 13) filing rate was 761 filings per 100,000 people, ranking Oklahoma as the 10th highest in the nation.

INCOME

In 2005 Oklahoma had a gross state product (GSP) of $121 billion which accounted for 1.0% of the nation's gross domestic product and placed the state at number 29 in highest GSP among the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, in 2004 Oklahoma had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $27,840. This ranked 40th in the United States and was 84% of the national average of $33,050. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of PCPI was 4.2%. Oklahoma had a total personal income (TPI) of $98,095,384,000, which ranked 29th in the United States and reflected an increase of 5.4% from 2003. The 19942004 average annual growth rate of TPI was 5.0%. Earnings of persons employed in Oklahoma increased from $68,758,304,000 in 2003 to $73,134,429,000 in 2004, an increase of 6.4%. The 200304 national change was 6.3%.

The US Census Bureau reports that the three-year average median household income for 2002 to 2004 in 2004 dollars was $38,281 compared to a national average of $44,473. During the same period an estimated 12.6% of the population was below the poverty line as compared to 12.4% nationwide.

LABOR

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), in April 2006 the seasonally adjusted civilian labor force in Oklahoma numbered 1,757,900, with approximately 69,000 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 3.9%, compared to the national average of 4.7% for the same period. Preliminary data for the same period placed nonfarm employment at 1,537,100. Since the beginning of the BLS data series in 1976, the highest unemployment rate recorded in Oklahoma was 9.4% in August 1986. The historical low was 2.7% in January 2001. Preliminary nonfarm employment data by occupation for April 2006 showed that approximately 4.4% of the labor force was employed in construction; 18.3% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 5.5% in financial activities; 11.3% in professional and business services; 12.1% in education and health services; 8.7% in leisure and hospitality services; and 20.5% in government. Data was unavailable for manufacturing.

The US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that in 2005, a total of 77,000 of Oklahoma's 1,432,000 employed wage and salary workers were formal members of a union. This represented 5.4% of those so employed, down from 6.1% in 2004, well below the national average of 12%. Overall in 2005, a total of 91,000 workers (6.4%) in Oklahoma were covered by a union or employee association contract, which includes those workers who reported no union affiliation. Oklahoma is one of 22 states with a right-to-work law.

As of 1 March 2006, Oklahoma had a two-tiered state-mandated minimum wage rate. Employers with annual sales of more than $100,000 came under the $5.15 per hour rate, while all others came under a $2.00 per hour rate. In 2004, women in the state accounted for 46.3% of the employed civilian labor force.

AGRICULTURE

Agriculture remains an important economic activity in Oklahoma, even though its relative share of personal income and employment has declined since 1950. Total farm income, estimated at $5.04 billion, ranked 18th in the United States in 2005. Crop marketings contributed $1.03 billion; livestock, $4.01 billion.

As of 2004, Oklahoma had 83,500 farms and ranches covering 33,700,000 acres (13,640,000 hectares). The state ranked fifth in the United States for wheat production in 2004, with 164,500,000 bushels worth $542.8 million. Peanut production ranked seventh in 2004, with 102,300,000 lb, valued at $19,232,000. Other 2004 crop figures include sorghum for grain, 14,400,000 bushels, $25,402,000; soybeans, 8,700,000 bushels, $43,500,000; corn for grain, 30,000,000 bushels, $75,000,000; and oats, 555,000 bushels, $944,000.

Virtually all of Oklahoma's wheat production is located in the western half of the state; cotton (310,000 bales in 2004) is grown in the southwest corner. Sorghum-producing regions include the panhandle, central to southwestern Oklahoma, and the northeast corner of the state.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

In 2005, there were 5.4 million cattle and calves, worth $4.4 billion. During 2004, Oklahoma farmers had 2.4 million hogs and pigs, valued at $194.4 million. In 2003, the state produced around 4 million lb (1.8 million kg) of sheep and lambs which brought in nearly $3.8 million in gross income. Also during 2003, poultry farmers produced 1.11 billion lb (0.5 billion kg) of broilers valued at $379.1 million, and 933 million eggs valued at $72 million. Oklahoma's 82,000 dairy cows produced an estimated 1.31 billion lb (0.59 billion kg) of milk in 2003.

FISHING

Commercial fishing is of minor importance in Oklahoma. The prolific white bass (sand bass), Oklahoma's state fish, is abundant in most large reservoirs. Smallmouth and spotted bass, bluegill, and channel catfish have won favor with fishermen. Rainbow trout are stocked year round in the Illinois River, and walleye and sauger are stocked in most reservoirs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery produces primarily smallmouth bass for distribution to federal wildlife areas in Oklahoma and Texas. In 2004, the state issued 668,924 sport fishing licenses.

FORESTRY

While Oklahoma is not generally known as a forested state, a significant amount of forest is found there. Oklahoma's forests cover approximately 7,665,000 acres (3,102,000 hectares) or nearly 17% of the state's land area. Approximately 65% of this is commercially productive forestland. These forests are about 95% privately owned. They are intensively utilized for lumber, plywood, paper, fuelwood, and other products. They also provide high quality drinking water for the state's two largest cities, excellent wildlife habitat, substantial protection against soil erosion, and numerous recreational opportunities.

Oklahoma's forests play a vital role in the economy in the eastern half of the state. Much of the timber harvested in Oklahoma is shipped to processing plants in western Arkansas. Nearly two million acres of the loblolly-shortleaf pine and shortleaf pine-oak forests support several major wood processing plants in the southeastern corner of the state. Hardwood processing is scattered over the entire forested area in smaller sawmills. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Oklahoma's eastern red cedar forests and woodlands supported a surge in processing plants.

In 2004 lumber output from Oklahoma's forests totaled 355 million board ft, 97% softwood.

MINING

According to preliminary data from the US Geological Survey (USGS), the estimated value of nonfuel mineral production by Oklahoma in 2003 was $479 million, an increase from 2002 of about 1%. The USGS data ranked Oklahoma as 28th among the 50 states by the total value of its nonfuel mineral production, accounting for over 1% of total US output.

According to the preliminary data for 2003, crushed stone was the leading nonfuel mineral produced by Oklahoma, accounting for over 40% of all nonfuel mineral output, by value. It was followed by cement (portland and masonry), construction sand and gravel, industrial sand and gravel, iodine, and gypsum, by value. By volume, Oklahoma in 2003, was the nation's leading producer of gypsum and ranked second in tripoli output. It ranked fifth in feldspar, seventh in common clays, and eighth in industrial sand and gravel. Oklahoma was the only state to produce iodine.

Preliminary data for 2003 showed that a total of 45.8 million metric tons of crushed stone were produced, with a value of $202 million, while construction sand and gravel output came to 9.8 million metric tons, with a value of $39.7 million. Industrial sand and gravel production that same year totaled 1.32 million metric tons, and had a value of $28.4 million. Crude iodine output totaled 1,750 metric tons and was valued at $19.7 million. Crude gypsum production in 2003 stood at 2.41 million metric tons, with a value of $18.7 million.

According to the Oklahoma Department of Mines in 2003, the state had 233 mine operators and 307 operating mines. A total of 26,702 people were directly employed by the state's mining industry, excluding those employed by helium and iodine mine operators.

ENERGY AND POWER

As of 2003, Oklahoma had 98 electrical power service providers, of which 62 were publicly owned and 30 were cooperatives. Of the remainder, four were investor owned, one was federally operated and one was the owner of an independent generator that sold directly to customers. As of that same year there were 1,805,442 retail customers. Of that total, 1,179,570 received their power from investor-owned service providers. Cooperatives accounted for 436,446 customers, while publicly owned providers had 189,346 customers. There was one federal customers and 79 were independent generator or "facility" customers.

Total net summer generating capability by the state's electrical generating plants in 2003 stood at 18.239 million kW, with total production that same year at 60.626 billion kWh. Of the total amount generated, 82.1% came from electric utilities, with the remainder coming from independent producers and combined heat and power service providers. The largest portion of all electric power generated, 36.676 billion kWh (60.5%), came from coal-fired plants, with natural gas fueled plants in second place at 21.822 billion kWh (36%) and hydroelectric facilities in third at 1.798 billion kWh (3%). Other renewable power sources, pumped storage facilities, petroleum fired plants and plants using other types of gases accounted for the remainder.

Oklahoma is rich in fossil fuel resources, producing oil, natural gas, and coal. Crude oil production declined from 223.6 million barrels in 1968, to 150.5 million barrels in 1978, to 70.6 million barrels in 1999. As of 2004, Oklahoma had proven crude oil reserves of 570 million barrels, or 3% of all proven US reserves, while output that same year averaged 171,000 barrels per day. Including federal off shore domains, the state that year ranked seventh (sixth excluding federal offshore) in both proven reserves and production among the 31 producing states. In 2004 Oklahoma had 83,750 producing oil wells and accounted for 3% of all US production. As of 2005, the state's five refineries had a combined crude oil distillation capacity of 484,961 barrels per day.

In 2004, Oklahoma had 35,612 producing natural gas and gas condensate wells. In that same year, marketed gas production (all gas produced excluding gas used for repressuring, vented and flared, and nonhydrocarbon gases removed) totaled 1,663.148 billion cu ft (47.23 billion cu m). As of 31 December 2004, proven reserves of dry or consumer-grade natural gas totaled 16,238 billion cu ft (461.15 billion cu m).

Oklahoma in 2004, had eight producing coal mines, seven of which were surface operations. Coal production that year totaled 1,792,000 short tons, up from 1,565,000 short tons in 2003. Of the total produced in 2004, the surface mines accounted for 1,383,000 short tons. Recoverable coal reserves in 2004 totaled 17 million short tons. One short ton equals 2,000 lb (0.907 metric tons).

INDUSTRY

Oklahoma's earliest manufactures were based on agricultural and petroleum production. As late as 1939, the food-processing and petroleum-refining industries together accounted for one-third of the total value added by manufacture. Although resource-related industries continue to predominate, manufacturing has become much more diversified.

According to the US Census Bureau's Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) for 2004, Oklahoma's manufacturing sector covered some 17 product subsectors. The shipment value of all products manufactured in the state that same year was $45.710 billion. Of that total, petroleum and coal products manufacturing accounted for the largest share at $8.904 billion. It was followed by transportation equipment manufacturing at $7.902 billion; machinery manufacturing at $5.378 billion; food manufacturing at $5.035 billion; and fabricated metal product manufacturing at $3.891 billion.

In 2004, a total of 132,540 people in Oklahoma were employed in the state's manufacturing sector, according to the ASM. Of that total, 98,281 were actual production workers. In terms of total employment, the fabricated metal product manufacturing industry accounted for the largest portion of all manufacturing employees at 22,319, with 16,497 actual production workers. It was followed by machinery manufacturing at 20,438 employees (12,935 actual production workers); transportation equipment manufacturing at 17,071 employees (13,166 actual production workers); food manufacturing at 14,277 employees (10,905 actual production workers); and plastics and rubber products manufacturing with 12,104 employees (9,765 actual production workers).

ASM data for 2004 showed that Oklahoma's manufacturing sector paid $5.241 billion in wages. Of that amount, the machinery manufacturing sector accounted for the largest share at $900.746 million. It was followed by fabricated metal product manufacturing at $799.199 million; transport equipment manufacturing at $714.183 million; plastics and rubber products manufacturing at $528.999 million; and food manufacturing at $480.609 million.

COMMERCE

According to the 2002 Census of Wholesale Trade, Oklahoma's wholesale trade sector had sales that year totaling $30.7 billion from 4,770 establishments. Wholesalers of durable goods accounted for 2,993 establishments, followed by nondurable goods wholesalers at 1,489 and electronic markets, agents, and brokers accounting for 288 establishments. Sales by durable goods wholesalers in 2002 totaled $11.1 billion, while wholesalers of nondurable goods saw sales of $15.9 billion. Electronic markets, agents, and brokers in the wholesale trade industry had sales of $3.6 billion.

In the 2002 Census of Retail Trade, Oklahoma was listed as having 13,922 retail establishments with sales of $32.1 billion. The leading types of retail businesses by number of establishments were: gasoline stations (2,020); motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers (1,830); miscellaneous store retailers (1,652); and food and beverage stores (1,558). In terms of sales, motor vehicle and motor vehicle parts dealers accounted for the largest share of retail sales at $9.4 billion, followed by general merchandise stores at $6.2 billion; gasoline stations at $3.7 billion; and food and beverage stores at $3.3 billion. A total of 167,949 people were employed by the retail sector in Oklahoma that year.

Exporters located in Oklahoma exported $4.3 billion in merchandise during 2005. Major exports included industrial machinery and transportation equipment.

CONSUMER PROTECTION

Consumer protection issues in Oklahoma are generally the responsibility of the Consumer Protection Division of the Attorney General's Office. Among the Division's duties are the resolution of complaints against businesses, the provision of information on those complaints and of publications to consumers to help educate the public and the enforcement of the state's laws regarding unfair and deceptive practices. However, consumer protection issues involving "Supervised Lenders," such as finance companies, and non-lender extenders of credit is the responsibility of the Commission on Consumer Credit, which also maintains a program of consumer education and has the power to require lawful and businesslike procedures by lending agencies under the state's Uniform Credit Code.

When dealing with consumer protection issues, the state's Attorney General's Office can initiate civil and criminal proceedings; represent the state before state and federal regulatory agencies; administer consumer protection and education programs; handle formal consumer complaints; and exercise broad subpoena powers. In antitrust actions, the Attorney General's Office can act on behalf of those consumers who are incapable of acting on their own; initiate damage actions on behalf of the state in state courts; initiate criminal proceedings; and represent counties, cities and other governmental entities in recovering civil damages under state or federal law.

The offices of the Commission on Consumer Credit and of the Consumer Protection Division are located in Oklahoma City.

BANKING

As of June 2005, Oklahoma had 274 insured banks, savings and loans, and saving banks, plus 26 state-chartered and 60 federally chartered credit unions (CUs). Excluding the CUs, the Oklahoma City market area accounted for the largest portion of the state's financial institutions and deposits in 2004, with 70 institutions and $15.734 billion in deposits, followed by the Tulsa market area with 68 institutions and $13.276 billion. As of June 2005, CUs accounted for 9.7% of all assets held by all financial institutions in the state, or some $6.412 billion. Banks, savings and loans, and savings banks collectively accounted for the remaining 90.3% or $59.840 billion in assets held.

The State Banking Department has the responsibility for supervising all state-chartered banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, and trust companies.

The median percentage of past-due/non accrual loans to total loans stood at 1.98% as of fourth quarter 2005, down from 2004's rate of 2.17% and 2003's level of 2.37%, mark an ongoing improvement in the state's lending environment. In 2004, the median net internal margin (the difference between the lower rates offered savers and the higher rates charged on loans) for the state's insured institutions stood at 4.49%, up from 4.45% in 2003, but down from the 4.54% rate as of fourth quarter 2005.

INSURANCE

As of 2003, there were 54 property and casualty and 29 life and health insurance companies domiciled in the state. In 2004, direct premiums for property and casualty insurance totaled over $4.8 billion. That year, there were 13,843 flood insurance policies in force in the state, with a total value of $1.5 billion.

In 2004, there were over 1.6 million individual life insurance policies in force, with a total value of about $111 billion; total value for all categories of life insurance (individual, group, and credit) was over $174 billion. The average coverage amount is $67,700 per policy holder. Death benefits paid that year totaled $604 million.

In 2004, 48% of state residents held employment-based health insurance policies, 4% held individual policies, and 25% were covered under Medicare and Medicaid; 20% of residents were uninsured. Oklahoma has the third-highest percentage of uninsured residents among the fifty states (following Texas and New Mexico). In 2003, employee contributions for employment-based health coverage averaged at 19% for single coverage and 28% for family coverage. The state offers a 30-day health benefits expansion program for small-firm employees (in some cases) in connection with the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA, 1986), a health insurance program for those who lose employment-based coverage due to termination or reduction of work hours.

In 2003, there were over 2.4 million auto insurance policies in effect for private passenger cars. Required minimum coverage includes bodily injury liability of up to $25,000 per individual and $50,000 for all persons injured in an accident, as well as property damage liability of $25,000. In 2003, the average expenditure per vehicle for insurance coverage was $688.64.

SECURITIES

There are no stock or commodity exchanges in Oklahoma. In 2005, there were 560 personal financial advisers employed in the state and 1,320 securities, commodities, and financial services sales agents. In 2004, there were over 75 publicly traded companies within the state, with over 20 NASDAQ companies, 15 NYSE listings, and 5 AMEX listings. In 2006, the state had six Fortune 500 companies; ONEOK ranked first in the state and 176th in the nation with revenues of over $12.8 billion, followed by Williams (energy), Devon Energy, Kerr-McGee, OGE Energy, and Chesa-

OklahomaState Government Finances
(Dollar amounts in thousands. Per capita amounts in dollars.)
AMOUNT PER CAPITA
Abbreviations and symbols:zero or rounds to zero; (NA) not available; (X) not applicable.
source: U.S. Census Bureau, Governments Division, 2004 Survey of State Government Finances, January 2006.
Total Revenue 17,520,326 4,971.72
  General revenue 13,700,103 3,887.66
    Intergovernmental revenue 4,565,639 1,295.58
    Taxes 6,426,713 1,823.70
      General sales 1,594,246 452.40
      Selective sales 744,782 211.35
      License taxes 840,421 238.48
      Individual income tax 2,319,123 658.09
      Corporate income tax 133,309 37.83
      Other taxes 794,832 255.55
    Current charges 1,686,097 478.46
    Miscellaneous general revenue 1,021,654 289.91
  Utility revenue 353,290 100.25
  Liquor store revenue - -
  Insurance trust revenue 3,466,933 983.81
Total expenditure 14,914,919 4,232.38
  Intergovernmental expenditure 3,715,417 1,054.32
  Direct expenditure 11,199,502 3,187.07
    Current operation 8,241,628 2,338.71
    Capital outlay 864,752 245.39
    Insurance benefits and repayments 1,531,825 434.68
    Assistance and subsidies 204,201 57.95
    Interest on debt 357,096 101.33
Exhibit: Salaries and wages 2,183,778 619.69
Total expenditure 14,914,919 4,232.38
  General expenditure 13,078,274 3,711.20
    Intergovernmental expenditure 3,715,417 1,054.32
    Direct expenditure 9,362,857 2,656.88
  General expenditures, by function:
    Education 5,594,067 1,587.42
    Public welfare 3,535,155 1,003.17
    Hospitals 154,342 43.80
    Health 495,409 140.58
    Highways 1,050,621 298.13
    Police protection 102,790 29.17
    Correction 501,001 142.17
    Natural resources 205,152 58.22
    Parks and recreation 77,230 21.92
    Government administration 571,760 162.25
    Interest on general debt 286,610 81.33
    Other and unallocable 504,137 143.06
  Utility expenditure 304,820 86.50
  Liquor store expenditure - -
  Insurance trust expenditure 1,531,825 434.68
Debt at end of fiscal year 6,930,071 1,966.54
Cash and security holdings 28,273,456 8,023.11

peake Energy. Devon Energy is listed on AMEX; the other listed companies are on the NYSE.

PUBLIC FINANCE

The Oklahoma budget is prepared by the director of state finance and submitted by the governor to the legislature each February. Article 10, section 23 of the Oklahoma Constitution requires a balanced budget. The constitution establishes a "Rainy Day" Fund into which general revenue fund revenues in excess of the certified estimate are deposited for emergency appropriation at a later date. All funds are "appropriated" pursuant to the constitution. In addition, state law authorizes a cash-flow reserve fund that can be up to 10% of the approved budget. The fiscal year (FY) is 1 July through 30 June.

2006 general funds were estimated at $5.6 billion for resources and $5.5 billion for expenditures. In fiscal year 2004, federal government grants to Oklahoma were $5.2 billion.

In the fiscal year 2007 federal budget, Oklahoma was slated to receive:$70.8 million in State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) funds to help the state provide health coverage to low-income, uninsured children who do not qualify for Medicaid. This funding is a 23% increase over fiscal year 2006; and $21.7 million for the HOME Investment Partnership Program to help Oklahoma fund a wide range of activities that build, buy, or rehabilitate affordable housing for rent or homeownership, or provide direct rental assistance to low-income people. This funding is a 12% increase over fiscal year 2006.

TAXATION

In 2005, Oklahoma collected $6,859 million in tax revenues or $1,933 per capita, which placed it 34th among the 50 states in per capita tax burden. The national average was $2,192 per capita. Sales taxes accounted for 24.2% of the total; selective sales taxes, 12.2%; individual income taxes, 36.0%; corporate income taxes, 2.5%; and other taxes, 25.1%.

As of 1 January 2006, Oklahoma had eight individual income tax brackets ranging from 0.5% to 6.25%. The state taxes corporations at a flat rate of 6.0%.

In 2004, local property taxes amounted to $1,637,457,000 or $465 per capita. The per capita amount ranks the state 47th highest nationally. Oklahoma does not collect property taxes at the state level.

Oklahoma taxes retail sales at a rate of 4.50%. In addition to the state tax, local taxes on retail sales can reach as much as 6%, making for a potential total tax on retail sales of 10.50%. Food purchased for consumption off-premises is taxable. The tax on cigarettes is 103 cents per pack, which ranks 18th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Oklahoma taxes gasoline at 17 cents per gallon. This is in addition to the 18.4 cents per gallon federal tax on gasoline.

According to the Tax Foundation, for every federal tax dollar sent to Washington in 2004, Oklahoma citizens received $1.48 in federal spending.

ECONOMIC POLICY

Pro-business measures in Oklahoma include comparatively low property tax rates, limits on annual increases in property tax rates, and requirements that tax increases be submitted to a vote of the people or pass the legislature with a 75% vote.

Business incentives include wage rebates of up to 5% for 10 years for qualifying basic firms that add at least $2.5 million of new payroll in the state over a three-year period. This incentive, known as the Oklahoma Quality Jobs Program, was adopted in 1993. Since that time, more than 130 firms have received in excess of $35 million in incentive payments while adding more than 26,000 jobs to the Oklahoma economy. More than 55,000 jobs were planned to be added as of 2005.

Other incentives include a job tax credit of $1,000 per year for five years for new manufacturing jobs in state enterprise zones; a 30% investment tax credit for investment in qualifying agricultural processing ventures or cooperatives; and free customized training for qualifying firms from the Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education through its Training in Industry Program (TIP). The state has placed emphasis on the Oklahoma Main Street Program, a statewide downtown revitalization program providing training, resources, and technical assistance to 36 targeted Main Street communities. The Oklahoma Main Street Program was first created in late 1985. By 2006, there were 44 communities in the Main Street program.

HEALTH

The infant mortality rate in October 2005 was estimated at 8.2 per 1,000 live births. The birth rate in 2003 was 14.4 per 1,000 population. The abortion rate stood at 10.1 per 1,000 women in 2000. In 2003, about 77.8% of pregnant woman received prenatal care beginning in the first trimester. In 2004, approximately 72% of children received routine immunizations before the age of three.

The crude death rate in 2003 was 10.2 deaths per 1,000 population. As of 2002, the death rates for major causes of death (per 100,000 resident population) were: heart disease, 321.4; cancer, 213.9; cerebrovascular diseases, 69.5; chronic lower respiratory diseases, 56.9; and diabetes, 30.5. Oklahoma had the second-highest heart disease death rate in the country (following West Virginia). The mortality rate from HIV infection was 2.6 per 100,000 population. In 2004, the reported AIDS case rate was at about 5.5 per 100,000 population. In 2002, about 56.2% of the population was considered overweight or obese. As of 2004, about 26% of state residents were smokers, representing the fourth-highest percentage in the country.

In 2003, Oklahoma had 108 community hospitals with about 11,000 beds. There were about 450,000 patient admissions that year and 5.5 million outpatient visits. The average daily inpatient census was about 6,500 patients. The average cost per day for hospital care was $1,777. Also in 2003, there were about 370 certified nursing facilities in the state with 32,733 beds and an overall occupancy rate of about 66.2%. In 2004, it was estimated that about 61.3% of all state residents had received some type of dental care within the year. Oklahoma had 205 physicians per 100,000 resident population in 2004 and 695 nurses per 100,000 in 2005. In 2004, there were a total of 1,728 dentists in the state.

About 19% of state residents were enrolled in Medicaid programs in 2003; 15% were enrolled in Medicare programs in 2004. Approximately 20% of the state population was uninsured in 2004, ranking the state as third in the nation for highest percentage of uninsured residents (following Texas and New Mexico). In 2003, state health care expenditures totaled $3.4 million.

SOCIAL WELFARE

In 2004, about 60,000 people received unemployment benefits, with the average weekly unemployment benefit at $219. For 2005, the estimated average monthly participation in the food stamp program included about 424,402 persons (172,837 households); the average monthly benefit was about $86.32 per person. That year, the total of benefits paid through the state for the food stamp program was about $439.5 million.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the system of federal welfare assistance that officially replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) in 1997, was reauthorized through the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. TANF is funded through federal block grants that are divided among the states based on an equation involving the number of recipients in each state. In 2004, the state TANF program had 34,000 recipients; state and federal expenditures on this TANF program totaled $174 million in fiscal year 2003.

In December 2004, Social Security benefits were paid to 623,160 Oklahoma residents. This number included 381,090 retired workers, 68,000 widows and widowers, 84,630 disabled workers, 36,180 spouses, and 53,260 children. Social Security beneficiaries represented 17.7% of the total state population and 93.1% of the state's population age 65 and older. Retired workers received an average monthly payment of $916; widows and widowers, $869; disabled workers, $880; and spouses, $449. Payments for children of retired workers averaged $477 per month; children of deceased workers, $589; and children of disabled workers, $257. Federal Supplemental Security Income payments in December 2004 went to 77,100 Oklahoma residents, averaging $382 a month. An additional $3.2 million of state-administered supplemental payments were distributed to 76,939 residents.

HOUSING

Indian tepees and settlers' sod houses dotted the Oklahoma plains when the "eighty-niners" swarmed into the territory; old neighborhoods in cities and towns of Oklahoma still retain some of the modest frame houses they built. Oklahomans continue to prefer single-family dwellings, despite a recent trend toward condominiums. Modern underground homes and solar-heated dwellings can be seen in the university towns of Norman and Stillwater.

In 2004, there were an estimated 1,572,756 housing units, of which 1,360,032 were occupied; 68.2% were owner-occupied. About 72.5% of all units were single-family, detached homes. Utility gas and electricity were the most common energy sources for heating. It was estimated that 85,609 units lacked telephone service, 2,351 lacked complete plumbing facilities, and 7,496 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household had 2.51 members.

In 2004, 17,100 new privately owned units were authorized for construction. The median home value was $85,060. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $871. Renters paid a median of $525 per month. In September 2005, the state received grants of $300,000 from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for rural housing and economic development programs. For 2006, HUD allocated to the state over $17.2 million in community development block grants.

EDUCATION

In 2004, 85.2% of Oklahomans 25 years of age or older were high school graduates; during the same year, 22.9% had obtained a bachelor's degree or higher.

The total enrollment for fall 2002 in Oklahoma's public schools stood at 625,000. Of these, 449,000 attended schools from kindergarten through grade eight, and 176,000 attended high school. Approximately 61.5% of the students were white, 10.9% were black, 7.6% were Hispanic, 1.5% were Asian/Pacific Islander, and 18.5% were American Indian/Alaskan Native. Total enrollment was estimated at 615,000 in fall 2003 and expected to be 626,000 by fall 2014, an increase of 0.3% during the period 200214. Expenditures for public education in 2003/04 were estimated at $4.4 billion or $6,176 per student the fourth-lowest among the 50 states. There were 27,603 students enrolled in 168 private schools in fall 2003. Since 1969, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has tested public school students nationwide. The resulting report, The Nation's Report Card, stated that in 2005, eighth graders in Oklahoma scored 271 out of 500 in mathematics, compared with the national average of 278.

As of fall 2002, there were 198,423 students enrolled in college or graduate school; minority students comprised 23.8% of total postsecondary enrollment. In 2005 year Oklahoma had 53 degree-granting institutions including 15 public four-year schools, 14 public two-year schools, and 17 nonprofit, private four-year schools. The comprehensive institutions, the University of Oklahoma (Norman) and Oklahoma State University (Stillwater), also offer major graduate-level programs. Well-known institutions include Oral Roberts University and the University of Tulsa.

ARTS

The Oklahoma Arts Council was founded in 1965. In 2005, the State Arts Council of Oklahoma and other Oklahoma arts organizations received 12 grants totaling $828,700 from the National Endowment for the Arts. The State Arts Council of Oklahoma also received funding from the state and private sources. Among the organizations that typically benefit from federal funding are the Metropolitan Library Commission of Oklahoma Country, the Red Earth Native American Cultural Festival, and the Theater of North Tulsa. The Oklahoma Humanities Council (OHC) was founded in 1971. In 2005, the National Endowment for the Humanities contributed $760,924 for 12 state programs.

Major arts centers are located in Tulsa and Oklahoma City, but there are many arts and crafts museums throughout the state. Oklahoma City's leading cultural institution is the Oklahoma City Philharmonic, formed in 1924. The Tulsa Philharmonic, Tulsa Ballet Theater, and Tulsa Opera all appear at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, a municipally owned and operated facility. As of 2005, this six-level center consisted of the 2,365-seat Chapman Music Hall, the 437-seat John H. Williams Theater, and two multilevel experimental theaters (the Liddy Doenges Theater and Charles E. Norman Theater).

There are five other ballet companies located in Oklahoma City, Bartlesville, Clinton, Lawton, and Norman. The intermingling of Native American, American West, and Euro-American art traditions infuses all aspects of Oklahoma culture. Native American contributions to the arts include achievements in art and sculpture, as well as the international acclaim accorded to ballerinas Maria and Marjorie Tallchief, Rosella Hightower, and Moscelyne Larkin.

The Oklahoma City Museum of Art was noted for serving over 130,000 visitors annually as of 2005. The museum's permanent collection covers five centuries, emphasizing the 19th and 20th centuries.

Bartlesville is home to a symphony orchestra, a show choir, a civic ballet, and a theater guild. It is also the host of the annual OK Mozart International Festival, established in 1985, which features the Solisti New York Orchestra and attracts world-class guest artists. In 2006, the festival celebrated its 22nd season and Mozart's 250th birthday.

LIBRARIES AND MUSEUMS

In June 2001, Oklahoma had 115 public library systems, with a total of 210 libraries, of which 95 were branches. In that same year, the public library system had 6,316,000 volumes of books and serial publications on its shelves, and a total circulation of 15,354,000. The system also had 174,000 audio and 151,000 video items, 6,000 electronic format items (CD-ROMs, magnetic tapes, and disks), and five bookmobiles. The Five Civilized Tribes Museum Library in Muskogee has a large collection of Indian documents and art, while the Cherokee archives are held at the Cherokee National Historical Society in Tahlequah. The Morris Swett Library at Ft. Sill has a special collection on military history, particularly field artillery. The Oklahoma Department of Libraries in Oklahoma City has holdings covering law, library science, Oklahoma history, and other fields. Large academic libraries include those of the University of Oklahoma (Norman), with 3,642,653 volumes and 10,496 periodical subscriptions in 1998, and Oklahoma State University Library (Stillwater), with 2,025,168. In fiscal year 2001, operating income for the state's public library system totaled $63,440,000 and included $313,000 in federal grants and $1,792,000 in state grants.

Oklahoma has 113 museums and historic sites. The Philbrook Art Center in Tulsa houses important collections of Indian, Renaissance, and Oriental art. Also in Tulsa are the Thomas Gil-crease Institute of American History and Art. Major museums in Norman are the University of Oklahoma's Museum of Art and the Stovall Museum of Science and Industry. The Oklahoma Art Center, National Cowboy Hall of Fame and Western Heritage Center, Oklahoma Heritage Association, Oklahoma Historical Society Museum, Oklahoma Museum of Art, State Museum of Oklahoma, and the Omniplex Science Museum are major attractions in Oklahoma City. Other museums of special interest include the Museum of the Great Plains in Lawton, the Will Rogers Memorial in Claremore, Cherokee National Museum in Tahlequah, and the Woolaroc Museum in Bartlesville.

COMMUNICATIONS

The Butterfield Stage and Overland Mail delivered the mail to Millerton on 18 September 1858 as part of the first US transcontinental postal route. After the Civil War, the early railroads delivered mail and parcels to the Oklahoma and Indian territories.

In 2004, 91.0% of Oklahoma's occupied housing units had telephones. Additionally, by June of that same year there were 1,724,505 mobile wireless telephone subscribers. In 2003, 55.4% of Oklahoma households had a computer and 48.4% had Internet access. By June 2005, there were 449,631 high-speed lines in Oklahoma, 409,046 residential and 40,585 for business. In 2005, Oklahoma had 25 major AM and 64 major FM radio stations, and 19 major television channels. Oklahoma City had 600,240 television households, 63% of which received cable in 1999. A total of 44,743 Internet domain names were registered in the state in 2000.

PRESS

In 2005, Oklahoma had 13 morning dailies, 29 evening dailies, and 34 Sunday newspapers. In 2004, the Oklahoman ranked 50th in the United States according to circulation among the top 100 daily newspapers, and the Tulsa World ranking 82nd.

Leading dailies and their approximate circulation in 2005 were as follows:

AREA NAME DAILY SUNDAY
Oklahoma City Oklahoman (m,S) 250,496 288,948
Tulsa Tulsa World (m,S) 158,965 198,477

As of 2005 there were 143 newspapers that appeared weekly or up to three times a week; most had circulations of less than 10,000 copies.

Tulsa and Oklahoma City each have monthly city-interest publications and the University of Oklahoma has a highly active university press.

ORGANIZATIONS

In 2006, there were over 2,810 nonprofit organizations registered within the state, of which about 2,000 were registered as charitable, educational, or religious organizations. Among the organizations headquartered in Oklahoma are the Football Writers Association of America, the International Professional Rodeo Association, the National Judges Association, the National Pigeon Association and the American Racing Pigeon Union, the Amateur Softball Association of America, the International Softball Federation, the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, the Gas Processors Association, and the US Jaycees.

Organizations focusing on the arts include the American Choral Directors Association and Sweet Adelines International. Historical and cultural organizations include the Cherokee National Historical Society, the Institute of the Great Plains, and the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. Organizations dedicated to the rights and welfare of Native Americans include the American Indian Institute, American Indian Research and Development, and the Institute for the Development of Indian Law.

TOURISM, TRAVEL, AND RECREATION

Tourism has become a growing sector of Oklahoma's economy. Domestic travelers spent $3.9 billion on overnight and day trips in 2002, a 5.2% increase over 1999. The travel industry employed over 69,200 people in the same year. Oklahoma and Tulsa received the most visitors.

Oklahoma's 50 state parks and recreational areas draw some 16 million visitors annually. The national park service maintains one facility in Oklahoma-Chickasaw National Recreation Area, centering on artificial Lake Arbuckle.

The state also maintains and operates the American Indian Hall of Fame, in Anadarko; Black Kettle Museum, in Cheyenne; the T. B. Ferguson Home in Watonga; the Murrell Home, south of Tahlequah; the Pawnee Bill Museum, in Pawnee; the Pioneer Woman Statue and Museum, in Ponca City; the Chisholm Trail Museum, in Kingfisher; and the Western Trails Museum, in Clinton.

National wildlife refuges include Optima, Salt Plains, Sequoyah, Tishomingo, Washita, and Wichita Mountains; they have a combined area of 140,696 acres (56,938 hectares). The Great Salt Plains National Park extends over 14 counties. Fort Sill, in Lawton, is the army's principal artillery school. Oklahoma is also the winter quarters for many traveling circuses. Many Indian tribes were forcibly relocated to Oklahoma on a march which became known as the Trail of Tears. There are 39 tribes still located in Oklahoma.

SPORTS

Oklahoma has no major professional sports teams. The Triple-A baseball Red Hawks play in Oklahoma City, and the Tulsa Drillers play in the Double-A Texas League. Collegiate sports, however, is the primary source of pride for Oklahomans. As of 2003, the University of Oklahoma Sooners had won seven national football titles. They won the Orange Bowl in 1954, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1968, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1986, 1987, and 2001. They have also produced championships in wrestling, baseball, softball, and gymnastics. Recently, the Sooners have had a resurgence in basketball. The Oklahoma State University Cowboys have captured National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and Big Eight titles in basketball, baseball, and golf, and are a perennial national contender in wrestling.

Oklahoma City hosts the rodeo at the Oklahoma state fair every September and October. In golf, Tulsa has been the site of several US Open tournaments. The Softball Hall of Fame is in Oklahoma City.

Jim Thorpe, possibly the greatest athlete of all time, was born in Oklahoma, as were baseball greats Mickey Mantle and Johnny Bench.

FAMOUS OKLAHOMANS

Carl Albert (19082000), a McAlester native, has held the highest public position of any Oklahoman. Elected to the US House of Representatives in 1947, he became majority leader in 1962 and served as speaker of the House from 1971 until his retirement in 1976. Patrick Jay Hurley (18831963), the first Oklahoman appointed to a cabinet post, was secretary of war under Herbert Hoover and later ambassador to China.

William "Alfalfa Bill" Murray (b.Texas, 18691956) was president of the state constitutional convention and served as governor from 1931 to 1935. Robert S. Kerr (18961963), founder of Kerr-McGee Oil, was the state's first native-born governor, serving from 1943 to 1947; elected to the US Senate in 1948, he became an influential Democratic leader. A(lmer) S(tillwell) Mike Monroney (190280) served as US representative from 1939 to 1951 and senator from 1951 to 1969.

Oklahomans have been prominent in literature and the arts. Journalist and historian Marquis James (b.Missouri, 18911955) won a Pulitzer Prize in 1930 for his biography of Sam Houston and another in 1938 for Andrew Jackson; John Berryman (191472) won the 1965 Pulitzer Prize in poetry for 77 Dream Songs, 1964; and Ralph Ellison (191494) won the 1953 National Book Award for his novel Invisible Man. The popular musical Oklahoma! by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II is based on Green Grow the Lilacs by Oklahoman Lynn Riggs (18991954). N(avarre) Scott Momaday (b.1934), born in Lawton, received a Pulitzer Prize in 1969 for House Made of Dawn. Woodrow Crumbo (191289) and Allen Houser (191494) are prominent Indian artists born in the state.

Just about the best-known Oklahoman was William Penn Adair "Will" Rogers (18791935), the beloved humorist and writer who spread cheer in the dreary days of the Depression. Part Cherokee, Rogers was a horse rider, trick roper, and stage and movie star until he was killed in a plane crash in Alaska. Among his gifts to the American language are the oft-quoted expressions "I never met a man I didn't like" and "All I know is what I read in the newspapers." Other prominent performing artists include singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie (191267), composer of "This Land Is Your Land," among other classics; ballerina Maria Tallchief (b.1925); popular singer Patti Page (b.1927); and operatic soprano Roberta Knie (b.1938). Famous Oklahoma actors include (Francis) Van Heflin (191071), Ben Johnson (191896), Jennifer Jones (b.1919), Tony Randall (19202004), James Garner (James Baumgardner, b.1928), and Cleavon Little (193992). Paul Harvey (b.1918) is a widely syndicated radio commentator. James Francis "Jim" Thorpe (18881953) became known as the "world's greatest athlete" after his pentathlon and decathlon performances at the 1912 Olympic Games; of Indian ancestry, Thorpe also starred in baseball, football, and other sports. Bud Wilkinson (b.Minnesota, 191694) coached the University of Oklahoma football team to a record 47-game unbeaten streak in the 1950s. Baseball stars Paul Warner (190365) and his brother Lloyd (190682), Mickey Mantle (193195), Wilver Dornel "Willie" Stargell (19412001), and Johnny Bench (b.1947) are native Oklahomans.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Brophy, Alfred L. Reconstructing the Dreamland: The Tulsa Riot of 1921: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.

Council of State Governments. The Book of the States, 2006 Edition. Lexington, Ky.: Council of State Governments, 2006.

Hamill, James F. Going Indian. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2006.

Harris, LaDonna. LaDonna Harris: A Comanche Life. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2000.

Mobil Travel Guide. Great Plains 2006: Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma. Lincolnwood, Ill.: ExxonMobil Travel Publications, 2006.

Preston, Thomas. Great Plains: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Vol. 4 in The Double Eagle Guide to 1,000 Great Western Recreation Destinations. Billings, Mont.: Discovery Publications, 2003.

Rees, Amanda (ed.). The Great Plains Region. Vol. 1 in The Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Regional Cultures. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2004.

Stein, Howard F., and Robert F. Hill (eds.). The Culture of Oklahoma. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1993.

Sullivan, Lynn M. Adventure Guide to Oklahoma. Edison, N.J.: Hunter Publishing, 1999.

US Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, US Census Bureau. Oklahoma, 2000. Summary Social, Economic, and Housing Characteristics: 2000 Census of Population and Housing. Washington, D.C.: US Government Printing Office, 2003.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." Worldmark Encyclopedia of the States. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." Worldmark Encyclopedia of the States. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/international/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." Worldmark Encyclopedia of the States. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/international/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA. Few states can boast a motto more appropriate to its history than that of Oklahoma: Labor Omnia Vincit (Labor Conquers All Things). Situated in the southern midsection of the United States, the land has provided the environment for development by diverse inhabitants since before its discovery by Europeans in the sixteenth century. A diagonal line drawn across the panshaped state from northeast to southwest highlights the difference in geographic regions. The rolling hills of the south and east contain the Ouachita, Arbuckle, Wichita, and Kiamichi Mountains, with forests, substantial rainfall, and diversified agriculture. The drier prairie and plains of the higher elevations in the north and west support wheat production and livestock. Mammoth bones and Clovis culture spearheads uncovered near Anadarko, Oklahoma, predate the more sophisticated artifacts left in ceremonial burial sites by the Mound Builders, who established communities near Spiro, Oklahoma, in the thirteenth century. By the time of European contact, Caddo, Osage, Kiowa, Apache, and Comanche groups traversed the area.

The explorations of Francisco Vásquez de Coronado and Hernando De Soto in 1541 established a Spanish claim to the vast expanse of Louisiana Territory, including what would become Oklahoma. France challenged Spain's control of the region based on the Mississippi River explorations of René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, in 1682. The territory changed hands between these two colonial powers until the United States purchased it from

France in 1803. American exploration began almost immediately. Lieutenant James B. Wilkinson secured an alliance for the U.S. government with the Osage Indians and in 1805 to 1806 reported on the navigability of the Arkansas River through northeastern Oklahoma. The government trader George C. Sibley provided the first written description of the northwestern part of the state available to the American public, and promoted interest in the Oklahoma salt plains during his survey of the Santa Fe Trail in 1825 to 1826. The naturalist Thomas Nuttall and Major Stephen H. Long both reported unfavorably on the fertility of the region in similar journeys through the area in 1819 to 1820. Long's official army report labeled the Great Plains as a "Great American Desert," but provided a more comprehensive report of plant and animal life and a more accurate map than any available before. It also delineated the more productive lands in eastern Oklahoma.

Early Conflicts

From 1817 until 1842, the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Seminole, and Creek Indians of the southeastern states faced increasing pressure by federal and state governments to voluntarily exchange their homelands for new tracts in Indian Territory encompassing all of present-day Oklahoma. Violence erupted both within the Indian groups over the issue of land cessions and between the Indians and white intruders. The Cherokee elite, led by Chief John Ross, with the aid of the missionary Samuel Austin Worcester fought removal through the U.S. court system. These actions resulted in two Supreme Court cases with decisions written by Chief Justice John Marshall: The Cherokee Nation v. Georgia (1831) and Worcester v. Georgia (1832). The latter case upheld the rights of the Cherokee Nation against the state of Georgia. The Indian Removal Act of 1830, however, gave President Andrew Jackson the authority to forcefully move the remaining Indian groups westward. The experiences of the Indians as they were marched overland horrified onlookers. Exposure, starvation, exhaustion, and disease caused a death toll estimated at one-fourth of their populations. For the Cherokees, these hardships became known as the "Trail of Tears."

Upon arrival in Indian Territory, the Five Tribes recreated themselves into autonomous nations. This period before 1860 has been called the "golden age" in Indian Territory. They formed governments patterned after the U.S. model with executive, legislative, and judicial branches. The Choctaws maintained their law enforcement unit, the Lighthorsemen. The Indians established public school systems for their children and invited American missionaries to build mission stations on their lands. The Cherokee, Choctaw, and Chickasaw nations operated male and female higher education institutions for their youth after 1845 that rivaled educational academies in most states at that time. The Cherokee Sequoyah developed an eighty-six-letter syllabary of the Cherokee language, which allowed the rapid achievement of literacy for the nation and enabled the publication of their newspaper, The Cherokee Phoenix, in English and Cherokee. Holding their national land domains in common, Indians built successful stock farms, small service businesses, and cotton plantations. Some, like Robert Love and Joseph Vann, attained considerable wealth. Before removal, many of the Indian–white intermarried elite had adopted the cultural lifestyles of planters in the southern states. They owned slaves, who worked their lands in a variety of labor relationships. These slaves accompanied their Indian masters on the removal journey to Indian Territory and helped to rebuild the comfortable homes and farms of the elite. Prior to the Civil War (1861–1865), approximately10,000 slaves resided among the Indian people.

The Civil War

The Civil War created the same divisions over slavery and sectional loyalties in Indian Territory as in the adjoining states. The Confederacy sent Commissioner Albert Pike to secure treaties of alliance with the governments of all of the Five Nations in 1861. The Choctaws, Chickasaws, and Cherokees immediately formed mounted rifle regiments. Factions favoring neutrality joined the Creek Chief Opothleyaholo as he led a retreat into Kansas under attack from Confederate Indian forces. The Confederate Cherokee Colonel Stand Watie led his regiment to victory at the Battle of Pea Ridge in Arkansas in 1862. The most significant battle in Indian Territory took place in 1863 when Union troops, loyal Indians, and African American soldiers defeated the Confederate Indian forces at Honey Springs. This allowed the Union to control Fort Gibson and the Texas Road into Indian Territory. Stand Watie continued an effective guerilla campaign against Union supply lines in Indian Territory for the remainder of the war. Promoted to Brigadier General, Watie was the last Confederate general to surrender in 1865.

The Civil War battles, destruction of property, lawless pillaging, and foraging for supplies devastated Indian Territory. More than 10,000 died from wounds, exposure, and disease. Indian and black refugees in Kansas and Texas returned to find their homes, schools, and churches vandalized or destroyed. Fields were burned, fences were torn down, and thousands of livestock were stolen. The Indian governments were in disarray, and the federal government now held them accountable for their alliance with the Confederacy. Reconstruction treaties with each of the Five Nations in 1865 to 1866 exacted a high price that would eventually lead to the dissolution of Indian Territory. The government ordered the Indian nations to abolish slavery and to incorporate the Indian freedmen into their respective nations as citizens. The agreements also included acceptance of sizable land reductions, a railroad right-of-way through Indian Territory, and a future unified government for Indian Territory. The Choctaw leader Allen Wright suggested the Choctaw word Oklahoma, meaning "the land of the red people," for the name of the new territory.

The federal government used the large tracts of land in the western half of the territory taken from the Five Nations to create reservations for a variety of Plains Indian groups. Approximately 30,000 Plains Indians were militarily disarmed, stripped of their leaders and horse herds, and forcefully confined to lands designated for them. African American military units, the Ninth and Tenth Cavalries, commanded by Benjamin Grierson, earned the respect of the Plains Indians, who gave them the name "Buffalo Soldiers." These units built Fort Sill (Lawton, Oklahoma) and policed the boundaries of the Indian lands. Conditions on the reservations deteriorated when Congress decreased appropriations and failed to honor treaty obligations made to the Plains people. Out of desperation, raiding parties left the reservation lands. Frequent skirmishes, known as the Red River War, between the military and the Indians occurred in 1874 to 1875. The most violent encounter actually occurred some years before, in 1868 near Washita in western Oklahoma. There, General George A. Custer led an attack that resulted in the deaths of the peaceful Cheyenne Chief Black Kettle, a village of approximately one hundred men, women, and children, and several hundred ponies. The Apache leader Geronimo surrendered in 1886 and remained a prisoner of war at Fort Sill until his death. One by one, the Plains Indian groups settled on their lands. By statehood, Oklahoma had become the home of sixty-seven different Indian groups.

The Reconstruction treaty alterations in the sovereignty status of the Five Nations opened the territory for exploitation. The demand for beef on Indian reservations and in eastern cities led Texas ranchers to drive herds of cattle along the East and the West Shawnee Trails and the Chisholm Trail (near present Interstate Highway 35) through Indian Territory to Kansas railheads. African Americans fleeing the South joined white citizens illegally invading the territory to take advantage of the rich farmlands. Coal deposits in the Choctaw lands created a demand for workers with mining experience. White inter-married businessmen, such as J. J. McAlester, recruited immigrants from European countries in order to develop the mineral assets. The Missouri, Kansas and Texas, Friscoe, Rock Island, and Santa Fe Railroads hired construction crews to build lines that crisscrossed the territory connecting small communities. After the turn of the century, the discovery of substantial oil deposits created instant boomtowns. Large-scale producers, such as the Glen Pool wells, increased Indian Territory production between 1904 and 1907 from one million to approximately forty-five million barrels a year. This economic development acquainted thousands of non-Indians with the potential value of these Indian lands.

Not all immigrants to Indian Territory were lawabiding citizens. The closest district court administered law enforcement for Indian Territory from Fort Smith, Arkansas, through Judge Isaac C. Parker, known as the "Hanging Judge." The territory became a haven for drifters, con men, whiskey peddlers, and hardened criminals such as the Doolin Gang, the Daltons, Jesse James, the Younger clan, Ned Christie, and the most famous female outlaw, Belle Starr. The large area of land, rough terrain, and Indian–white confrontations made maintaining order and tracking criminals more difficult for the marshals, including Bill Tilghman, Heck Thomas, and the African American Bass Reeves, who served more than thirty years in Indian Territory.

Changes in Oklahoma

Interest group pressure increased in the 1870s through the 1880s for the opening of sizable tracts of land in Indian Territory that had not been specifically assigned to Indian groups. Charles C. Carpenter, David Payne, and William L. Couch led expeditions of homesteaders called "boomers" into the Indian lands to establish colonies, defy government regulations, and open the lands to white settlement. Congress attached the Springer Amendment to the Indian Appropriations Bill in 1889 providing for the opening of the Unassigned Lands. President Benjamin Harrison issued a proclamation that declared the lands available for settlement on 22 April 1889. On that date, approximately 50,000 people participated in the land run to secure quarter sections. Some home seekers sneaked onto the lands illegally prior to the opening and became known as "Sooners." The 1887 Dawes Act (or General Allotment Act) provided for the abolition of tribal governments, the survey of Indian lands, and the division of reservation land into 160-acre homesteads. Between 1891 and 1895, there were four more land runs for additional areas that were added to Oklahoma Territory, which had been created on 2 May 1890. Land run disputes proved so difficult that the last western lands were added by lottery and sealed auction bids. The area controlled by the Five Nations was originally exempt, and for seventeen years the twin territories, Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory, existed side by side. But the Curtis Act of 1898 ended the independence of the Five Nations, and in spite of rigorous opposition, they, too, were forced to enroll for allotments.

Economic development and increased population led to demands for statehood. The combined population of the twin territories around 1900 approached 750,000. African American promoters, among them E. P. McCabe, recruited black migrants from the South to establish all-black communities, such as Boley, Langston, and Clearview, where freedom from race discrimination and economic uplift could be enjoyed. Approximately twenty-seven such all-black towns developed in the twin territories, leading to the speculation that Oklahoma might be made into a state exclusively for African Americans. The Indian population in Indian Territory, now outnumbered four to one by whites, hoped for the creation of two states, while the white population lobbied for a combination of the territories into a single state. Between 1889 and 1906, Congress entertained thirty-one bills for either single or joint statehood. Congress rejected an Indian state to be called Sequoyah in 1905, and President Theodore Roosevelt signed the Oklahoma Enabling Act creating one state in 1906. A constitutional convention dominated by delegates from the Democratic Party met in Guthrie in 1906 to 1907 to complete a constitution. A coalition of reformers and business and agricultural interests led by William Murray, Pete Hanraty, Charles Haskell, and Kate Barnard produced a 250,000-word document that included major Progressive Era protective measures. On 16 November 1907, Roosevelt signed the proclamation bringing Oklahoma into the union as the forty-sixth state. Oklahoma comprises seventy-seven counties with a land area of 68,667 square miles. The capitol at Guthrie was relocated to Oklahoma City after a vote of the electorate in 1910.

As the territorial days waned, popular interest in the "old Wild West" increased across the nation. Three famous Wild West shows originated in Oklahoma and provided working experience for future Hollywood and rodeo cowboy stars. Zach Mulhall created a show from his ranch near Guthrie that toured from 1900 through 1915 showcasing the talents of his daughter, Lucille. President Theodore Roosevelt invited Lucille to ride in his inaugural parade, and her performances across the United States led to what is believed to be the first use of the word "cowgirl." Mulhall's show included a young trick roper from Claremore, Oklahoma, named Will Rogers, who became Oklahoma's favorite son and a nationally celebrated performer, comedian, and political commentator in the 1920s and 1930s. Gordon "Pawnee Bill" Lillie featured his wife, May Lillie, in his show, and the Miller Brothers' 101 Ranch near Ponca City, Oklahoma, produced a popular show that toured until the Great Depression. Famous cowboys from Oklahoma included Bill Pickett, Tom Mix, and Gene Autry. Informal local rodeo competitions testing a variety of cowboy skills developed into more than one hundred rodeos yearly in Oklahoma involving events at the high school, the intercollegiate, and the professional levels.

Republican Party appointees dominated territorial politics in Oklahoma, with only a single Democratic governor, William C. Renfrow (1893–1897). The opposite has been true since statehood. Only three Republicans have been elected governor of the state. The first, Henry Bellmon, served from 1963 to 1967 and again from 1987 to 1991. Oklahoma politics since the 1950s, however, has followed a pattern of Democrat leadership in the state, but support for Republican national presidential candidates. Lyndon Johnson, in 1964, was the only Democrat to win Oklahoma's presidential vote in the last third of the twentieth century. From 1968 through the end of the twentieth century, a majority of U.S. Senate seats also went to the Republicans. Following the reports from the year 2000 census, Oklahoma dropped from six seats in the House of Representatives to five. A dome and a statue of a Native American titled "The Guardian" for the capitol building were completed in 2002. The dome had been planned for the state capitol building, originally completed in 1917, but had been abandoned because of financial commitments during World War I (1914–1918).

Oklahoma's economic development most often followed cycles of boom and bust. The state benefited from the national demands for increased production of oil and agricultural products during World War I, but the 1920s and 1930s proved to be economically and politically challenging. Two governors in the 1920s, John Walton and Henry Johnston, were impeached and removed from office. Longstanding racial tensions erupted into a race riot in Tulsa in 1921 that left the African American section of the city a burned ruin and hundreds dead or missing. Ku Klux Klan activity and smoldering Oklahoma Socialist Party discontent underscored worsening economic conditions. By the 1930s, the majority of Oklahoma farms were operated by tenant farmers, and western Oklahoma experienced the devastation of the dust bowl. The state treasury had a $5 million deficit, the oil market was depressed, and mass unemployment, bank failures, and fore-closures threatened the state. Thousands of impoverished Oklahomans, referred to negatively as "Okies," joined migrants from other states making their way west in search of work. The census reported a decline in the state population between 1930 and 1940 by approximately 60,000.

Boom and bust continued to mark the state's economic progress through the 1980s. World War II (1939–1945) demands for petroleum, coal, food, and cotton, as well as substantial government spending for military installations, brought a return of prosperity to the state. Following the war, Oklahoma ranked fourth in the nation in the production of petroleum and natural gas, and continued to rely on this industry and cattle and agriculture for economic growth. The Arab oil embargo and grain sales to the Soviet Union in the 1970s pushed per capita income to national levels. The 1980s produced a massive readjustment as oil prices plummeted from a high of $42 per barrel to just over $10. Wheat prices declined dramatically as well. This major downturn in primary business investments affected every sector of the state's economy and led to a determined effort to diversify economic activities through recruitment of manufacturing and technology. Trade, services, public administration, and manufacturing top the list as largest employers in the state. Cooperative planning efforts between state government and Oklahoma's forty-three colleges and universities led to innovations such as the National Weather Center. State per capita personal income increased 46 percent from 1990 to 2000.

Oklahoma, its history, and its people gained renewed national interest following the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on 19 April 1995 by Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols. A national memorial now stands at the site of the tragedy, which killed 168 people. The state's population grew by 9.7 percent between 1990 and 2000 to reach 3,450,654. In 2000 Oklahoma had a larger Native American population, 273,230, than any other state in the union. The Hispanic population was the fastest growing group in the state, more than doubling in size from 86,160 in 1990 to 179,304 in 2000. Since 1950, more Oklahomans have lived in the cities than in rural areas. At the beginning of the twenty-first century Oklahoma City (506,132) ranked first in size, followed by Tulsa (393,049) and Norman (95,694).

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Baird, W. David, and Danney Goble. The Story of Oklahoma. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1994.

Gibson, Arrell Morgan. Oklahoma, A History of Five Centuries. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1965.

Joyce, Davis D., ed. An Oklahoma I Had Never Seen Before: Alternative Views of Oklahoma History. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1994.

Morgan, David R., Robert E. England, and George G. Humphreys. Oklahoma Politics and Policies: Governing the Sooner State. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1991.

Reese, Linda Williams. Women of Oklahoma, 1890–1920. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997.

Stein, Howard F., and Robert F. Hill, eds. The Culture of Oklahoma. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1993.

Thompson, John. Closing the Frontier: Radical Response in Oklahoma, 1889–1923. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1986.

Wickett, Murray R. Contested Territory: Whites, Native Americans and African Americans in Oklahoma, 1865–1907. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2000.

Linda W.Reese

See alsoChisholm Trail ; Dust Bowl ; Indian Policy, U.S.: 1830–1900 ; Indian Policy, U.S.: 1900–2000 ; Sequoyah, Proposed State of ; Tulsa .

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." Dictionary of American History. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." Dictionary of American History. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." Dictionary of American History. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma (ōkləhō´mə), state in SW United States. It is bordered by Missouri and Arkansas (E); Texas, partially across the Red River (S, W); New Mexico, across the narrow edge of the Oklahoma Panhandle (W); and Colorado and Kansas (N).

Facts and Figures

Area, 69,919 sq mi (181,090 sq km). Pop. (2010) 3,751,351, an 8.7% increase since the 2000 census. Capital and largest city, Oklahoma City. Statehood, Nov. 16, 1907 (46th state). Highest pt., Black Mesa, 4,973 ft (1,517 m); lowest pt., Little River, 287 ft (88 m). Nickname, Sooner State. Motto,Labor Omnia Vincit [Labor Conquers All Things]. State bird, scissor-tailed flycatcher. State flower, mistletoe. State tree, redbud. Abbr., Okla.; OK

Geography

The high, short-grass plains of W Oklahoma are part of the Great Plains, which are chilled by north winds in the winter and baked by intense heat in the summer. There are extensive grazing lands and wheat fields. The plains are broken here and there, notably by Black Mesa in the Panhandle and by the Wichita Mts. in the southwest, but the general slope is downward to the east, and central and E Oklahoma is mostly prairie, rising in the northeast to the Ozark Mts. and in the southeast to the Ouachita Mts.

The rivers that flow from west to east across the state—the Arkansas and its tributaries, the Cimarron, and the Canadian (with the North Canadian) in the north, the Red River with the Washita and other tributaries in the south—are much more prominent in the east. Chickasaw National Recreation Area is in S Oklahoma. Oklahoma City is the capital, and the other large city is Tulsa.

Economy

Cotton, formerly the leading cash crop of Oklahoma, has been succeeded by wheat; income from livestock, however, exceeds that from crops. Many minerals are found in Oklahoma, including coal, but the one that gave the state its wealth is oil. After the first well was drilled in 1888, the petroleum industry grew enormously, until Oklahoma City and Tulsa were among the great natural gas and petroleum centers of the world. Oil and gas have declined somewhat in importance today. Many of Oklahoma's factories process local foods and minerals, but its chief manufactures include nonelectrical machinery and fabricated metal products. Military bases and other government facilities are also important.

Government and Higher Education

The original 1907 constitution is still in effect. Oklahoma has a legislature of 48 senators and 101 representatives. The governor is elected for a four-year term. The state elects two U.S. senators and five representatives and has seven electoral votes. In 1994, Republican Frank Keating won the governorship; he was reelected in 1998. Democrat Brad Henry narrowly won the office in the 2002 election and retained it in 2006. Mary Fallin, a Republican, was elected to the post in 2010 and 2014; she was the first woman to win the governorship.

Among institutions of higher learning in the state are Oklahoma State Univ., at Stillwater; the Univ. of Oklahoma, at Norman and Oklahoma City; and the Univ. of Tulsa and Oral Roberts Univ., at Tulsa.

History

The Native American Heritage

Oklahoma's Native American population is the largest in the nation—252,420 at the 1990 census. Several indigenous cultures existed in the area before the first European visited in 1541. Francisco Coronado almost certainly crossed Oklahoma in that year, and Hernando De Soto may have visited E Oklahoma. Later Juan de Oñate passed through W Oklahoma, and some other Spanish explorers and traders and French traders from Louisiana visited the region, but there was no development of the area.

Tribes of the Plains cultures—Osage, Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache—dominated the west; the Wichita and other relatively sedentary tribes lived farther east. It is asserted that the first European trading post was established at Salina by the Chouteau family of St. Louis before the territory was transferred to the United States by the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, but the land remained in control of the sparse and nomadic native population. For the most part only traders, official explorers (notably Stephen H. Long), and scientific and curious travelers (among them Washington Irving and George Catlin) came into the present-day state.

Indian Territory

In 1819 the Adams-Onís Treaty with Spain defined Oklahoma as the southwestern boundary of the United States. After the War of 1812 the U.S. government invited the Cherokee of Georgia and Tennessee to move into the area, and a few had come to settle. Soon intense white pressure for their lands, with the approval of President Andrew Jackson, forced the Cherokee and the others of the Five Civilized Tribes (the Choctaw, the Chickasaw, the Creek, and the Seminole) to abandon their old homes east of the Mississippi and to take up residence in what was to become the Indian Territory. Their tragic removal is known as the Trail of Tears. They settled on the hills and little prairies of the eastern section and built separate organized states and communities.

The Cherokee particularly had a highly Europeanized culture, with a written language, invented by their great leader Sequoyah, and highly developed institutions. Some of the Cherokee were slaveholders and ran their agricultural properties in the traditional Southern plantation pattern; others were small farmers. The Five Civilized Tribes clashed briefly with the Plains Indians, particularly the Osage, but they were for a time free from white interference, and they were able to establish a civilization that strongly affected the whole history of the region.

The troubles of the whites did not, however, long escape them, and the Civil War was a major disaster. Although no major battle of the war was fought in present-day Oklahoma, there were numerous skirmishes. Most Native Americans allied themselves with the Confederacy, but Unionist disaffection was widespread, and individual violence was so prevalent that many fled, leaving their farms to desolation.

As a punishment for taking the Confederate side the Five Civilized Tribes lost the western part of the Indian Territory, and the federal government began assigning lands there to such landless eastern tribes as the Delaware and the Shawnee, as well as to nomadic Plains tribes, who put up strong resistance before they were subdued and settled on reservations. The territory was plagued by lawlessness and served as a hideout for white outlaws. After the establishment of a federal court at Fort Smith, Isaac Parker became famous as the "hanging judge."

Cattle, Railroads, and Boomers

Immediately after the Civil War the long drives of cattle from Texas to the Kansas railroad head began to cross Oklahoma, traveling over the cattle trails that became part of Western folklore. The best known was the Chisholm Trail. The cattle were fattened on the virgin ranges of Oklahoma, and cattlemen began to look on the grasslands with speculative and covetous eyes.

The first railroad to cross Oklahoma was built between 1870 and 1872, and thereafter it was not possible to keep white settlers out. They came despite proscriptive laws and treaties with the Native Americans, and by the 1880s there was a strong admixture of whites. In addition, ranches were developed that were nominally owned by Native Americans, but actually controlled by white cattlemen and their cowboys. The region quickly took on a tinge of the Old West of the cattle frontier, a tinge that it has never wholly lost.

In the 1880s land-hungry frontier farmers, the boomers, agitated to obtain the "unassigned" lands in the western section—the lands not given to any Native American tribe. The agitation succeeded, and a large strip was opened for settlement in 1889. Prospective settlers lined up on the territorial border, and at high noon they were allowed to cross on a "run" to compete in finding and claiming the best lands. Those who illegally entered ahead of the set time were the nicknamed the "sooners." Later other strips of territory were opened, and settlers poured in from the Midwest and the South.

Oklahoma Territory and Statehood

The western section of what is now the state of Oklahoma became the Oklahoma Territory in 1890; it included the Panhandle, the narrow strip of territory that, taken from Texas by the Compromise of 1850, had become a no-man's-land where settlers came in undisturbed. In 1893 the Dawes Commission was appointed to implement a policy of dividing the tribal lands into individual holdings; the Native Americans resisted, but the policy was finally enforced in 1906. The wide lands of the Indian Territory were thus made available to whites.

The Civilized Tribes made the best of a poor bargain, and the Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory were united in 1907 to form the state of Oklahoma, with a constitution that included provision for initiative and referendum. Already the oil boom had reached major proportions, and the young state was on the verge of great economic development. At the same time, cotton, wheat, and corn were major money crops, and cattleland holdings, although shrinking, were still enormous.

The Dust Bowl

In World War I the great demand for farm products brought an agricultural boom to the state, but in the 1920s the state fell upon hard times. Recurrent drought burned the wheat in the fields, and overplanting, overgrazing, and unscientific cropping aided the weather in making Oklahoma part of the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. Farm tenancy increased in the 1920s, and in both the east and west the farms tended more and more to be held by large interests and to be consolidated in large blocks.

A great number of tenant farmers were compelled to leave their dust-stricken farms and went west as migrant laborers; the tragic plight of these "Okies" is the theme of John Steinbeck's novel The Grapes of Wrath. With the return of rains, however, and with increasing care in selecting crops and in conserving and utilizing water and soil resources, much of the Dust Bowl again became productive farm land. The demand for food in World War II and federal price supports for agricultural products after the war further aided farm prosperity.

Irrigation and an Oil Boom

Large state and federal programs for conserving river water and, at the same time, meeting irrigation needs have resulted in such constructions as the reservoir impounded by the Kerr Dam on the Arkansas River. For the most part, these programs resulted in improved agricultural conditions and created new recreation areas. In 1971 the opening of the Oklahoma portion of the Arkansas River Navigation System gave the cities of Muskogee and Tulsa (at its port Catoosa) direct access to the sea.

Oklahoma experienced another boom during the 1970s when oil prices rose dramatically. In the mid-1980s, however, Oklahoma's economy was hurt (as it had been in the 1930s) by dependence on a single industry, as oil prices fell rapidly.

Bibliography

See V. E. Harlow, Oklahoma History (5th ed. 1967); E. C. McReynolds, Oklahoma: A History of the Sooner State (rev. ed. 1971); A. Marriott and C. K. Rachlin, Oklahoma (1973); A. H. Morgan and H. W. Morgan, Oklahoma (1982); A. M. Gibson, Oklahoma: A History of Five Centuries (1984); J. S. Morris et al., Historical Atlas of Oklahoma (3d ed. 1986).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA


Oklahoma City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405

Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419

The State in Brief

Nickname: Sooner State

Motto: Labor omnia vincit (Labor conquers all things)

Flower: Mistletoe

Bird: Scissor-tailed flycatcher

Area: 69,898 square miles (2000; U.S. rank: 20th)

Elevation: Ranges from 289 feet to 4,973 feet above sea level

Climate: Temperate and continental, with seasonal extremes

Admitted to Union: November 16, 1907

Capital: Oklahoma City

Head Official: Governor Brad Henry (D) (until 2007)

Population

1980: 3,025,000

1990: 3,145,585

2000: 3,450,654

2004 estimate: 3,523,553

Percent change, 19902000: 9.7%

U.S. rank in 2004: 28th

Percent of residents born in state: 62.6% (2000)

Density: 50.3 people per square mile (2000)

2002 FBI Crime Index Total: 165,715

Racial and Ethnic Characteristics (2000)

White: 2,628,434

Black or African American: 260,968

American Indian and Alaska Native: 273,230

Asian: 46,767

Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander: 2,372

Hispanic or Latino (may be of any race): 179,304

Other: 82,898

Age Characteristics (2000)

Population under 5 years old: 236,353

Population 5 to 19 years old: 765,927

Percent of population 65 years and over: 13.2%

Median age: 35.5 years (2000)

Vital Statistics

Total number of births (2003): 51,040

Total number of deaths (2003): 35,325 (infant deaths,378)

AIDS cases reported through 2003: 2,085

Economy

Major industries: Machinery, oil, gas, agriculture, food processing, manufacturing

Unemployment rate: 4.2% (December 2004)

Per capita income: $26,567 (2003; U.S. rank: 40th)

Median household income: $36,733 (3-year average, 2001-2003)

Percentage of persons below poverty level: 14.0% (3-year average, 2001-2003)

Income tax rate: Ranges from 0.5% to 6.75%

Sales tax rate: 4.5%

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." Cities of the United States. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." Cities of the United States. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." Cities of the United States. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma State in central s USA; the capital is Oklahoma City. Other important cities are Tulsa and Lawton. Much of the area was acquired by the USA from France in the Louisiana Purchase (1803). The Territory of Oklahoma was merged with the Indian Territory to form the state of Oklahoma in 1907. The w of the state is part of the Great Plains. The e is mountainous. Oklahoma is drained chiefly by the Arkansas and Red rivers. Wheat and cotton are the leading crops, but livestock is more important. There are many minerals, but oil and natural gas form the basis of Oklahoma's economic wealth. Area: 181,089sq km (69,918sq mi). Pop. (2000) 3,450,654.

Statehood :

November 16, 1907

Nickname :

The Sooner State

State bird :

Scissor-tailed flycatcher

State flower :

Mistletoe

State tree :

Redbud

State motto :

Labour conquers all things

http://www.youroklahoma.com

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA


Oklahoma was admitted to the Union as the forty-sixth state on November 16, 1907. Its location in the western south central United States makes it a geographic melting pot. Sharing borders with Texas and Arkansas, Oklahoma is part of the South. But its common borders with Missouri and Kansas place Oklahoma in the central United States, and its borders with Colorado and New Mexico give the state a western flavor. Oklahoma is the nation's eighteenth largest state with over 69,000 square miles. Its population of 3.3 million people ranks 30th among the fifty states. Oklahoma City is the state's capital and its most populous city.

The state enjoys a diverse topography, climate, and economy. The humid eastern region of Oklahoma is graced by seven million acres of forests and 2,600-foot mountainous peaks where mining and lumbering are the chief economic activities. The east is also home to hundreds of swift-running rivers, many of which are damned to provide hydroelectric power in neighboring communities. Wheat is grown and cattle raised in the more temperate, low-rolling prairies to the west. Most of Oklahoma's cotton is grown in the drier, heavily irrigated southwestern counties. Petroleum and natural gas are produced throughout the stateOklahoma is one of the country's five leading producers of both mineral fuels.

Oklahoma winters are relatively mild, with temperatures in January averaging about 38 degrees Fahrenheit. Spring brings dozens of tornadoes that twist through the state annually, usually leaving measurable damage. Summers tend to be long and hot, and periodic droughts can turn the semi-arid western region of Oklahoma into a dust bowl. But the state's sometimes challenging climate does not stop yearly visits from 16 million tourists, who generate over $3 billion in gross revenue for the state. Popular Oklahoma tourist attractions include plentiful state parks, rodeos, Old West shows, and Native American exhibits.

Native Americans played an integral role in Oklahoma's early history. The name "Oklahoma" itself is derived from two Choctaw words: "okla" meaning people and "humma" meaning red. Oklahoma has been inhabited by Native Americans since at least 1200 ad. Explored by the Spanish in the sixteenth century and settled by the French in the seventeenth century, Oklahoma was acquired by the United States in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase. To open land for white settlers in the Atlantic states during the 1820s the federal government began relocating Native Americans from their homelands in the southeastern United States to the new Louisiana Territory west of the Mississippi. The most populous tribes inhabiting this area were the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, Seminole, and Cherokee. Many of these Native Americans adopted European dress styles, farming methods, and political practices.

In the 1830s the federal government seized more land from Native Americans and created what was then called the Indian Territory, which included all of present-day Oklahoma as well as parts of Nebraska and Kansas. Tens of thousands of Native Americans were forcibly uprooted from their communities and driven into this newly created territory. Two-fifths of the uprooted Native Americans died along the way, while others suffered great hardship in what became known as the Trail of Tears.

During the American Civil War (18611865) the five tribes indigenous to Oklahoma signed treaties committing their support to the Confederate states. But the war left Oklahoma in ruins. Homes, land, and personal property were destroyed, creating widespread poverty and lawlessness. From the disorder, outlaws and bandits emerged, including the notorious Frank and Jesse James. In response to complaints about the growing tumult, the federal government built a district courthouse in Arkansas and appointed hundreds of U.S. marshals to quell the chaos.

The federal government also built a number of military posts that were designed to keep Native Americans on their reservations. (The Indian Territory had been reduced to the area of present-day Oklahoma after various tribes surrendered land as a condition for rejoining the Union.) Beginning in 1866 native peoples from several western states were relocated to reservations on the western half of the Indian Territory, while the five tribes were cramped into reservations on the eastern half. Skirmishes soon erupted when Native Americans left their reservations to hunt for food on white settlements in Texas and Kansas. U.S. troops were ordered to chase after the wayward Native Americans, beat them back to the reservations, and disarm them. During one particularly cruel military campaign in the winter of 1868, Colonel George Armstrong Custer led a Seventh Cavalry attack on an unsuspecting Cheyenne village near the banks of Oklahoma's Washita River. Custer's troops killed more than one hundred men, women, and children.

Treaties and federal laws further encroached upon the Indian Territory. In 1889 Congress opened 800,000 acres for settlement in the central Indian Territory known as "the Unassigned Lands." Promoters (called "Boomers") organized the settlers (called "Sooners") into communities of home seekers. On April 22, 1889, 50,000 Sooners lined up on the border of the Unassigned Lands, awaiting their signal to race across the unclaimed lots in search of property they wanted to settle. By nightfall nearly all of the available land was taken, and Oklahoma had a new nickname, the Sooner State. "Boomer Sooner," the University of Oklahoma's fight song, was also named after this page in the state's history.

The Native American population in Oklahoma was decimated by the influx of Sooners during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Native Americans comprised only 9 percent of Oklahoma's population at the time it was granted statehood in 1907, a stark contrast to their 27 percent of the pre-statehood population of 1890. African Americans, many of whom had been lured from other southern states by the promise of unsettled land in Oklahoma, comprised 10 percent of the state's population. They established more all-black towns in Oklahoma than the rest of the country combined.

Although African Americans were discriminated against in Oklahoma, as they were elsewhere in the country, the Oklahoma African American community served as a bellwether for the Civil Rights Movement. For example, African Americans in Oklahoma were among the first to successfully file lawsuits challenging the system of racial segregation in the South. These lawsuits, brought to court during the 1940s, fore-shadowed the U.S. Supreme Court's groundbreaking 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education, which declared racial segregation in all public schools unconstitutional.

Oklahoma continued to act as a kind of national political and economic barometer for the remainder of the twentieth century. Relations between Native Americans in Oklahoma and the federal government seesawed during this time. The federal government teetered between periods when local tribes were encouraged to exercise greater authority over their internal affairs and periods when the federal government interfered with that authority. Oklahoma farmers enjoyed a boom in wheat prices that resulted from massive grain sales to the Soviet Union in the 1970s, but suffered a swoon when the prices began to fall in the 1980s. The Oklahoma petroleum industry also mirrored that pattern as it watched gas prices skyrocket during the OPEC oil embargo of the 1970s, but then saw oil-industry jobs disappear as prices dropped a decade later.

Near the end of the century Oklahoma became the site of the most deadly terrorist act in U.S. history. On April 19, 1995, 168 people died in Oklahoma City when a bomb exploded inside a rental truck parked outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. Timothy McVeigh was convicted of 11 counts of conspiracy and murder for his part in the bombing, while Terry Nichols was found guilty of conspiracy and involuntary manslaughter. Prosecutors portrayed the defendants as right wing, anti-government extremists who sought revenge for the federal government's destruction of the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas. McVeigh was sentenced to death and Nichols to life in prison.

See also: Native American Policy


FURTHER READING

"Oklahoma Government Information Server," [cited May 25, 1999] available from the World Wide Web @ www.state.ok.us/.

"Oklahoma Is Home Of Indian." Daily Oklahoman, April 25, 1993.

Schumacher, Krista. "Exhibit Leads Tour of Oklahoma's Indian History." Tulsa World, September 21, 1994.

"State of Oklahoma," [cited May 25, 1999] available from the World Wide Web @ www.surfinok.com/okhistor.htm/.

Worldmark Encyclopedia of the States. Detroit: Gale Research, 1998, s.v. "Oklahoma."

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. Economic History. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. Economic History. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. Economic History. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahomadormer, former, korma, Norma, performer, pro-forma, stormer, transformer, trauma, warmer •sixth-former • barnstormer •aroma, carcinoma, chroma, coma, comber, diploma, glaucoma, Homer, lymphoma, melanoma, misnomer, Oklahoma, Omagh, roamer, Roma, romer, sarcoma, soma •beachcomber •bloomer, boomer, consumer, Duma, humour (US humor), Nkrumah, perfumer, puma, roomer, rumour (US rumor), satsuma, stumer, Sumer, tumour (US tumor) •zeugma • fulmar •bummer, comer, drummer, hummer, midsummer, mummer, plumber, rummer, strummer, summa, summer •latecomer • newcomer • agama •welcomer •astronomer, monomer •ashrama • isomer • gossamer •customer •affirmer, Burma, derma, Irma, murmur, squirmer, terra firma, wormer

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA , state in south central United States. The Jewish population in 2001 was about 5,000 out of a general population of 3,453,000. The vast majority resided in Tulsa and Oklahoma City, the two large metropolitan areas of the state. Extensive white settlement began with the famous "run" of April 22, 1889. Jews began coming to Oklahoma and Indian Territory as early as 1875. There were also Jews in the "run" of 1889. Leo Meyer of Tulsa was active in state political offices in the early territorial and statehood days. In 1890 High Holiday services were conducted in Oklahoma City. In Ardmore there were 50 Jewish people in 1890 and about 100 in 1907, when a Reform congregation, Temple Emeth, was organized. In the 1890s Jake Katz went to Stillwater and prospered. In Perry, a Jew named Kretsch arrived in 1892 from his native Bohemia. Subsequently he served as mayor of the town for three or four terms. Seymor C. Heyman arrived in Oklahoma City in 1901, eventually served as president of the local Chamber of Commerce, and later became president of the school board, the only Jew to hold these offices in Oklahoma. Sam and Dave Daube of Ardmore and the Sondheimer family of Muskogee were famed for their philanthropy. Dave Schonwald, a Hungarian immigrant, came to Oklahoma Territory before the turn of the 20th century, served as a penniless section hand on the Santa Fe Railroad in Guthrie, and subsequently became president of a gas and oil company and a bank in Blackwell, ending his days as a prominent Oklahoma City businessman and Jewish leader.

Enid Jewish history began with the Cherokee Strip opening in 1885, when Marius Gottschalk made the "run." In Tecumseh the Krouch brothers, German immigrants, came from Kansas and Colorado to establish a business in the early 1890s. A new elementary school building stands as a memorial to the philanthropy of Max Krouch, while his brother, Julius, who was elected county commissioner in Pottawatomie County in 1916, and sister Erna, who survived Max, continued to contribute lavishly to Jewish and non-Jewish causes. Julius Krouch was a delegate to the Democratic Convention in Denver in 1908 which nominated William Jennings Bryan for president. Max Krouch was chairman of the Excise Board in Pottawatomie County under three governors (Bill Murray, Phillips, and Kerr), until he died in 1948. He also was chairman of the Draft Board in Pottawatomie County during World War ii.

In Oklahoma City a Reform congregation, Temple B'nai Israel, was chartered in 1903. Gus Paul, who came from Evansville, Indiana, was a moving figure in the life of the congregation for many years. He was a prominent civic leader and served the municipal government as city attorney. The first ordained rabbi to serve a congregation in Oklahoma was Joseph Blatt. He came in 1906 to minister to the 35 families of Temple B'nai Israel. The Jewish population did not expand in proportion to the growth of the general population. In 1967 the temple's membership numbered 325 families, representing about

half of the Jewish population of the city. In 1904 Emanuel Synagogue was organized as an Orthodox congregation. It is now affiliated with the Conservative movement and also embraces about half of the Jewish population of Oklahoma City in its membership. A Jewish community council was organized in 1941 to serve as a fund raising and social service agency.

In Tulsa, Temple Israel (Reform) was organized in 1914. Its first rabbi came in 1917. Orthodox congregation B'nai Emunah has its origins in a minyan begun by Latvian immigrants in 1903. The Jewish community council of Tulsa was founded in 1938 to raise funds for national and overseas relief. Early Tulsa Jewish life sponsored the Federation of Jewish Charities – taken over by the Tulsa Community Fund – a Mutual Aid Bank, and a Hebrew Free Loan Society.

Muskogee Jewish history began with the arrival of Joseph Sondheimer in 1881. Alexander, the former's son, was the first court reporter in Oklahoma in 1891. Temple Beth Ahabah, the Reform congregation, was founded in 1905 and was heavily supported and endowed by the Sondheimer family.

Oklahoma Jewry, small though it has been, has participated significantly in the development of every aspect of the state's life. Jews were representatives in the first territorial legislature. There were also Jews in the convention which decided that the Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory should enter the Union as a single state. A number of Jews served in the state legislature through the years. Some have been elected judges and county commissioners, and have held important state and municipal appointive positions. There are Reform synagogues in Ardmore and Muskogee, as well as Ponca City and Seminole. Oklahoma City, which includes the University of Oklahoma at Norman, has three synagogues: Conservative, Reform, and Chabad, as well as a mikveh and a Jewish population of some 2,600 people. Tulsa supports the Charles Schusterman jcc, the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art; a Conservative Congregation B'nai Emunah, as well as a Reform and Chabad Congregation. The Tulsa Jewish Review is published monthly, and the Heritage Hebrew Academy is the Tulsa day school. Although small in number, the Oklahoma Jewish community has had national influence. In the early part of the 20th century, Yeshiva University president Bernard Dov *Revel had business interests and spent considerable time in Tulsa. Irvin Frank was an early chairman of the National Jewish Conference Center, the precursor of clal, and Charles Goodall, established the small cities program on the Council of Jewish Federations. The Charles and Lynn Schusterman family are among the mega givers who support Jewish life throughout the country, and their family foundation is among the most important in the United States. The scope of their philanthropic work has given them international outreach. Among their largest gifts were $11.25 million to Synagogue Transformation and Renewal (star), a Chicago-based philanthropic partnership committed to enhancing synagogues and increasing their potential to connect and inspire Jews in North American Jewish communities; $10 million to the University of Oklahoma to establish the Schusterman Center at the University of Oklahoma in Tulsa, expanding the ou presence and providing the cohesiveness, facilities, and organizational identity to aid in future program development for the Tulsa campus; $5 million to the World Union of Progressive Judaism to help complete Mercaz Shimshon (Samson Center), a new cultural center in Jerusalem named in honor of Mr. Schusterman's father; $1.5 million to the Partnership for Excellence in Jewish Education (peje); an initiative designed to meet the challenge of providing excellent Jewish education for k-12 with the goal of ensuring a Jewish presence into the next century.

They helped build Succat Shalom: The Jerusalem Center for Children and their Families, the Parent-Child Center of Tulsa, and the Schusterman-Benson Library in Tulsa.

bibliography:

C.I. Cooper, in: Oklahoma Jewish Chronicle (Dec. 1929 and March 1930).

[Joseph Levenson /

Michael Berenbaum (2nd ed.)]

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." Encyclopaedia Judaica. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." Encyclopaedia Judaica. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." Encyclopaedia Judaica. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

■ BACONE COLLEGE E-15

2299 Old Bacone Rd.
Muskogee, OK 74403-1597
Tel: (918)683-4581; 888-682-5514
Admissions: (918)781-7349
Fax: (918)682-5514
Web Site: http://www.bacone.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with American Baptist Churches in the U.S.A.. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1880. Setting: 220-acre small town campus with easy access to Tulsa. Endowment: $1.4 million. Total enrollment: 914. 819 applied, 58% were admitted. 6% from top 10% of their high school class, 17% from top quarter, 43% from top half. Full-time: 697 students, 43% women, 57% men. Part-time: 217 students, 88% women, 12% men. Students come from 24 states and territories, 10 other countries, 15% from out-of-state, 39% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 20% black, 3% international, 35% 25 or older, 48% live on campus, 10% transferred in. Retention: 50% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, minimum ACT score of 16, SAT or ACT. Recommended: ACT. Required for some: essay, recommendations, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $14,467 includes full-time tuition ($8137), mandatory fees ($630), and college room and board ($5700). College room only: $3000. Part-time tuition: $350 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $240 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Most popular organizations: Native American Club, Phi Beta Kappa, Christian Nurses Fellowship. Major annual event: Multicultural Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, controlled dormitory access, 8-hour patrols by trained security personnel. 425 college housing spaces available; 380 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Bacone College Library with 34,564 books, 18,960 microform titles, 121 serials, 185 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. 46 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Bacone is a suburban community, one mile from Muskogee, a town of 60,000. All the cultural, recreational, and community services are located in Muskogee.

■ CAMERON UNIVERSITY I-7

2800 West Gore Blvd.
Lawton, OK 73505-6377
Tel: (580)581-2200; 888-454-7600
Admissions: (580)581-2289
Fax: (580)581-5514
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cameron.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1908. Setting: 160-acre small town campus. Endowment: $11.6 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $269,443. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4602 per student. Total enrollment: 5,873. Faculty: 297 (180 full-time, 117 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 17:1. 1,357 applied, 99.9% were admitted. 8% from top 10% of their high school class, 28% from top quarter, 62% from top half. Full-time: 3,173 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 2,266 students, 62% women, 38% men. Students come from 49 states and territories, 4% from out-of-state, 8% Native American, 9% Hispanic, 19% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 45% 25 or older, 4% live on campus, 8% transferred in. Retention: 56% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; computer and information sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at University of Oklahoma, East Central University, Oklahoma State University. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.7 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 8/10.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $3240 full-time, $108 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7830 full-time, $261 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $200 full-time, $100 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $3014. Room and board charges vary according to board plan.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 57 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 1% of eligible men and 2% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Aggie Club, Intramural Club, Baptist Student Union, Sociology Club. Major annual events: Comedy Club, Spring Fling, Diversity Week. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. 512 college housing spaces available; 240 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Cameron University Library with 262,835 books, 507,461 microform titles, 4,272 serials, and 6,986 audiovisual materials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.3 million. 350 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Lawton is a metropolitan area that enjoys a dry, temperate climate. The city is served by two airlines, two railroads for freight, bus service, and a turnpike. Community services include a public library, museum, churches of most denominations, two general and one public health hospital, major civic and fraternal organizations, and good shopping facilities. Part-time employment is available for students. Local recreational facilities include camping, water sports, theaters, and bowling.

■ CARL ALBERT STATE COLLEGE G-17

1507 South McKenna
Poteau, OK 74953-5208
Tel: (918)647-1200
Admissions: (918)647-1301
Fax: (918)647-1306
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.carlalbert.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1934. Setting: 78-acre small town campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7636 per student. Total enrollment: 2,501. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 996 applied, 79% were admitted. 5% from top 10% of their high school class, 30% from top half. Full-time: 1,484 students, 65% women, 35% men. Part-time: 1,017 students, 75% women, 25% men. 11% from out-of-state, 27% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 3% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 18% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/13. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1632 full-time, $68 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4004 full-time, $167 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $4 full-time, $2 per term part-time. College room and board: $1520. College room only: $1000.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 25 open to all; local sororities; 5% of women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Phi Theta Kappa, Baptist Student Union, BACCHUS, Student Physical Therapist Assistant Association. Major annual events: Welcome Week, Homecoming, graduation. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: security guards. 150 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Joe E. White Library with 27,200 books, 1,350 serials, and an OPAC. 15 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Poteau is located in central eastern Oklahoma in the Cavanal Mountain area. This is the county seat and may be reached by bus lines. Nearby Ouachita National Forest offers excellent recreational facilities.

■ COMMUNITY CARE COLLEGE D-13

4242 South Sheridan
Tulsa, OK 74145
Tel: (918)610-0027
Fax: (918)610-0029
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.communitycarecollege.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Part of Dental Directions, Inc.. Awards certificates, diplomas, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1995. Total enrollment: 525. Full-time: 512 students, 90% women, 10% men. Part-time: 13 students, 92% women, 8% men. 4% from out-of-state, 12% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 17% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international. Calendar: semesters.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript, interview, Assessment. Entrance: noncompetitive.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. Tuition: $9000 full-time. Mandatory fees: $850 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Student services: personal-psychological counseling.

■ CONNORS STATE COLLEGE F-15

Route 1 Box 1000
Warner, OK 74469-9700
Tel: (918)463-2931; (918)463-2931
Admissions: (918)463-6233
Web Site: http://www.connorsstate.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards certificates, diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1908. Setting: 1,658-acre rural campus. Endowment: $19,200. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $1916 per student. Total enrollment: 2,335. 727 applied, 100% were admitted. 8% from top 10% of their high school class, 19% from top quarter, 35% from top half. 8 valedictorians. Students come from 36 states and territories, 4 other countries, 3% from out-of-state, 25% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 11% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 38% 25 or older, 12% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required for some: high school transcript. Placement: SAT or ACT, ACT COMPASS required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 21 open to all. Most popular organizations: Aggie Club, CD Club, Twilight Angels, McClarren Club, Library Club. Major annual events: Welcome Back Hamburger Cookout, Aggie Rodeo. Student services: health clinic. Campus security: late night transport-escort service, trained security personnel. 320 college housing spaces available; 198 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Carl Westbrook Library with 63,728 books, 319 serials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $223,165. 206 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Warner is a rural community with mild winters and warm to hot summers. The area is provided transportation by bus lines, and U.S. Highways 64 and 266. There are several churches of various denominations, and civic and service clubs within the city. Recreational facilities within the area include theatres, restaurants, and nearby lakes. Within driving distance, there is the Five Civilized Tribes Museum.

■ EAST CENTRAL UNIVERSITY H-11

1100 East 14th St.
Ada, OK 74820-6899
Tel: (580)332-8000
Admissions: (580)310-5239
Fax: (580)436-5495
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ecok.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1909. Setting: 140-acre small town campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Endowment: $1.6 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $381,950. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3947 per student. Total enrollment: 4,571. Faculty: 255 (156 full-time, 99 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. 617 applied, 98% were admitted. 16% from top 10% of their high school class, 38% from top quarter, 74% from top half. Full-time: 3,172 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 631 students, 67% women, 33% men. Students come from 24 states and territories, 32 other countries, 5% from out-of-state, 20% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 5% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 39% 25 or older. Retention: 61% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; public administration and social services. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Ardmore Higher Education Center.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: early admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Recommended: ACT. Required for some: minimum 2.7 high school GPA, rank in upper 50% of high school class. Entrance: moderately difficult. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. State resident tuition: $2,722 full-time, $75.11 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5,739 full-time, $229.55 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $844 full-time, $31.80 per semester hour part-time, $23.50 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $3000. College room only: $1070. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 52 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 3% of eligible men and 3% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: BACCHUS, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Human Resources. Major annual events: Homecoming Week, concerts/plays, movie series. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, controlled dormitory access. 1,009 college housing spaces available; 677 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: coed, women-only housing available. Linscheid Library with 171,080 books, 8,308 microform titles, 1,221 serials, 8,955 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $902,753. 500 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Ada is the commercial, industrial, service, and medical center for this area. An EPA world-class groundwater research laboratory (Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory) and the seat of government of the Chickasaw Indian Nation are located in Ada. Ada's primary commercial employers include a cement plant, a plastics molding operation, and petroleum and cattle industries. The climate is temperate with mild winters. The average temperature is 64 degrees. Ada is approximately 90 miles southeast of Oklahoma City. Community services include a major regional medical center, thirty churches, and many active civic and fraternal organizations. Local recreational facilities include parks, swimming pools, picnic areas, hiking, golf, fishing, hunting, waterskiing, and tennis.

■ EASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE H-15

1301 West Main
Wilburton, OK 74578-4999
Tel: (918)465-2361
Fax: (918)465-2431
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.eosc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1908. Setting: 4,000-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 2,639. 12% from top 10% of their high school class, 18% from top quarter, 52% from top half. Students come from 8 states and territories, 2 other countries, 31% 25 or older, 20% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at E. T. Dunlap Higher Education Center, McAlester Higher Education Center.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission for state residents. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Most popular organizations: Student Senate, Aggie Club, Phi Beta Lambda. Major annual events: Homecoming Week, Mudbowl. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Bill H. Hill Library with 41,639 books, 220 serials, and an OPAC. 250 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Wilburton is a small community located in the San Bois Mountains. The area is served by commercial bus lines, U.S. Route 270 and State Highway 2. A small municipal airport is located here, but commercial airlines are approximately 30 miles distant. Good recreational facilities for outdoor sports include nearby Robber's Cave State Park, and Kiamichi National Forest. The nearest large cities are Muskogee and Fort Smith, Arkansas.

■ HERITAGE COLLEGE OF HAIR DESIGN F-9

7100 I-35 Services Rd., Ste. 7118
Oklahoma City, OK 73149
Tel: (405)631-3399
Fax: (405)631-6711

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed.

■ HILLSDALE FREE WILL BAPTIST COLLEGE F-9

3701 South I-35 Service Rd.
PO Box 7208
Moore, OK 73160-1208
Tel: (405)912-9000
Admissions: (405)912-9006
Fax: (405)912-9050
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hc.edu/

Description:

Independent Free Will Baptist, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1959. Setting: 41-acre suburban campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Endowment: $277,141. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2587 per student. Total enrollment: 268. 88 applied, 100% were admitted. 4% from top 10% of their high school class, 24% from top quarter, 56% from top half. 1 valedictorian. Full-time: 203 students, 40% women, 60% men. Part-time: 51 students, 37% women, 63% men. 10% Native American, 5% Hispanic, 10% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 7% international, 12% 25 or older, 45% live on campus, 14% transferred in. Retention: 47% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, 1 recommendation, Biblical foundation statement, student conduct pledge; medical form required for some. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 2 recommendations. Required for some: 1 recommendation, interview. Placement: SAT or ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $12,120 includes full-time tuition ($6800), mandatory fees ($1060), and college room and board ($4260). Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $260 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $15 per credit hour, $150 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 11 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities; 48% of eligible men and 62% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Mission Fellowship, Ironmen Fellowship, society organizations, Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Major annual events: Missions Emphasis Week, On-Campus Days, homecoming. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, controlled dormitory access. 132 college housing spaces available; 116 were occupied in 2003-04. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Geri Ann Hull Learning Resource Center with 20,102 books, 3,416 microform titles, 363 serials, 1,800 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $38,141. 22 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Community transportation is provided by bus and rail. Will Rogers International Airport is 10 minutes away. The city has many churches, a library, and health facilities. Nearby Lake Draper offers water skiing and fishing. There are many businesses in town, and part-time employment is available for students.

■ ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE D-13

4943 South 78th East Ave.
Tulsa, OK 74145
Admissions: (918)619-8700
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/

Description:

primarily 2-year, coed. Awards terminal associate and bachelor's degrees.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Recommended: recommendations. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $100.

■ LANGSTON UNIVERSITY D-10

PO Box 907
Langston, OK 73050-0907
Tel: (405)466-2231
Admissions: (405)466-2980
Fax: (405)466-3381
Web Site: http://www.lunet.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1897. Setting: 40-acre rural campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Total enrollment: 3,010. 2,088 applied, 50% were admitted. Full-time: 2,230 students, 56% women, 44% men. Part-time: 668 students, 63% women, 37% men. Students come from 37 states and territories, 8 other countries, 2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 75% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 20% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. ROTC: Army (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.70 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: recommendations. Placement: SAT or ACT required. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: national fraternities, national sororities. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. 1,726 college housing spaces available; 1,384 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Main library plus 2 others with 97,565 books, 824,457 microform titles, 1,235 serials, 4,974 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 200 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Langston is a small rural community located 40 miles northeast of Oklahoma City and 90 miles west of Tulsa, OK.

■ METROPOLITAN COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY) F-9

2901 North Classen Blvd., Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK 73106
Tel: (405)528-5000
Admissions: (405)843-1000
Fax: (405)528-0320
Web Site: http://www.metropolitancollege.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 4-year, coed. Part of Wyandotte Collegiate Systems. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Total enrollment: 140. 7% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 34% black, 1% international. Calendar: trimesters.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Entrance: minimally difficult.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Tuition: $7710 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program.

■ METROPOLITAN COLLEGE (TULSA) D-13

4528 South Sheridan Rd., Ste. 105
Tulsa, OK 74145-1011
Tel: (918)627-9300
Fax: (918)627-2122
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.metropolitancollege.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 4-year, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Setting: urban campus. Total enrollment: 223. 2% from top 10% of their high school class, 10% from top quarter, 15% from top half. Full-time: 223 students, 91% women, 9% men. Students come from 3 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 3% Hispanic, 17% black, 5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 71% 25 or older, 4% transferred in. Retention: 71% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Calendar: trimesters. Academic remediation for entering students, accelerated degree program, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, interview, Wonderlic aptitude test. Entrance: minimally difficult.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. College housing not available. 25 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ MID-AMERICA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY F-9

3500 Southwest 119th St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73170-4504
Tel: (405)691-3800
Admissions: (405)392-3241
Fax: (405)692-5165
Web Site: http://www.macu.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Church of God. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1953. Setting: 145-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $421,051. Total enrollment: 613. 79 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 547 students, 49% women, 51% men. Part-time: 66 students, 44% women, 56% men. Students come from 32 states and territories, 4 other countries, 29% from out-of-state, 3% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 10% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 53% 25 or older, 34% live on campus, 15% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: 2 recommendations, interview. Placement: SAT or ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $14,360 includes full-time tuition ($9900) and college room and board ($4460). College room only: $2360. Full-time tuition varies according to course load. Part-time tuition: $420 per hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Most popular organizations: Christian Women's Organization, Behavioral Science Club, Student Ministers' Fellowship, Drama Club, S.A.C.E. Major annual events: Howdy Party, Christmas Banquet, Spring Banquet. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, student patrols. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Charles Ewing Brown Library with 60,000 books, 12,324 microform titles, 3,906 audiovisual materials, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $101,656. 20 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Oklahoma City University.

■ MURRAY STATE COLLEGE J-11

One Murray Campus
Tishomingo, OK 73460-3130
Tel: (580)371-2371
Fax: (580)371-9844
Web Site: http://www.mscok.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards transfer associate and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1908. Setting: 120-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 1,958. Students come from 16 states and territories, 4 other countries, 3% from out-of-state, 15% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 6% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.5% international, 6% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. 155 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Murray State College Library plus 1 other with 20,000 books and 160 serials. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Historically noted as the original capital of the Chickasaw Nation, Tishomingo is situated on the banks of Lake Texoma within a wildlife refuge. This is a rural area with a temperate climate. The city is served by five highways. Tishomingo has six churches, a hospital, and major civic, fraternal and veteran's organizations. Local recreational facilities include water sports, hunting, fishing, and hiking.

■ NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE A-16

200 I St., NE
Miami, OK 74354-6434
Tel: (918)542-8441
Admissions: (918)540-6212
Fax: (918)542-9759
Web Site: http://www.neoam.cc.ok.us/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1919. Setting: 340-acre small town campus. Total enrollment: 2,102. 5% from top 10% of their high school class, 80% from top half. Full-time: 1,473 students, 51% women, 49% men. Part-time: 629 students, 71% women, 29% men. Students come from 25 states and territories, 19 other countries, 15% from out-of-state, 35% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: electronic application. Required: high school transcript. Placement: SAT or ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 50 open to all. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. 500 college housing spaces available; 300 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Learning Resource Center with 74,000 books, 450 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 65 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Miami is headquarters for the Grand Lake recreation area. Items produced by the city's manufacturers include automotive parts, tires and tubes, clothing, food products and boats and accessories. Part-time employment is available. The climate is temperate. There are dormitories and housing units on campus. Good health services are available.

■ NORTHEASTERN STATE UNIVERSITY D-16

600 North Grand
Tahlequah, OK 74464-2399
Tel: (918)456-5511
Fax: (918)458-2342
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.nsuok.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards bachelor's, master's, and first professional degrees. Founded 1846. Setting: 160-acre small town campus with easy access to Tulsa. Endowment: $780,030. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $592,531. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3679 per student. Total enrollment: 9,562. 2,202 applied, 86% were admitted. 16% from top 10% of their high school class, 40% from top quarter, 73% from top half. Full-time: 6,677 students, 59% women, 41% men. Part-time: 1,866 students, 67% women, 33% men. Students come from 27 states and territories, 44 other countries, 0.1% from out-of-state, 29% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 6% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 35% 25 or older, 16% transferred in. Retention: 60% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school transcript, ACT. Required for some: recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/5. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $3300 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $8100 full-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course level, course load, and location. College room and board: $3312. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 80 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities, local fraternities, local sororities; 3% of eligible men and 2% of eligible women are members. Major annual event: homecoming. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,700 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Option: coed housing available. John Vaughn Library with 424,818 books, 742,695 microform titles, 3,983 serials, 6,804 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.3 million. 534 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

In a region of lakes within the foothills of the Ozark Mountains, Tahlequah is the former capital city of the Cherokee Indian Nation. There are many historic sites and artifacts in the area. The city is accessible by five highways. Community services includes several churches of various denominations, two hospitals, two libraries, and a museum. Apartments provide student housing. There are various civic and fraternal organizations within the city. Limited part-time employment is available for students. Local recreational facilities include boating, fishing, hunting, water skiing, and swimming.

■ NORTHERN OKLAHOMA COLLEGE B-10

1220 East Grand Ave., PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK 74653-0310
Tel: (580)628-6200
Free: 800-429-5715
Admissions: (580)628-6221
Fax: (580)628-6209
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.north-ok.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards transfer associate and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1901. Setting: 10-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 3,050. Students come from 4 other countries, 40% 25 or older, 20% live on campus. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Options: Common Application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 15 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Law Enforcement Club, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Student Nurses Association, Young Republicans. Major annual events: homecoming, Drug Awareness Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols. 550 college housing spaces available; 540 were occupied in 2003-04. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Vineyard Library with 34,458 books and 211 serials. 150 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Tonkawa is located 14 miles west of Ponca City and enjoys a mild climate. The city has a public library, churches representing 10 denominations, a nearby hospital, a Chamber of Commerce and other civic, fraternal and veteran's organizations. Housing for students is provided by dormitories and one hotel. There are limited job opportunities for students. Fishing in nearby rivers is considered excellent sport.

■ NORTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY B-6

709 Oklahoma Blvd.
Alva, OK 73717-2799
Tel: (580)327-1700
Admissions: (580)327-8550
Fax: (580)327-1881
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.nwosu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1897. Setting: 70-acre small town campus. Endowment: $14.5 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $33,400. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4096 per student. Total enrollment: 2,102. Faculty: 145 (73 full-time, 72 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 438 applied, 99% were admitted. 12% from top 10% of their high school class, 28% from top quarter, 57% from top half. Full-time: 1,475 students, 57% women, 43% men. Part-time: 389 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 31 states and territories, 30 other countries, 17% from out-of-state, 4% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 4% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 26% 25 or older, 20% live on campus, 12% transferred in. Retention: 62% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; health professions and related sciences; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Northern Oklahoma College, Southwestern Oklahoma State University. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: early admission. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay, minimum 2.7 high school GPA, 3 recommendations. Placement: SAT or ACT required. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $3270 full-time, $109 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8100 full-time, $270 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load, degree level, and location. Part-time tuition varies according to course load, degree level, and location. College room and board: $2980. College room only: $1000. Room and board charges vary according to board plan.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 43 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Aggie Club, Phi Beta Lambda, Baptist Student Union. Major annual events: Bahama Breakaway, Homecoming, Family Day. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 806 college housing spaces available; 396 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. J. W. Martin Library plus 1 other with 344,640 books, 1 million microform titles, 3,990 serials, 3,609 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $621,962. 131 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Alva is located in northwestern Oklahoma. The average mean temperature is 59.1 degrees. Rainfall averages 16 inches annually. Local public services include a hospital, many churches, five motels, and active civic and fraternal groups. A movie theatre, golf course, municipal swimming pool, park, picnic areas, lighted baseball fields, playgrounds, tennis courts, fishing, and hunting provide recreation and are all easily accessible. Little Sahara State Park and Alabaster Caverns are located approximately 25 miles distant.

■ OKLAHOMA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY F-11

500 West University
Shawnee, OK 74804
Tel: (405)275-2850
Free: 800-654-3285
Admissions: (405)878-2033
Fax: (405)878-2046
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.okbu.edu/

Description:

Independent Southern Baptist, 4-year, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1910. Setting: 125-acre small town campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Endowment: $68.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $5097 per student. Total enrollment: 1,883. 1,098 applied, 85% were admitted. 45% from top 10% of their high school class, 73% from top quarter, 92% from top half. 6 National Merit Scholars, 42 valedictorians. Full-time: 1,511 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 355 students, 34% women, 66% men. Students come from 42 states and territories, 17 other countries, 39% from out-of-state, 17% 25 or older, 72% live on campus, 5% transferred in. Retention: 74% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: 4-1-4. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at St. Gregory's University. Study abroad program. ROTC: Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.5 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay, recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 9/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $17,986 includes full-time tuition ($12,924), mandatory fees ($922), and college room and board ($4140). College room only: $1840. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 50 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities; 10% of eligible men and 10% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Campus Activities Board, Student Ambassadors, Student Government Association, Baptist Student Union, University Concert Series. Major annual events: Stampede of Stars, Spring Affair, Welcome Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. On-campus residence required through junior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Mabee Learning Center with 230,000 books, 315,000 microform titles, 1,800 serials, 1,600 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $825,183. 170 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

On the North Canadian River, Shawnee is in a rich agricultural and oil-producing area. The altitude of the city is 1,080 feet above sea level and the average temperature is 62.3 degrees. It is located near the geographical center of the state approximately 40 miles by interstate highway from Oklahoma City. The area is accessible via bus lines and a municipal airport. There are churches of most denominations and a YMCA in town. Local recreational facilities provide for golf, fishing, tennis, boating, hunting, bowling, and roller skating as well as picnic grounds, three swimming pools, parks, theatres, museums, and one drive-in. Events include horse shows and rodeo. There are various civic, fraternal and veterans' organizations here.

■ OKLAHOMA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY F-9

PO Box 11000
Oklahoma City, OK 73136-1100
Tel: (405)425-5000
Admissions: (405)425-5050
Fax: (405)425-5208
Web Site: http://www.oc.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Church of Christ. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1950. Setting: 200-acre suburban campus. Endowment: $45 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $25,000. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2946 per student. Total enrollment: 2,058. Faculty: 160 (85 full-time, 75 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 1,421 applied, 39% were admitted. 21% from top 10% of their high school class, 49% from top quarter, 77% from top half. 49% from out-of-state, 2% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 6% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 66% live on campus. Retention: 66% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; liberal arts/general studies; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, internships. Off campus study at University of Central Oklahoma. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $20,416 includes full-time tuition ($13,422), mandatory fees ($1554), and college room and board ($5440). Part-time tuition: $559 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $747 per term.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 19 open to all. Most popular organizations: Outreach, Agape, College Women for Christ, Young Republicans, College Democrats. Major annual events: Homecoming basketball game, Spring Sing, First Week Follies. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing designed to accommodate 1,183 students; 1,236 undergraduates lived in college housing during 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Tom and Ada Beam Library with 93,680 books, 700,019 microform titles, 1,171 serials, 5,083 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $279,043. 101 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Oklahoma City has a metropolitan population of 958,000. Closer to the University is the smaller suburban community of Edmond, population 55,000. Air transportation is available at Will Rogers World Airport. Many cultural, entertainment, and job opportunities are readily available.

■ OKLAHOMA CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE F-9

7777 South May Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK 73159-4419
Tel: (405)682-1611
Admissions: (405)682-7515
Web Site: http://www.okccc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1969. Setting: 143-acre urban campus. Endowment: $91,544. Total enrollment: 12,048. Full-time: 4,863 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 7,185 students, 59% women, 41% men. Students come from 8 states and territories, 16 other countries, 5% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 8% black, 6% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 6% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for applicants under 19 or nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy programs. Options: early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT, ACT COMPASS required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 20 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, College Republicans, Future Teachers, Hispanic Organization to Promote Education, Student Activities Board. Major annual events: Arts Festival, Cultural Awareness Series, SAB Film Series. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available.

Community Environment:

Oklahoma City was born on April 22, 1889, when the population jumped from zero to 10,000 as a result of a unique land run. The city is one of the largest municipalities in the nation, covering a total of 621 square miles. The more than 970,000 residents enjoy temperatures ranging from the mid-80s in July to the mid-30s in January. The community is served by all major forms of transportation. Entertainment, cultural and sports related activities are numerous.

■ OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY F-9

2501 North Blackwelder
Oklahoma City, OK 73106-1402
Tel: (405)521-5000
Free: 800-633-7242
Admissions: (405)208-5050
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.okcu.edu/

Description:

Independent United Methodist, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and first professional degrees. Founded 1904. Setting: 68-acre urban campus. Endowment: $73.3 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7763 per student. Total enrollment: 3,688. Faculty: 285 (164 full-time, 121 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 1,044 applied, 81% were admitted. 30% from top 10% of their high school class, 65% from top quarter, 87% from top half. Full-time: 1,466 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 445 students, 67% women, 33% men. Students come from 49 states and territories, 65 other countries, 37% from out-of-state, 4% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 8% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 20% international, 21% 25 or older, 39% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 72% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: liberal arts/general studies; visual and performing arts; business/marketing. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at American University. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview, audition for music and dance programs. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 8/20. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $23,863 includes full-time tuition ($16,700), mandatory fees ($913), and college room and board ($6250). College room only: $3050. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $570 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $120 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to program.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 42 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 11% of eligible men and 15% of eligible women are members. Major annual events: homecoming, Spring Sing, Midnight Breakfast. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, Operation ID. 1,051 college housing spaces available. Freshmen given priority for college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Dulaney Browne Library plus 1 other with 440,374 books, 975,580 microform titles, 6,017 serials, 10,948 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2.6 million. 264 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Oklahoma City, the capital City of Oklahoma, offers a wide variety of cultural, civic, religious, entertainment and sports events in the unique setting of modern facilities and old-fashioned Western hospitality. With more than 1,000,000 people in the metropolitan area, Oklahoma City is a dynamic, growing location with a wide range of opportunities to offer its students. From the State Capitol and the center of Oklahoma's political and governmental activity, to the cultural offerings the Oklahoma City Philharmonic, Lyric Theater, Ballet Oklahoma, Oklahoma Zoo, Omniplex, and more. Oklahoma City stands as a vibrant, growing metropolitan center offerings the Southwest. Out-of-state students are able to make use of the excellent transportation facilities available to the City. Oklahoma City is linked by interstate highways to other major cities in the region, and the City's Will Rogers International Airport, one offerings the busiest in the region, provides jet service coast-to-coast and international flights to Europe, Asia, and South America.

■ OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE STATE UNIVERSITY M-7

PO Box 430
Goodwell, OK 73939-0430
Tel: (580)349-2611
Free: 800-664-6778
Admissions: (580)349-1376
Fax: (580)349-2302
Web Site: http://www.opsu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 4-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1909. Setting: 40-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 1,144. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 13:1. 257 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 920 students, 51% women, 49% men. Part-time: 224 students, 71% women, 29% men. Students come from 34 states and territories, 19 other countries, 40% from out-of-state, 3% Native American, 12% Hispanic, 4% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 23% 25 or older, 17% live on campus, 16% transferred in. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: agriculture; education; biological/life sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: SAT or ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadlines: Rolling, Rolling for nonresidents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2274 full-time, $75.80 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4500 full-time, $150 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1118 full-time, $34.50 per hour part-time, $62 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course level. College room and board: $4270. College room only: $2520. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and student level.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 39 open to all. Major annual events: Fall Homecoming, Annual Rodeo. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, safety bars over door latches. 450 college housing spaces available; 315 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Option: coed housing available. McKee Library with 129,467 books, 10,064 microform titles, 5,295 serials, 6,132 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $359,645. 50 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Goodwell is located in the center of the Oklahoma Panhandle in Texas County. The climate is cool and arid. The area is served by railroad, and Highway 54. Goodwell has three churches, and various civic, fraternal and veteran's organizations.

■ OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY D-10

Stillwater, OK 74078
Tel: (405)744-5000
Free: 800-852-1255
Admissions: (405)744-5358
Fax: (405)744-5285
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://osu.okstate.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Part of Oklahoma State University System. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1890. Setting: 840-acre small town campus with easy access to Oklahoma City and Tulsa. Endowment: $195.6 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $77.7 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6529 per student. Total enrollment: 23,461. Faculty: 1,237 (1,000 full-time, 237 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 6,533 applied, 88% were admitted. 27% from top 10% of their high school class, 55% from top quarter, 85% from top half. 7 National Merit Scholars, 621 valedictorians. Full-time: 16,731 students, 48% women, 52% men. Part-time: 2,178 students, 47% women, 53% men. Students come from 50 states and territories, 82 other countries, 15% from out-of-state, 9% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 4% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 4% international, 12% 25 or older, 40% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 79% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; engineering; education. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at National Student Exchange. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, class rank, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $3099 full-time, $103.30 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $11,122 full-time, $370.75 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1266 full-time, $42.21 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program and student level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to program and student level. College room and board: $5848. College room only: $2848. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 360 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 18% of eligible men and 24% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Campus Crusade for Christ, Flying Aggies, Block and Bridle Club, OSU Ski Club. Major annual events: Homecoming, Madrigal Dinner and Concert, Spring Sing. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, controlled dormitory access. 6,052 college housing spaces available; 4,540 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Edmon Low Library plus 3 others with 2.5 million books, 4.5 million microform titles, 23,806 serials, 517,213 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $12.8 million. 2,456 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Stillwater is located in north central Oklahoma. The climate is mild with an average annual temperature of 59.8 degrees and average rainfall of 33.3 inches. The city is accessible by Highways 51 and 177, and nearby U.S. Highways 64 and Interstate 35. There are bus lines to the city. Stillwater has several churches of major denominations, a hospital, two clinics, and a health center. Local recreational facilities include 15 parks, three golf courses, fishing, camping, picnicking, hiking, hunting, boating, water-skiing, theatres, and a drive-in. Rooming houses, apartments and private homes provide housing for students. There is part-time employment available.

■ OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, OKLAHOMA CITY F-9

900 North Portland
Oklahoma City, OK 73107-6120
Tel: (405)947-4421
Admissions: (405)945-3287

Fax: (405)945-3277

Web Site: http://www.osuokc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State University. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1961. Setting: 80-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 5,654. Students come from 18 states and territories, 15 other countries, 1% from out-of-state, 6% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 13% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 51% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing program. Option: early admission. Placement: SAT or ACT, ACT COMPASS required for some. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Social organizations: 20 open to all. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Deaf/Hearing Social Club, American Criminal Justice Association, Horticulture Club, Vet-Tech Club. Major annual events: Howdy Week, Spring Fling, Halloween Party. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Campus with 11,973 books, 244 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 75 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Oklahoma City University.

■ OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, OKMULGEE E-13

1801 East Fourth St.
Okmulgee, OK 74447-3901
Tel: (918)293-4678
Free: 800-722-4471
Admissions: (918)293-5298
Web Site: http://www.osu-okmulgee.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State University. Awards transfer associate and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1946. Setting: 160-acre small town campus with easy access to Tulsa. Total enrollment: 2,329. Full-time: 1,717 students, 33% women, 67% men. Part-time: 612 students, 58% women, 42% men. Students come from 22 states and territories, 3 other countries, 37% 25 or older, 25% live on campus. Core. Calendar: trimesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: SAT or ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group. Social organizations: 32 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Senate, Junior Ambassadors, Phi Theta Kappa, departmental clubs, Drama Club. Major annual events: Super Weekend, Okmulgee College and Career Day, Auto Show. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Option: coed housing available. Learning Resource Center with 9,965 books, 484 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 360 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ OKLAHOMA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY B-13

2201 Silver Lake Rd.
Bartlesville, OK 74006-6299
Tel: (918)335-6200
Admissions: (866)222-8226
Fax: (918)335-6229
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.okwu.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Wesleyan Church. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1909. Setting: 127-acre small town campus with easy access to Tulsa. Endowment: $2.9 million. Total enrollment: 887. 391 applied, 77% were admitted. 20% from top 10% of their high school class, 35% from top quarter, 80% from top half. 5 valedictorians. Full-time: 864 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 23 students, 61% women, 39% men. Students come from 31 states and territories, 13 other countries, 37% from out-of-state, 8% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 4% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 35% 25 or older, 70% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 70% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Tri-County Technical College, Coalition for Christian Colleges and Universities. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum ACT of 18 or SAT 860, SAT or ACT. Recommended: minimum 2.0 high school GPA. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $18,950 includes full-time tuition ($12,900), mandatory fees ($850), and college room and board ($5200). College room only: $2625. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $475 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $50 per credit.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 10 open to all. Most popular organizations: Forensics Club, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Teachers Association, Theology Club, Education Club. Major annual events: Homecoming Festivities, seasonal banquets. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, controlled dormitory access. 300 college housing spaces available; 272 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Oklahoma Wesleyan University Library with 124,722 books, 300 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $300,000. 30 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY D-13

7777 South Lewis Ave.
Tulsa, OK 74171-0001
Tel: (918)495-6161
Free: 800-678-8876
Admissions: (918)495-6529
Fax: (918)495-6222
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.oru.edu/

Description:

Independent interdenominational, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees. Founded 1963. Setting: 263-acre urban campus. Endowment: $66.4 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $107,010. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2742 per student. Total enrollment: 4,086. Faculty: 235 (164 full-time, 71 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 1,244 applied, 70% were admitted. 6 National Merit Scholars. Students come from 41 other countries, 86% from out-of-state, 1% Native American, 5% Hispanic, 23% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 5% international, 11% 25 or older, 71% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Christian College Coalition. Study abroad program. ROTC: Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, 1 recommendation, proof of immunization, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadlines: Rolling, 9/1 for early action. Notification: continuous, 9/1 for early action.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $22,650 includes full-time tuition ($15,400), mandatory fees ($480), and college room and board ($6770). College room only: $3280. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $642 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 37 open to all. Most popular organizations: missions, Student Nurse Association, American Management Society, Accounting Society. Major annual events: homecoming, community outreach events, revivals. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. John D. Messick Resources Center plus 1 other with 216,691 books, 49,936 microform titles, 600 serials, 25,445 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.1 million. 253 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Tulsa is located in northeast Oklahoma. The area has four distinct seasons, and is served by major airlines, bus lines, and U.S. highways. Tulsa is located on the fringe of the southwest's greatest inland vacation and recreation areas. Nearby lakes provide fishing, golf, boating, hunting, and other outdoor sports. Community services include many churches, an Opera Association, Philbrook and Gilcrease Museums, major health facilities, and civic organizations.

■ PLATT COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY) F-9

309 South Ann Arbor Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK 73128
Tel: (405)946-7799
Fax: (405)943-2150
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.plattcollege.org/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Founded 1979. Calendar: continuous.

■ PLATT COLLEGE (TULSA) D-13

3801 South Sheridan Rd.
Tulsa, OK 74145
Tel: (918)663-9000
Fax: (918)622-1240
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.plattcollege.org/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Founded 1979. Calendar: continuous.

■ REDLANDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE F-8

1300 South Country Club Rd.
El Reno, OK 73036-5304
Tel: (405)262-2552
Web Site: http://www.redlandscc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1938. Setting: 55-acre suburban campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Total enrollment: 2,323. Full-time: 583 students, 62% women, 38% men. Part-time: 1,740 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 4 states and territories, 7 other countries, 8% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 6% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 36% 25 or older, 15% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for nursing, medical laboratory technology programs. Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: ACT required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1380 full-time, $46 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $3630 full-time, $121 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $930 full-time, $31 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to location. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to location.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: 11 open to all. Most popular organizations: Nursing Club, Aggie Club, Baptist Student Union, Phi Theta Kappa, Outdoors Club. Major annual events: Back to School Bash, End of Year Party, Career Fair. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. Learning Resource Center with 14,810 books, 43,865 microform titles, 292 serials, 19,075 audiovisual materials, and an OPAC. 74 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

El Reno is located on the south bank of the North Canadian River. The average annual temperature is 60 degrees. The city is served by bus lines, railroad, and an airport. Nearby lakes offer waterskiing, fishing, and boating. El Reno has many community service facilities including a hospital, hotel and many motels, a library, and various civic, service, and fraternal organizations. Part-time job opportunities are good. Local recreational facilities include two movie theatres, drive-ins, parks, tennis, golf, and a municipal swimming pool.

■ ROGERS STATE UNIVERSITY C-14

1701 West Will Rogers Blvd.
Claremore, OK 74017-3252
Tel: (918)343-7777
Free: 800-256-7511
Admissions: (918)343-7545
Fax: (918)343-7898
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.rsu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 4-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1909. Setting: 40-acre small town campus with easy access to Tulsa. Endowment: $4 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $4500. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4478 per student. Total enrollment: 3,300. 1,001 applied, 89% were admitted. 8% from top 10% of their high school class, 26% from top quarter, 55% from top half. Full-time: 1,681 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 1,619 students, 65% women, 35% men. Students come from 16 other countries, 3% from out-of-state, 45% 25 or older, 10% live on campus, 28% transferred in. Retention: 51% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Northeast Technology Centers, Claremore and Pryor, OK; Tri-County Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK; University Learning Center of Northern Oklahoma; Central Technology Center, Drumright, OK. ROTC: Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission for applicants to the Associate's degree program or the Certificate program. Option: electronic application. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: minimum 2.7 high school GPA, ACT, ACT COMPASS (for students over 21). Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $3300 full-time, $110 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7860 full-time, $262 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $30 full-time, $15 per term part-time. College room and board: $6210. College room only: $4050.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 22 open to all; 3% of eligible men and 5% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Phi Theta Kappa, Adult Students Aspiring to Prosper, Horse and Ag Student Association, Native American Student Association, Criminal Justice Student Association. Major annual events: Welcome Week, Halloween Dance/Carnival, Spring Fling. Student services: personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service. 256 college housing spaces available; 200 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. Rogers State University Library with 57,283 books, 524 serials, 4,844 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $468,500. 314 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ ROSE STATE COLLEGE F-10

6420 Southeast 15th St.
Midwest City, OK 73110-2799
Tel: (405)733-7673
Fax: (405)733-7399
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.rose.edu/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 110-acre suburban campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Total enrollment: 7,000. Students come from 18 states and territories, 33 other countries, 60% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for health occupations programs. Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Placement: SAT, ACT, or ACT COMPASS required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. College housing not available. Rose State College Learning Resources Center with 90,000 books, 6,193 microform titles, 443 serials, 9,620 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.3 million. 390 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Oklahoma City University.

■ ST. GREGORY'S UNIVERSITY F-11

1900 West MacArthur Dr.
Shawnee, OK 74804-2499
Tel: (405)878-5100; 888-STGREGS
Fax: (405)878-5198
Web Site: http://www.stgregorys.edu/

Description:

Independent Roman Catholic, 4-year, coed. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1875. Setting: 640-acre small town campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Endowment: $9.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3314 per student. Total enrollment: 868. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 15:1. 235 applied, 83% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 26% from top half. Full-time: 476 students, 51% women, 49% men. Part-time: 392 students, 54% women, 46% men. Students come from 15 states and territories, 22 other countries, 13% from out-of-state, 8% Native American, 7% Hispanic, 6% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 12% international, 30% 25 or older, 65% live on campus, 10% transferred in. Retention: 60% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; parks and recreation. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Peterson's Universal Application, Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay, recommendations, interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $19,408 includes full-time tuition ($12,922), mandatory fees ($850), and college room and board ($5636). College room only: $3200. Part-time tuition: $465 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $36 per hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 27 open to all; local fraternities, local sororities; 25% of eligible men and 25% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Delta Epsilon Sigma Homer Society, Campus Ministry, ITEST-Institute for Theological Encounter with Science and Technology, Drama Club. Major annual events: Orientation, Dean's Activity Night, Winter/Spring Formals. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 400 college housing spaces available; 312 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. James J. Kelly Library plus 1 other with 82,715 books, 3,000 microform titles, 2,060 serials, 267 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $105,600. 60 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus.

■ SEMINOLE STATE COLLEGE G-11

PO Box 351
Seminole, OK 74818-0351
Tel: (405)382-9950
Admissions: (405)382-9272
Web Site: http://www.ssc.cc.ok.us/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1931. Setting: 40-acre small town campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2149 per student. Total enrollment: 2,584. 2,096 applied, 100% were admitted. Full-time: 2,096 students, 69% women, 31% men. Part-time: 488 students, 74% women, 26% men. Students come from 13 states and territories, 5 other countries, 2% from out-of-state, 23% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 6% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 47% 25 or older, 8% live on campus, 43% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs. Off campus study at Gordon Cooper Technology Center, Wes Watkins Technology Center, Moore-Norman Technology Center.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $1116 full-time, $46.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $3,589 full-time, $149.55 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $719 full-time, $29.95 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $2470.

Collegiate Environment:

Choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 21 open to all; local fraternities; 1% of eligible men and 1% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Native American Student Association, Psi Beta Honor Society, Student Nurses Association, Phi Theta Kappa. Major annual events: Trojan Olympics, SSC Coffee House, Mayfair. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. 125 college housing spaces available; all were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Boren Library with 27,507 books, 200 serials, and an OPAC. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $205,958. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Seminole is an urban community enjoying temperate climate. Local transportation services include railroad, bus, and airlines. The city has a public library, 30 churches of various denominations, a hospital, and three clinics. Some part-time employment is available for students. Recreational facilities in Seminole include a theater, a drive-in, bowling, and water sports. The major civic, fraternal and veteran's organizations are active within the immediate community. There are several historic sites located nearby.

■ SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY K-12

1405 North 4th Ave.
Durant, OK 74701-0609
Tel: (580)745-2000
Free: 800-435-1327
Admissions: (580)745-2060
Fax: (580)745-7490
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.sosu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1909. Setting: 177-acre small town campus. Endowment: $11.4 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $515,396. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7384 per student. Total enrollment: 4,075. Faculty: 237 (141 full-time, 96 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. 1,067 applied, 80% were admitted. 11% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 68% from top half. 26 valedictorians. Full-time: 2,994 students, 53% women, 47% men. Part-time: 669 students, 66% women, 34% men. Students come from 35 states and territories, 28 other countries, 21% from out-of-state, 29% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 5% black, 0.5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 24% 25 or older, 20% live on campus, 12% transferred in. Retention: 58% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; engineering technologies. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Ardmore Higher Education Center, E.T. Dunlap Higher Education Center, Tinker AFB, OKCCC.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission for adults over 21. Required: high school transcript, SAT or ACT. Required for some: interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. State resident tuition: $2195 full-time, $73.15 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7016 full-time, $233.85 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1177 full-time, $34.70 per credit part-time, $68. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. College room and board: $3910. College room only: $1875. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 40 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 1% of eligible men and 2% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Baptist Collegiate Ministries, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Wesley Foundation, Resident Hall Association. Major annual events: Springfest, Homecoming, Welcome Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols, late night transport-escort service. 636 college housing spaces available; 478 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Henry G. Bennett Memorial Library with 187,971 books, 457,438 microform titles, 671 serials, 5,291 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $854,434. 425 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Durant is a rural community served by bus line and airport. The community has one hospital, Medical Center of Southeastern Oklahoma, and active civic, fraternal, and veteran's organizations. There are libraries, churches, and motels. Local recreational facilities include hunting, boating, fishing, golf and other sports.

■ SOUTHERN NAZARENE UNIVERSITY F-9

6729 Northwest 39th Expressway
Bethany, OK 73008
Tel: (405)789-6400
Free: 800-648-9899
Admissions: (405)491-6324
Fax: (405)491-6381
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.snu.edu/

Description:

Independent Nazarene, comprehensive, coed. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1899. Setting: 40-acre suburban campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Endowment: $15 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $2000. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6515 per student. Total enrollment: 2,218. Faculty: 176 (69 full-time, 107 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 529 applied, 54% were admitted. 25% from top 10% of their high school class, 45% from top quarter, 74% from top half. Full-time: 1,659 students, 50% women, 50% men. Part-time: 134 students, 63% women, 37% men. Students come from 34 states and territories, 28% from out-of-state, 4% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 9% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0.1% international, 32% 25 or older, 67% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 64% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; health professions and related sciences; family and consumer sciences. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Christian College Coalition Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Peterson's Universal Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, 2 recommendations. Recommended: interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/15. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. One-time mandatory fee: $350. Comprehensive fee: $20,402 includes full-time tuition ($14,400), mandatory fees ($624), and college room and board ($5378). College room only: $2458. Part-time tuition: $507 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $23 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 30 open to all. Most popular organizations: Business Gaming Team, Campus Social Life Committee, intramural sports societies, Choral Society, Inter-Club. Major annual events: Lip Sync Contest, Homecoming, Pow-Wow Weekend. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 964 college housing spaces available; 866 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. R. T. Williams Learning Resources Center with 95,535 books, 331,364 microform titles, 225 serials, 4,257 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $327,732. 120 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Bethany is a metropolitan community in central Oklahoma with a mild climate. Located on U.S. Highway 66, eight miles from Will Rogers Airport, the city also has train service. The community includes active churches, a Chamber of Commerce, nearby health centers and hospitals, and numerous motels. Unusual job opportunities are available for students.

■ SOUTHWESTERN CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY F-9

PO Box 340
Bethany, OK 73008-0340
Tel: (405)789-7661
Web Site: http://www.swcu.edu/

Description:

Independent, comprehensive, coed, affiliated with Pentecostal Holiness Church. Awards associate, bachelor's, and master's degrees. Founded 1946. Setting: 7-acre suburban campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Total enrollment: 199. 2 class presidents, 4 valedictorians, 15 student government officers. Full-time: 121 students, 46% women, 54% men. Part-time: 7 students, 29% women, 71% men. Students come from 15 states and territories, 3 other countries, 30% from out-of-state, 5% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 9% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 20% 25 or older, 30% live on campus. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, advanced placement, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Southern Nazarene University.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, recommendations, minimum ACT score of 19 or SAT score of 910, ACT. Recommended: interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $12,250 includes full-time tuition ($8250) and college room and board ($4000). Part-time tuition: $295 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Major annual events: Campus Revival, Feat of Ingathering, graduation. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Springer Learning Center with 38,900 books and 100 serials. 13 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY F-6

100 Campus Dr.
Weatherford, OK 73096-3098
Tel: (580)772-6611
Admissions: (580)774-3782
Fax: (580)774-3795
Web Site: http://www.swosu.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Southwestern Oklahoma State University. Awards bachelor's, master's, and first professional degrees. Founded 1901. Setting: 73-acre small town campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Endowment: $9.1 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $396,532. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3713 per student. Total enrollment: 4,841. 1,451 applied, 94% were admitted. 18% from top 10% of their high school class, 42% from top quarter, 72% from top half. Full-time: 3,771 students, 54% women, 46% men. Part-time: 479 students, 65% women, 35% men. Students come from 32 states and territories, 32 other countries, 10% from out-of-state, 7% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 5% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 17% 25 or older, 27% live on campus, 7% transferred in. Retention: 69% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Academic Common Market.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.0 high school GPA, ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Notification: continuous. Preference given to state residents.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 66 open to all; national fraternities, local fraternities, local sororities; 1% of eligible men and 2% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Education Association, Baptist Student Union, Southwestern Pharmaceutical Association, Gamma Delta Kappa, Bible Chair Student Union. Major annual events: homecoming, Howdy Week, Panorama events. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, 20-hour campus emergency security. 1,255 college housing spaces available; 1,052 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Al Harris Library with 217,051 books, 1.2 million microform titles, 1,230 serials, 6,718 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $1.5 million. 270 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY AT SAYRE F-4

409 East Mississippi St.
Sayre, OK 73662-1236
Tel: (580)928-5533
Web Site: http://www.swosu.edu/sayre/

Description:

State and locally supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Southwestern Oklahoma State University. Awards diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1938. Setting: 6-acre rural campus. Total enrollment: 549. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 18:1. 107 applied, 100% were admitted. 11% from top 10% of their high school class, 22% from top quarter, 55% from top half. Full-time: 328 students, 74% women, 26% men. Part-time: 221 students, 70% women, 30% men. Students come from 2 states and territories, 3% from out-of-state, 5% Native American, 5% Hispanic, 1% black, 0.4% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 50% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, independent study, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, early admission, deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $3456 full-time, $108 per credit hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Student-run newspaper. College housing not available. Oscar McMahan Library with 9,975 books, 45 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 100 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ SPARTAN COLLEGE OF AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY D-13

8820 East Pine St., PO Box 582833
Tulsa, OK 74158-2833
Tel: (918)836-6886
Web Site: http://www.spartan.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, primarily 2-year, coed. Awards certificates, terminal associate, and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1928. Setting: 26-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 1,500. 5% from top 10% of their high school class, 30% from top quarter, 65% from top half. Students come from 52 states and territories, 40 other countries, 85% from out-of-state, 32% 25 or older. Calendar: calendar terms. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, advanced placement.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript. Recommended: interview. Placement: ACT ASSET required. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Collegiate Environment:

Most popular organizations: Aircraft Electronics Association, Model Club, Electronics Technician Association, NIFA Flight Team. Major annual event: Annual Barbecue. 18,000 books and 160 serials. 75 computers available on campus for general student use. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE D-13

6111 East Skelly Dr.
Tulsa, OK 74135-6198
Tel: (918)595-7000
Admissions: (918)595-7811
Fax: (918)595-7910
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tulsacc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1968. Setting: 160-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 16,803. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. 15,911 applied, 100% were admitted. 3% from top 10% of their high school class, 10% from top quarter, 22% from top half. Full-time: 6,162 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 10,641 students, 64% women, 36% men. Students come from 16 states and territories, 1% from out-of-state, 8% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 9% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 59% 25 or older, 18% transferred in. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, freshman honors college, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission except for honors, allied health programs. Options: Common Application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $20. State resident tuition: $47.80 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $172.20 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $25 per semester hour part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 50 open to all. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Learning Resource Center plus 1 other with 110,000 books, 987 serials, and a Web page. 1,000 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ TULSA WELDING SCHOOL D-13

2545 East 11th St.
Tulsa, OK 74104-3909
Tel: (918)587-6789
Free: 800-WELD-PRO
Admissions: 800-331-2934
Fax: (918)295-6821
Web Site: http://www.weldingschool.com/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Administratively affiliated with Tulsa Welding School, Jacksonville Branch. Awards diplomas, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1949. Setting: 5-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 362. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. Students come from 21 states and territories, 41% from out-of-state, 9% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 13% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 37% 25 or older. Core. Calendar: continuous (phased start every 3 weeks).

Entrance Requirements:

Required: high school diploma, GED, or ATB test. Entrance: noncompetitive.

Costs Per Year:

Tuition: $11,090 full-time. Mandatory fees: $1900 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student services: Student Advisor, Graduate Employment Assistance, Part-Time Job Assistance. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. College housing not available. Technical Resource Center with 389 books, 2 serials, and a Web page. 3 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed.

■ UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA E-9

100 North University Dr.
Edmond, OK 73034-5209
Tel: (405)974-2000
Free: 800-254-4215
Admissions: (405)974-2338
Fax: (405)974-4964
Web Site: http://www.ucok.edu/

Description:

State-supported, comprehensive, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1890. Setting: 200-acre suburban campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Total enrollment: 15,953. Faculty: 812 (411 full-time, 401 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 21:1. 4,020 applied. 14% from top 10% of their high school class, 36% from top quarter, 74% from top half. Full-time: 10,512 students, 58% women, 42% men. Part-time: 4,117 students, 60% women, 40% men. Students come from 48 states and territories, 81 other countries, 4% from out-of-state, 6% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 9% black, 3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 7% international, 26% 25 or older, 9% live on campus, 11% transferred in. Retention: 72% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; liberal arts/general studies. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. ROTC: Army.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: deferred admission. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.7 high school GPA, rank in upper 50% of high school class, SAT or ACT. Recommended: ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous until 4/1.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $2811 full-time, $93.70 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7821 full-time, $260.70 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $807 full-time, $26.90 per semester hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, program, and student level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, program, and student level. College room and board: $4476. College room only: $2166. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 160 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 5% of eligible men and 5% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Malaysian Student Association, Baptist Student Union, Student Government Association, Association of Women Students, University Center Activities Board. Major annual events: homecoming, Earth Day, International Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 1,552 college housing spaces available; 1,350 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Max Chambers Library with 254,478 books, 966,565 microform titles, 3,707 serials, 37,484 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 400 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Edmond is a suburban city 12 miles north of Oklahoma City. All modes of transportation are available to the community. Edmond has churches of most denominations, a movie theatre, numerous parks, a swimming pool, and shopping centers. Part-time employment is plentiful.

■ UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA G-9

660 Parrington Oval
Norman, OK 73019-0390
Tel: (405)325-0311
Free: 800-234-6868
Admissions: (405)325-4521
Fax: (405)325-7478
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ou.edu/

Description:

State-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's certificates. Founded 1890. Setting: 3,500-acre suburban campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Endowment: $560.1 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $60.4 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $6370 per student. Total enrollment: 26,968. Faculty: 1,204 (976 full-time, 228 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 22:1. 7,388 applied, 86% were admitted. 37% from top 10% of their high school class, 72% from top quarter, 93% from top half. 169 National Merit Scholars, 285 valedictorians. Full-time: 17,716 students, 49% women, 51% men. Part-time: 2,682 students, 48% women, 52% men. Students come from 50 states and territories, 74 other countries, 23% from out-of-state, 7% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 5% black, 5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 3% international, 10% 25 or older, 20% live on campus, 7% transferred in. Retention: 85% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; social sciences; communications/journalism. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, freshman honors college, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Oklahoma State University, Langston University, Northeastern State University, Rose State College, Oklahoma City Community College, Rogers University, Cameron University. Study abroad program. ROTC: Army, Naval, Air Force.

Entrance Requirements:

Option: international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, SAT or ACT. Required for some: essay. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 4/1. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $2862 full-time, $95.40 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,755 full-time, $358.50 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1546 full-time, $44.10 per credit hour part-time, $111.50 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, location, program, and reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, location, program, and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $6361. College room only: $3355. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 300 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 14% of eligible men and 23% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Campus Activities Council, international student organizations, OU Cousins, American Indian Student Association, Black Student Association. Major annual events: The Big Event, Homecoming, Dad's Day/Mom's Day. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access, crime prevention programs, police bicycle patrols, self-defense classes. 4,368 college housing spaces available; 4,160 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. Bizzell Memorial Library plus 8 others with 4.3 million books, 4.1 million microform titles, 24,292 serials, 9,743 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $12.3 million. 2,356 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Norman is a mid-sized city in central Oklahoma with award-winning public schools; cultural offerings, such as theaters and museums; community services including churches, hospitals, a public library; and recreational facilities, including parks, golf courses and nearby Lake Thunderbird. The community is served by major highways, bus lines, and Will Rogers World Airport, located 18 miles north in Oklahoma City. The university operates Max Westheimer Airpark, a general aviation, reliever category airport in Norman.

■ UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER F-9

PO Box 26901
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
Tel: (405)271-4000
Admissions: (405)271-2359
Fax: (405)271-2480
Web Site: http://www.ouhsc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, upper-level, coed. Part of University of Oklahoma. Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and post-master's and first professional certificates. Founded 1890. Setting: 200-acre urban campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Endowment: $185.7 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $60.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $42,433 per student. Total enrollment: 3,538. Faculty: 403 (273 full-time, 130 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 3:1. Full-time: 777 students, 88% women, 12% men. Part-time: 104 students, 84% women, 16% men. Students come from 15 states and territories, 12 other countries, 7% from out-of-state, 9% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 5% black, 5% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 1% international, 38% 25 or older, 49% transferred in. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: health professions and related sciences; biological/life sciences; interdisciplinary studies. Calendar: semesters. Advanced placement, honors program, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. ROTC: Army (c), Air Force (c).

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $2862 full-time, $95.40 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,755 full-time, $358.50 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1382 full-time, $38.15 per credit hour part-time, $118.50 per term part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 12 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Government Association, Public Health Student Association, Student National Medical Association, Graduate Student Council, Student Medical Association. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. College housing not available. Robert M. Bird Health Sciences Library plus 3 others with 300,260 books, 650 microform titles, 4,028 serials, 5,931 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.1 million. 120 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

See Oklahoma City University.

■ UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-OKLAHOMA CITY CAMPUS F-9

6501 North Broadway Extension, Ste. 100
Oklahoma City, OK 73116-8244
Tel: (405)842-8007
Free: 800-228-7240
Admissions: (480)557-1712
Web Site: http://www.phoenix.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1976. Setting: urban campus. Total enrollment: 1,051. Faculty: 187 (2 full-time, 185 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 6:1. 31 applied. Full-time: 876 students, 60% women, 40% men. 1% Native American, 2% Hispanic, 7% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 6% international, 92% 25 or older. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; computer and information sciences; security and protective services. Core. Calendar: continuous. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, graduate courses open to undergrads.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: 1 recommendation. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $110. Tuition: $9360 full-time, $312 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time, $70 per course part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

College housing not available. University Library with 444 books, 666 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. System-wide operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.2 million.

■ UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-TULSA CAMPUS D-13

10810 East 45th St., Ste. 103
Tulsa, OK 74146-3801
Tel: (918)622-4877
Free: 800-228-7240
Admissions: (480)557-1712
Web Site: http://www.phoenix.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1998. Setting: urban campus. Total enrollment: 1,302. Faculty: 161 (5 full-time, 156 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 8:1. 52 applied. Full-time: 1,114 students, 60% women, 40% men. 0% from out-of-state, 2% Native American, 1% Hispanic, 2% black, 0.3% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 35% international, 89% 25 or older. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; computer and information sciences; security and protective services. Core. Calendar: continuous. Advanced placement, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, graduate courses open to undergrads.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Option: deferred admission. Required: 1 recommendation. Required for some: high school transcript. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $110. Tuition: $9360 full-time, $312 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time, $70 per course part-time.

Collegiate Environment:

College housing not available. University Library with 444 books, 666 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. System-wide operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $3.2 million.

■ UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND ARTS OF OKLAHOMA G-8

1727 West Alabama
Chickasha, OK 73018
Tel: (405)224-3140
Free: 800-933-8726
Admissions: (405)574-1204
Fax: (405)574-1220
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.usao.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 4-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1908. Setting: 75-acre small town campus with easy access to Oklahoma City. Endowment: $1.5 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $136,375. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $3421 per student. Total enrollment: 1,430. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 19:1. 448 applied, 89% were admitted. 13% from top 10% of their high school class, 42% from top quarter, 75% from top half. Full-time: 1,064 students, 60% women, 40% men. Part-time: 366 students, 74% women, 26% men. Students come from 20 states and territories, 13 other countries, 6% from out-of-state, 13% Native American, 3% Hispanic, 6% black, 1% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 2% international, 24% 25 or older, 36% live on campus, 9% transferred in. Retention: 61% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; education; visual and performing arts. Core. Calendar: trimesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, deferred admission. Recommended: graduated in top half of high school class. Required for some: high school transcript, minimum 2.85 high school GPA, graduated in top half of high school class. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 9/6. Notification: 2/10.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $2490 full-time, $83 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7230 full-time, $241 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $990 full-time, $33 per hour part-time. College room and board: $4170. College room only: $2180. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 24 open to all; national fraternities, local sororities; 2% of eligible men and 3% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Activities Council, Volunteer Action Council, Baptist Student Union, Intertribal Heritage Club, Psychology Club. Major annual events: Montmartre Festival/Droverstock, Pow-Wow, Tinsel Ball. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, controlled dormitory access. 504 college housing spaces available; 423 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required in freshman year. Option: coed housing available. Nash Library with 79,780 books, 153,514 microform titles, 191 serials, 4,240 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $144,649. 125 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Chickasha is a suburban area southwest of Oklahoma City. Located in the fertile Washita River Valley, the city lies within one of the largest gas fields in the world. The community has rail, bus, and air service. The community includes Catholic and Protestant churches, a hospital, a public library, and major civic, fraternal, and veteran's organizations. Local recreational facilities include theatres and several good lakes within a few miles for boating, fishing and water sports. Some part-time employment is available for students.

■ UNIVERSITY OF TULSA D-13

600 South College Ave.
Tulsa, OK 74104-3189
Tel: (918)631-2000
Free: 800-331-3050
Admissions: (918)631-2307
Fax: (918)631-2247
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.utulsa.edu/

Description:

Independent, university, coed, affiliated with Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Awards bachelor's, master's, doctoral, and first professional degrees and first professional certificates. Founded 1894. Setting: 200-acre urban campus with easy access to Tulsa. Endowment: $770.5 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $14.6 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $12,492 per student. Total enrollment: 4,084. Faculty: 422 (306 full-time, 116 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 11:1. 2,687 applied, 75% were admitted. 63% from top 10% of their high school class, 81% from top quarter, 94% from top half. 66 National Merit Scholars, 30 valedictorians. Full-time: 2,635 students, 49% women, 51% men. Part-time: 161 students, 53% women, 47% men. Students come from 38 states and territories, 41 other countries, 34% from out-of-state, 5% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 7% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 8% international, 10% 25 or older, 64% live on campus, 6% transferred in. Retention: 84% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: business/marketing; engineering; visual and performing arts. Core. Calendar: semesters. ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, self-designed majors, honors program, independent study, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Study abroad program. ROTC: Air Force (c).

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, 1 recommendation, SAT or ACT. Recommended: essay, minimum 3.0 high school GPA, interview. Entrance: very difficult. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $27,790 includes full-time tuition ($20,658), mandatory fees ($80), and college room and board ($7052). College room only: $3896. Part-time tuition: $741 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $3 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, marching band, student-run newspaper, radio station. Social organizations: 272 open to all; national fraternities, national sororities; 21% of eligible men and 23% of eligible women are members. Most popular organizations: Student Association, Residence Hall Association, honor societies, intramural sports, pre-professional clubs. Major annual events: Homecoming, Springfest, Parents' Weekend. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 2,206 college housing spaces available; 1,752 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through sophomore year. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. McFarlin Library plus 1 other with 940,105 books, 3 million microform titles, 6,317 serials, 13,320 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $5.5 million. 900 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

The climate is temperate. The average year-round high temperature is 71 degrees. The population is 750,000 in the metropolitan area. The city features a professional opera company, a national ballet company, a symphony orchestra, museums, art galleries, community theatres, parks, minor league teams in hockey and baseball and recreation and shopping facilities. Public bus transportation is available.

■ VATTEROTT COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY) F-9

4629 Northwest 23rd St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73127
Tel: (405)945-0088; 888-948-0088
Fax: (405)945-0788
Web Site: http://www.vatterott-college.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards diplomas, terminal associate, and first professional degrees. Setting: urban campus. Total enrollment: 284. 145 applied, 62% were admitted. 7% Native American, 5% Hispanic, 36% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international. Calendar: semesters.

Entrance Requirements:

Required: essay, high school transcript, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive.

Costs Per Year:

Tuition: $20,000 full-time. Mandatory fees: $900 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level and program. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment.

■ VATTEROTT COLLEGE (TULSA) D-13

555 South Memorial Dr.
Tulsa, OK 74112
Tel: (918)835-8288; 888-857-4016
Admissions: (918)836-6656
Fax: (918)836-9698
Web Site: http://www.vatterott-college.edu/

Description:

Proprietary, 2-year, coed. Awards diplomas and terminal associate degrees. Setting: 3-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 226. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 12:1. 117 applied, 78% were admitted. Full-time: 226 students, 29% women, 71% men. 11% Native American, 4% Hispanic, 28% black, 0% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international. Retention: 71% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Calendar: semesters.

■ WESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE I-5

2801 North Main St.
Altus, OK 73521-1397
Tel: (580)477-2000
Admissions: (580)477-7720
Fax: (580)477-7723
Web Site: http://www.wosc.edu/

Description:

State-supported, 2-year, coed. Part of Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Awards certificates, transfer associate, and terminal associate degrees. Founded 1926. Setting: 142-acre rural campus. Endowment: $2.5 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $2376 per student. Total enrollment: 2,061. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 20:1. 499 applied, 100% were admitted. 10% from top 10% of their high school class, 20% from top quarter, 50% from top half. 5 valedictorians. Full-time: 859 students, 55% women, 45% men. Part-time: 1,202 students, 60% women, 40% men. Students come from 30 states and territories, 1 other country, 4% Native American, 11% Hispanic, 13% black, 2% Asian American or Pacific Islander, 0% international, 65% 25 or older. Retention: 50% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs. Off campus study at all state institutions in the Oklahoma Higher Education Televised Instructional System.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: electronic application, early admission. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: ACT. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: Rolling. Notification: continuous.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $2213 full-time, $73.75 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5348 full-time, $178.25 per semester hour part-time. College room and board: $4400.

Collegiate Environment:

Drama-theater group, choral group. Social organizations: national fraternities; 4% of men are members. Most popular organizations: Baptist Student Union, Phi Theta Kappa, Student Senate, Behavioral Science Club, Aggie Club. Major annual events: Homecoming, organizational competitions, basketball games. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices. 96 college housing spaces available; 83 were occupied in 2003-04. Option: coed housing available. Learning Resources Center with 33,000 books, 1,000 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $254,402. 50 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Altus is an urban community served by bus, railroad, and major interstate highways. The climate is temperate. The community has one hospital, a public library, many churches, and recreational facilities.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-6

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-6

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

BACONE COLLEGE

2299 Old Bacone Rd.
Muskogee, OK 74403-1597
Tel: (918)683-4581; 888-682-5514
Admissions: (918)781-7349
Fax: (918)682-5514
Web Site: http://www.bacone.edu/
President/CEO: Robert J. Duncan, Jr.
Registrar: Bill Painter
Admissions: Jerrett Phillips
Financial Aid: Shannon Panthin
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: American Baptist Churches in the U.S.A. Scores: 70% SAT V 400+; 70.5% SAT M 400+; 39% ACT 18-23; 5% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $14,467 includes full-time tuition ($8137), mandatory fees ($630), and college room and board ($5700). College room only: $3000. Part-time tuition: $350 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $240 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 697, PT 217 Faculty: FT 33, PT 22 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 48 Library Holdings: 34,564 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 semester hours, Associates; 124 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: JRCERT, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W; Wrestling M

CAMERON UNIVERSITY

2800 West Gore Blvd.
Lawton, OK 73505-6377
Tel: (580)581-2200; 888-454-7600
Admissions: (580)581-2289
Fax: (580)581-5514
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cameron.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Cynthia S. Ross
Registrar: Linda Phillips
Admissions: Zoe DuRant
Financial Aid: Caryn Pacheco
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Scores: 42.6% ACT 18-23; 17.2% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $3240 full-time, $108 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7830 full-time, $261 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $200 full-time, $100 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $3014. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,173, PT 2,266, Grad 434 Faculty: FT 180, PT 117 Student-Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 4 Library Holdings: 262,835 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 128 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M; Golf M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

CARL ALBERT STATE COLLEGE

1507 South McKenna
Poteau, OK 74953-5208
Tel: (918)647-1200
Admissions: (918)647-1301
Fax: (918)647-1306
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.carlalbert.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Joe E. White
Registrar: Dee Ann Dickerson
Admissions: Dee Ann Dickerson
Financial Aid: Robin Benson
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education % Accepted: 79 Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Deadline: August 13 Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For nursing, physical therapy assistant programs: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1632 full-time, $68 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4004 full-time, $167 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $4 full-time, $2 per term part-time. College room and board: $1520. College room only: $1000. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 1,484, PT 1,017 Faculty: FT 51, PT 103 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 18 Library Holdings: 27,200 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: APTA, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Softball M

COMMUNITY CARE COLLEGE

4242 South Sheridan
Tulsa, OK 74145
Tel: (918)610-0027
Fax: (918)610-0029
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.communitycarecollege.com/
President/CEO: Teresa Knox
Admissions: Teresa Knox
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Dental Directions, Inc. Application Fee: $15.00 Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. Tuition: $9000 full-time. Mandatory fees: $850 full-time. Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 512, PT 13 Professional Accreditation: ABHES

CONNORS STATE COLLEGE

Route 1 Box 1000
Warner, OK 74469-9700
Tel: (918)463-2931; (918)463-2931
Admissions: (918)463-6233
Web Site: http://www.connorsstate.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Donnie Nero
Registrar: John Turnbull
Admissions: John A. Turnbull
Financial Aid: Wanda Fuller
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 54, PT 62 Student-Faculty Ratio: 21:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 12 Library Holdings: 63,728 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Softball W

EAST CENTRAL UNIVERSITY

1100 East 14th St.
Ada, OK 74820-6899
Tel: (580)332-8000
Admissions: (580)310-5239
Fax: (580)436-5495
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ecok.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Bill S. Cole
Registrar: Pamla Armstrong
Admissions: Pamela Armstrong
Financial Aid: Marcia Carter
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Scores: 54% ACT 18-23; 22% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 98 Admission Plans: Early Admission Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. State resident tuition: $2,722 full-time, $75.11 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5,739 full-time, $229.55 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $844 full-time, $31.80 per semester hour part-time, $23.50 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. College room and board: $3000. College room only: $1070. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,172, PT 631, Grad 768 Faculty: FT 156, PT 99 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 53 Library Holdings: 171,080 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AHIMA, ACBSP, CORE, CSWE, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W

EASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE

1301 West Main
Wilburton, OK 74578-4999
Tel: (918)465-2361
Fax: (918)465-2431
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.eosc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Richard Bernard
Admissions: Leah Miller
Financial Aid: Mimi Kelley
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For state residents 18 or over: High school diploma or equivalent not required Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 51 Exams: ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 20 Library Holdings: 41,639 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Softball W

HERITAGE COLLEGE OF HAIR DESIGN

7100 I-35 Services Rd., Ste. 7118
Oklahoma City, OK 73149
Tel: (405)631-3399
Fax: (405)631-6711
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

HILLSDALE FREE WILL BAPTIST COLLEGE

3701 South I-35 Service Rd.
PO Box 7208
Moore, OK 73160-1208
Tel: (405)912-9000
Admissions: (405)912-9006
Fax: (405)912-9050
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.hc.edu/
President/CEO: Rev. Timothy W. Eaton
Registrar: Sue Chaffin
Admissions: Pamela Thompson
Financial Aid: Pam Thompson
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Free Will Baptist Scores: 44.3% ACT 18-23; 10% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $12,120 includes full-time tuition ($6800), mandatory fees ($1060), and college room and board ($4260). Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Part-time tuition: $260 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $15 per credit hour, $150 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 203, PT 51, Grad 14 Faculty: FT 18, PT 27 Student-Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 45 Library Holdings: 20,102 Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: TACCS Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Softball W

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

4943 South 78th East Ave.
Tulsa, OK 74145
Admissions: (918)619-8700
Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/
Admissions: Karen Selby
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $100.00 Costs Per Year: Application fee: $100. Calendar System: Quarter Exams: Other

LANGSTON UNIVERSITY

PO Box 907
Langston, OK 73050-0907
Tel: (405)466-2231
Admissions: (405)466-2980
Fax: (405)466-3381
Web Site: http://www.lunet.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Ernest L. Holloway
Registrar: Margie Allen Bonner
Admissions: Gayle L. Robertson
Financial Aid: Yvonne Maxwell
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Admission Plans: Open Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,230, PT 668, Grad 109 Student-Faculty Ratio: 30:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 71 Library Holdings: 97,565 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credit hours, Associates; 124 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, CORE, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Football M; Track and Field M & W

METROPOLITAN COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY)

2901 North Classen Blvd., Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK 73106
Tel: (405)528-5000
Admissions: (405)843-1000
Fax: (405)528-0320
Web Site: http://www.metropolitancollege.edu/
Admissions: Pamela Picken
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Wyandotte Collegiate Systems Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. Tuition: $7710 full-time. Calendar System: Trimester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 77, PT 63 Faculty: FT 3, PT 15 Exams: Other Credit Hours For Degree: 69 credit hours, Associates; 126 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

METROPOLITAN COLLEGE (TULSA)

4528 South Sheridan Rd., Ste. 105
Tulsa, OK 74145-1011
Tel: (918)627-9300
Fax: (918)627-2122
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.metropolitancollege.edu/
Admissions: Vicki Angelo
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $50.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Calendar System: Trimester Enrollment: FT 223 Faculty: FT 4, PT 12 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: Other Credit Hours For Degree: 63 credits, Associates; 129 credits, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

MID-AMERICA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

3500 Southwest 119th St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73170-4504
Tel: (405)691-3800
Admissions: (405)392-3241
Fax: (405)692-5165
Web Site: http://www.macu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John Fozard
Registrar: Debra Shoemake
Admissions: Debra Shoemake
Financial Aid: Steve Gilliland
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Church of God Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. Comprehensive fee: $14,360 includes full-time tuition ($9900) and college room and board ($4460). College room only: $2360. Full-time tuition varies according to course load. Part-time tuition: $420 per hour. Part-time tuition varies according to course load. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 547, PT 66 Faculty: FT 18, PT 28 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 86 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 34 Library Holdings: 60,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 124 semester hours, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Soccer M; Softball W; Volleyball W

MURRAY STATE COLLEGE

One Murray Campus
Tishomingo, OK 73460-3130
Tel: (580)371-2371
Fax: (580)371-9844
Web Site: http://www.mscok.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. William D. Pennington
Registrar: Ann Beck
Admissions: Ann Beck
Financial Aid: Marilyn Schwarz
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,115, PT 843 Faculty: FT 43, PT 30 Student-Faculty Ratio: 27:1 Exams: ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 6 Library Holdings: 20,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 63 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: APTA, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Softball M

NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE

200 I St., NE
Miami, OK 74354-6434
Tel: (918)542-8441
Admissions: (918)540-6212
Fax: (918)542-9759
Web Site: http://www.neoam.cc.ok.us/
President/CEO: Dr. Glenn E. Mayle
Registrar: Linda Oldham-Burns
Admissions: Amy Ishmael
Financial Aid: Tammy Higgins
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,473, PT 629 Faculty: FT 80, PT 35 Student-Faculty Ratio: 23:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 74,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: APTA, NAACLS, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Football M; Golf M; Softball W; Volleyball W

NORTHEASTERN STATE UNIVERSITY

600 North Grand
Tahlequah, OK 74464-2399
Tel: (918)456-5511
Fax: (918)458-2342
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.nsuok.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Larry Williams
Registrar: Bill Nowlin
Admissions: William E. Nowlin
Financial Aid: Teri Cochran
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $3300 full-time. Nonresident tuition: $8100 full-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course level, course load, and location. College room and board: $3312. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 6,677, PT 1,866, Grad 920 Student-Faculty Ratio: 24:1 Exams: ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 68 Library Holdings: 424,818 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: AOA, ASLHA, ACBSP, CSWE, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis W

NORTHERN OKLAHOMA COLLEGE

1220 East Grand Ave., PO Box 310
Tonkawa, OK 74653-0310
Tel: (580)628-6200
Free: 800-429-5715
Admissions: (580)628-6221
Fax: (580)628-6209
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.north-ok.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Joe Kinzer
Registrar: Rick Edgington
Admissions: Wanda Webb
Financial Aid: Linda Brown
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For applicants 24 or over: High school diploma or equivalent not required Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 45, PT 35 Student-Faculty Ratio: 35:1 Exams: ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 20 Library Holdings: 34,458 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball W; Basketball M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Volleyball M & W

NORTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

709 Oklahoma Blvd.
Alva, OK 73717-2799
Tel: (580)327-1700
Admissions: (580)327-8550
Fax: (580)327-1881
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.nwosu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Paul B. Beran
Registrar: Shirley Murrow
Admissions: Shirley Murrow
Financial Aid: Irala Magee
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Scores: 56% ACT 18-23; 14% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 99 Admission Plans: Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $3270 full-time, $109 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $8100 full-time, $270 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition varies according to course load, degree level, and location. Part-time tuition varies according to course load, degree level, and location. College room and board: $2980. College room only: $1000. Room and board charges vary according to board plan. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,475, PT 389, Grad 238 Faculty: FT 73, PT 72 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 57 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 20 Library Holdings: 344,640 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer W; Softball W

OKLAHOMA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY

500 West University
Shawnee, OK 74804
Tel: (405)275-2850
Free: 800-654-3285
Admissions: (405)878-2033
Fax: (405)878-2046
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.okbu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Mark A. Brister
Registrar: Peggy J. Askins
Admissions: Trent Argo
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southern Baptist Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 96% SAT M 400+; 41% ACT 18-23; 45% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $17,986 includes full-time tuition ($12,924), mandatory fees ($922), and college room and board ($4140). College room only: $1840. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: 4-1-4, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,511, PT 355, Grad 17 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 58 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 72 Library Holdings: 230,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Air Force Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W

OKLAHOMA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

PO Box 11000
Oklahoma City, OK 73136-1100
Tel: (405)425-5000
Admissions: (405)425-5050
Fax: (405)425-5208
Web Site: http://www.oc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Mike O'Neal
Registrar: Dr. Mickey Banister
Admissions: Risa Forrester
Financial Aid: Missi Bryant
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Church of Christ Scores: 78.4% SAT V 400+; 92.8% SAT M 400+; 40.4% ACT 18-23; 37.3% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 39 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $20,416 includes full-time tuition ($13,422), mandatory fees ($1554), and college room and board ($5440). Part-time tuition: $559 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $747 per term. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,744, PT 91, Grad 220 Faculty: FT 85, PT 75 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 67 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 66 Library Holdings: 93,680 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 126 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACBSP, NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W

OKLAHOMA CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

7777 South May Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK 73159-4419
Tel: (405)682-1611
Admissions: (405)682-7515
Web Site: http://www.okccc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Robert P. Todd
Registrar: Gloria Barton
Admissions: Gloria Cardenas-Barton
Financial Aid: Harold Case
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Scores: 54% ACT 18-23; 16% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For applicants under 19, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy programs: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 4,863, PT 7,185 Faculty: FT 115, PT 403 Student-Faculty Ratio: 23:1 Exams: ACT, Other Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: AOTA, APTA, CARC, JRCEMT, NLN

OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY

2501 North Blackwelder
Oklahoma City, OK 73106-1402
Tel: (405)521-5000
Free: 800-633-7242
Admissions: (405)208-5050
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.okcu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Thomas J. McDaniel
Registrar: Charles Monnot
Admissions: Dr. Lloyd Musselman
Financial Aid: Denise Flis
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: United Methodist Scores: 100% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 41% ACT 18-23; 41% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 81 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 20 Application Fee: $30.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $30. Comprehensive fee: $23,863 includes full-time tuition ($16,700), mandatory fees ($913), and college room and board ($6250). College room only: $3050. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $570 per semester hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $120 per term. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to program. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,466, PT 445, Grad 1,086 Faculty: FT 164, PT 121 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 50 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 39 Library Holdings: 440,374 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 semester hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ABA, AALS, ACBSP, MACTE, NASM, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Crew M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W

OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE STATE UNIVERSITY

PO Box 430
Goodwell, OK 73939-0430
Tel: (580)349-2611
Free: 800-664-6778
Admissions: (580)349-1376
Fax: (580)349-2302
Web Site: http://www.opsu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. David A. Bryant
Admissions: Bobby Jenkins
Financial Aid: Mary Ellen Riley
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Scores: 56% ACT 18-23; 9% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $2274 full-time, $75.80 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $4500 full-time, $150 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1118 full-time, $34.50 per hour part-time, $62 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course level. College room and board: $4270. College room only: $2520. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and student level. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 920, PT 224 Faculty: FT 56, PT 33 Student-Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 17 Library Holdings: 129,467 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 124 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports W; Football M; Golf M & W; Softball W; Volleyball W

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Stillwater, OK 74078
Tel: (405)744-5000
Free: 800-852-1255
Admissions: (405)744-5358
Fax: (405)744-5285
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://osu.okstate.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. David Schmidly
Registrar: Joan Payne
Admissions: Dr. Paul B. Carney
Financial Aid: Dr. Charles Bruce
Type: University Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State University System Scores: 97.45% SAT V 400+; 98.44% SAT M 400+; 40.27% ACT 18-23; 45.39% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 88 Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $3099 full-time, $103.30 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $11,122 full-time, $370.75 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1266 full-time, $42.21 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to program and student level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to program and student level. College room and board: $5848. College room only: $2848. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 16,731, PT 2,178, Grad 4,256 Faculty: FT 1,000, PT 237 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 51 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 40 Library Holdings: 2,470,138 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEJMC, AAMFT, ADtA, APA, ASLA, ASLHA, AVMA, FIDER, JRCEPAT, NASM, NAST, NCATE, NRPA, SAF Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Equestrian Sports W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Wrestling M

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, OKLAHOMA CITY

900 North Portland
Oklahoma City, OK 73107-6120
Tel: (405)947-4421
Admissions: (405)945-3287
Fax: (405)945-3277
Web Site: http://www.osuokc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Jerry Carroll
Registrar: Jeanne Kubier
Admissions: Jeanne Kubier
Financial Aid: Jerry Brooks
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State University Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 65, PT 185 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: Other, SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 11,973 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, OKMULGEE

1801 East Fourth St.
Okmulgee, OK 74447-3901
Tel: (918)293-4678
Free: 800-722-4471
Admissions: (918)293-5298
Web Site: http://www.osu-okmulgee.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Robert E. Klabenes
Registrar: Cary Fox
Admissions: Kelly Hildebrant
Financial Aid: Barrett Bell
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State University Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Trimester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,717, PT 612 Faculty: FT 129 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 25 Library Holdings: 9,965 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 84 credit hours, Associates

OKLAHOMA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

2201 Silver Lake Rd.
Bartlesville, OK 74006-6299
Tel: (918)335-6200
Admissions: (866)222-8226
Fax: (918)335-6229
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.okwu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Everett Piper
Registrar: Becky Tupper
Admissions: Jim Weidman
Financial Aid: Lee Kanakis
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Wesleyan Church Scores: 89% SAT V 400+; 85% SAT M 400+; 60% ACT 18-23; 21% ACT 24-29 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $18,950 includes full-time tuition ($12,900), mandatory fees ($850), and college room and board ($5200). College room only: $2625. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $475 per credit. Part-time mandatory fees: $50 per credit. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 864, PT 23 Faculty: FT 35, PT 5 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 84 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 70 Library Holdings: 124,722 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates; 126 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AACN, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading W; Golf M; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY

7777 South Lewis Ave.
Tulsa, OK 74171-0001
Tel: (918)495-6161
Free: 800-678-8876
Admissions: (918)495-6529
Fax: (918)495-6222
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.oru.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Richard L. Roberts
Registrar: Sheree King
Admissions: Chris Belcher
Financial Aid: Scott Carr
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: interdenominational % Accepted: 70 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $22,650 includes full-time tuition ($15,400), mandatory fees ($480), and college room and board ($6770). College room only: $3280. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Part-time tuition: $642 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 164, PT 71 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 70 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 71 Library Holdings: 216,691 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Air Force Professional Accreditation: ABET, ATS, CSWE, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

PLATT COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY)

309 South Ann Arbor Ave.
Oklahoma City, OK 73128
Tel: (405)946-7799
Fax: (405)943-2150
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.plattcollege.org/
President/CEO: Jane Nowlin
Admissions: Jane Nowlin
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Continuous Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

PLATT COLLEGE (TULSA)

3801 South Sheridan Rd.
Tulsa, OK 74145
Tel: (918)663-9000
Fax: (918)622-1240
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.plattcollege.org/
President/CEO: Susan Rone
Admissions: Susan Rone
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Calendar System: Continuous Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

REDLANDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

1300 South Country Club Rd.
El Reno, OK 73036-5304
Tel: (405)262-2552
Web Site: http://www.redlandscc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Larry F. Devane
Registrar: Dennis Harris
Financial Aid: Chris Christian
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $1380 full-time, $46 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $3630 full-time, $121 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $930 full-time, $31 per credit hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to location. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to location. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 583, PT 1,740 Faculty: FT 32, PT 93 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: ACT Library Holdings: 14,810 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 semester hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Volleyball W

ROGERS STATE UNIVERSITY

1701 West Will Rogers Blvd.
Claremore, OK 74017-3252
Tel: (918)343-7777
Free: 800-256-7511
Admissions: (918)343-7545
Fax: (918)343-7898
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.rsu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Joe Wiley
Registrar: Steve Hedges
Admissions: Becky Noah
Financial Aid: Cynthia Hoyt
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Scores: 54.53% ACT 18-23; 13.22% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Fee: $0.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $0. State resident tuition: $3300 full-time, $110 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7860 full-time, $262 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $30 full-time, $15 per term part-time. College room and board: $6210. College room only: $4050. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,681, PT 1,619 Faculty: FT 88, PT 63 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: ACT, Other % Receiving Financial Aid: 100 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 10 Library Holdings: 57,283 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates; 120 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Air Force Professional Accreditation: NLN

ROSE STATE COLLEGE

6420 Southeast 15th St.
Midwest City, OK 73110-2799
Tel: (405)733-7673
Fax: (405)733-7399
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.rose.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. James J. Cook
Registrar: Evelyn K. Hutchings
Admissions: Evelyn K. Hutchings
Financial Aid: Steve Daffen
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Faculty: FT 143, PT 269 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 90,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credit hours, Associates ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ADA, AHIMA, CARC, JRCERT, NAACLS, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Soccer W

ST. GREGORY'S UNIVERSITY

1900 West MacArthur Dr.
Shawnee, OK 74804-2499
Tel: (405)878-5100; 888-STGREGS
Fax: (405)878-5198
Web Site: http://www.stgregorys.edu/
President/CEO: Fr. Lawrence Stasyszen, OSB
Registrar: Joanne Cody
Financial Aid: Jonna Raney
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Roman Catholic Scores: 61% ACT 18-23; 30% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 83 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $19,408 includes full-time tuition ($12,922), mandatory fees ($850), and college room and board ($5636). College room only: $3200. Part-time tuition: $465 per hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $36 per hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 476, PT 392 Faculty: FT 31, PT 33 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 82 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 65 Library Holdings: 82,715 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates; 128 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

SEMINOLE STATE COLLEGE

PO Box 351
Seminole, OK 74818-0351
Tel: (405)382-9950
Admissions: (405)382-9272
Web Site: http://www.ssc.cc.ok.us/
President/CEO: Dr. James W. Utterback
Admissions: Chris Lindley
Financial Aid: Chris Lindley
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Scores: 50% ACT 18-23; 6% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent not required. For applicants under 18, nursing, medical laboratory technology programs: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $1116 full-time, $46.50 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $3,589 full-time, $149.55 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $719 full-time, $29.95 per credit hour part-time. College room and board: $2470. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,096, PT 488 Faculty: FT 48, PT 44 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 8 Library Holdings: 27,507 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: NAACLS, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Golf M & W; Softball W; Volleyball W

SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

1405 North 4th Ave.
Durant, OK 74701-0609
Tel: (580)745-2000
Free: 800-435-1327
Admissions: (580)745-2060
Fax: (580)745-7490
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.sosu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Glen Johnson
Registrar: Kristie Luke
Admissions: Kyle Stafford
Financial Aid: Sherry Foster
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Scores: 57% ACT 18-23; 16% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 80 Admission Plans: Open Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. State resident tuition: $2195 full-time, $73.15 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7016 full-time, $233.85 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1177 full-time, $34.70 per credit part-time, $68. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. College room and board: $3910. College room only: $1875. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,994, PT 669, Grad 412 Faculty: FT 141, PT 96 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 67 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 20 Library Holdings: 187,971 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ACBSP, NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running W; Football M; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W

SOUTHERN NAZARENE UNIVERSITY

6729 Northwest 39th Expressway
Bethany, OK 73008
Tel: (405)789-6400
Free: 800-648-9899
Admissions: (405)491-6324
Fax: (405)491-6381
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.snu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Loren P. Gresham
Registrar: Wes Lee
Admissions: Larry Hess
Financial Aid: Chuck Kietzman
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Nazarene Scores: 45% ACT 18-23; 30% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 54 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 15 Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. One-time mandatory fee: $350. Comprehensive fee: $20,402 includes full-time tuition ($14,400), mandatory fees ($624), and college room and board ($5378). College room only: $2458. Part-time tuition: $507 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $23 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,659, PT 134, Grad 425 Faculty: FT 69, PT 107 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 % Receiving Financial Aid: 82 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 67 Library Holdings: 95,535 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credit hours, Associates; 124 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACN, NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

SOUTHWESTERN CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

PO Box 340
Bethany, OK 73008-0340
Tel: (405)789-7661
Web Site: http://www.swcu.edu/
President/CEO: Rev. Bob R. Ely
Registrar: Debbie Burpo
Admissions: Rev. Johnny Upton
Financial Aid: Mark Arthur
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Pentecostal Holiness Church Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. Comprehensive fee: $12,250 includes full-time tuition ($8250) and college room and board ($4000). Part-time tuition: $295 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 121, PT 7, Grad 71 Faculty: FT 5, PT 9 Student-Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Exams: ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 89 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 30 Library Holdings: 38,900 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credits, Associates; 128 credits, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M; Volleyball W

SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

100 Campus Dr.
Weatherford, OK 73096-3098
Tel: (580)772-6611
Admissions: (580)774-3782
Fax: (580)774-3795
Web Site: http://www.swosu.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John Hays
Registrar: Bob Klaassen
Admissions: Todd Boyd
Financial Aid: Larry Hollingsworth
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southwestern Oklahoma State University Scores: 50% ACT 18-23; 22% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 3,771, PT 479, Grad 279 Faculty: FT 196 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 58 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 27 Library Holdings: 217,051 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 credit hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACPhE, AHIMA, APTA, ACBSP, CSWE, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Cross-Country Running W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer W; Softball W

SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY AT SAYRE

409 East Mississippi St.
Sayre, OK 73662-1236
Tel: (580)928-5533
Web Site: http://www.swosu.edu/sayre/
President/CEO: Dr. John Hays
Registrar: Kim Seymour
Admissions: Kim Seymour
Financial Aid: T.J. Williams
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Southwestern Oklahoma State University Scores: 63.29% ACT 18-23; 12.66% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For applicants 18 or over: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $3456 full-time, $108 per credit hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 328, PT 221 Faculty: FT 12, PT 7 Student-Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Exams: ACT Library Holdings: 9,975 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ABHES, AOTA, JRCERT

SPARTAN COLLEGE OF AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY

8820 East Pine St., PO Box 582833
Tulsa, OK 74158-2833
Tel: (918)836-6886
Web Site: http://www.spartan.edu/
President/CEO: Terrell W. Harrison
Registrar: Angie Waymire
Admissions: Mark Fowler
Financial Aid: Rick Cox
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Fee: $100.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For applicants who demonstrate ability to benefit from college: High school diploma or equivalent not required Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Miscellaneous, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 1,500 Faculty: FT 120, PT 30 Exams: Other Library Holdings: 18,000 Credit Hours For Degree: 42 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

6111 East Skelly Dr.
Tulsa, OK 74135-6198
Tel: (918)595-7000
Admissions: (918)595-7811
Fax: (918)595-7910
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.tulsacc.edu/
Admissions: Leanne Brewer
Financial Aid: Deborah McIntyre
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $20.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted. For adult students: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $20. State resident tuition: $47.80 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $172.20 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $25 per semester hour part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 6,162, PT 10,641 Faculty: FT 418, PT 867 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Library Holdings: 110,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credit hours, Associates Professional Accreditation: AAMAE, ADA, AHIMA, AOTA, APTA, CARC, JRCERT, NAACLS, NLN

TULSA WELDING SCHOOL

2545 East 11th St.
Tulsa, OK 74104-3909
Tel: (918)587-6789
Free: 800-WELD-PRO
Admissions: 800-331-2934
Fax: (918)295-6821
Web Site: http://www.weldingschool.com/
President/CEO: R. Harter
Admissions: Mike Thurber
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Tulsa Welding School, Jacksonville Branch Costs Per Year: Tuition: $11,090 full-time. Mandatory fees: $1900 full-time. Calendar System: Continuous Enrollment: FT 362 Faculty: FT 16, PT 1 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Library Holdings: 389 Credit Hours For Degree: 62 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

100 North University Dr.
Edmond, OK 73034-5209
Tel: (405)974-2000
Free: 800-254-4215
Admissions: (405)974-2338
Fax: (405)974-4964
Web Site: http://www.ucok.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. W. Roger Webb
Registrar: Jerry Legere
Admissions: Linda Lofton
Financial Aid: Sheila Fugett
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Scores: 63% ACT 18-23; 22% ACT 24-29 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $25.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $25. State resident tuition: $2811 full-time, $93.70 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7821 full-time, $260.70 per semester hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $807 full-time, $26.90 per semester hour part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, program, and student level. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, program, and student level. College room and board: $4476. College room only: $2166. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 10,512, PT 4,117, Grad 1,324 Faculty: FT 411, PT 401 Student-Faculty Ratio: 21:1 Exams: ACT, SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 44 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 9 Library Holdings: 254,478 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army Professional Accreditation: ABFSE, ADtA, ASLHA, ACBSP, FIDER, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

660 Parrington Oval
Norman, OK 73019-0390
Tel: (405)325-0311
Free: 800-234-6868
Admissions: (405)325-4521
Fax: (405)325-7478
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.ou.edu/
President/CEO: David L. Boren
Registrar: Matt Hamilton
Admissions: Matt Hamilton
Financial Aid: Bradley Burnett
Type: University Sex: Coed Scores: 23% ACT 18-23; 57% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 86 Application Deadline: April 01 Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $2862 full-time, $95.40 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,755 full-time, $358.50 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1546 full-time, $44.10 per credit hour part-time, $111.50 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, location, program, and reciprocity agreements. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, location, program, and reciprocity agreements. College room and board: $6361. College room only: $3355. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 17,716, PT 2,682, Grad 6,049 Faculty: FT 976, PT 228 Student-Faculty Ratio: 22:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 50 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 20 Library Holdings: 4,264,831 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Navy, Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ACEJMC, ABA, ACCE, ACSP, ALA, APA, ASLA, AALS, CSWE, FIDER, NASM, NAST, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Gymnastics M & W; Soccer W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W; Wrestling M

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER

PO Box 26901
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
Tel: (405)271-4000
Admissions: (405)271-2359
Fax: (405)271-2480
Web Site: http://www.ouhsc.edu/
President/CEO: David L. Boren
Admissions: Leslie Wilbourn
Financial Aid: Anthony Spano
Type: Two-Year Upper Division Sex: Coed Affiliation: University of Oklahoma Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $40.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $40. State resident tuition: $2862 full-time, $95.40 per credit hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $10,755 full-time, $358.50 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $1382 full-time, $38.15 per credit hour part-time, $118.50 per term part-time. Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 777, PT 104, Grad 645 Faculty: FT 273, PT 130 Student-Faculty Ratio: 3:1 Library Holdings: 300,260 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Army, Air Force Professional Accreditation: ABET, ACEHSA, ACPhE, ADA, ADtA, AOTA, APTA, APA, ASLHA, AClPE, CEPH, JRCEDMS, JRCERT, JRCNMT, LCMEAMA, NLN

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-OKLAHOMA CITY CAMPUS

6501 North Broadway Extension, Ste. 100
Oklahoma City, OK 73116-8244
Tel: (405)842-8007
Free: 800-228-7240
Admissions: (480)557-1712
Web Site: http://www.phoenix.edu/
President/CEO: Wally Hedgecock
Admissions: Nina Omelchanko
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $110.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $110. Tuition: $9360 full-time, $312 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time, $70 per course part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Continuous, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 876, Grad 175 Faculty: FT 2, PT 185 Student-Faculty Ratio: 6:1 Library Holdings: 444 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates; 120 credits, Bachelors

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-TULSA CAMPUS

10810 East 45th St., Ste. 103
Tulsa, OK 74146-3801
Tel: (918)622-4877
Free: 800-228-7240
Admissions: (480)557-1712
Web Site: http://www.phoenix.edu/
President/CEO: Lori Santiago
Admissions: Nina Omelchanko
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Admission Plans: Open Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $110.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $110. Tuition: $9360 full-time, $312 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $560 full-time, $70 per course part-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Continuous, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 1,114, Grad 188 Faculty: FT 5, PT 156 Student-Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Library Holdings: 444 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 60 credits, Associates; 120 credits, Bachelors

UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND ARTS OF OKLAHOMA

1727 West Alabama
Chickasha, OK 73018
Tel: (405)224-3140
Free: 800-933-8726
Admissions: (405)574-1204
Fax: (405)574-1220
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.usao.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. John Feaver
Registrar: Joseph Evans
Admissions: Joseph Evans
Financial Aid: Nancy Moats
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education Scores: 54% ACT 18-23; 26% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 89 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: September 06 Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $2490 full-time, $83 per hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $7230 full-time, $241 per hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $990 full-time, $33 per hour part-time. College room and board: $4170. College room only: $2180. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Trimester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 1,064, PT 366 Faculty: FT 48, PT 36 Student-Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Exams: Other % Receiving Financial Aid: 66 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 36 Library Holdings: 79,780 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 124 hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: NASM, NCATE Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Cheerleading M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA

600 South College Ave.
Tulsa, OK 74104-3189
Tel: (918)631-2000
Free: 800-331-3050
Admissions: (918)631-2307
Fax: (918)631-2247
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.utulsa.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. Steadman Upham
Registrar: Ruth V. Langston
Admissions: John Corso
Financial Aid: Vicki A. Hendrickson
Type: University Sex: Coed Affiliation: Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Scores: 98% SAT V 400+; 100% SAT M 400+; 27% ACT 18-23; 44% ACT 24-29 % Accepted: 75 Admission Plans: Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $27,790 includes full-time tuition ($20,658), mandatory fees ($80), and college room and board ($7052). College room only: $3896. Part-time tuition: $741 per credit hour. Part-time mandatory fees: $3 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 2,635, PT 161, Grad 670 Faculty: FT 306, PT 116 Student-Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT % Receiving Financial Aid: 50 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 64 Library Holdings: 940,105 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 126 credit hours, Bachelors ROTC: Air Force Professional Accreditation: AACSB, ABET, ABA, APA, ASLHA, AALS, JRCEPAT, NASM, NCATE, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Crew W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Golf M & W; Soccer M & W; Softball W; Tennis M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball W

VATTEROTT COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY)

4629 Northwest 23rd St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73127
Tel: (405)945-0088; 888-948-0088
Fax: (405)945-0788
Web Site: http://www.vatterott-college.edu/
President/CEO: Robert Birkenmaier
Admissions: Mark Hybers
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Costs Per Year: Tuition: $20,000 full-time. Mandatory fees: $900 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to degree level and program. Tuition guaranteed not to increase for student's term of enrollment. Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 249 Faculty: FT 15, PT 6 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

VATTEROTT COLLEGE (TULSA)

555 South Memorial Dr.
Tulsa, OK 74112
Tel: (918)835-8288; 888-857-4016
Admissions: (918)836-6656
Fax: (918)836-9698
Web Site: http://www.vatterott-college.edu/
President/CEO: Paul Shuler
Admissions: Tim Maloukis
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed % Accepted: 78 Calendar System: Semester Enrollment: FT 226 Faculty: FT 18, PT 0 Student-Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Professional Accreditation: ACCSCT

WESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE

2801 North Main St.
Altus, OK 73521-1397
Tel: (580)477-2000
Admissions: (580)477-7720
Fax: (580)477-7723
Web Site: http://www.wosc.edu/
President/CEO: Randy Cumby
Registrar: Dr. Larry Paxton
Admissions: Dr. Larry W. Paxton
Financial Aid: Myrna Cross
Type: Two-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education % Accepted: 100 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Early Admission Application Deadline: Rolling Application Fee: $15.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $15. State resident tuition: $2213 full-time, $73.75 per semester hour part-time. Nonresident tuition: $5348 full-time, $178.25 per semester hour part-time. College room and board: $4400. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 859, PT 1,202 Faculty: FT 37, PT 63 Student-Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Exams: ACT Library Holdings: 33,000 Regional Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Credit Hours For Degree: 64 credits, Associates Professional Accreditation: JRCERT, NLN Intercollegiate Athletics: Baseball M; Basketball M & W; Equestrian Sports M & W; Golf M & W; Softball W

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-5

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-5

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

BACONE COLLEGE

Accounting, AB

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

American Indian/Native American Studies, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Business Administration and Management, AB

Cardiopulmonary Technology/Technologist, A

Computer Science, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Education, AB

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Entrepreneurship/Entrepreneurial Studies, B

Finance, B

General Studies, A

History, A

Horticultural Science, A

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, A

Journalism, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, A

Mathematics, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Natural Resources Management/Development and Policy, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Sciences, A

Political Science and Government, A

Sales, Distribution and Marketing Operations, B

Sociology, A

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling, A

CAMERON UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Agriculture, B

Allied Health Diagnostic, Intervention, and Treatment Professions, A

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Chemistry, B

Child Care and Support Services Management, A

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, AB

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Criminal Justice/Police Science, AB

Digital Communication and Media/Multimedia, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, B

Education, BM

Educational Leadership and Administration, M

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, AB

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering Technologies/Technicians, AB

English Language and Literature, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Health and Physical Education, B

History, B

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Mathematics, B

Mechanical Drafting and Mechanical Drafting CAD/CADD, A

Music, B

Natural Sciences, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BM

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Romance Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Sociology, B

Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Subject Areas, B

Visual and Performing Arts, B

CARL ALBERT STATE COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Art Teacher Education, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business Teacher Education, A

Computer Science, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

English Language and Literature, A

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, A

Journalism, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Mathematics, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Music, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Sciences, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Psychology, A

Social Sciences, A

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, A

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, A

Zoology/Animal Biology, A

COMMUNITY CARE COLLEGE

Business Administration, Management and Operations, A

Dental Assisting/Assistant, A

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, A

Massage Therapy/Therapeutic Massage, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Pharmacy Technician/Assistant, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

CONNORS STATE COLLEGE

Animal Sciences, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Chemistry, A

Child Development, A

Computer Science, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Education, A

Engineering, A

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, A

General Studies, A

Health Services/Allied Health/Health Sciences, A

History, A

Horticultural Science, A

Journalism, A

Mathematics, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Pre-Nursing Studies, A

Psychology, A

Social Work, A

Sociology, A

EAST CENTRAL UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Advertising, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Business/Office Automation/Technology/Data Entry, B

Cartography, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, B

Comparative Literature, B

Computer Science, B

Consumer Merchandising/Retailing Management, B

Corrections, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, BM

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminal Justice/Police Science, B

Criminology, M

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Ecology, B

Education, BM

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Entrepreneurship/Entrepreneurial Studies, B

Environmental Health, B

Environmental Sciences, B

Environmental Studies, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Fashion Merchandising, B

Finance, B

General Studies, B

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Human Resources Management and Services, M

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Human Services, B

Hydrology and Water Resources Science, B

Juvenile Corrections, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Law and Legal Studies, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Medical Staff Services Technology/Technician, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Physics Teacher Education, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, BM

Public Relations, Advertising, and Applied Communication, B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Radio and Television, B

Rehabilitation Counseling, M

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Theatre/Theatre Arts Management, B

Voice and Opera, B

EASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Agricultural Economics, A

Agricultural Teacher Education, A

Agronomy and Crop Science, A

Animal Sciences, A

Art Teacher Education, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business Teacher Education, A

Chemistry, A

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Science, A

Corrections, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Economics, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

English Language and Literature, A

Environmental Studies, A

Farm/Farm and Ranch Management, A

Fashion Merchandising, A

Forestry, A

Forestry Technology/Technician, A

History, A

Horticultural Science, A

Journalism, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mathematics, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Music, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Sciences, A

Political Science and Government, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Psychology, A

Range Science and Management, A

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, A

Sociology, A

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, A

Survey Technology/Surveying, A

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, A

Wildlife and Wildlands Science and Management, A

HILLSDALE FREE WILL BAPTIST COLLEGE

Bible/Biblical Studies, A

Business/Commerce, AB

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

English Language and Literature, A

General Studies, A

Interdisciplinary Studies, AB

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mathematics, A

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, AB

Music, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, M

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Psychology, A

Religious Education, AB

Religious/Sacred Music, AB

Theology/Theological Studies, B

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

Business Administration and Management, B

CAD/CADD Drafting and/or Design Technology/Technician, A

Computer and Information Systems Security, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, AB

System, Networking, and LAN/WAN Management/Manager, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

LANGSTON UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, B

Agricultural Economics, B

Agricultural Teacher Education, B

Animal Sciences, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Computer Science, B

Corrections, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminal Justice/Police Science, B

Developmental and Child Psychology, B

Dietetics/Dieticians, B

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, BM

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English as a Second Language, M

English Language and Literature, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

Gerontology, B

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

History, B

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, B

Industrial Technology/Technician, B

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Multilingual and Multicultural Education, M

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Therapy/Therapist, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Radio and Television, B

Rehabilitation Counseling, M

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sociology, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language/ESL Language Instructor, B

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, B

Urban Education and Leadership, M

Urban Studies/Affairs, B

Voice and Opera, B

METROPOLITAN COLLEGE (TULSA)

Court Reporting/Court Reporter, AB

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

MID-AMERICA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

Behavioral Sciences, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Piano and Organ, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

Voice and Opera, B

MURRAY STATE COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Teacher Education, A

Agriculture, A

Animal Sciences, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business Teacher Education, A

Chemistry, A

Child Development, A

Computer Science, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Engineering, A

Engineering Technology, A

English Language and Literature, A

Equestrian/Equine Studies, A

History, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mathematics, A

Metallurgical Technology/Technician, A

Natural Resources and Conservation, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Public Health (MPH, DPH), A

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Agricultural Economics, A

Agronomy and Crop Science, A

American Indian/Native American Studies, A

Animal Sciences, A

Apparel and Textiles, A

Art Teacher Education, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Botany/Plant Biology, A

Broadcast Journalism, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Chemistry, A

Child Development, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Science, A

Computer Typography and Composition Equipment Operator, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Dairy Science, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Economics, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Forestry, A

Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator Production, A

Horticultural Science, A

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, A

Journalism, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mathematics, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Music, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Philosophy, A

Photography, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Sciences, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Piano and Organ, A

Plastics Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Political Science and Government, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Psychology, A

Social Sciences, A

Social Work, A

Sociology, A

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, A

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, A

Welding Technology/Welder, A

Wildlife and Wildlands Science and Management, A

Wildlife Biology, A

NORTHEASTERN STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, BM

American Indian/Native American Studies, B

American/United States Studies/Civilization, M

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Audiology/Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Cell/Cellular Biology and Histology, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Communication and Media Studies, M

Communication Disorders, BM

Computer Science, B

Counseling Psychology, M

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminal Justice/Police Science, B

Criminology, M

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Education, BM

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering Physics, B

English, M

English Language and Literature, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Fashion Merchandising, B

Finance, B

Finance and Banking, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

Geography, B

Health Teacher Education, B

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

Higher Education/Higher Education Administration, M

History, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Industrial and Manufacturing Management, M

Industrial Technology/Technician, B

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Library Science, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Medical Microbiology and Bacteriology, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Ophthalmic/Optometric Services, B

Optometry, P

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, BM

Reading Teacher Education, BM

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, B

Tourism and Travel Services Management, B

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

Voice and Opera, B

Wildlife Biology, B

Zoology/Animal Biology, B

NORTHERN OKLAHOMA COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Broadcast Journalism, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer Science, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Engineering, A

Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator Production, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

NORTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Adult and Continuing Education and Teaching, M

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Agriculture, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Computer Science, B

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, B

Counseling Psychology, M

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Criminal Justice/Police Science, B

Education, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Psychology, B

Reading Teacher Education, M

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Sciences, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

OKLAHOMA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Advertising, B

Ancient Near Eastern and Biblical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Applied Art, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Chemistry, B

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Child Development, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, B

Computer Science, B

Computer Systems Analysis/Analyst, B

Developmental and Child Psychology, B

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), B

Drama and Dance Teacher Education, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Education, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Emotional Disturbances, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Mental Retardation, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Composition, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Finance, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

French Language Teacher Education, B

German Language and Literature, B

German Language Teacher Education, B

Health and Physical Education, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Interdisciplinary Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

International Marketing, B

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Marriage and Family Therapy/Counseling, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, B

Museology/Museum Studies, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Music Theory and Composition, B

Natural Sciences, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Sciences, B

Physics, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Radio and Television, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Telecommunications Technology/Technician, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

Voice and Opera, B

Wind and Percussion Instruments, B

OKLAHOMA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Advertising, B

American Government and Politics (United States), B Art/Art Studies, General, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business/Commerce, B

Chemistry, B

Child Development, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Computer Engineering, B

Computer Science, B

Creative Writing, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Family and Community Services, B

History, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Interior Design, B

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Mechanical Engineering, B

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, B

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, M

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Psychology, B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Radio and Television, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language/ESL Language Instructor, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, MP

Voice and Opera, B

Wind and Percussion Instruments, B

OKLAHOMA CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Airframe Mechanics and Aircraft Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Applied Art, A

Area Studies, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Avionics Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Biomedical Technology/Technician, A

Broadcast Journalism, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Chemistry, A

Child Development, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Comparative Literature, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Science, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Finance, A

Fine/Studio Arts, A

Gerontology, A

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, A

History, A

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, A

Insurance, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, A

Mathematics, A

Modern Languages, A

Music, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, A

Orthoptics/Orthoptist, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Physics, A

Political Science and Government, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Psychology, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Sociology, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY

Accounting, BM

Advertising, B

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Arts Management, BM

Biochemistry, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biophysics, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MO

Business/Commerce, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, B

Cinematography and Film/Video Production, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Comparative Literature, M

Composition, M

Computer Science, BM

Corporate and Organizational Communication, M

Corrections, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminal Justice/Police Science, B

Criminology, M

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Dance, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Education, BM

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English as a Second Language, M

English Language and Literature, B

Finance, B

Finance and Banking, M

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

German Language and Literature, B

Health Services Administration, M

History, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

International Affairs, M

International Business/Trade/Commerce, BM

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Law and Legal Studies, PO

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Liberal Studies, M

Management, M

Management Information Systems and Services, BM

Marketing, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Montessori Teacher Education, B

Music, BM

Music Management and Merchandising, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Music Theory and Composition, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Performance, M

Philosophy, BM

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Nursing Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Public Administration, M

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Radio and Television, B

Religion/Religious Studies, BM

Religious Education, BM

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Technical Theatre/Theatre Design and Technology, B

Theater, M

Violin, Viola, Guitar and Other Stringed Instruments, B

Voice and Opera, B

Wind and Percussion Instruments, B

Writing, M

OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Agricultural Teacher Education, B

Agriculture, A

Agronomy and Crop Science, B

Animal Sciences, B

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Farm/Farm and Ranch Management, A

General Studies, A

History, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Industrial Technology/Technician, AB

Information Science/Studies, AB

Mathematics, B

Natural Sciences, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, AB

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, AB

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Psychology, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, B

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, B

Technology Teacher Education/Industrial Arts Teacher Education, B

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, BMD

Aeronautics/Aviation/Aerospace Science and Technology, B

Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering, BM

Agricultural Business and Management, B

Agricultural Communication/Journalism, B

Agricultural Economics, BMD

Agricultural Education, MD

Agricultural Engineering, MD

Agricultural Sciences, MD

Agricultural Teacher Education, B

Agriculture, B

Agronomy and Soil Sciences, MD

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Animal Sciences, BMD

Applied Mathematics, M

Applied Science and Technology, M

Architectural Engineering, BM

Architecture, BM

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Biochemistry, BMD

Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, B

Bioengineering, MD

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biomedical/Medical Engineering, B

Botany/Plant Biology, BMD

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business/Commerce, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Cell/Cellular and Molecular Biology, B

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BMD

Child and Family Studies, MD

Civil Engineering, BMD

Clinical Psychology, D

Clothing and Textiles, MD

Communication Disorders, BM

Computer Engineering, MD

Computer Science, BMD

Construction Management, B

Corrections, M

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, MD

Curriculum and Instruction, MD

Design and Applied Arts, MD

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Ecology, MD

Economics, BMD

Education, BMDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, MD

Educational Psychology, MD

Electrical Engineering, MD

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Emergency Medical Services, M

Engineering, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MD

Engineering Management, M

Engineering Technology, B

English, MD

English Language and Literature, B

Entomology, BMD

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, MD

Environmental Sciences, MD

Environmental Studies, B

Experimental Psychology, D

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, MD

Finance, B

Finance and Banking, MD

Fire Protection and Safety Technology/Technician, B

Fire Protection Engineering, M

Food Engineering, MD

Food Science and Technology, MD

Forestry, BM

French Language and Literature, B

Geography, BM

Geology/Earth Science, BM

German Language and Literature, B

Gerontology, M

Health Education, MD

Health Services Administration, M

Higher Education/Higher Education Administration, MD

History, BMD

Home Economics, MD

Horticultural Science, BMD

Hospitality Administration/Management, MD

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, B

Human Development and Family Studies, B

Industrial and Manufacturing Management, D

Industrial Education, MD

Industrial Engineering, B

Industrial/Management Engineering, MD

International Affairs, M

Journalism, B

Landscape Architecture, BMD

Leisure Studies, MD

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management, D

Management Information Systems and Services, BMD

Management of Technology, M

Management Science, B

Manufacturing Engineering, M

Marketing, D

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, M

Mathematics, BMD

Mechanical Engineering, BMD

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, B

Microbiology, MD

Molecular Biology, MD

Molecular Genetics, MD

Music, BM

Music Teacher Education, B

Natural Resources and Conservation, MD

Nutritional Sciences, MD

Operations Research, D

Philosophy, BM

Photonics, MD

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, BMD

Physics, BMD

Physiology, B

Plant Pathology/Phytopathology, MD

Plant Sciences, BD

Political Science and Government, BM

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, BMD

Public Health (MPH, DPH), B

Russian Language and Literature, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Sociology, BMD

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Statistics, BMD

Student Personnel Services, MD

Systems Engineering, M

Technical and Business Writing, MD

Telecommunications Management, MD

Theater, M

Veterinary Medicine, P

Veterinary Sciences, MD

Vocational and Technical Education, MD

Writing, MD

Zoology/Animal Biology, BMD

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, OKLAHOMA CITY

Accounting, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business/Office Automation/Technology/Data Entry, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, A

Education, A

Electrical and Power Transmission Installation/Installer, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Engineering, A

Fire Science/Firefighting, A

Horticultural Science, A

Industrial Design, A

Landscape Architecture, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Medical/Health Management and Clinical Assistant/Specialist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Occupational Safety and Health Technology/Technician, A

Quality Control Technology/Technician, A

Sign Language Interpretation and Translation, A

Special Products Marketing Operations, A

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling, A

Survey Technology/Surveying, A

Turf and Turfgrass Management, A

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, OKMULGEE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Architectural Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Avionics Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer Graphics, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Culinary Arts/Chef Training, A

Dietetics/Dieticians, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Food Technology and Processing, A

Graphic and Printing Equipment Operator Production, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Heavy Equipment Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Hospitality Administration/Management, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Machine Tool Technology/Machinist, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Metal and Jewelry Arts, A

Photography, A

Pipefitting/Pipefitter and Sprinkler Fitter, A

Special Products Marketing Operations, A

OKLAHOMA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

Accounting, AB

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Behavioral Sciences, AB

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, AB

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Teacher Education, B

Chemistry, AB

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), B

Education, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

History, B

Information Science/Studies, AB

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Linguistics, AB

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Natural Sciences, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Therapy/Therapist, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, B

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language/ESL Language Instructor, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY

Accounting, BM

Art Teacher Education, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biomedical Technology/Technician, B

Biomedical/Medical Engineering, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Chemistry, B

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer Engineering, B

Computer Science, B

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, BM

Education, BMD

Educational Administration and Supervision, MD

Educational Leadership and Administration, B

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering Mechanics, B

English as a Second Language, M

English Language and Literature, B

English Literature (British and Commonwealth), B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Film/Cinema Studies, B

Finance, B

Finance and Banking, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, B

French Language and Literature, B

French Language Teacher Education, B

German Language and Literature, B

German Language Teacher Education, B

History, B

Hospitality and Recreation Marketing Operations, B

Human Resources Management and Services, M

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

International/Global Studies, B

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Management Science, B

Marketing, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Mechanical Engineering, B

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, BMD

P Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Music Theory and Composition, B

Non-Profit/Public/Organizational Management, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, BM

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Engineering, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Psychology, B

Public Health (MPH, DPH), B

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Radio and Television, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, M

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Teacher Education, Multiple Levels, B

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language/ESL Language Instructor, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, MDP

Theology/Theological Studies, B

REDLANDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

Agricultural Teacher Education, A

Agriculture, A

Animal Sciences, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biological and Physical Sciences, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Child Development, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Science, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Corrections, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

English Language and Literature, A

Equestrian/Equine Studies, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mathematics, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Sciences, A

Psychology, A

Social Sciences, A

ROGERS STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Agricultural Business and Management, A

American Indian/Native American Studies, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, AB

Broadcast Journalism, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Chemistry, A

Commercial and Advertising Art, A

Computer Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Computer Science, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering Technologies/Technicians, AB

Equestrian/Equine Studies, A

Farm/Farm and Ranch Management, A

History, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Mathematics, A

Nursing, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Sciences, A

Political Science and Government, A

Radio and Television, A

Secondary Education and Teaching, A

Social Sciences, AB

Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling, A

ROSE STATE COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Avionics Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Broadcast Journalism, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business/Commerce, A

Chemistry, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Court Reporting/Court Reporter, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Dental Assisting/Assistant, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Developmental and Child Psychology, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

English Language and Literature, A

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, A

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, A

Health and Medical Laboratory Technologies, A

History, A

Industrial Radiologic Technology/Technician, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Journalism, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Library Science, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Mathematics, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Modern Languages, A

Music, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Physics, A

Political Science and Government, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, A

Psychology, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Sociology, A

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, A

ST. GREGORY'S UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biomedical Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Chemistry, B

Communication and Media Studies, B

Conservation Biology, B

Criminal Justice/Police Science, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

Dance, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Fine/Studio Arts, AB

History, B

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, AB

Journalism, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, AB

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Management Science, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics and Computer Science, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Natural Resources and Conservation, B

Natural Sciences, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, B

Philosophy, B

Photojournalism, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Engineering, A

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Nursing Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Theology/Pre-Ministerial Studies, A

Psychology, B

Social Sciences, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Sociology, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

Visual and Performing Arts, B

SEMINOLE STATE COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Behavioral Sciences, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer Science, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

English Language and Literature, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mathematics, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Sciences, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Social Sciences, A

SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Airline/Commercial/Professional Pilot and Flight Crew, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Aviation, M

Aviation/Airway Management and Operations, BM

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

BioTechnology, B

Botany/Plant Biology, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Communication, Journalism and Related Programs, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, BM

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, M

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Environmental Sciences, B

Finance, B

General Studies, B

Health and Medical Laboratory Technologies, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, B

Industrial and Manufacturing Management, M

Industrial Technology/Technician, B

Information Science/Studies, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Management Science, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Natural Resources and Conservation, B

Occupational Safety and Health Technology/Technician, B

Office Management and Supervision, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Special Education and Teaching, B

Wildlife and Wildlands Science and Management, B

Zoology/Animal Biology, B

SOUTHERN NAZARENE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Aviation/Airway Management and Operations, B

Biochemistry, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business/Commerce, A

Chemistry, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, A

Counseling Psychology, M

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Education, BM

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Environmental Studies, B

Finance, B

Gerontology, B

History, B

Human Development and Family Studies, B

International Relations and Affairs, B

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Management Science, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Marriage and Family Therapy/Counseling, M

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, B

Music Management and Merchandising, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Philosophy, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Psychology, BM

Religion/Religious Studies, M

Religious Education, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Spanish Language Teacher Education, B

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, B

Speech Teacher Education, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, M

Theology/Theological Studies, B

Urban Studies/Affairs, B

Voice and Opera, B

Youth Ministry, B

SOUTHWESTERN CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

Behavioral Sciences, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), B

Interdisciplinary Studies, A

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, BM

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious Education, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Social Work, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Accounting, B

Art Education, M

Art Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biophysics, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Chemistry, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Science, B

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Education, BM

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Measurement and Evaluation, M

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

Engineering Physics, B

Engineering Technology, B

English Education, M

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Finance, B

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, B

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

History, B

History Teacher Education, B

Industrial Technology/Technician, B

Kinesiology and Movement Studies, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, B

Mathematics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Music, BM

Music Management and Merchandising, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Music Therapy/Therapist, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies, B

Pharmacy, BP

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, B

Recreation and Park Management, M

Religious/Sacred Music, B

School Psychology, M

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, BM

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Science Teacher Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, M

Social Work, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Technology Education/Industrial Arts, B

Technology Teacher Education/Industrial Arts Teacher Education, B

Therapeutic Recreation/Recreational Therapy, B

Vocational and Technical Education, M

Voice and Opera, B

Wind and Percussion Instruments, B

SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY AT SAYRE

Business Administration and Management, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer Science, A

Corrections, A

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, A

General Studies, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Occupational Therapist Assistant, A

Physical Therapist Assistant, A

SPARTAN COLLEGE OF AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY

Airline/Commercial/Professional Pilot and Flight Crew, A

Avionics Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Communications Technology/Technician, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Instrumentation Technology/Technician, A

Quality Control Technology/Technician, A

TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Accounting, A

Administrative Assistant and Secretarial Science, A

Advertising, A

Aeronautics/Aviation/Aerospace Science and Technology, A

Agriculture, A

Airframe Mechanics and Aircraft Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

American/United States Studies/Civilization, A

Applied Horticulture/Horticultural Operations, A

Architecture, A

Art/Art Studies, General, A

Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, A

Astronomy, A

Automobile/Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician, A

Avionics Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

Behavioral Sciences, A

Biology/Biological Sciences, A

Biomedical Technology/Technician, A

Botany/Plant Biology, A

Business Administration and Management, A

Business and Personal/Financial Services Marketing Operations, A

Business Teacher Education, A

Chemistry, A

Child Care and Support Services Management, A

Child Development, A

Civil Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, A

Computer and Information Sciences, A

Computer and Information Systems Security, A

Computer Graphics, A

Computer Hardware Engineering, A

Computer Programming, A

Computer Programming, Specific Applications, A

Computer Programming, Vendor/Product Certification, A

Computer Science, A

Computer Software and Media Applications, A

Computer Software Engineering, A

Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications, A

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, A

Construction Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Corrections, A

Creative Writing, A

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Data Entry/Microcomputer Applications, A

Data Modeling/Warehousing and Database Administration, A

Dental Assisting/Assistant, A

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, A

Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, A

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, A

Ecology, A

Economics, A

Education, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Elementary and Middle School Administration/Principalship, A

Elementary Education and Teaching, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Engineering, A

English Language and Literature, A

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, A

Fashion/Apparel Design, A

Fire Protection and Safety Technology/Technician, A

Fire Science/Firefighting, A

Forestry, A

French Language and Literature, A

Geography, A

Geology/Earth Science, A

German Language and Literature, A

Health Information/Medical Records Administration/Administrator, A

Health Teacher Education, A

Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician, A

History, A

Horticultural Science, A

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, A

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, A

Human Services, A

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, A

Industrial Radiologic Technology/Technician, A

Industrial Technology/Technician, A

Information Science/Studies, A

Information Technology, A

Insurance, A

Interior Design, A

International Business/Trade/Commerce, A

International Relations and Affairs, A

Italian Language and Literature, A

Japanese Language and Literature, A

Journalism, A

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, A

Labor and Industrial Relations, A

Landscape Architecture, A

Landscaping and Groundskeeping, A

Latin Language and Literature, A

Law and Legal Studies, A

Legal Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Legal Assistant/Paralegal, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Library Science, A

Management Information Systems and Services, A

Management Science, A

Marketing/Marketing Management, A

Mass Communication/Media Studies, A

Materials Sciences, A

Mathematics, A

Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

Medical/Clinical Assistant, A

Music, A

Music Teacher Education, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Occupational Safety and Health Technology/Technician, A

Occupational Therapist Assistant, A

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, A

Oceanography, Chemical and Physical, A

Ornamental Horticulture, A

Petroleum Technology/Technician, A

Philosophy, A

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, A

Physical Sciences, A

Physical Therapy/Therapist, A

Physician Assistant, A

Physics, A

Plant Protection and Integrated Pest Management, A

Political Science and Government, A

Pre-Dentistry Studies, A

Pre-Engineering, A

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, A

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, A

Prepress/Desktop Publishing and Digital Imaging Design, A

Pre-Veterinary Studies, A

Psychology, A

Public Health (MPH, DPH), A

Purchasing, Procurement/Acquisitions and Contracts Management, A

Quality Control Technology/Technician, A

Radio and Television, A

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, A

Religion/Religious Studies, A

Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist, A

Russian Language and Literature, A

Sign Language Interpretation and Translation, A

Social Sciences, A

Social Work, A

Sociology, A

Spanish Language and Literature, A

Speech and Rhetorical Studies, A

Surgical Technology/Technologist, A

Survey Technology/Surveying, A

System Administration/Administrator, A

Telecommunications Technology/Technician, A

Therapeutic Recreation/Recreational Therapy, A

Tourism and Travel Services Management, A

Veterinary/Animal Health Technology/Technician and Veterinary Assistant, A

Web Page, Digital/Multimedia and Information Resources Design, A

Web/Multimedia Management and Webmaster, A

Word Processing, A

Zoology/Animal Biology, A

TULSA WELDING SCHOOL

Welding Technology/Welder, A

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

Accounting, B

Actuarial Science, B

Adult and Continuing Education and Teaching, BM

Advertising, B

American/United States Studies/Civilization, M

Apparel and Textiles, B

Applied Mathematics, BM

Applied Physics, M

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Audiology/Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, M

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biomedical/Medical Engineering, B

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Business/Commerce, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Chemistry, BM

Child Development, B

Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Commercial and Advertising Art, B

Communication Disorders, M

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer Science, B

Consumer Merchandising/Retailing Management, B

Counseling Psychology, M

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, BM

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Criminology, M

Dance, B

Design and Applied Arts, M

Dietetics/Dieticians, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, M

Economics, B

Education, M

Educational Administration and Supervision, M

Educational Leadership and Administration, B

Educational Media/Instructional Technology, M

Educational/Instructional Media Design, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, BM

English, M

English as a Second Language, M

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, B

Fashion Merchandising, B

Finance, B

Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, B

Forensic Science and Technology, B

French Language and Literature, B

Funeral Service and Mortuary Science, B

Geography, B

German Language and Literature, B

Gerontology, M

Health and Physical Education/Fitness, B

Health Education, M

Health Occupations Teacher Education, B

Higher Education/Higher Education Administration, M

History, BM

History Teacher Education, B

Home Economics, M

Home Economics Education, M

Hotel/Motel Administration/Management, B

Human Development, M

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Interior Design, BM

International Affairs, M

Journalism, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, BM

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Museology/Museum Studies, M

Music, BM

Music Teacher Education, BM

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nutritional Sciences, M

Occupational Safety and Health Technology/Technician, B

Performance, M

Philosophy, B

Photography, B

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, BM

Psychology, BM

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Radio and Television, B

Reading Teacher Education, BM

Real Estate, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, BM

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, BM

Statistics, M

Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Subject Areas, B

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

Urban Studies/Affairs, M

Violin, Viola, Guitar and Other Stringed Instruments, B

Voice and Opera, B

Wind and Percussion Instruments, B

Writing, M

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

Accounting, BM

Adult and Continuing Education and Teaching, MD

Advertising, B

Advertising and Public Relations, M

Aeronautics/Aviation/Aerospace Science and Technology, B

Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering, BMD

African-American/Black Studies, B

American Indian/Native American Studies, BM

Anthropology, BMD

Architecture, BMO

Architecture and Related Services, B

Area Studies, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, BM

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Astronomy, B

Astrophysics, BMD

Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology, B

Biochemistry, MD

Bioengineering, MD

Biomedical/Medical Engineering, B

Botany/Plant Biology, BMD

Broadcast Journalism, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MDO

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Ceramic Arts and Ceramics, M

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BMD

Chinese Language and Literature, B

Cinematography and Film/Video Production, B

Civil Engineering, BMD

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, B

Communication and Media Studies, MD

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Communication, Journalism and Related Programs, B

Community Psychology, M

Composition, MD

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Computer Engineering, BMD

Computer Science, MD

Counseling Psychology, D

Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services, M

Criminology, B

Curriculum and Instruction, MD

Dance, BM

Design and Applied Arts, M

Design and Visual Communications, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Economics, BMD

Education, MDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MD

Educational Psychology, MD

Electrical Engineering, MD

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MD

Engineering Physics, BMD

English, MD

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Entrepreneurship/Entrepreneurial Studies, B

Environmental and Occupational Health, M

Environmental Design/Architecture, B

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, M

Environmental Sciences, BMD

Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering, B

Exercise and Sports Science, MD

Film, Television, and Video Production, M

Finance, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Foreign Language Teacher Education, B

Foundations and Philosophy of Education, MD

French Language and Literature, BMDO

Geography, BMD

Geological and Earth Sciences/Geosciences, B

Geological Engineering, MD

Geology/Earth Science, BMD

Geophysics and Seismology, BM

Geotechnical Engineering, M

German Language and Literature, BMO

Hazardous Materials Management and Waste Technology/Technician, M

Health and Medical Laboratory Technologies, B

Health and Physical Education, B

Higher Education/Higher Education Administration, MD

History, BMD

History of Science and Technology, MD

Human Resources Management and Services, B

Human Services, M

Industrial Engineering, B

Industrial/Management Engineering, MD

Information Science/Studies, MO

Interdisciplinary Studies, MD

Interior Design, B

International Affairs, M

International Business/Trade/Commerce, B

Journalism, BM

Landscape Architecture, MO

Law and Legal Studies, PO

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Liberal Studies, M

Library Science, BMO

Linguistics, B

Management, M

Management Information Systems and Services, BM

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mass Communication/Media Studies, M

Mathematics, BMDO

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Mechanical Engineering, BMD

Meteorology, MD

Microbiology, BMD

Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, B

Music, BMD

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, MD

Music Theory and Composition, BM

Musicology and Ethnomusicology, M

Natural Resources and Conservation, M

Organizational Behavior Studies, M

Painting, M

Performance, MD

Petroleum Engineering, BMD

Philosophy, BMD

Photography, BM

Physics, BMD

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, BMD

Printmaking, M

Professional Studies, B

Psychology, BMD

Public Administration, BM

Public Relations/Image Management, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Russian Language and Literature, B

School Psychology, M

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, BM

Sociology, BMD

Spanish Language and Literature, BMDO

Special Education and Teaching, BMD

Structural Engineering, M

Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Subject Areas, B

Telecommunications, M

Theater, M

Urban and Regional Planning, MO

Violin, Viola, Guitar and Other Stringed Instruments, B

Visual and Performing Arts, B

Voice and Opera, B

Water Resources, M

Wind and Percussion Instruments, B

Women's Studies, B

Writing, M

Zoology/Animal Biology, BMD

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER

Allied Health and Medical Assisting Services, MDO

Allopathic Medicine, PO

Audiology/Audiologist and Hearing Sciences, B

Audiology/Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Biochemistry, MD

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MDO

Biopsychology, MD

Biostatistics, MD

Cell Biology and Anatomy, MD

Communication Disorders, BMDO

Communication Disorders Sciences and Services, B

Dental Hygiene/Hygienist, B

Dentistry, P

Dietetics/Dieticians, B

Environmental and Occupational Health, MDO

Epidemiology, MD

Genetic Counseling/Counselor, M

Health Education, D

Health Physics/Radiological Health, MD

Health Promotion, MD

Health Services Administration, MDO

Immunology, MD

Medical Physics, MD

Microbiology, MD

Molecular Biology, MD

Neuroscience, MD

Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist, B

Nursing, MO

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nutritional Sciences, M

Occupational Therapy/Therapist, M

Orthodontics, M

Pathology/Experimental Pathology, D

Periodontics, M

Pharmaceutical Sciences, MDO

Pharmacy, P

Physical Therapy/Therapist, M

Physiology, MD

Public Health, MD

Radiation Biology/Radiobiology, MD

Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer, B

Rehabilitation Sciences, M

Special Education and Teaching, M

Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-OKLAHOMA CITY CAMPUS

Accounting, BM

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Electronic Commerce, M

Health Services Administration, M

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

Human Resources Management and Services, M

Information Science/Studies, M

Information Technology, B

Management Information Systems and Services, BM

Management of Technology, M

Management Science, B

Nursing, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Organizational Management, M

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-TULSA CAMPUS

Accounting, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Corrections and Criminal Justice, B

Electronic Commerce, M

Health Services Administration, M

Health/Health Care Administration/Management, B

Human Resources Management and Services, M

Management Information Systems and Services, BM

Management of Technology, M

Management Science, B

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Organizational Management, M

UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND ARTS OF OKLAHOMA

American Indian/Native American Studies, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business/Commerce, B

Chemistry, B

Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technician, B

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer and Information Sciences, B

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Economics, B

Education/Teaching of Individuals with Hearing Impairments, Including Deafness, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

English Language and Literature, B

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Health and Physical Education, B

History, B

Mathematics, B

Music, B

Natural Sciences, B

Physics, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, B

Sociology, B

Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA

Accounting, B

Anthropology, BMO

Applied Mathematics, B

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Arts Management, B

Athletic Training and Sports Medicine, B

Audiology/Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathology/Pathologist, B

Biochemistry, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MDO

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Business Administration, Management and Operations, MO

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BM

Clinical Psychology, MDO

Communication Disorders, M

Communication Studies/Speech Communication and Rhetoric, B

Computer Science, BMD

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Economics, B

Education, BM

Electrical Engineering, M

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MDO

Engineering Management, M

Engineering Physics, B

English, MDO

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Studies, B

Film/Cinema Studies, B

Finance, B

Finance and Banking, M

Financial Engineering, M

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

French Language and Literature, B

Geology/Earth Science, BM

Geophysics and Seismology, B

Geosciences, MD

German Language and Literature, B

History, BMO

Industrial and Organizational Psychology, MDO

Information Science/Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, BM

Investment Management, M

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Law and Legal Studies, MPO

Legal Professions and Studies, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Management Information Systems and Services, B

Management of Technology, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, BM

Mathematics Teacher Education, M

Mechanical Engineering, BMD

Music, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Petroleum Engineering, BMD

Philosophy, B

Physics, B

Piano and Organ, B

Political Science and Government, B

Psychology, BMDO

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, M

Sociology, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Taxation, M

Voice and Opera, B

VATTEROTT COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY)

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technologies/Technicians, A

Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology/Technician, A

Information Technology, A

Medical Office Assistant/Specialist, A

VATTEROTT COLLEGE (TULSA)

Computer Programming/Programmer, A

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, A

Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology/Technician, A

Medical Administrative Assistant/Secretary, A

WESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE

Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping, A

Aviation/Airway Management and Operations, A

Child Development, A

Computer/Information Technology Services Administration and Management, A

Criminal Justice/Police Science, A

Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (EMT Paramedic), A

Fire Protection, A

General Studies, A

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, A

Mechanics and Repairers, A

Medical Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiation Therapist, A

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, A

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-4

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-4

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA

STATE EDUCATION OFFICE

Jay Evans, Program Specialist
Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education
1500 W. Seventh Ave.
Stillwater, OK 74074-4364
(405)377-2000

STATE REGULATORY INFORMATION

For specific information, contact the Oklahoma State Department of Education, address above.

ADA

Pontotoc Technology Center

601 W. 33rd, Ada, OK 74820-9808. Trade and Technical. Founded 1986. Contact: Linda Medlock, Student Svcs. Dir., (580)310-2200, (580)310-2250, Fax: (580)436-0236, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.pontotoc.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,6265 to $3,369 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 259. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Technology; Business Technology; Carpentry; Computer Technology; Cosmetology; Emergency Medical Technology; Heavy Equipment; Nursing, Practical

AFTON

Northeast Technology Center (Afton)

19901 S. Hwy. 69, PO Box 219, Afton, OK 74331. Cosmetology, Nursing, Trade and Technical. Founded 1969. Contact: DeWayne Mead, Dir. Student Svcs., (918)257-8324, (918)540-1111, 888-513-2378, Fax: (918)257-4342, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.netechcenters.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 101. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC; NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Auto Body & Fender Repair; Automotive Service; Business Management; Carpentry; Computer Information Science; Cosmetology; Culinary Arts; Diesel Technology; Electrical Technology; Marine Technology; Masonry; Nursing, Practical; Welding Technology

ALTUS

Western Oklahoma State College

2801 N. Main St., Altus, OK 73521. Two-Year College. Founded 1926. Contact: Mr. Larry Paxton, Dir. of Academic Svcs., (580)477-7700, Fax: (580)477-7707, Web Site: http://www.wosc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $74/credit resident; $178/credit non-resident (includes fees). Enrollment: Total 615. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; NCA-HLC; FAA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available.

Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Accounting, Specialist (2 Yr); Agricultural Science (2 Yr); Agri-Management (2 Yr); Aircraft Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Airport Management (2 Yr); Business Education (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (2 Yr); Commercial Art (2 Yr); Construction Technology (2 Yr); Correctional Science (2 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (2 Yr); Law Enforcement (2 Yr); Management Development (2 Yr); Music (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Photography (2 Yr)

ALVA

Northwest Technology Center

1801 11th St., Alva, OK 73717. Trade and Technical. Founded 1972. Contact: Dwight Hughes, Asst. Superintendent, (580)327-0344, Fax: (580)327-5467, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.nwtechonline.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1312 per year in district; $3,600 out-of-district. Enrollment: Total 220. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Auto Body & Fender Repair (1050 Hr); Automotive Technology (1050 Hr); Building Maintenance (1050 Hr); Business Technology (2100 Hr); Computer Repair (1050 Hr); E-Commerce (1050 Hr); Health Occupations (1050 Hr)

Northwestern Oklahoma State University

709 Oklahoma Blvd., Alva, OK 73717. Other. Founded 1897. Contact: Dr. Steven Lohmann, VP for Academic Affairs, (580)327-1700, Fax: (580)327-1881, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.nwosu.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $109/credit (includes fees) resident; $270 non-resident. Enrollment: Total 1,306. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NCATE; NLNAC; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available.

ARDMORE

Oklahoma State Horseshoeing School

4802 Dogwood Rd., Ardmore, OK 73401. Trade and Technical. Founded 1975. Contact: Reggie Kester, Owner/Operator, (580)223-0064, 800-634-2811, Fax: (580)223-0729, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.horseshoes.com/okstate. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $5,500. Enrollment: Total 22. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Horseshoeing (300 Hr)

Southern Oklahoma Vocational Technical Center

2610 Sam Noble Pky., Ardmore, OK 73401. Trade and Technical. Founded 1966. Contact: Nyoka Rogers, (580)223-2070, 800-989-4599, Fax: (580)223-2120, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.sotc.org. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: none in-district; $4,115/semester out-of-district; $5,340/semester out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 900. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (1020 Hr); Automotive Collision Repair (1020 Hr); Automotive Service (1020 Hr); Carpentry (1020 Hr); Computer Aided Drafting (1020 Hr); Computer Technology (1020 Hr); Cosmetology (1020 Hr); Diesel Technology (1020 Hr); Health Technology (1020 Hr); Nursing, Practical (1504 Hr); Surgical Technology (1200 Hr); Telecommunications Technology (1020 Hr); Welding Technology (1020 Hr)

ATOKA

Kiamichi Technology Center (Atoka)

Hwy 3 and 75 W, Atoka, OK 74525-0240. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Bill G. Powers, Superintendent, (580)889-7321, 888-567-6645, Fax: (580)889-5642, Web Site: http://www.kiamichi-atoka.tec.ok.us; GaySue Bayles, Registrar, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kiamichi-atoka.tec.ok.us/request.htm. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Tuition: $1,312; $250 fees. Enrollment: Total 78. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Administrative Assistant (1050 Hr); Automotive Service (1050 Hr); Carpentry (1050 Hr); Computer Technology (1050 Hr); Cosmetology (1050 Hr); Nursing, Practical (1050 Hr)

BARTLESVILLE

Oklahoma Wesleyan University

2201 Silver Lake Rd., Bartlesville, OK 74006. Other. Founded 1909. Contact: Jim Wiedman, VP for Enrollment Services, (918)335-6200, 800-468-6292, Fax: (918)335-6229, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.okwu.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $12,900 per year; $850 fees per year. Enrollment: Total 420. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS; NCA-HLC; NCATE; CCNE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Bible Study (2 Yr); Communications Technology (2 Yr); English As A Second Language (2 Yr); Mathematics (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office Administration (2 Yr); Physical Education (2 Yr); Small Business Management (2 Yr)

BROKEN ARROW

Broken Arrow Beauty College

400 S. Elm Place, Broken Arrow, OK 74012. Cosmetology. Founded 1969. Contact: Frances Sells, (918)251-9669, (918)251-9660, Fax: (918)258-3059, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,180-$7,730 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 2, women 114. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Barbering (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (600 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

BURNS FLAT

Western Oklahoma Area Vocational-Technical School

PO Box 1469, Burns Flat, OK 73624. Allied Medical, Business, Cosmetology, Barber. Founded 1971. Contact: C. Orsack, (580)562-3181, Fax: (580)562-4476, Web Site: http://www.tec.ok.us. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: men 350, women 150. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Business, General Office (1 Yr); Career Development; Computer Electro-Mechanics (2 Yr); Computer Science - Terminal Operation (1 Yr); Dental Assisting (1 Yr); Diesel Technology (2 Yr); Food Service & Management (2 Yr); Graphic Arts (2 Yr); Health Occupations (1 Yr); Meat Cutting, Packing & Handling (1 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Welding Technology

CHICKASHA

Canadian Valley Technology Center

1401 Michigan Ave., Chickasha, OK 73018. Trade and Technical. Founded 1970. Contact: George Tiner, Assistant Superintendent, (405)224-7220, Fax: (405)222-3839, Web Site: http://www.cutech.org. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Semester. Tuition: Full-time $1312 in-district; Part-time $656 in district except PN $1980. Surgical Technology $1607. All per year. Enrollment: Total 396. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Service (2 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Business Education (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (2 Yr); Graphic Arts (2 Yr); Health Information Technology (2 Yr); Machinist, Advanced (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (2 Yr); Occupational Services (2 Yr); Surgical Technology (1 Yr); Web Development (2 Yr); Welding Technology (2 Yr)

CLAREMORE

Claremore Beauty College

200 N. Cherokee, Claremore, OK 74017. Cosmetology. Founded 1969. Contact: Denise Nelson, (918)341-4370, Fax: (918)435-2132, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.claremorebeautycollege.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $7,150 Basic Cosmetology, $2,500 Manicure, $4,100 Instructor (not including books and supplies). Enrollment: men 0, women 10. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

DRUMRIGHT

Central Tech (Drumright)

3 CT Circle, Drumright, OK 74030. Trade and Technical. Founded 1969. Contact: Phil Waul, Supt., (918)352-2551, 800-256-8282, Fax: (918)352-2441, Web Site: http://www.ctechok.org. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Service (9 Mo); Building Trades (9 Mo); Computer Aided Drafting (9 Mo); Computer Networking (9 Mo); Computer Servicing - Software Applications (9 Mo); Computer Support Technology (9 Mo); Cosmetology (9 Mo); Criminal Justice (9 Mo); Electricity, Industrial (9 Mo); Engineering Technology, Electronic (9 Mo); Graphic Design (9 Mo); Health Occupations (9 Mo); Manufacturing Technology (9 Mo); Mechanics, Diesel (9 Mo); Motorcycle Repair (9 Mo); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Printing, Offset (9 Mo); Ranch & Farm Management (1 Yr); Small Business Management (9 Mo); Telecommunications Technology (9 Mo); Truck Driving (6 Wk); Web Development (9 Mo); Welding Technology (9 Mo)

DUNCAN

Red River Technology Center

3300 W. Bois D'Arc, PO Box 1807, Duncan, OK 73534. Trade and Technical. Founded 1975. Contact: Jerry Morris, Superintendent, (580)255-2903, 888-607-2446, Fax: (405)255-0491, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.redriver.tec.ok.us. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 605. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Auto Body & Fender Repair; Auto Mechanics; Business; Carpentry; Computer Repair; Cosmetology; Drafting & Design Technology; Electronics Technology; Health Technology; Machine Shop; Mechanics, Diesel; Nursing, Practical; Ranch & Farm Management; Surgical Technology; Welding Technology

DURANT

Kiamichi Technology Center (Durant)

810 Waldron Rd, Durant, OK 74701-1904. Trade and Technical, Allied Medical. Contact: Mike Goodwin, Campus Dir., (580)924-7081, Fax: (580)924-2790, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kiamichi-durant.tec.ok.us; Sheila Ammons, Office Manager/Financial Aid, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $3,200. Enrollment: Total 99. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Service (2100 Hr); Computer Repair (2100 Hr); Emergency Medical Technology (2100 Hr); Nursing, Practical (2100 Hr); Office Administration (2100 Hr); Welding Technology (2100 Hr)

Southern School of Beauty

140 W. Main St., Durant, OK 74701. Cosmetology. Founded 1982. Contact: Dale White, (580)924-1049, (580)924-7909, Fax: (580)924-4841, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $7,200 cosmetology; $4,000 cosmetology instructor; $3,200 nail technology. Enrollment: men 2, women 33. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Cosmetology - Refresher; Manicurist (600 Hr)

EDMOND

University of Central Oklahoma

100 N. University Dr., Edmond, OK 73034. Other. Founded 1890. Contact: Gerry Legere, Asst. VP for Enrollment Mgt/Registrar, (405)974-2727, (405)974-2000, 800-254-4215, Fax: (405)341-4964, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ucok.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,950. Enrollment: men 6,260, women 8,986. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ABFSE; NCATE; NLNAC; NASM; ACSCPT; ACBSP; ASHA; NAEYC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available.

EL RENO

Redlands Community College

1300 S. Country Club Rd., El Reno, OK 73036-5304. Two-Year College. Founded 1938. Contact: Jana Dawson, Admissions Assistant, (405)262-2552, (866)415-6367, Fax: (405)422-1200, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.redlandscc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,190 in-state; $3,570 out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 928. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agriculture, General (2 Yr); Art (2 Yr); Biological Technology (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (15 Hr-2 Yr); Education (2 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); General Studies (2 Yr); Horse Management (2 Yr); Mathematics (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (70 Hr); Physical Education (2 Yr); Physical Fitness (2 Yr); Public Speaking (2 Yr)

ENID

Autry Vocational Technical Center

1201 W. Willow St., Enid, OK 73703. Trade and Technical. Founded 1967. Contact: Dr. James Strate, Dir., (580)242-2750, 800-522-5810, Fax: (580)233-8262, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.autrytech.com; Linda Belknap, Career Counselor, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Year. Enrollment: Total 850. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: FAA; NCAHLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Automated; Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Aircraft Mechanics; Automotive Collision Repair; Automotive Technology; Business Automation; Construction Technology; Culinary Arts; Dental Office Management; Drafting & Design Technology; Electronics Technology; Graphic Arts; Health Technology; Heavy Equipment; Information Sciences Technology; Machine Shop; Medical Office Management; Nursing, Practical; Surgical Technology; Welding, Combination

Enid Beauty College

1601 E. Broadway, Enid, OK 73701-4538. Cosmetology. Founded 1963. Contact: Lois Record, (580)237-6677, (580)237-6234, Fax: (580)237-4145, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Hour. Tuition: $4,850 to $7,500 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 0, women 45. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1000-1500H); Cosmetology Instructor (3 Mo)

FAIRVIEW

Oklahoma Northwest Area Vocational-Technical School

Fairview Site, Box 250, Fairview, OK 73737. Trade and Technical. Founded 1972. Contact: Jane Bowen, Dir., (580)227-3708, Fax: (580)227-2651. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $800 full-time, in-district; $2,400 full-time, out-of-district. Enrollment: men 60, women 80. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Technology (1050 Hr); Building & Grounds Management (1050 Hr); Business Communications (1050 Hr); Business, General Office (1050 Hr); Diesel Technology (1050 Hr); Health Technology (1050 Hr); Microcomputers (1050 Hr); Welding Technology (1050 Hr)

FORT COBB

Caddo-Kiowa Vocational Technical Center

100 Career Tech Dr., PO Box 190, Fort Cobb, OK 73038. Trade and Technical. Founded 1968. Contact: Jerry Martin, Superintendent, (405)643-5511, (405)643-3230, 888-302-9050, Fax: (405)643-2144, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.caddokiowa.com/. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 1,605. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Auto Mechanics; Automotive Collision Repair; Business Education; Child Care & Guidance; Construction Technology; Cosmetology; Data Processing; Electrical Technology; Electronics Technology; Farm Management Technology; Food Service & Management; Health Occupations; Horticulture; Machine Shop; Masonry; Mechanics, Diesel; Mechanics, Power Plant; Nursing, Practical; Printing, Offset; Truck Driving; Welding Technology

FORT SILL

United States Army Field Artillery School

ATTN: ATSF-DS, Fort Sill, OK 73503-5600. Other. Founded 1911. Contact: Bill Lodes, (580)442-5903, (580)442-3427, Fax: (580)442-7764, Web Site: http://sill-www.army.mil/FDIC/ITPS/Training_courses.htm. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Enrollment: Total 500. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Management; Physical Fitness

HUGO

Kiamichi Technology Center (Hugo)

107 S. 15th, PO Box 699, Hugo, OK 74743. Trade and Technical. Contact: Dr. Charles H. Wibben, Dir., (580)326-6491, 888-567-6807, Fax: (580)326-5696, Web Site: http://www.kiamichi-hugo.tec.ok.us; Kelly Brame, Student Services Coordinator/Counselor, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $1.25 per credit hour. Enrollment: men 150, women 150. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Technology; Building Construction Technology; Business Technology; Child Care & Guidance; Computer Repair; Health Technology; Mechanics, Diesel; Nursing, Practical; Retail Management

IDABEL

Kiamichi Technology Center (Idabel)

3205 Lincoln Rd. NE, Hwy 70 N, Idabel, OK 74745-2415. Trade and Technical. Contact: Johnnie Meredith, Campus Dir., (580)286-7555, 888-567-6724, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kiamichi-idabel.tec.ok.us; Jason Eric Allen, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $1,312; $250 fees. Enrollment: Total 296. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Service; Food Service & Management; Health Occupations; Industrial Technology; Information Technology; Masonry; Nursing, Practical; Welding Technology

JENKS

Jenks Beauty College

535 West Main, Jenks, OK 74037-0955. Cosmetology. Founded 1977. Contact: Myra Sellers, Owner, (918)299-0901, Fax: (918)299-7053, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://jenksbeautycollege.com; Dolores Ruiz, Admissions Dir.. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,495-$8,410. Enrollment: men 23, women 72. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Cosmetology Refresher; Facial Treatment (600 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

LAWTON

Cameron University

2800 West Gore Blvd., Lawton, OK 73505-6377. Other. Founded 1908. Contact: Zoe Durant, Dir. of Admissions, (580)581-2200, (580)581-2289, 888-454-7600, Fax: (580)581-5514, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.cameron.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $108/credit in-state; $261/credit out-of-state. Enrollment: Total 3,335. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: NASM; NLNAC; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Criminal Justice; Data Processing; Drafting & Design Technology; Early Childhood Education; Electronics Technology; Media Technology; Nursing, R.N.; Nursing, Vocational; Telecommunications Technology

Eve's College of Hairstyling

912 Southwest Centre, Ave. B, Lawton, OK 73501. Cosmetology. Founded 1967. Contact: Jeanine Tahahwah, FAA, (580)355-6620, Fax: (580)248-4894, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $4,250-$8,500. Enrollment: Total 58. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

Great Plains Technology Center

4500 W. Lee Blvd., Lawton, OK 73505. Trade and Technical. Founded 1971. Contact: Ken Taylor, Dir., (580)355-6371, (580)250-5601, Fax: (580)250-5677, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.gptech.org. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 1,127. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NLNAC; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning; Allied Health Occupations; Auto Body Design; Auto Mechanics; Auto Mechanics - Diesel; Building & Grounds Management; Carpentry; Computer Business Systems Technology; Computer Literacy; Computer Networking; Computer Repair; Drafting Technology; Electrical Technology; Electronics Technology; Emergency Medical Technology; Farm Management Technology; Fire Fighting; Food Preparation & Service; Graphic Arts; Internet Technologies; Masonry; Medical Technology; Nursing, Practical; Plumbing; Radiologic Technology; Respiratory Therapy; Small Business Management; Surgical Technology; Welding Technology

MCALESTER

Kiamichi Technology Center (McAlester)

301 Kiamichi Dr., McAlester, OK 74501. Trade and Technical. Founded 1970. Contact: Joe Ann Vermillion, Dir., (918)426-0940, 888-567-6630, Fax: (918)426-1626, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected] us, Web Site: http://www.kiamichi-mcalester.tec.ok.us; Fred Probis, Assistant Campus Dir., E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $2,914 for nursing; $1312 for other courses (plus books and supplies). Enrollment: Total 397. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Heating (4 Sm); Auto Mechanics (4 Sm); Building Maintenance (4 Sm); Business, General Office (2 Sm); Carpentry (4 Sm); Child Care & Guidance (4 Sm); Computer Science - Terminal Operation (2 Sm); Drafting Technology (4 Sm); Health Care & Management (4 Sm); Machine Shop (4 Sm); Nursing, Practical (12 Mo); Welding Technology (4 Sm)

MIAMI

Northeastern Oklahoma A & M College

200 I St., NE, Miami, OK 74354. Two-Year College. Founded 1919. Contact: Verna Bass, (918)540-6210, (918)540-6291, 888-464-6636, Fax: (918)540-6946, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.neoam.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $64.65 per hour. Enrollment: Total 2,100. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; CAAHEP; NAACLS; APTA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agricultural Science (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (1 Yr); Computer Science (2 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (2 Yr); Early Childhood Education (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Forestry Technology (2 Yr); Golf Course Management (2 Yr); Journalism (2 Yr); Language Arts (2 Yr); Marketing Management (1 Yr); Medical Assistant (1-2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Office, General (1 Yr); Physical Education (2 Yr); Physical Therapy Technology (2 Yr); Ranch & Farm Management (2 Yr); Secretarial, General (2 Yr); Secretarial, Legal (2 Yr); Secretarial, Medical (1 Yr); Surgical Technology (1 Yr); Theatre Arts (2 Yr); Theatre, Technical (2 Yr)

MIDWEST CITY

Mid-Del Technology Center

1621 Maple Dr., Midwest City, OK 73110-4825. Trade and Technical. Founded 1965. Contact: John Matlock, Assistant Superintendent, (405)739-1707, Fax: (405)739-1716, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.mid-del.tec.ok.us; Debbie Neugent, Principal. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $525 per semester. Enrollment: men 360, women 350. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Auto Body & Fender Repair; Automotive Service; Business Technology; Carpentry; Child Care & Guidance; Computer Technology; Cosmetology; Drafting Technology; Electrical Technology; Electricity, Industrial; Electronics Technology; Fashion Design & Merchandising; Health Technology; Masonry; Occupational Therapy; Plumbing; Printing; Welding Technology

Midwest Beauty College, Inc.

7020 SE 15th, Midwest City, OK 73110-5193. Cosmetology. Founded 1959. Contact: Sonya Campbell, (405)732-5595, (405)732-0992, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $0.94 per hour. Enrollment: men 1, women 20. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (9 Mo); Cosmetology Instructor (6 Mo); Cosmetology - Refresher (3 Mo)

Rose State College

6420 SE 15th St., Midwest City, OK 73110-2799. Two-Year College. Founded 1970. Contact: Dr. Bill Brown, Academic Affairs, (405)733-7693, (866)621-0987, Fax: (405)733-7958, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.rose.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $59.65 per credit hour, state resident; $147.62 per credit hour, nonresident. Enrollment: Total 8,400. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: ADA; CAAHEP; JRCERT; NAACLS; NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Broadcasting Technology (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Communications Technology (2 Yr); Computer Aided Design (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Computer Networking (2 Yr); Court Reporting (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); Dental Assisting (2 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); E-Commerce (2 Yr); Environmental Technology (2 Yr); Family Living Specialist (2 Yr); Health Technology (2 Yr); Legal Assistant (2 Yr); Library Technical Assistant (2 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (2 Yr); Medical Technology - Phlebotomy (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr)

MOORE

City College, Inc.

2620 S. Service Rd., Moore, OK 73160-5544. Business. Founded 1987. Contact: Thorpe Mayes, (405)329-5627, Fax: (405)321-2763, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.citycollegeinc.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 200. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCET. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Advanced (750 Hr); Child Care & Guidance (750 Hr); Computer Servicing Theory & Systems (750 Hr); Legal Assistant (600 Hr); Medical Insurance Specialist (750 Hr); Secretarial, Legal (750 Hr)

Oklahoma School of Photography, Inc.

2306 N. Moore Ave., Moore, OK 73160. Trade and Technical. Founded 1972. Contact: Jerry Cockrell, Pres., (405)799-1411, Fax: (405)799-2023, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.photocareers.com; Kristi Cockrell, Manager/Dir. of Financial Aid. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $9,420. Enrollment: Total 20. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACCET. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Desktop Publishing (720 Hr); Digital Computing (720 Hr); Photography (720 Hr)

MUSKOGEE

Bacone College

2299 Old Bacone Rd., Muskogee, OK 74403. Other. Founded 1880. Contact: Leroy Thompson, Dir. of Admissions, (918)683-4581, (918)683-6286, 888-682-5514, Fax: (918)781-7376, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.bacone.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $8,530 per year. Enrollment: Total 697. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC; JRCERT; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (4 Yr); Art (2 Yr); Business Administration (4 Yr); Business Education (2 Yr); Business Occupations (2 Yr); Computer Science - Terminal Operation (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (4 Yr); Entrepreneurship (4 Yr); Horticulture (2 Yr); Information Systems (4 Yr); Journalism (2 Yr); Marketing (4 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr and 4); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Recreation Administration (4 Yr)

Virgil's Beauty College

111 S. 9th St., Muskogee, OK 74401-6802. Cosmetology. Founded 1968. Contact: V.D. Large, (918)682-9429, Fax: (918)683-6192, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $6,850 cosmetology; $4,350 cosmetology instructor; $2,650 manicurist (plus books and supplies). Enrollment: men 9, women 36. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

NORMAN

Hollywood Cosmetology Center

1708 W. Lindsey, Norman, OK 73069. Cosmetology. Contact: Crystal Burgess, Owner, (405)364-3375. Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $2,100 to $6,100 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 3, women 30. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Nail Technology (600 Hr)

Moore Norman Technology Center

PO Box 4701, Norman, OK 73070-4701. Trade and Technical. Founded 1975. Contact: Cole Atkinson, Student Svcs., (405)364-5763, Fax: (405)360-9989, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.mntechnology.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $480. Enrollment: Total 700. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Automotive Collision Repair; Automotive Technology; Building & Grounds Management; Business Technology; Carpentry; Computer Aided Drafting & Design; Cosmetology; Database Management; Dental Assisting; Dental Laboratory Technology; Early Childhood Education; E-Commerce; Electricity, Apprenticeship; Electricity, Industrial; Entrepreneurship; Graphic Design; Health Information Technology; Machinist, General; Medical Assistant; Medical Sonography; Network Support; Nursing, Practical; Software Development/Engineering; Surgical Technology; Web Development; Welding Technology

University of Oklahoma - Aviation Department

1700 Lexington, Norman, OK 73069. Flight and Ground. Founded 1946. Contact: Glenn Schaumburg, Program Administrator, (405)325-7231, (405)325-7017, 800-522-0772, Fax: (405)325-0136, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.aviation.ou.edu; Renee' Mitchell, Admissions/Recruitment Specialist, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 200. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: FAA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Aircraft Flight Instruction, Airplane Rating; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Basic Ground; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Commercial Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Instrument Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Multi-Engine Rating - Airplane; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Primary Flying

OKLAHOMA CITY

American Broadcasting School

4511 S.E. 29th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73115. Contact: Delton L. Cockrell, Owner, (405)672-6511, Web Site: http://www.radioschool.com. Private. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $9,125. Degrees awarded: Certificate.

Central State Beauty Academy

8494 Northwest Expy, Oklahoma City, OK 73162-6007. Cosmetology. Contact: Carol Fisher, President, (405)722-4499. Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,600-$8,450 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 8, women 95. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (600 Hr); Nail Technology (600 Hr)

Central State Massage Academy

8494 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City, OK 73162-6007. Other. Founded 1997. Contact: Carol A. Fisher, President, (405)722-4560, Fax: (405)722-4521, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,495. Enrollment: Total 150. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Massage Therapy (20 credits)

ELS Language Centers

Oklahoma City Univ., 1915 NW 24th St., Harris Hall, Oklahoma City, OK 73106-1219. Other. Founded 1961. Contact: Nancy Kintsel, Center Dir., (405)525-3738, Fax: (405)525-0826, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.els.edu/default.els?ISO=en. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Month. Tuition: $1,395 intensive; $1,045 semi-intensive. Enrollment: Total 75. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: ACCET. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: English As A Second Language (3-4 Wk)

ITT Technical Institute (Oklahoma City)

50 Penn Place Office Tower, 1900 Northwest Expressway Ste. 305R, Oklahoma City, OK 73118. Trade and Technical.(405)810-4100, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits)

Oklahoma City Community College

7777 S. May Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73159-4444. Two-Year College. Founded 1972. Contact: Gloria Cardenas-Barton, Dean of Admissions/Registrar, (405)682-1611, Fax: (405)682-7521, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.okccc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $61/credit resident; $134/credit non-resident. Enrollment: Total 4,863. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General (2 Yr); Aerospace (2 Yr); Agriculture, General (2 Yr); Automotive Technology (2 Yr); Aviation Maintenance Technology (2 Yr); Banking & Finance (2 Yr); Broadcasting, Nontechnical (2 Yr); Broadcasting Technology (2 Yr); Business (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (2 Yr); Computer Aided Design (2 Yr); Computer Aided Drafting (2 Yr); Computer Science (2 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); Engineering (2 Yr); Geriatric Care (2 Yr); Graphic Design (2 Yr); Insurance, General (2 Yr); Journalism (2 Yr); Language (2 Yr); Management (2 Yr); Manufacturing Technology (2 Yr); Mathematics (2 Yr); Medical Transcription (2 Yr); Music (2 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Occupational Therapy Assistant (2 Yr); Office Management (2 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide (2 Yr); Public Relations (2 Yr); Real Estate, Basic (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (2 Yr); Theatre Arts (2 Yr); Travel & Tourism (2 Yr)

Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City

900 N. Portland, Oklahoma City, OK 73107-6195. Contact: Dr. Jerry D. Carroll, President, (405)947-4421, (405)945-3224, Web Site: http://www.osuokc.edu. Public. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: 60 in-state; 175out-of-state. Degrees awarded: Associate.

Praxis College of Health, Arts and Sciences

8900 N. Western Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73114-2518. Allied Medical. Founded 1903. Contact: Andre F. Fountain, RN, Dir., (405)879-0224, (405)843-0381, Fax: (405)879-2102, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://praxiscollege.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $7,000 includes books, supplies and uniforms; free for out of state students. Enrollment: men 100, women 300. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate, Diploma. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Massage Therapy (1800 Hr)

State Barber College

2514 S. Agnew, Oklahoma City, OK 73108. Barber. Founded 1975. Contact: Elaine Gunn, (405)631-8621, Fax: (405)632-2738, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.statebarber.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $5,500. Enrollment: Total 33. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Barbering (10-18 Mo)

Wright Business School

2219 SW 74th St., Ste. 124, Oklahoma City, OK 73159. Business, Trade and Technical, Allied Medical. Founded 1921. Contact: Kathy Pool, (405)681-2300, 800-946-0651, Fax: (405)681-7016, Web Site: http://wrightbusinessschool.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Semester. Tuition: $10,790. Enrollment: Total 400. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available.

OKMULGEE

Oklahoma State University Technical Branch

1801 East 4th, Okmulgee, OK 74447. Two-Year College. Founded 1946. Contact: R. E. Klabenes, (918)293-4678, 800-722-4471, Fax: (918)293-4650, Web Site: http://www.osu-okmulgee.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Trisemester. Tuition: $105/semester credit resident; $250/semester credit non-resident. Enrollment: Total 1,758. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma, Associate. Accreditation: NCOPE; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Automotive Service; Automotive Technology; Avionics; Baking; Business Management; Civil Engineering Technology; Communications Technology; Computer Aided Drafting; Computer Applications; Computer Operations; Computer Programming; Computer Technology; Construction Management; Construction Technology; Culinary Arts; Dietetic Technology; Drafting & Design Technology; Drafting, Architectural; Electrical Technology; Electronic Engineering Technology; Food Processing Technology; Food Service & Management; Graphic Arts; Health Information Technology; Heavy Equipment; Industrial Technology; Jewelry Design - Repair & Stone Setting; Legal Technology; Management; Manufacturing Technology; Mathematics; Mechanical Technology; Media Technology; Office Technology; Orthotics; Photography; Plumbing; Printing Technology; Shoe Building; Telecommunications Technology; Watchmaking & Repairing

PONCA CITY

Pioneer Area Vocational-Technical School

2101 N. Ash, Ponca City, OK 74601. Trade and Technical. Founded 1972. Contact: Mike Swinehart, Assistant Dir. of Student Services, (580)762-8336, Fax: (405)762-1175, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.pioneertech.org. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1 per hour for most programs; tuition varies. Enrollment: men 244, women 276. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Collision Repair; Automotive Technology; Business Technology; Child Care & Guidance; Commercial Foods; Construction Technology; Cosmetology; Health Technology; Information Sciences Technology; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Mechanical Technology; Medical Assistant; Nursing, Practical; Respiratory Therapy; Welding Technology

Ponca City Beauty College

122 N. First St., Ponca City, OK 74601. Cosmetology. Contact: Freda Poe, President, (580)762-1470, 888-557-6709. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $4,600 to $6,800 (plus books and supplies). Enrollment: men 1, women 25. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Nail Technology (600 Hr)

POTEAU

Carl Albert State College

1507 S. McKenna, Poteau, OK 74953. Two-Year College. Founded 1932. Contact: Anita Sutter, Admissions Dir., (918)647-1200, (918)647-1300, Fax: (918)647-1306, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.carlalbert.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $66 per credit hour (fees included). Enrollment: Total 1,200. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: NLNAC; APTA; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Allied Health Occupations; Art; Business Administration; Business Occupations; Business Technology; Child Care & Guidance; Computer Technology; Education; Environmental Technology; Food Distribution & Management; Hotel & Restaurant Management; Industrial Technology; Mathematics; Music; Nursing, Vocational; Physical Therapy Aide; Radiologic Technology; Technological Studies; Telecommunications Technology

Kiamichi Technology Center (Poteau)

1509 S. McKenna, PO Box 825, Poteau, OK 74953. Trade and Technical, Allied Medical. Founded 1968. Contact: Kathy Davidson, Secretary, (918)647-4525, 888-567-6632, Fax: (918)647-4527, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kiamichi-poteau.tec.ok.us; Joe Carrick, Dir.. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,312 per year plus books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 391. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration; Automotive Technology; Carpentry; Computer Business Systems Technology; Computer Technology; Electrical Technology; Emergency Medical Technology; Health Technology; Nursing, Practical; Paramedic; Welding Technology

Poteau Beauty College

301 Turman St., Poteau, OK 74953-2343. Cosmetology. Contact: Shirley Smith, Owner, (918)647-4119. Private. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $7,266. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

PRYOR

Northeast Technology Center (Pryor)

PO Box 825, Pryor, OK 74361. Trade and Technical, Allied Medical. Founded 1973. Contact: Tom Girten, Dir. of Student Svcs., (918)825-5555, (918)341-8324, 888-825-6281, Fax: (918)825-6281, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.nevteast.tec.ok.us/. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $800 - $2,099. Enrollment: Total 100. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC; NLNAC; NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Auto Body & Fender Repair; Auto Mechanics; Business; Carpentry; Computer Technology; Cosmetology; Electrical Technology; Food Service & Management; Health Occupations; Machine Tool Programming Technology; Marketing; Masonry; Mechanics, Diesel; Nursing, Practical; Welding Technology

PURCELL

Oklahoma Horseshoeing School

26446 Horseshoe Cir., Purcell, OK 73080. Trade and Technical. Founded 1973. Contact: Jack Roth, Dir., (405)288-0200, 800-538-1383, Fax: (405)288-1004, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.horseshoes.net/school. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $1,300-$6,000 (varies with program). Enrollment: Total 45. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Horse Management (60 Hr); Horseshoeing (2-15 Wk)

SALLISAW

Indian Capital Technology Center-Sallisaw Campus

401 Houser, HC 61 Box 12, Sallisaw, OK 74955. Trade and Technical. Founded 1969. Contact: Shawna Vaughan, Director's Secretary, (918)775-9119, 800-340-9119, Fax: (918)775-7305, E-mail: [email protected] ok.us, Web Site: http://www.icavts.tec.ok.us/Sallisaw/sallisaw.htm; Jackie Whitekiller, Secretary, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 285. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Business, General Office (2 Yr); Carpentry (2 Yr); Computer Applications (2 Yr); Furniture Manufacturing (2 Yr); Health Occupations (2 Yr); Information Sciences Technology (2 Yr); Machine Technology (2 Yr); Machine Tool Programming Technology (2 Yr); Masonry (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (12 Mo); Upholstering (2 Yr)

SAND SPRINGS

Sand Springs Beauty College

28 E. 2nd St., PO Box 759, Sand Springs, OK 74063. Cosmetology. Founded 1977. Contact: Myra Sellers, Owner, (918)245-6627, Fax: (918)241-1822, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://sandspringsbeautycollege.com; Theresa Stubblefield, Admissions Dir.. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,135-$7,800 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 10, women 148. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr); Skin Care (600 Hr)

SAPULPA

Central Tech (Sapulpa)

1720 S. Main St., Sapulpa, OK 74066. Trade and Technical. Founded 1969. Contact: David Main, Dir., (918)224-9300, Fax: (918)224-3190, Web Site: http://www.ctechok.org. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $750. Enrollment: men 125, women 200. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Data Processing (9 Mo); Electronics Technology (9 Mo); Health Occupations (9 Mo); Law Enforcement (9 Mo); Marketing (9 Mo); Medical Receptionist (5 Mo); Office, General (6 Mo); Secretarial, General (9 Mo); Small Business Management (1 Yr)

SAYRE

Southwestern Oklahoma State University-Sayre

409 E. Mississippi Ave., Sayre, OK 73662. Two-Year College. Founded 1938. Contact: Dr. Jim James, (580)928-5533, Fax: (580)928-1140, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.swosu.edu/sayre. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 585. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: ABHES; JRCERT; NCA-HLC; ABET; NAACLS; NCATE; COE; AHIMA; CSWE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business (2 Yr); Computer Science (2 Yr); Criminal Justice (2 Yr); General Studies (2 Yr); Health Occupations (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (2 Yr)

SEMINOLE

Seminole State College

2701 Boren Blvd., PO Box 351, Seminole, OK 74868. Two-Year College. Founded 1931. Contact: Dr. James W. Utterback, Pres., (405)382-9950, Fax: (405)382-9950, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.ssc.cc.ok.us; Lana Reynolds, VP Institutional Advancement, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Semester. Tuition: $72/semester credit, resident (includes fees); $169/semester credit, non-resident (includes fees). Enrollment: Total 1,476. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; NCAHLC; NAACLS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Business Occupations; Child Care & Guidance; Computer Technology; Drafting & Design Technology; Journalism; Law Enforcement; Management; Medical Laboratory Technology; Nursery Management; Nursing, Vocational; Secretarial, Science

SPERRY

Oklahoma Farrier's College, Inc.

Rt. 2, Box 88, Sperry, OK 74073. Trade and Technical. Founded 1965. Contact: Bud Beaston, (918)288-7221, 800-331-4061, Fax: (918)288-2757. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Week. Tuition: $3,800 approximately. Enrollment: Total 40. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Horseshoeing (14-56 Wk)

SPIRO

Kiamichi Technology Centerl (Spiro)

610 SW 3rd St., Spiro, OK 74959-2502. Trade and Technical. Founded 1978. Contact: Wanda Smith, (918)962-3722, 888-567-6646, Fax: (918)962-4627, Web Site: http://www.kiamichi-spiro.tec.ok.us/. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students not accepted. Term: Hour. Tuition: $1,312 per year plus books and supplies. Enrollment: Total 20. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Business Technology (2100 Hr); Welding Technology (1050 Hr)

STIGLER

Kiamichi Technology Center (Stigler)

1410 Old Military Rd., Stigler, OK 74462-9601. Trade and Technical. Contact: Jimmy Eakle, Dir., (918)465-2323, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kiamichi-stigler.tec.ok.us; April Murray, E-mail: [email protected] Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $1,312 in-state; $2,625 out-of-state; $250 fees. Enrollment: Total 127. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Automotive Service (1050 Hr); Carpentry; Education; Emergency Medical Technology (1400 Hr); Health Occupations; Nursing, Practical; Small Business Management; Welding Technology

STILLWATER

Stillwater Beauty Academy

1684 Cimmaron Plz., Stillwater, OK 74075. Cosmetology. Founded 1988. Contact: Mary Whitby, Dir., (405)377-4100, Fax: (405)377-4153. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $3,350-$6,950 plus books and supplies. Enrollment: men 0, women 39. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Esthetician (600 Hr); Manicurist (600 Hr)

Stillwater Flight Center, Inc.

2020-3 W. Airport Rd., Stillwater, OK 74075. Flight and Ground. Founded 1982. Contact: Morris Dedgeon, Dir., (405)624-5463, Fax: (405)372-2529. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 197. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: FAA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Aircraft Flight Instruction, Commercial Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Instrument Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Multi-Engine Rating - Airplane; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Personnel Training

TAHLEQUAH

Beauty Technical College Inc.

605 E. Downing St., Tahlequah, OK 74465. Cosmetology. Contact: Freda Poe, President, (918)456-9431. Private. Coed. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $4,600 nail technician; $$,850 cosmetology instructor; $5,500 cosmetology (prices do not include books and supplies). Enrollment: men 2, women 56. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Nail Technology (600 Hr)

Indian Capital Technology Center-Tahlequah

240 Vo-tech Rd., Tahlequah, OK 74464. Trade and Technical. Contact: Wilson Fargo, Dir., (918)456-2594, 800-340-2594, Fax: (918)456-0140, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.icavts.tec.ok.us. Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: $1,050. Degrees awarded: Associate.

TALIHINA

Kiamichi Technology Center (Talihina)

Rt. 2, Box 1800, Talihina, OK 74571. Trade and Technical, Allied Medical. Founded 1971. Contact: Shelley D. Free, Campus Dir., (918)567-2264, 888-567-6643, Fax: (918)567-3359, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.kiamichi-talihina.tec.ok.us. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $3010 for nursing; $1312 for other programs (plus books and supplies). Enrollment: Total 66. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Allied Health Occupations; Auto Mechanics; Business Technology; Carpentry; Nursing, Practical

Talihina Beauty College

Drawer B, Talihina, OK 74571. Cosmetology. Founded 1966. Contact: Jahala Williams, (918)567-2245. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Tuition: $850. Enrollment: men 1. Degrees awarded: Diploma. Financial aid available. Curriculum: Cosmetology; Cosmetology Instructor; Hair Styling, Advanced

TISHOMINGO

Murray State College

One Murray Campus, Tishomingo, OK 73460. Two-Year College. Founded 1908. Contact: William Pennington, Pres., (580)371-2371, Fax: (580)371-9844, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.mscok.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,704, state resident; $4,104 per semester hour, non-resident. Enrollment: Total 1,098. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; AVMA; CAPTE; APTA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agriculture, General (2 Yr); Art (2 Yr); Business (2 Yr); Business Education (2 Yr); Business Management (2 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (2 Yr); Computer Information Science (2 Yr); Computer Science (2 Yr); Conservation; Gunsmithing (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (2 Yr); Office Administration (2 Yr); Physical Education (2 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide; Secretarial, Science (2 Yr); Veterinary Technology (2 Yr); Wild Life Management (2 Yr)

TONKAWA

Northern Oklahoma College

PO Box 310, Tonkawa, OK 74653. Two-Year College. Founded 1921. Contact: Dr. Rick Edgington, Dir. of Admissions/Registrar, (580)628-6200, (580)628-6220, Fax: (580)628-6371, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.north-ok.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Term: Semester. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Curriculum: Accounting, Junior; Agribusiness; Agriculture - Production; Broadcasting Management; Broadcasting Technology; Building Construction Technology; Business Education; Data Processing; Drafting & Design Technology; Engineering Technology; Fashion Merchandising; Interior Design; Law Enforcement; Mid-Management; Nursing, R.N.; Printing; Secretarial, General; Secretarial, Medical; Wood Industries Technology

TULSA

Aircraft Service Company

1500 S. 135th E. Ave., Tulsa, OK 74108. Flight and Ground. Founded 1974. Contact: D.R. Grosh, (918)437-2787, Fax: (918)437-2790, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 45. Degrees awarded: Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: FAA. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Aircraft Flight Instruction; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Advanced Ground; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Commercial Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor Additional Rating; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Instrument Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Multi-Engine Rating - Airplane; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Primary Flying

Allied Helicopter International, Inc.

Tulsa Downtown Airpark, PO Box 6216, 1201 W. 36th St. North, Tulsa, OK 74148. Flight and Ground. Founded 1966. Contact: Roy B. David, Owner, (918)425-7558, Fax: (918)425-7559, Web Site: http://www.alliedhelicopter.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: flight training $190-$550/hour. Accreditation: FAA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Aircraft Flight Instruction, Agriculture Operator; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Commercial Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, External Load Operator - Rotocraft; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Helicopter Rating; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Primary Flying

H & R Block Income Tax School

1871 S. Sheridan, Tulsa, OK 74112-7303. Other. Founded 1965. Contact: Neterri Smith, (918)835-8989, (918)971-6090, 800-HRB-LOCK, Fax: (918)835-4621, Web Site: http://www.hrblock.com. Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Housing not available. Term: Week. Tuition: $119. Enrollment: Total 450. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Income Tax Preparation (6 Wk)

ITT Technical Institute (Tulsa)

4943 S. 78th East Ave., Tulsa, OK 74145. Trade and Technical.(918)619-8700, 800-514-6535, Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu; Web Site: http://www.itt-tech.edu/contact/form.cfm. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Quarter. Tuition: $14,196 per year. Degrees awarded: Associate. Accreditation: ACICS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Computer Aided Drafting & Design (96 Credits); Computer Networking (96 Credits); Electrical Engineering Technology (96 Credits); Multimedia Design (96 Credits)

Linda Layman Agency Ltd.

3546 E. 51st, Tulsa, OK 74135. Other. Founded 1975. Contact: Linda Layman, (918)744-0888, Fax: (918)744-1802, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Financial aid not available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Acting (8 Wk); Fashion Careers (8 Wk); Modeling & Personal Improvement (8 Wk)

Spartan College of Aeronautics and Technology (Tulsa)

8820 E. Pine St., Tulsa, OK 74115. Flight and Ground, Trade and Technical. Founded 1928. Contact: Damon Bowling, (918)836-6886, (918)831-5206, 800-331-1204, Fax: (918)831-5287, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.spartan.edu. Private. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies by program. Enrollment: men 1,010, women 73. Degrees awarded: Associate, Diploma, Certificate. Accreditation: ACCSCT. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Aviation Maintenance Technology; Aviation Management; Aviation Technology; Avionics; Communications Technology; Quality Control

TCC Professional Pilot School

801 E. 91st St., Tulsa, OK 74132-4008. Flight and Ground, Two-Year College. Founded 1990.(918)828-4270, (918)828-4041, Fax: (918)828-4089, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tulsacc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 50. Degrees awarded: Associate, Certificate. Accreditation: FAA. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Aircraft Flight Instruction, Commercial Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Flight Instructor; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Instrument Flying; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Multi-Engine Rating - Airplane; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Personnel Training

Tulsa Community College

6111 E. Skelly Dr., Tulsa, OK 74135-6198. Two-Year College. Founded 1970. Contact: Dr. John Kontogianes, (918)595-7000, Fax: (918)595-7910, Web Site: http://www.tulsacc.edu. Public. Coed. HS diploma required. Out-of-state students accepted. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $48/semester hr. resident enrollment fee; $172/per semester hr. non-resident tuition. Enrollment: Total 7,723. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: AAMAE; JRCRTE; ADA; AOTA; APTA; CAAHEP; NAACLS; NLNAC; NCA-HLC; JRCERT; AVMA; CAPTE. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, Junior (1 Yr); Accounting, Specialist (2 Yr); Administrative Assistant (2 Yr); Aviation Maintenance Technology (2 Yr); Aviation Management (2 Yr); Aviation Technology (2 Yr); Avionics (2 Yr); Biomedical Technology (2 Yr); Business (2 Yr); Business, International (1 Yr); Child Care & Guidance (2 Yr); Civil Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Computer Aided Manufacturing (2 Yr); Computer Networking (1 Yr); Computer Operations (1 Yr); Computer Programming (1 Yr); Customer Service (1 Yr); Dental Assisting (2 Yr); Dental Hygiene (2 Yr); Desktop Publishing (1 Yr); Drafting & Design Technology (1 Yr); Electrical Engineering Technology (1 Yr); Electronics Technology (2 Yr); Emergency Medical Technology (2 Yr); Engineering Technology (2 Yr); Engineering Technology, Electronic (2 Yr); Fire Protection Technology (2 Yr); Health Care & Management (2 Yr); Horticulture (2 Yr); Human Services (2 Yr); Industrial Management & Supervision (1 Yr); Interior Design (1 Yr); Language (2 Yr); Law Enforcement (2 Yr); Legal Assistant (2 Yr); Marketing (2 Yr); Medical Assistant (1 Yr); Medical Laboratory Technology (1 Yr); Medical Record Technology (2 Yr); Medical Technology - Phlebotomy; Medical Transcription (2 Yr); Numerical Control (1 Yr); Nursing, R.N. (2 Yr); Occupational Therapy Assistant (2 Yr); Office Administration (2 Yr); Personnel Management (1-2 Yr); Petroleum Technology (2 Yr); Pharmacy Technician (1 Yr); Physical Therapy Aide (1 Yr); Purchasing (1 Yr); Quality Control (1 Yr); Radiologic Technology (2 Yr); Respiratory Therapy (1 Yr); Safety Technology (2 Yr); Secretarial, Administrative (2 Yr); Secretarial, Bilingual (1 Yr); Secretarial, Legal (2 Yr); Surveying (1 Yr); Telecommunications Technology (1 Yr)

Tulsa Technology Center, Lemley Campus

3420 South Memorial Dr., Tulsa, OK 74145-1390. Trade and Technical. Founded 1928. Contact: Sandee Tackett, Dir., (918)828-1000, Fax: (918)828-1009, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tulsatech.com. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Housing available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: Varies. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NLNAC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Accounting, General; Air Conditioning; Air Conditioning & Refrigeration; Aircraft Flight Instruction, Basic Ground; Auto Body & Fender Repair; Auto Mechanics; Blue Print Reading; Business, General Office; Cabinet & Mill Work; Carpentry; Clerical, General; Computer Programming; Data Processing; Dental Assisting; Dental Technology; Drafting & Design Technology; Drafting, Technical Illustrated; Drafting Technology; Early Childhood Specialist; Electrical Technology; Electronics Technology; Environmental Technology; Machine Shop; Maintenance, Supervisor; Masonry; Mechanics, Diesel; Nurses Aide; Nursing, Practical; Photography; Plumbing; Printing, Offset; Small Engine Repair; Surgical Technology; Welding Technology; Wood Industries Technology; Word Processing

Tulsa Technology Center, Peoria Campus

3850 N. Peoria, Tulsa, OK 74106-1600. Trade and Technical. Contact: Sharon Schaub, Campus Dir., (918)828-2000, (918)828-5155, Fax: (918)828-2009, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.tulsatech.com. Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $1,744. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

WARNER

Connors State College

Rte. 1, Box 1000, Warner, OK 74469-9700. Two-Year College. Founded 1908. Contact: Dr. Donnie L. Nero, President, (918)463-2931, Fax: (918)463-2233, E-mail: [email protected], Web Site: http://www.connors.cc.ok.us. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: $1,715/year state resident; $4,160/year non-resident (plus books and supplies). Enrollment: Total 2,387. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate. Accreditation: NLNAC; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Agriculture, General; Banking & Finance; Business Occupations; Criminal Justice; Data Processing; Early Childhood Specialist; Horseman-ship; Nursing; Office Administration; Police Science

WAYNE

Mid-America Area Technology Center

27438 State Hwy. 59, Wayne, OK 73095-3309. Trade and Technical. Founded 1971. Contact: Dale E. Nye, (405)449-3391, Fax: (405)449-3421. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Other. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 965. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Handicapped facilities available. Curriculum: Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (2 Yr); Aircraft Mechanics (2 Yr); Auto Body & Fender Repair (2 Yr); Auto Mechanics (2 Yr); Business Education (2 Yr); Career Development; Carpentry (2 Yr); Computer Electro-Mechanics (2 Yr); Cosmetology (2 Yr); Data Processing (2 Yr); Drafting Technology (2 Yr); Electrical Technology; Electronics & Communication; Farm Management Technology (3 Yr); Graphic Arts (2 Yr); Health Occupations (2 Yr); Horse Management (2 Yr); Horticulture (2 Yr); Law Enforcement (2 Yr); Machine Tool Programming Technology (2 Yr); Mechanics, Diesel (2 Yr); Microcomputers (2 Yr); Nursing, Practical (1 Yr); Small Business Management (2 Yr); Welding Technology (2 Yr)

WILBURTON

Eastern Oklahoma State College

1301 West Main, Wilburton, OK 74578. Two-Year College. Founded 1908. Contact: Leah Miller, Dir. of Enrollment Management, (918)465-2361, Fax: (918)465-4435, E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], Web Site: http://www.eosc.cc.ok.us/. Public. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing available. Term: Semester. Tuition: Varies. Enrollment: Total 1,085. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate, Diploma. Accreditation: NLNAC; NCA-HLC. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service available. Curriculum: Agribusiness (2 Yr); Agriculture, General (2 Yr); Animal Science, General (2 Yr); Art (2 Yr); Business Administration (2 Yr); Business Education (2 Yr); Communications, Electronic (2 Yr); Electrical Technology (2 Yr); Engineering (2 Yr); Forestry Technology (2 Yr); Horticulture (2 Yr); Journalism (2 Yr); Library Technology (2 Yr); Meat Cutting, Packing & Handling (1 Yr); Music (2 Yr); Nursing, Vocational (2 Yr); Ranch & Farm Management (2 Yr); Secretarial, General (2 Yr); Timber Harvester (2 Yr); Urban Forestry (2 Yr)

WOODWARD

High Plains Technology Center

3921 34th St., Woodward, OK 73801. Trade and Technical. Contact: Dr. Don Dale, Superintendent, (580)256-6618, (580)571-6183, 800-725-1492, Fax: (580)571-6190, Web Site: http://www.hptc.net. Public. Coed. Housing not available. Term: Varies with Program. Tuition: $2,500. Degrees awarded: Certificate, Associate.

Woodward Beauty College

502 Texas, Woodward, OK 73801. Cosmetology. Founded 1952. Contact: Sherry Jo Yauk, (580)256-7520, Fax: (580)256-7535, E-mail: [email protected] Private. Coed. HS diploma not required. Out-of-state students accepted. Housing not available. Term: Hour. Tuition: $6,475 cosmetology; $4,350 cosmetology instructor; $2,650 nail technology (plus books and supplies). Enrollment: men 0, women 14. Degrees awarded: Certificate. Accreditation: NACCAS. Approved: Vet. Admin. Financial aid available. Placement service not available. Handicapped facilities not available. Curriculum: Cosmetology (1500 Hr); Cosmetology Instructor (1000 Hr); Cosmetology - Refresher; Manicurist (600 Hr)

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-3

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-3

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

1 Location and Size

2 Topography

3 Climate

4 Plants and Animals

5 Environmental Protection

6 Population

7 Ethnic Groups

8 Languages

9 Religions

10 Transportation

11 History

12 State Government

13 Political Parties

14 Local Government

15 Judicial System

16 Migration

17 Economy

18 Income

19 Industry

20 Labor

21 Agriculture

22 Domesticated Animals

23 Fishing

24 Forestry

25 Mining

26 Energy and Power

27 Commerce

28 Public Finance

29 Taxation

30 Health

31 Housing

32 Education

33 Arts

34 Libraries and Museums

35 Communications

36 Press

37 Tourism, Travel & Recreation

38 Sports

39 Famous Oklahomans

40 Bibliography

State of Oklahoma

ORIGIN OF STATE NAME: Derived from the Choctaw Indian words okla humma, meaning “land of the red people.”

NICKNAME : The Sooner State.

CAPITAL: Oklahoma City.

ENTERED UNION: 16 November 1907 (46th).

OFFICIAL SEAL: Each point of a five-pointed star incorporates the emblem of a Native American nation: (clockwise from top) Chickasaw, Choctaw, Seminole, Creek, and Cherokee. In the center, a frontiersman and Native American shake hands before the goddess of justice; behind them are symbols of progress, including a farm, train, and mill. Surrounding the large star are 45 small ones and the words “Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma 1907.”

FLAG: On a blue field, a peace pipe and an olive branch cross an Osage warrior’s shield, which is decorated with small crosses and from which seven eagle feathers descend. The word “Oklahoma” appears below.

MOTTO: Labor omnia vincit (Labor conquers all things).

SONG: “Oklahoma!”

FLOWER: Mistletoe.

TREE: Redbud.

ANIMAL: American buffalo (bison).

BIRD: Scissor-tailed flycatcher.

FISH: White bass (sand bass).

REPTILE: Collared lizard (mountain boomer).

ROCK OR STONE: Barite rose (rose rock).

GRASS: Indian grass.

LEGAL HOLIDAYS: New Year’s Day, 1 January; Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., 3rd Monday in January; Presidents’ Day, 3rd Monday in February; Confederate Memorial Day, May 10; National Memorial Day, last Monday in May; Independence Day, 4 July; Labor Day, 1st Monday in September; Veterans’ Day, 11 November; Thanksgiving Day, 4th Thursday in November and the following day; Christmas Day, 25 December and the day following.

TIME: 6 AM CST = noon GMT.

1 Location and Size

Situated in the western south-central United States, Oklahoma ranks 18th in size among the 50 states. The total area of Oklahoma is 69,956 square miles (181,186 square kilometers), of which land takes up 68,655 square miles (177,817 square kilometers) and inland water 1,301 square miles (3,369 square kilometers). Oklahoma extends 464 miles (747 kilometers) from east to west including the panhandle in the northwest, which is about 165 miles (266 kilometers) long. The maximum north–south extension is 230 miles (370 kilometers). The total estimated boundary length of Oklahoma is 1,581 miles (2,544 kilometers).

2 Topography

The land of Oklahoma rises gently to the west from an altitude of 289 feet (88 meters) at Little River in the southeastern corner to a height of 4,973 feet (1,517 meters) at Black Mesa, on the tip of the panhandle. Four mountain ranges cross this Great Plains state: the Boston Mountains (part of the Ozark Plateau) in the northeast, the Quachitas in the southeast, the Arbuckles in the south-central region, and the Wichitas in the southwest. Much of the northwest belongs to the High Plains, while northeastern Oklahoma is mainly a region of buttes and valleys.

Major rivers are the Arkansas River and the Red River. There are few natural lakes but many artificial ones, of which the largest is Lake Eufaula, covering 102,500 acres (41,500 hectares).

3 Climate

Oklahoma has a continental climate with cold winters and hot summers. Normal daily mean temperatures in Oklahoma City range from 37°f (2°c) in January to 82°f (27°c) in July. The record low temperature of -27°f (-33°c) was set at Watts on 18 January 1930. The record high, 120°f (49°c), occurred at Tipton on 27 June 1994.

Oklahoma Population Profile

Total population estimate in 2006:3,579,212
Population change, 2000–06:3.7%
Hispanic or Latino†:6.6%
Population by race
One race:94.3%
White:75.4%
Black or African American:7.1%
American Indian /Alaska Native:7.4%
Asian:1.6%
Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander:0.1%
Some other race:2.7%
Two or more races:5.7%

Population by Age Group

Major Cities by Population
City Population % change 2000–05
Notes: †A person of Hispanic or Latino origin may be of any race. NA indicates that data are not available.
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey and Population Estimates. www.census.gov/ (accessed March 2007).
Oklahoma531,3245.0
Tulsa382,457-2.7
Norman101,7196.3
Lawton90,234-2.7
Broken Arrow86,22815.2
Edmond74,8819.6
Midwest54,8901.5
Moore47,69715.9
Enid46,416-1.3
Stillwater40,9064.7

Precipitation varies from an average of 15 inches (38 centimeters) annually in the panhandle to over 50 inches (127 centimeters) in the southeast. Snowfall averages 9 inches (23 centimeters) a year in Oklahoma City, which is also one of the windiest cities in the United States, with an average annual wind speed of 13 miles per hour (20 kilometers per hour). Tornados are common throughout the state.

4 Plants and Animals

Grasses grow in abundance in Oklahoma, the most common of which are bluestem, buffalo, sand lovegrass, and grama grasses. Deciduous hardwoods stand in eastern Oklahoma, and red and yellow cactus brighten the Black Mesa. In 2006, the western prairie fringed orchid was listed as a threatened plant species. There were no plant species listed as endangered that year.

The white-tailed deer is found in all counties and Rio Grande wild turkeys are hunted across much of the state. Pronghorn antelope inhabit the panhandle area, and elk survive in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, where a few herds of American buffalo (bison) are also preserved. The bobwhite quail and prairie chicken are common game birds. Native sport fish include bass and catfish. In 2006, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed 18 endangered or threatened species of wildlife, including three species of bat (Ozark big-eared, Indiana, and gray), bald eagle, whooping crane, black-capped vireo, red-cockaded woodpecker, Eskimo curlew, and Neosho madtom.

5 Environmental Protection

The Oklahoma Department of Environment Quality has overall responsibility for coordinating all pollution control activities by other state agencies and for developing a comprehensive water quality management program for Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Conservation Commission is responsible for conservation of renewable natural resources through land use planning, small watershed upstream flood control, reclamation of abandoned mine land, water quality monitoring, and soil and water conservation, as well as environmental education and wetlands conservation. The Department of Wildlife Conservation manages wildlife resources and habitat specifically for hunters, anglers, and others who appreciate wildlife.

The Department of Health is responsible for the monitoring of air quality standards; the enforcement of regulations covering control of industrial and solid waste; the enforcement of regulations covering radioactive materials at the Kerr-McGee processing facility at Gore and elsewhere; and the maintenance of standards at all public waterworks and sewer systems. The Water Resources Board has broad statutory authority to protect the state’s waters.

Toxic industrial waste remains an environmental concern, and old mines in the Tar Creek area of northeastern Oklahoma still exude groundwater contaminated by zinc, iron, and cadmium. In 2003, Oklahoma had 165 hazardous waste sites listed in the Environmental Protection Agency’s database, 10 of which were on the National Priorities List in 2006; among these were Tar Creek in Ottawa County and Tinker Air Force Base.

Oklahoma Population by Race

Census 2000 was the first national census in which the instructions to respondents said, “Mark one or more races.” This table shows the number of people who are of one, two, or three or more races. For those claiming two races, the number of people belonging to the various categories is listed. The U.S. government conducts a census of the population every ten years.

 Number Percent
Source: U.S. Census Bureau. Census 2000: Redistricting Data. Press release issued by the Redistricting Data Office. Washington, D.C., March, 2001. A dash (—) indicates that the percent is less than 0.1.
Total population3,450,654100.0
One race3,294,66995.5
Two races149,9754.3
White and Black or African American10,1160.3
White and American Indian/Alaska Native104,2303.0
White and Asian7,1280.2
White and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander822
White and some other race13,6900.4
Black or African American and American Indian/Alaska Native7,5660.2
Black or African American and Asian813
Black or African American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander164
Black or African American and some other race1,485
American Indian/Alaska Native and Asian683
American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander174
American Indian/Alaska Native and some other race1,411
Asian and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander556
Asian and some other race972
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and some other race165
Three or more races6,0100.2

In 2003, the state had about 890,000 acres of wetlands—about 2% of the land.

6 Population

In 2005, Oklahoma ranked 28th in the Untied States in population with an estimated total of 3,547,884 residents. The population is projected to reach 3.8 million by 2025. In 2004, Oklahoma had a population density of 51.3 persons per square mile (19.8 persons per square kilometer). In 2005, about 13% of all residents were 65 or older and 25% were 18 or younger.

The largest city is Oklahoma City, which had an estimated 531,324 inhabitants in 2005. Tulsa, the second largest city, had an estimated population of 382,457, and Norman, 101,719.

7 Ethnic Groups

Oklahoma has the second-largest Native American population of all the 50 states. According to the 2000 census, an estimated 273,230 Native Americans lived in Oklahoma, including those of the Creek, Cherokee, Chickasaw, and Choctaw tribes. Also in 2000, the black American population was 260,968 people. Hispanics and Latinos numbered 179,304, including 132,813 Mexicans. The Asian population numbered 46,767 and there were 2,372 Pacific Islanders.

In 2000, 131,747 residents, less than 4% of the population, were foreign born. Persons claiming at least one specific ancestry group were English, 291,553; German, 435,245; and Irish, 354,802.

8 Languages

Oklahoma English is diverse, with an uneven blending of features of North Midland, South Midland, and Southern dialects. In 2000, 92.6% of the resident population five years or older spoke only English at home. Other languages spoken at home and the number of people who spoke them included Spanish, 141,060; various Native American languages, 18,871; and German, 13,445.

9 Religions

Evangelical Protestant groups have always dominated in Oklahoma. They were influential in keeping the state “dry”—banning the sale of all alcoholic beverages—until 1959 and resisted legalization of public drinking until 1985.

The leading Protestant group in 2000 was the Southern Baptist Convention with 967,223 adherents. Other leading Evangelical Protestant denominations were the Assemblies of God, with 88,301 adherents; the Churches of Christ, 83,047; the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 53,729; and the Christian Churches, 42,708. Free Will Baptists, Nazarenes, Missouri Synod Lutherans, and those of various other Pentecostal traditions were also fairly well represented. The largest Mainline Protestant denominations were the United Methodist Church, with 253,375 adherents in 2004; and the Presbyterian Church USA, with 35,211 adherents in 2000. In 2004, there were 169,045 Roman Catholics, and in 2000 there were 6,145 Muslims and about 5,050 Jews throughout the state. About 39.2% of the population did not claim any religious affiliation.

Oral Roberts, a popular minister, has established a college and faith-healing hospital in Tulsa and his Tower of Faith broadcasts by radio and television have made him a well known preacher throughout the United States.

10 Transportation

In 2003, there were 3,853 rail miles (6,203 kilometers) of track. As of that year, there were three Class I railroads operating in Oklahoma: the Burlington Northern Santa Fe, the Union Pacific, and the Kansas City Southern. As of 2006, Amtrak provided passenger service to five stations in Oklahoma via its Oklahoma City to Fort Worth Heartland Flyer train. Intercity transit needs, formerly served by streetcars, are now supplied by buses.

The main east–west highways are I-44, connecting Tulsa and Oklahoma City, and I-40. The major north–south route is I-35, which links Oklahoma City with Topeka, Kansas and the Dallas-Ft. Worth area in Texas. Overall in 2004, Oklahoma had 112,713 miles (181,467 kilometer) of roadway. A total of some 3,156,000 motor vehicles were registered in 2004, including 1,622,000 automobiles and 1,448,000 trucks. There were 2,369,621 licensed drivers.

The opening of the McClellan–Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System in 1971 linked Oklahoma with the Mississippi River and to Gulf coast ports. Tulsa, Port of Catoosa, is the chief port on the system.

Oklahoma had 346 airports, 91 heliports, 1 STOLport (Short Take-Off and Landing), and 1 seaplane base in 2005. Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City and Tulsa International Airport are the state’s largest airports.

11 History

At the time the Spanish conquistadores, led by Hernando de Soto and Francisco Vásquez de Coronado, arrived in Oklahoma in the 16th century, only a few scattered Native American tribes inhabited the region. Two centuries later, French trappers moved up the rivers of Oklahoma.

Except for the panhandle, all of present-day Oklahoma became part of US territory with the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Under the Indian Removal Act of 1830, many Native American tribes from the southeastern United States were ordered to resettle in Oklahoma in what was then known as Indian Territory. The Cherokees, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole prospered in the new land, which offered rich soil and abundant vegetation. Military posts such as Fort Gibson and Fort Towson were established between 1824 and the 1880s, with settlements growing up around them.

During the early Civil War period, Native Americans allied with the Confederacy. After Union troops captured Fort Gibson in 1863, the Union Army controlled half their lands. Congress opened western Oklahoma—formerly reserved for the Cherokee, Cheyenne, Fox, and other tribes—to homesteaders in 1889. The western region became Oklahoma Territory in 1890, while most of eastern Oklahoma remained under Native American control. Oklahoma became the 46th state on 16 November 1907 after a vote of the residents of both territories. Oklahoma City was named the state capital in 1910.

State Development Oil wells were producing more than 40 million barrels annually when Oklahoma entered the Union, and the state led all others in oil production until 1928. The decade of the 1920s was a period of racial unrest in Oklahoma, as close to 100,000 Oklahomans belonged to the Ku Klux Klan 1921. The 1930s brought a destructive drought, dust storms, and an exodus of unemployed “Okies,” many of them to California.

Under post-World War II governors Roy Turner, Johnston Murray, and Raymond Gary, tax reductions attracted industry, major highways were built, and Oklahoma’s higher educational facilities were integrated. Oil and gas again brought increased wealth to the state in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s, as state revenues from oil and gas increased from $72 million in 1972 to $745 million in 1982.

In 1983, the oil boom suddenly ended, as oil prices fell in the face of a growing worldwide oil glut. The failure of 24 banks and mounting distress among the state’s farmers added to Oklahoma’s financial woes. Those industries with a national rather than a regional base, however, such as transportation, food processing, and light manufacturing, continued to prosper.

On 19 April 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was bombed, killing 168 people. It was considered the most serious act of terrorism in the history of the United States until the events of 11 September 2001. A memorial to the victims of the Oklahoma City bombing was unveiled in April 2000.

Education was a priority in 2000, when the legislature approved the largest teacher pay raise in the state’s history. In 2004, Oklahomans voted in favor of establishing a state lottery to fund education. Other priorities for the state in the 2000s included: providing access to affordable prescription drugs; retaining jobs for the state; funding healthcare initiatives; providing assistance to the troubled Tar Creek region; and expansion of pre-school programs.

12 State Government

The Oklahoma legislature consists of two chambers: a 48-member senate and a 101-member house of representatives. Senators hold office for four-year terms, while representatives serve two-year terms. Elected executive officials include the governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, and state treasurer. Any member of either house may introduce legislation. A bill passed by the legislature becomes law if signed by the governor, if left unsigned by the governor for five days while the legislature is in session, or if passed over the governor’s veto by two-thirds of the elected members of each house (or three-fourths in the case of emergency bills).

The legislative salary as of December 2004 was $38,400 and the governor’s salary was $110,298.

13 Political Parties

When Oklahoma was admitted to the Union in 1907, Democrats outnumbered Republicans, as they have ever since. Democrats have dominated the lesser state offices, but the Republicans won the governorship three times between 1962 and 1990. Also, the Republican presidential nominee outpolled his Democratic counterpart in 10 of 12 presidential elections between 1948 and 1992.

In 2004, there were approximately 2,143,000 registered voters. In 1998, 57% of registered voters were Democratic, 35% Republican, and 8% unaffiliated or members of other parties.

Oklahomans cast 60% of the popular vote for Republican George W. Bush in 2000 and 38% for Democrat Al Gore. In 2004, some 65.6% of the vote went to incumbent President Bush while 32.4% went to the challenger, Democrat John Kerry. Republican Tom Coburn won a seat in the US Senate in 2004. Republican Senator James M. Inhofe was reelected in 2002.

Of the five-member delegation to the US House of Representatives, all but one are Republican. Democrat Brad Henry was reelected governor in 2006. Following the 2006 midterm elections, there were 45 Democrats and 56 Republicans in the state house, and 24 Democrats and 24 Republicans in the state senate. Twenty-two women were elected to the state legislature in 2006, or 14.8%.

14 Local Government

As of 2005, there were 77 counties, 590 incorporated cities and towns, and several hundred unincorporated areas with local governments. There were 544 public school districts and 560 special districts that year. County government consists of three commissioners elected by districts, as well as a county clerk, assessor, treasurer, and other officials. Any city of 2,000 or more people may vote to become a home-rule city, determining its own form of government. Cities electing not to adopt a home-rule charter operate under

Oklahoma Governors: 1907–2007

1907–1911Charles Nathaniel HaskellDemocrat
1911–1915Lee CruceDemocrat
1915–1919Robert Lee WilliamsDemocrat
1919–1923James Brooks Ayers RobertsonDemocrat
1923John Calloway WaltonDemocrat
1923–1927Martin Edwin TrappDemocrat
1927–1929Henry Simpson JohnstonDemocrat
1929–1931William Judson HollowayDemocrat
1931–1935William Henry David MurrayDemocrat
1935–1939Ernest Whitworth MarlandDemocrat
1939–1943Leon Chase PhillipsDemocrat
1943–1947Robert Samuel KerrDemocrat
1947–1951Roy Joseph TurnerDemocrat
1951–1955Johnston MurrayDemocrat
1955–1959Raymond Dancel GaryDemocrat
1959–1963James Howard EdmondsonDemocrat
1963George Patterson NighDemocrat
1963–1967Henry Louis BellmonRepublican
1967–1971Dewey Follett BartlettRepublican
1971–1975David HallDemocrat
1975–1979David Lyle BorenDemocrat
1979–1987George Patterson NighDemocrat
1987–1991Henry Louis BellmonRepublican
1991–1995David WaltersDemocrat
1995–2002Frank KeatingRepublican
2002–Brad Henry 

aldermanic, mayor-council, or council-manager systems.

15 Judicial System

The supreme court, the state’s highest court, consists of nine justices. The court’s appeals jurisdiction includes all civil cases except those which it assigns to the courts of appeals. The highest appeals court for criminal cases is the court of criminal appeals. District courts have original jurisdiction over legal matters and some review powers over administrative actions. Municipal courts hear cases arising from local ordinances. In 2004, the FBI reported a violent crime rate (murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault) of 500.5 reported incidents per 100,000 population.

Oklahoma Presidential Vote by Political Parties, 1948–2004

YEAR OKLAHOMA WINNER DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN
* Won US presidential election.
** Independent candidate Ross Perot received 319,878 votes in 1992 and 130,788 votes in 1996.
1948*Truman (D)452,782687,817
1952*Eisenhower (R)430,939518,045
1956*Eisenhower (R)385,581473,769
1960Nixon (R)370,111533,039
1964*Johnson (D)519,834412,665
1968*Nixon (R)301,658449,697
1972*Nixon (R)247,147759,025
1976Ford (R)532,442545,708
1980*Reagan (R)402,026695,570
1984*Reagan (R)385,080861,530
1988*Bush (R)483,423678,367
1992**Bush (R)473,066592,929
1996**Dole (R)488,105582,315
2000*Bush, G. W. (R)474,276744,337
2004*Bush, G. W. (R)503,966959,792

Crimes against property (burglary, larceny/ theft, and motor vehicle theft) in 2004 totaled 4,242.1 reported incidents per 100,000 people. As of 31 December 2004, over 23,319 prisoners were under the jurisdiction of state and federal authorities. Oklahoma has a death penalty law; the method of execution is lethal injection. A total of 80 persons were executed between 1976 and 5 May 2006. As of 1 January 2006, 91 persons were under sentence of death.

16 Migration

Early immigrants to what is now Oklahoma included explorers, adventurers, and traders as well as Native American tribes forcibly removed from the East and Midwest. Coal brought miners from Italy to the McAlester and Krebs area in the 1870s and Poles migrated to Bartlesville to work in the lead and zinc smelters. British and Irish coal miners came to Native American territories because they could earn higher wages there than in their native countries and Czechs and Slovaks arrived from Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, and Texas when railroad construction began. Mexicans also worked as railroad laborers, ranch hands, and coal miners before statehood. The oil boom of the early 20th century brought an influx of workers from the eastern and Midwestern industrial regions.

Oklahoma lost population during the 1930s because of dust bowl and drought conditions and the trend toward out-migration continued after World War II. Migration patterns were reversed, however, after 1960.

Between 1990 and 1998, the state had net gains of 48,000 in domestic migration and 26,000 in international migration. In the period 2000–05, net international migration was 36,546 and net domestic migration was -15,418, for a net gain of 21,128.

17 Economy

Primarily an agricultural state through the first half of the 20th century, Oklahoma diversified its economy after the 1950s. Manufacturing heads the list of growth areas, followed by wholesale and retail trade, services, finance, insurance, and real estate. Oil and gas extraction continues to play a major role. The oil industry boomed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s. In 1985, however, the boom ended, and Oklahoma’s unemployment rate, which had averaged about 3% in the early 1980s, jumped to 9%. Since then, the economy has undergone a slow but steady recovery.

Manufacturing output fell in the early 2000s, however. The national recession of 2001 was offset by Oklahoma’s military installations. Fort Sill and Tinder Air Force Base are two of the state’s top five employers. Oklahoma’s economy was also helped by its oil and gas industries, as prices reached high levels in 2003.

In 2004, Oklahoma’s gross state product (GSP) was $107.6 billion, of which manufacturing accounted for the largest share at $11.98 billion, or 11.1% of GSP. Manufacturing was followed by real estate, at $10.49 billion (9.7% of GSP), and healthcare and social assistance services at $7.52 billion (6.9% of GSP).

18 Income

In 2005, Oklahoma had a gross state product (GSP) of $121 billion, 29th highest among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. In 2004, Oklahoma ranked 40th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia with a per capita (per person) income of $27,840 (the national average was $33,050). The three-year average median household income for 2002–04 was $38,281 compared to the national average of $44,473. During the same period, an estimated 12.6% of the state’s residents lived below the federal poverty level, compared to 12.4% nationwide.

19 Industry

Resource-related industries dominate the economy, but manufacturing has become increasingly diversified. The total value of shipments of manufactured goods in 2004 was more than $45.7 billion. Of that total, petroleum and coal products manufacturing accounted for the largest share at $8.9 billion, followed by transportation equipment manufacturing ($7.9 billion), machinery manufacturing ($5.4 billion), food manufacturing ($5.0 billion), and fabricated metal product manufacturing ($3.9 billion).

20 Labor

In April 2006, the civilian labor force in Oklahoma numbered 1,757,900, with approximately 69,000 workers unemployed, yielding an unemployment rate of 3.9%, compared to the national average of 4.7%. In April 2006, 4.4% of the labor force was employed in construction; 18.3% in trade, transportation, and public utilities; 5.5% in financial activities; 11.3% in professional and business services; 12.1% in education and health services; 8.7% in leisure and hospitality services; and 20.5% in government. Data was unavailable for manufacturing.

In 2005, 77,000 of Oklahoma’s 1,432,000 employed wage and salary workers were members of unions, representing 5.4% of those so employed. The national average was 12%.

21 Agriculture

In 2005, total farm income estimated at $5.04 billion placed the state 18th in the country. As of 2004, Oklahoma had 83,500 farms and ranches covering 33,700,000 acres (13,640,000 hectares). The state ranked fifth in the United States for wheat production in 2004 and seventh for peanut production. Other 2004 crops included sorghum for grain, soybeans, corn for grain, and oats.

Virtually all of Oklahoma’s wheat production is located in the western half of the state. Cotton is grown in the southwest corner. Sorghum-producing regions include the panhandle, central to

southwestern Oklahoma, and the northeast corner of the state.

22 Domesticated Animals

In 2005, there were 5.4 million cattle and calves, worth $4.4 billion. During 2004, Oklahoma farmers had 2.4 million hogs and pigs, valued at $194.4 million. In 2003, the state produced around 4 million pounds (1.8 million kilograms) of sheep and lambs which brought in nearly $3.8 million in gross income. Also during 2003, poultry farmers produced 1.11 billion pounds (0.5 billion kilograms) of broilers valued at $379.1 million, and 933 million eggs valued at $72 million. Oklahoma’s 82,000 dairy cows produced an estimated 1.31 billion pounds (0.59 billion kilograms) of milk in 2003.

23 Fishing

Commercial fishing is of minor importance in Oklahoma. The prolific white bass (sand bass), Oklahoma’s state fish, is abundant in most large reservoirs. Smallmouth and spotted bass, blue-gill, and channel catfish have won favor with fishermen. Rainbow trout are stocked year round in the Illinois River, and walleye and sauger are stocked in most reservoirs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery produces primarily smallmouth bass for distribution to federal wildlife areas in Oklahoma and Texas. In 2004, the state issued 668,924 sport fishing licenses.

24 Forestry

Oklahoma’s forests cover approximately 7,665,000 acres (3,102,000 hectares) or nearly 17% of the state’s land area. Approximately 65% of this is commercially productive forestland. These forests are about 95% privately owned. They are intensively utilized for lumber, plywood, paper, fuelwood, and other products. They also provide high quality drinking water for the state’s two largest cities, excellent wildlife habitat, substantial protection against soil erosion, and numerous recreational opportunities.

Oklahoma’s forests play a vital role in the economy in the eastern half of the state. Much of the timber harvested in Oklahoma is shipped to processing plants in western Arkansas. There are several major wood processing plants in the southeastern corner of the state. Hardwood processing is scattered over the entire forested area in smaller sawmills.

25 Mining

The value of nonfuel mineral production in Oklahoma in 2003 was estimated at $479 million. Large deposits of limestone are found throughout northeastern Oklahoma, while gypsum is extracted in the northwest, the west-central region, and the four most southwestern counties. Crushed stone was the state’s leading mineral commodity, accounting for about 40% of the total nonfuel mineral value. Cement (portland and masonry), construction sand and gravel, industrial sand and gravel, iodine, and gypsum are the next most important minerals. Oklahoma was the only state producing crude iodine. Approximately 2.41 million metric tons of gypsum were produced in 2003, worth $18.7 million. In 2003, Oklahoma ranked 28th in the United States in total nonfuel mineral value.

26 Energy and Power

Electric power production in Oklahoma in 2003 was 60.6 billion kilowatt hours, based on an installed capacity of 18.2 million kilowatts. Coal-fired steam units accounted for 60.5% of production, natural gas-fired units 36%, and hydroelectricity 3%. There were no nuclear power plants as of 2003. In 2000, Oklahoma’s total per capita energy consumption was 406 million Btu (102.3 million kilocalories), ranking it 12th among the 50 states.

Oklahoma is rich in fossil fuel resources, producing oil, natural gas, and coal. Crude oil production was at 171,000 barrels per day in 2004. Proven reserves of crude oil were estimated at 570 million barrels in 2004. In 2004, Oklahoma’s natural gas output was 1.66 trillion cubic feet (47.23 billion cubic meters). There were proven natural gas reserves of 16.2 trillion cubic feet (461.2 billion cubic meters).

Production of bituminous coal was at 1.79 million tons in 2004. Of eight coal mines in the state, all but one were surface mines. Recoverable reserves totaled 17 million tons in 2004.

27 Commerce

Oklahoma’s wholesale sales were over $30.7 billion for 2002; retail sales were $32.1 billion. Automotive dealers accounted for most retail sales ($9.4 billion), followed by general merchandise stores ($6.2 billion), gasoline stations ($3.7 billion), and food and beverage stores ($3.3 billion). The value of foreign exports produced within Oklahoma in 2005 was $4.3 billion.

28 Public Finance

The Oklahoma budget is prepared by the director of state finance and submitted by the governor to the legislature each February. The Oklahoma constitution requires a balanced budget. The fiscal year is from 1 July to 30 June.

The state revenues for 2004 were $17.5 billion and expenditures were $14.9 billion. The largest general expenditures were for education ($5.59 billion), public welfare ($3.53 billion), and highways ($1.05 billion). The total indebtedness of state government in Oklahoma was over $6.9 billion, or about $1,966.54 per capita (per person).

29 Taxation

The state income tax for Oklahoma’s eight-bracket schedule ranges from 0.5% to 6.25%. The corporate tax is 6%. The state levies a sales and use tax of 4.5% and many municipalities levy their own sales taxes; the highest of these is 6%. The typical city in Oklahoma has an 8% or 9% sales tax, but collections are reduced by competition from Native American reservations where there is little or no sales tax. The state also imposes a full array of excise taxes covering motor fuels, tobacco products, insurance premiums, public utilities, alcoholic beverages, amusements, pari-mutuels, and other selected items. It is estimated, however, that about a third of all cigarettes sold in the state are bought in Native American territories where the state excises do not apply.

Property taxes are collected only at the local level and remain the principal source of revenue for local governments.

Total state tax collections in Oklahoma in 2005 were $6.86 billion, of which 36% was generated by the state income tax, 24.2% by the state general sales taxes, 12.2% by selective sales taxes, 2.5% by the corporate income tax, and 25.1% by other taxes. In 2005, Oklahoma was ranked 34th highest rate in the country in terms of state and local tax burden, at $1,933 per capita (the national average was $2,192 per capita).

In October 2005, the infant mortality rate was 8.2 per 1,000 live births. The overall death rate in 2003 was one of the highest in the nation at 10.2 per 1,000 inhabitants. The leading causes of death were heart disease, cancer, accidents, and cerebrovascular diseases. The HIV mortality rate was 2.6 per 100,000. Among adults ages 18 and older, 26% were smokers in 2004.

Oklahoma’s 108 community hospitals had about 11,000 beds in 2003. The average expense for community hospital care was $1,777 per inpatient day in 2003. Oklahoma had 205 doctors per 100,000 residents in 2004 and 695 nurses per 100,000 residents in 2005. In 2004, approximately 20% of Oklahoma’s residents were uninsured, the third-highest rate for the uninsured in the nation, after Texas and New Mexico.

31 Housing

Native American tepees and the sod houses of settlers dotted the Oklahoma plains when the “eighty-niners” swarmed into the territory. Old neighborhoods in cities and towns of Oklahoma still retain some of the modest frame houses they built. Oklahomans continue to prefer single-family dwellings, despite a recent trend toward condominiums. Modern underground homes and solar-heated dwellings can be seen in the university towns of Norman and Stillwater.

In 2004, there were an estimated 1,572,756 housing units, of which 1,360,032 were occupied; 68.2% were owner-occupied. About 72.5% of all units were single-family, detached homes. Utility gas and electricity were the most common energy sources for heating. It was estimated that 85,609 units lacked telephone service, 2,351 lacked, complete plumbing facilities, and 7,496 lacked complete kitchen facilities. The average household size was 2.51 people.

In 2004, 17,100 new privately owned units were authorized for construction. The median home value was $85,060. The median monthly cost for mortgage owners was $871, while renters paid a median of $525 per month.

32 Education

In 2004, 85.2% of all Oklahomans 25 years of age or older were high school graduates and 22.9% of adult state residents had obtained a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Total public school enrollment was estimated at 625,000 in fall 2002 and is expected to be 626,000 by fall 2014. Education is the largest expenditure item in the state budget. Expenditures for public education in 2003/04 were estimated at $4.4 billion. Enrollment in nonpublic schools in fall 2003 was 27,603.

As of fall 2002, there were 198,423 students enrolled in college or graduate school. In 2005 Oklahoma had 53 degree-granting institutions. Public higher education institutions include 15 public four-year schools, 14 public two-year schools, and 17 nonprofit, private four-year schools. The comprehensive institutions, the University of Oklahoma (Norman) and Oklahoma State University (Stillwater), also offer major graduate-level programs. Well-known institutions include Oral Roberts University and the University of Tulsa.

33 Arts

Major arts centers are located in Tulsa and Oklahoma City, but there are many arts and crafts museums throughout the state. Oklahoma City’s leading cultural institution is the Oklahoma City Philharmonic. The Tulsa Philharmonic, Tulsa Ballet Theater, and Tulsa Opera all appear at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, a municipally owned and operated facility. There are five other ballet companies located in Oklahoma City, Bartlesville, Clinton, Lawton, and Norman.

The intermingling of Native American, American West, and Euro-American art traditions infuses all aspects of Oklahoma culture. Native American contributions to the arts include achievements in art and sculpture, as well as the international acclaim accorded to ballerinas Maria and Marjorie Tallchief, Rosella Hightower, and Moscelyne Larkin.

Bartlesville is home to a symphony orchestra, a show choir, a civic ballet, and a theater guild. It is also the host of the annual OK Mozart International Festival, established in 1985, which features the Solisti New York Orchestra and attracts world class guest artists.

The State Arts Council of Oklahoma supports many programs with the help of state and federal funds. The Oklahoma Humanities Council was founded in 1971.

34 Libraries and Museums

As of 2001, Oklahoma had 115 public library systems, with a total of 210 libraries, of which 95 were branches. The public library system had 6.3 million volumes and a total circulation of 15.3 million. The Five Civilized Tribes Museum Library in Muskogee has a large collection of Native American documents and art. Cherokee archives are held at the Cherokee National Historical Society in Tahlequah. The Morris Swett Library at Ft. Sill has a special collection on military history, particularly field artillery.

Oklahoma has 113 museums and historic sites. The Philbrook Art Center in Tulsa houses important collections of Native American, Renaissance, and Oriental art. Other museums of special interest include the Museum of the Great Plains in Lawton, the Cowboy Hall of Fame and Western Heritage Center in Oklahoma City, and the Will Rogers Memorial in Claremore. The Omniplex Science Museum in Oklahoma City is also popular.

35 Communications

In 2004, some 91% of Oklahoma’s occupied housing units had telephones. That year, there were 1,724,505 mobile phone subscribers. In 2003, 55.4% of Oklahoma households had a computer, and 48.4% had Internet access. In 2005, Oklahoma had 25 major AM and 64 major FM radio stations, and 19 major television channels. A total of 44,743 Internet domain names were registered in the state in 2000.

36 Press

In 2005, Oklahoma had 13 morning dailies, 29 evening dailies, and 34 Sunday newspapers. Leading dailies and their approximate circulation in 2005 were the Oklahoma City Oklahoman (250,496) and Tulsa World (158,965). As of 2005, there were 143 newspapers that appeared weekly or up to three times a week. Tulsa and Oklahoma City each have monthly city-interest publications and the University of Oklahoma has a highly active university press.

37 Tourism, Travel & Recreation

In 2002, domestic travelers spent $3.9 billion on overnight and day trips to Oklahoma. The travel industry employed over 69,200 people in the same year.

Oklahoma’s 50 state parks draw over 16 million visitors annually. Chickasaw National Recreation Area centers on artificial Lake Arbuckle. The Oklahoma History Center opened its new 215,000 square-foot learning center situated on 18 acres, in Oklahoma City in November 2005. The state also maintains and operates the American Indian Hall of Fame, in Anadarko; the Pioneer Woman Statue and Museum, in Ponca City; and the Chisholm Trail Museum, in Kingfisher. National wildlife refuges include Optima, Salt Plains, Sequoyah, Tishomingo, Washita, and Wichita Mountains. They have a combined area of 140,696 acres (56,938 hectares).

38 Sports

Oklahoma has no major league professional sports teams. The class-AAA baseball Red

Hawks play in Oklahoma City and the Tulsa Drillers play in the AA Texas League. Collegiate sports, however, are the primary source of pride for Oklahomans. As of 2003, the University of Oklahoma Sooners had won seven national football titles and twelve Orange Bowls. They have also produced championships in wrestling, baseball, and gymnastics. Recently, the Sooners have had a resurgence in basketball as well. The Oklahoma State University Cowboys have captured National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and Big Eight titles in basketball, baseball, and golf, and are a perennial national contender in wrestling.

Oklahoma City hosts the rodeo at the Oklahoma state fair every September and October. In golf, Tulsa has been the site of several US Open tournaments. The Softball Hall of Fame is in Oklahoma City.

39 Famous Oklahomans

Congressman Carl Albert (1908–2000), Speaker of the US House of Representatives from 1971 until his retirement in 1976, held the highest public position of any Oklahoman.

John Berryman (1914–1972) won the 1965 Pulitzer Prize in poetry for 77 Dream Songs, 1964; and Ralph Ellison (1914–1994) won the 1953 National Book Award for his novel Invisible Man. The popular musical Oklahoma! by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II is based on Green Grow the Lilacs by Oklahoman Lynn Riggs (1899–1954). N(avarre) Scott Momaday (b.1934), born in Lawton, received a Pulitzer Prize in 1969 for House Made of Dawn. Woodrow Crumbo (1912–1989) and Allen Houser (1914–1994) were prominent Native American artists born in the state.

Just about the best known Oklahoman was William Penn Adair “Will” Rogers (1879–1935). Other prominent performing artists include singer-songwriter Woody Guthrie (1912–1967), composer of “This Land Is Your Land,” among other classics; and popular singer Patti Page (b.1927). Famous Oklahoma actors include (Francis) Van Heflin (1910–1971), Ben Johnson (1918–1996), Tony Randall (1920–2004), James Garner (James Baumgardner, b.1928), and Cleavon Little (1939–1992). James Francis “Jim” Thorpe (1888–1953) became known as the “world’s greatest athlete” after his pentathlon and decathlon performances at the 1912 Olympic Games. Baseball stars Paul Warner (1903–1965) and his brother Lloyd (1906–1982), Mickey Mantle (1931–1995), Wilver Dornel “Willie” Stargell (1941–2001), and Johnny Bench (b.1947) are all native Oklahomans.

40 Bibliography

BOOKS

Baldwin, Guy. Oklahoma. New York: Benchmark Books, 2001.

Bristow, M. J. State Songs of America. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2000.

Brown, Jonatha A. Oklahoma. Milwaukee, WI: Gareth Stevens, 2006.

Gisbon, Karen Bush. Oklahoma Facts and Symbols. Rev. ed. Mankato, MN: Capstone Press, 2003.

Heinrichs, Ann. Oklahoma. Minneapolis, MN: Compass Point Books, 2003.

Murray, Julie. Oklahoma. Edina, MN: Abdo Publishing, 2006.

WEB SITES

Oklahoma Tourism & Recreation Department. Oklahoma. Native America. www.travelok.com (accessed March 1, 2007).

State of Oklahoma. Welcome to Oklahoma’s Official Web Site. www.state.ok.us (accessed March 1, 2007).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." Junior Worldmark Encyclopedia of the States, 5th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." Junior Worldmark Encyclopedia of the States, 5th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." Junior Worldmark Encyclopedia of the States, 5th ed.. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Oklahoma, also known as the Sooner State, entered the Union on November 16, 1907, as the forty-sixth state. It is located in the western southcentral United States, surrounded by Texas , New Mexico , Colorado , Kansas , Missouri , and Arkansas . With a total area of 69,956 square miles (181,185 square kilometers), Oklahoma is the eighteenth-largest state in America.

The first explorers to visit Oklahoma were Spanish conquistadors , led by Hernando de Soto (c. 1500–1542) and Francisco Vásquez de Coronado (c. 1510–1554) in the sixteenth century. At that time, very few Native American tribes lived there. In the eighteenth century, French fur trappers paddled up the rivers of Oklahoma.

All of present-day Oklahoma became part of U.S. territory as part of the 1803 Louisiana Purchase . By that time, many Native American tribes, including the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole, had been ordered by the federal government to relocate from the southeast United States into the Oklahoma region. These tribes prospered in their new home because the soil was rich, enabling them to grow vast food crops.

Congress opened up the western part of Oklahoma to white settlers in 1889. Soon, homesteaders took control of that portion of the state while Native Americans retained control of the eastern region.

Oklahoma was an oil-producing state when it entered the Union, and it remained the U.S. leader in oil production until 1928. The state experienced great social unrest throughout the 1920s as nearly one hundred thousand residents joined the white supremacist group, the Ku Klux Klan . The following decade brought economic depression and drought, causing many residents to leave for California in hopes of finding work.

Oklahoma increased its wealth throughout the 1960s and into the early 1980s as it reemerged as a leader in the oil and gas industry. That changed in 1983, when the oil boom ended and prices fell. Farmers and bankers found themselves in financial straits while industries such as transportation and light manufacturing continued to prosper.

On April 19, 1995, domestic terrorism struck Oklahoma when the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was bombed. The Oklahoma City federal building bombing claimed the lives of 168 people, including children. A memorial to the victims of the bombing was erected in April 2000.

Oklahoma's population in 2006 had reached nearly 3.6 million, with 75.4 percent white, 7.4 percent American Indian or Alaska Native, and 6.6 percent Hispanic or Latino.

Agriculture dominated the state until midway through the twentieth century. At that point, manufacturing led the growth areas, followed by wholesale and retail trade, services, and finance. The oil and gas industry continues to contribute to state revenues. The state's military installations—Fort Sill and Tinder Air Force Base—are two of the top five employers in Oklahoma.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." U*X*L Encyclopedia of U.S. History. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." U*X*L Encyclopedia of U.S. History. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma-1

"Oklahoma." U*X*L Encyclopedia of U.S. History. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-2

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-2

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma!

The musical Oklahoma! was the first collaboration between composer Richard Rodgers (1902-1979) and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II (1895-1960), both of whom already had extensive careers in show business behind them. Oklahoma! was based on the play Green Grow the Lilacs by Lynn Riggs, first produced by the Theatre Guild in New York in 1931. It took a radically new approach to musical theatre on several fronts. The story of ordinary, real-life people and rural life during the Oklahoma land rush was an unusual subject at that time. The libretto followed the play closely, breaking with the conventional placement of song and dance elements. The choreography by Agnes de Mille synthesized ballet and American vernacular dance, and a "dream ballet" advanced the story. Oscar Hammerstein's libretto and lyrics celebrated the hardy, optimistic spirit of the American West during the bleakest years of World War II. Oklahoma! became a runaway hit show and won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1944. Many of the young actors and dancers in the opening production went on to stellar careers. Since the initial run, touring companies have presented the musical around the world, and revivals have been frequent. Oklahoma! proved to be only the first of a series of artistically and financially successful musicals by Rodgers and Hammerstein, but none of their works has influenced the development of musical theater more than this one.

Oklahoma! takes place at the turn of the twentieth century between the Oklahoma land rushes in 1889 and 1893, and statehood in 1907. Curley, a cowhand, and Jud Fry, a farmhand, are in love with Laurey. She is in love with Curley, but after an argument with him agrees to go to a dance with Jud Fry, whom she secretly fears. At the dance Curley puts up his entire belongings to buy Laurey's box lunch. She and Curley admit their love for each other and are married. After the wedding Jud fights with Curley and is killed with his own knife during the struggle. Laurey's Aunt Eller engineers a trial at the scene and Curley is acquitted, enabling the young couple to begin married life happily. A second, more comic subplot involves man-crazy Ado Annie, her true love cowboy Will Parker, and her temporary interest, peddler Ali Hakim. Like Laurey and Curley, Ado Annie and Will work out their problems and settle down to married life.

The happy combination of events which produced Oklahoma! began with the 1940 revival of Green Grow the Lilacs by the Westport Country Playhouse in Westport, Connecticut. The Playhouse was owned by Lawrence Langer and his wife Armina Marshall, who were also partners in the Theatre Guild, a theater management group active in New York since 1918. Another partner in the distinguished Theatre Guild was Theresa Helburn. After seeing the Riggs play revival in Westport with square dances choreographed by Gene Kelly, Helburn thought it would make a good musical theatre production. Later in the summer of 1940, Richard Rodgers saw the play and told Langer and Helburn that he agreed the musical theatre adaptation was a promising idea. Rodgers was still working with his first partner Lorenz Hart in 1940; their shows Pal Joey (1940) and By Jupiter (1942) had yet to open. Hart had struggled with alcoholism for years, and although he continued to write inspired lyrics, his working habits had become erratic. Rodgers, however, was determined to continue collaborating with Hart as long as possible, and he asked Hart to join the Oklahoma! project. Hart refused, feeling that Riggs's play did not provide good musical theatre material. Rodgers turned to Oscar Hammerstein II for Oklahoma! Hammerstein knew the play and was eager to write the book and lyrics.

Oklahoma! opened at the St. James Theatre in New York on March 31, 1943, remaining on Broadway for a remarkable 2,212 performances. The reviews after opening night in New York were dazzling. New York Times reviewer Lewis Nichols said, "Wonderful is the nearest adjective, for this excursion of the Guild combines a fresh and infectious gaiety, a charm of manner, beautiful acting, singing and dancing, and a score by Richard Rodgers that doesn't do any harm, either, since it is one of his best." The next morning the box office was in pandemonium and performances quickly sold out for the foreseeable future. But no accolade could have meant more to Richard Rodgers than that of his former partner Lorenz Hart. In Musical Stages Rodgers remembered the traditional post-show gathering at Sardi's when a grinning Hart threw his arms around Rodgers and said, "Dick, I've never had a better evening in my life! This show will be around 20 years from now!" Max Wilk's OK! The Story of Oklahoma! quotes lyricist/librettist Alan Jay Lerner, who said, "A musical in the twenties and the thirties had no dramatic validity and the wit was the lyric writer's, never the characters'. Oscar Hammerstein, on the other hand, was very much a dramatic writer, and with Oklahoma! he and Dick Rodgers radically changed the course of the musical theatre. The musical comedy became a play."

A remarkable number of popular songs came from Oklahoma!, especially when compared to earlier shows. Except for the monumental Show Boat (1927) by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II, most musicals of the 1920s and 1930s contained one or two memorable songs. Oklahoma! gave birth to several: "Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin"'; "The Surrey with the Fringe on Top"; "Kansas City"; "I Cain't Say No"; "People Will Say We're in Love"; and of course, "Oklahoma," the energetic "title song" which caused the musical's original title Away We Go! to be changed. Songs from the show became overnight smashes: "People Will Say We're in Love" was the top radio song of 1943, and the cast recorded the first "original-cast" recording of a Broadway show, beginning a practice which continues today. Since 1943 the original cast album has been in print as 78s, LPs, cassette tapes, and now as compact discs.

Writing his autobiography Musical Stages in 1975, Rodgers theorized about what made Oklahoma such an extraordinary work. "When a show works perfectly, it's because all the individual parts complement each other and fit together. No single element overshadows any other…. That's what made Oklahoma! work. All the components dovetailed. There was nothing extraneous or foreign, nothing that pushed itself into the spotlight yelling 'Look at me!"' Critics and audiences have agreed with Rodgers for over half a century about Oklahoma!'s significance. In 1993 the United States Postal Service acknowledged its place in American cultural history with a stamp commemorating the show's fiftieth anniversary.

—Ann Sears

Further Reading:

de Mille, Agnes. Dance to the Piper. New York, Da Capo, 1980.

Riggs, Lynn. Green Grow the Lilacs. New York, Samuel French,1931. Reprint, The Easton Press, 1991.

Rodgers, Richard. Musical Stages: An Autobiography. New York, Random House, 1975. Reprint, with a new introduction by Mary Rodgers, New York, Da Capo Press, 1995.

Rodgers, Richard, and Oscar Hammerstein. Six Plays. New York, Random House, n.d.

Wilk, Max. OK! The Story of Oklahoma! New York, Grove Press, 1993.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/media/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/media/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Labor omnia vincit (Labor conquers all things).

At a Glance

Name: Oklahoma comes from the Choctaw words okla humma, which mean "red people."

Nickname: Sooner State

Capital: Oklahoma City

Size: 69,903 sq. mi. (181,048 sq km)

Population: 3,450,654

Statehood: Oklahoma became the 46th state on November 16, 1907.

Electoral votes: 7 (2004)

U.S. representatives: 6 (until 2003)

State tree: redbud

State flower: mistletoe

State animal: American bison

Highest point: Black Mesa, 4,973 ft. (1,516 m)

The Place

Oklahoma is a southwestern state located close to the center of the continental United States. It has a variable terrain, with hilly slopes in the Ozark Mountains in the northeast, fertile plains in the Red River Region, and sandstone ridges that form the Ouachita Mountains in the southeastern corner near Arkansas.

The middle region of Oklahoma has forested hills with rich deposits of oil and plains with fertile soil for farming. South-central Oklahoma is home to the Arbuckle Mountains. Over millions of years, these once-tall mountains have been so eroded by wind and weather that the peaks are low and rounded, with many unusual rock formations. To the southwest are the Wichita Mountains, which are higher peaks made of granite. Oklahoma's Panhandle, the part of the state that juts out to the west, is a region of level prairie.

Oklahoma's two major rivers are the Red and the Arkansas. The state's most important resources are its large areas of fertile soil and prairie grasses, and deposits of petroleum, natural gas, and coal.

Most of Oklahoma has a warm climate, which is important for the state's largely agricultural economy. Northwestern Oklahoma is cooler and receives more snow in the winter. Oklahoma's Panhandle is the state's snowiest region.

The Past

Oklahoma's plains were once the home of huge herds of bison that provided food and supplies to many Native American peoples, including the Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, Pawnee, and Wichita. In 1541, the first Europeans to reach the area were Spanish explorers in search of gold. Finding none, they quickly passed through. The French claimed the Oklahoma region in 1682. Although the Spanish regained control in 1762, the French eventually retook Oklahoma and in 1803 sold it to the United States as part of the Louisiana Purchase.

Since few white settlers lived in the area, the U.S. government forced many Native American tribes to give up their lands in the East and relocate to Oklahoma. Between 1830 and 1842, many Native Americans became ill and died during the forced migrations. For the Cherokee, the westward route came to be known as the Trail of Tears.

Oklahoma: Facts and Firsts

  1. Oklahoma has about twice as many artificially created lakes as it has natural lakes.
  2. Thirty-nine Native American tribes have headquarters in Oklahoma.
  3. The largest independently owned Native American newspaper in the United States is the Native American Times in Tulsa.
  4. Sylvan Goldman invented the shopping cart in Oklahoma.
  5. In 1935, the first automatic parking meter, invented by Carl C. Magee, was installed in Oklahoma City.
  6. Okmulgee hosts a pecan festival every June, and the town holds the world's record for the world's largest pecan pie—42 feet (13 m) in diameter.

Soon the territories that surrounded Oklahoma began to fill with settlers from the East, who sought good, inexpensive land to farm. Texas cattle ranchers pressured the U.S. government to open Oklahoma to settlement so that they could drive their cattle straight through from Texas to Kansas. The government resisted until 1889, when it bought more than 3 million acres of land (1.2 million ha) from Creek and Seminole tribes and opened the area to settlement. About 50,000 people moved into Oklahoma on the first day that the land was opened. In the same year, Oklahoma's first oil well began operation near Chelsea.

Two of the most famous eras in Oklahoma's history were dramatized in the musical play Oklahoma! and John Steinbeck's novel The Grapes of Wrath. The musical Oklahoma! depicts the years after Oklahoma was opened to settlement, when farmers and cattle ranchers competed for control of the land. The Grapes of Wrath portrays a more difficult time—the drought and economic hardship of the Dust Bowl during the Great Depression. During this time, thousands of farm families lost their money and land and left for California to look for work.

Oklahoma: State Smart

The 45th Infantry Division Museum in Oklahoma City is the largest state military museum in the United States. It covers more than 12.5 acres (5 ha).

After the Great Depression, oil production increased in Oklahoma, and today there is even an oil well on the grounds of the State Capitol. (The well ended production in 1986 but remains as a tourist attraction.) Oklahoma became increasingly urban as factories were built, and dams were constructed to provide hydroelectric power to new industries. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) built an aeronautics center in Oklahoma City in the 1960s, which furthered Oklahoma's industrial economy.

In 1995, Oklahoma was the scene of tragedy when a terrorist bomb destroyed Oklahoma City's Murrah Federal Building and killed 168 people.

The Present

Because of its location midway between the East and West Coasts, Oklahoma is a major transportation and distribution center for manufactured goods. Factories in Oklahoma produce computer and electronics equipment, machinery, automobiles, rubber and plastic products, and heating and refrigeration equipment.

Born in Oklahoma

  1. John Berryman , poet
  2. Garth Brooks , singer
  3. L. Gordon Cooper , astronaut
  4. Iron Eyes Cody , actor
  5. Ralph Ellison , author
  6. James Garner , actor
  7. Chester Gould , cartoonist
  8. Woody Guthrie , singer and composer
  9. Roy Harris , composer
  10. Ron Howard , actor and director
  11. Jean Kirkpatrick , U.S. public official
  12. Wilma Mankiller , chief of the Cherokee nation
  13. Mickey Mantle , baseball player
  14. Reba McEntire , singer
  15. Bill Moyers , journalist
  16. Will Rogers , humorist
  17. Maria Tallchief , ballerina
  18. Jim Thorpe , athlete
  19. Alfre Woodard , actress

Oklahoma has remained a largely agricultural state, with farms covering about three-quarters of its area. Many cattle ranches operate throughout the state. Oklahoma has more than 5 million beef cattle; other livestock include chickens, hogs, and turkeys. Oklahoma is a leading producer of wheat and hay.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." Blackbirch Kid's Visual Reference of the United States. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." Blackbirch Kid's Visual Reference of the United States. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." Blackbirch Kid's Visual Reference of the United States. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA

Located on the southern prairie-plains and intersected by the Arkansas, Red, Canadian, and Cimarron Rivers, Oklahoma was long an important crossroads. The great Mississippian city of Spiro in eastern Oklahoma dominated the region from a.d. 950 to 1450, and its burial mounds held some of the most remarkable pre-Columbian artwork north of Mexico. By 1700, Caddo and Wichita Indian villages, surrounded by immense cornfields, sprawled along the Red and Canadian Rivers, while Comanches, and later Kiowas, roamed the western regions.

Oklahoma fell within the territorial claims of France's Louisiana colony. In 1719, Bénard de la Harpe became one of the first French explorers to visit Oklahoma Indians. Soon French traders from Louisiana and Arkansas were regulars in the area. Spanish Texas also claimed Oklahoma but could never exert control over it. In 1759, at the Battle of the Wichita Fort on the Red River, a Spanish punitive expedition against the Wichitas, Caddos, and Comanches was driven off with the loss of its artillery.

Oklahoma became part of the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. Considered to be part of the Great American Desert, politicians saw it as a place to relocate "civilized" eastern Indians. In 1824 the federal government formed what later became Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska into an official Indian Territory. At that time, Oklahoma was home to the Comanches, Kiowas, Wichitas, and Caddos, with perhaps a few Cherokees living in eastern Oklahoma before the 1830s. However, that decade would see the arrival of thousands of southeastern Indians who had been removed to Oklahoma over the Trail of Tears.

See alsoAmerican Indians: American Indian Removal .

bibliography

John, Elizabeth A. H. Storms Brewed in Other Men's Worlds: The Confrontaton of the Indians, Spanish, and French in the Southwest, 1540–1795. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1975.

La Vere, David. Contrary Neighbors: Southern Plains and Removed Indians in Indian Territory. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2000.

Smith, F. Todd. The Wichita Indians: Traders of Texas and the Southern Plains, 1540–1845. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2000.

David La Vere

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." Encyclopedia of the New American Nation. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." Encyclopedia of the New American Nation. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma-0

"Oklahoma." Encyclopedia of the New American Nation. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/oklahoma-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

BACONE COLLEGE E-15
CAMERON UNIVERSITY I-7
CARL ALBERT STATE COLLEGE G-17
COMMUNITY CARE COLLEGE D-13
CONNORS STATE COLLEGE F-15
EAST CENTRAL UNIVERSITY H-11
EASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE H-15
HERITAGE COLLEGE OF HAIR DESIGN F-9
HILLSDALE FREE WILL BAPTIST COLLEGE F-9
LANGSTON UNIVERSITY D-10
METROPOLITAN COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY) F-9
METROPOLITAN COLLEGE (TULSA) D-13
MID-AMERICA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY F-9
MURRAY STATE COLLEGE J-11
NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE A-16
NORTHEASTERN STATE UNIVERSITY D-16
NORTHERN OKLAHOMA COLLEGE B-10
NORTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY B-6
OKLAHOMA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY F-11
OKLAHOMA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY F-9
OKLAHOMA CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE F-9
OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY F-9
OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE STATE UNIVERSITY M-7
OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY D-10
OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, OKLAHOMA CITY F-9
OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, OKMULGEE E-13
OKLAHOMA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY B-13
ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY D-13
PLATT COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY) F-9
PLATT COLLEGE (TULSA) D-13
REDLANDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE F-8
ROGERS STATE UNIVERSITY C-14
ROSE STATE COLLEGE F-10
ST. GREGORY'S UNIVERSITY F-11
SEMINOLE STATE COLLEGE G-11
SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY K-12
SOUTHERN NAZARENE UNIVERSITY F-9
SOUTHWESTERN CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY F-9
SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY F-6
SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY AT SAYRE F-4
SPARTAN COLLEGE OF AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY D-13
TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE D-13
TULSA WELDING SCHOOL D-13
UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA E-9
UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA G-9
UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER F-9
UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-OKLAHOMA CITY CAMPUS F-9
UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-TULSA CAMPUS D-13
UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND ARTS OF OKLAHOMA G-8
UNIVERSITY OF TULSA D-13
VATTEROTT COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY) F-9
VATTEROTT COLLEGE (TULSA) D-13
WESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE I-5

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-1

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

BACONE COLLEGE
CAMERON UNIVERSITY
CARL ALBERT STATE COLLEGE
COMMUNITY CARE COLLEGE
CONNORS STATE COLLEGE
EAST CENTRAL UNIVERSITY
EASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE
HERITAGE COLLEGE OF HAIR DESIGN
HILLSDALE FREE WILL BAPTIST COLLEGE
LANGSTON UNIVERSITY
METROPOLITAN COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY)
METROPOLITAN COLLEGE (TULSA)
MID-AMERICA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY
MURRAY STATE COLLEGE
NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE
NORTHEASTERN STATE UNIVERSITY
NORTHERN OKLAHOMA COLLEGE
NORTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY
OKLAHOMA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY
OKLAHOMA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY
OKLAHOMA CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY
OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE STATE UNIVERSITY
OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY
OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, OKLAHOMA CITY
OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, OKMULGEE
OKLAHOMA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY
ORAL ROBERTS UNIVERSITY
PLATT COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY)
PLATT COLLEGE (TULSA)
REDLANDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE
ROGERS STATE UNIVERSITY
ROSE STATE COLLEGE
ST. GREGORY'S UNIVERSITY
SEMINOLE STATE COLLEGE
SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY
SOUTHERN NAZARENE UNIVERSITY
SOUTHWESTERN CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY
SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY
SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY AT SAYRE
SPARTAN COLLEGE OF AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY
TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE
TULSA WELDING SCHOOL
UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA
UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA
UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER
UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-OKLAHOMA CITY CAMPUS
UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX-TULSA CAMPUS
UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND ARTS OF OKLAHOMA
UNIVERSITY OF TULSA
VATTEROTT COLLEGE (OKLAHOMA CITY)
VATTEROTT COLLEGE (TULSA)
WESTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-0

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Oklahoma

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma

"Oklahoma." College Blue Book. . Retrieved November 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-and-education-magazines/oklahoma

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.