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Flower, State

272. Flower, State (See also Flower or Plant, National.)

  1. American pasque flower of South Dakota. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 642]
  2. apple blossom of Arkansas and Michigan. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 626]
  3. bitterroot of Montana. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 636]
  4. black-eyed susan of Maryland. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 633]
  5. bluebonnet of Texas. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 643]
  6. camellia of Alabama. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 625]
  7. Carolina yellow jessamine of South Carolina. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 642]
  8. Cherokee rose of Georgia. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 629]
  9. dogwood of North Carolina and Virginia. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 639]
  10. flower of saguaro cactus of Arizona. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 626]
  11. forget-me-not of Alaska. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 625]
  12. golden poppy of California. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 627]
  13. goldenrod of Kentucky and Nebraska. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 632]
  14. hawthorn of Missouri. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 635]
  15. hibiscus of Hawaii. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 629]
  16. Indian paintbrush of Wyoming. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 646]
  17. iris of Tennessee. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 642]
  18. magnolia of Louisiana and Mississippi. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 632]
  19. mayflower of Massachusetts. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 633]
  20. mistletoe of Oklahoma. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 640]
  21. mountain laurel of Connecticut and Pennsylvania. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 628]
  22. orange blossom of Florida. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 628]
  23. Oregon grape of Oregon. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 640]
  24. peach blossom of Delaware. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 628]
  25. peony of Indiana. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 631]
  26. purple lilac of New Hampshire. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 637]
  27. red clover of Vermont. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 644]
  28. rhododendron of Washington and West Virginia. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 644]
  29. Rocky Mountain columbine of Colorado. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 627]
  30. rose of New York. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 638]
  31. sagebrush of Nevada. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 636]
  32. scarlet carnation of Ohio. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 639]
  33. sego lily of Utah. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 643]
  34. showy lady slipper of Minnesota. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 634]
  35. sunflower of Kansas. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 631]
  36. syringa of Idaho. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 630]
  37. violet of Illinois, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 630]
  38. white pine cone and tassel of Maine. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 633]
  39. wild prairie rose of North Dakota. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 639]
  40. wild rose of Iowa. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 631]
  41. yucca of New Mexico. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 638]

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"Flower, State." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Flower, State." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 16, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flower-state

"Flower, State." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Retrieved November 16, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flower-state

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