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bibliography: The listing of books is of ancient origin. Lists of clay tablets have been found at Nineveh and elsewhere; the library at Alexandria had subject lists of its books. Modern bibliography began with the invention of printing and at first consisted of "trade" bibliographies, i.e., lists of the publications of important publishing houses, comparable to those in the present-day Publisher's Trade List Annual, British Books in Print, and Books in Print. There have been efforts at universal bibilography: in 1545 at Zürich, Konrad von Gesner published his Bibliotheca universalis; in 1895 the International Institute of Bibliography was established at Brussels. There are national bibliographies, such as the Library of Congress Catalog and the British Museum Catalogue; subject bibliographies, such as Sabin's Dictionary of Books Relating to America; and lists of the works of individual authors. Bibliographies of rare and old books include Book Prices Current.The Cumulative Book Index is a monthly bibliography of books in the English language that cumulates annually. The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature is useful for British publications, and the Bibliographic Guide to the Study of the Literature of the U.S.A., by C. L. Gohdes, for American works. The Bibliographical Index, which is cumulative, and World Bibliography of Bibliographies are useful compilations. The term bibliography is also used to describe books as physical objects and their production history, and has been expanded to include nonprint media such as microfilm.

See A. J. K. Esdaile, Manual of Bibliography (4th ed. 1967); R. Downs, Bibliography (1967); E. W. Padwick, Bibliographical Method (1969); A. M. Robinson, Systematic Bibliography (3d ed. 1971); R. Stokes, The Function of Bibliography (1982); D. Drummel, Bibliographies (1984).

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPHY.
1. A branch of library science dealing with the description, history, comparison, and classification of documents
.
2. A list of documents compiled according to a particular need and/or principle of classification, such as 20c books on gardening published in Britain or the printed sources used in a piece of research or a published work. Most bibliographies are relatively straightforward lists organized alphabetically, but may otherwise vary greatly. Usually keyed to authors' names, they may also be organized according to subject, place of publication, publisher, or some other criterion; in an electronic database, a bibliography may be variously tagged, to make its information accessible according to authors, topics in titles, publishers, etc. Bibliographies ordered according to surname take many forms, according to rules laid down by academic and other institutions, practices favoured in publishers' house styles, or authors' preferences. Such lists may be long enough to be documents in their own right or published as works of reference, but most are appendices to books, articles, and dissertations. Below are three possible formats for the same title: Watson, James, & Hill, Anne (eds.). 1984. A Dictionary of Communication and Media Studies. London: Edward Arnold.
Watson, J., and Hill, A. (eds.). A Dictionary of Communication and Media Studies (London: Edward Arnold, 1984).
Watson, J., and Hill, A., eds., A Dictionary of Communication and Media Studies, London, 1984.


See NOTES AND REFERENCES.

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Notes:
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bibliography

bib·li·og·ra·phy / ˌbiblēˈägrəfē/ (abbr.: bibliog.) • n. (pl. -phies) a list of the books referred to in a scholarly work, usually printed as an appendix. ∎  a list of the books of a specific author or publisher, or on a specific subject: a bibliography of his publications. ∎  the history or systematic description of books, their authorship, printing, publication, editions, etc.: he regarded bibliography as a science. ∎  any book containing such information. DERIVATIVES: bib·li·og·ra·pher / -fər/ n. bib·li·o·graph·ic / -lēəˈgrafik/ adj. bib·li·o·graph·i·cal / -ˈgrafikəl/ adj. bib·li·o·graph·i·cal·ly adv.

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Bibliography

Bibliography

a collection of book titles arranged in a special order or relating to a special subject.

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bibliography

bibliographydaffy, taffy •Amalfi •Cavafy, Gaddafi •Effie •beefy, Fifi, leafy •cliffy, iffy, jiffy, Liffey, niffy, sniffy, spiffy, squiffy, stiffy, whiffy •salsify •coffee, toffee •wharfie •Sophie, strophe, trophy •Dufy, goofy, Sufi •fluffy, huffy, puffy, roughie, roughy, scruffy, snuffy, stuffy, toughie •comfy • atrophy •anastrophe, catastrophe •calligraphy, epigraphy, tachygraphy •dystrophy, epistrophe •autobiography, bibliography, biography, cardiography, cartography, chirography, choreography, chromatography, cinematography, cosmography, cryptography, demography, discography, filmography, geography, hagiography, historiography, hydrography, iconography, lexicography, lithography, oceanography, orthography, palaeography (US paleography), photography, pornography, radiography, reprography, stenography, topography, typography •apostrophe •gymnosophy, philosophy, theosophy •furphy, murphy, scurfy, surfy, turfy

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American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
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  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.