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Contributor Biographies


Terrie Dopp Aamodt is Professor of History and English, Walla Walla College, and the author of Righteous Armies, Holy Cause: Apocalyptic Imagery and the Civil War (2002). Religion

Robert E. Abrams is Associate Professor, University of Washington. He has been awarded a Walter Chapin Simpson Research Fellowship for 2005–2006. His major publications include Landscape and Ideology in American Renaissance Literature: Topographies of Skepticism (2004); "Critiquing Colonial American Geography: Hawthorne's Landscape of Bewilderment," Texas Studies in Literature and Language (1994); and "Image, Object, and Perception in Thoreau's Landscapes: The Development of Anti-Geography," Nineteenth-Century Literature (1991). Borders

Alan Ackerman is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. He is author of The Portable Theater: American Literature and the Nineteenth-Century Stage (1999) and coeditor, with Martin Puchner, of Against Theatre: Creative Destructions on the Modernist Stage (forthcoming). Theater

Joseph Alkana is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Miami. His is author of The Social Self (1997) as well as articles on American and Jewish American literature. He is also coeditor of Cohesion and Dissent in America (1994). Jews; Psychology

William L. Andrews, E. Maynard Adams Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is the author of The Literary Career of Charles W. Chesnutt (1980) and To Tell a Free Story: The First Century of Afro-American Autobiography, 1760–1865 (1986). He is the editor or coeditor of more than thirty books on African American literature, including The Oxford Companion to African American Literature (1997); The Norton Anthology of African American Literature (2003); and North Carolina Slave Narratives (2003). Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

David Anthony is Associate Professor in the Department of English at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. A specialist in nineteenth-century literature and culture, he has published essays on the role of "lowbrow" urban sensationalism in reflecting and helping shape standards of class and taste in journals such as American Literature (September 1997 and December 2004), the Yale Journal of Criticism (1999), and Early American Literature (2005). He has completed a book-length study of the relations between the unstable form of masculine sensibility offered in early-nineteenth-century gothic sensationalism and the precarious nature of the period's credit-based boom-and-bust economy. Taste

Jana Lea Argersinger is coeditor of ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance and Poe Studies/Dark Romanticism, both published at Washington State University, and an executive officer of the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. She has published articles in American Literature and the Edgar Allan Poe Review as well as in Writers of the American Renaissance: An A-to-Z Guide, edited by Denise D. Knight. Argersinger's scholarly interest in American women writers encompasses Elizabeth Stoddard, the northwest regionalist Carol Ryrie Brink, and the nineteenth-century sentimental tradition generally. The Wide, Wide World

Charlene Avallone, an independent scholar based in Lanikai, Hawai'i, is working on a study of nineteenth-century U.S. women's literary conversation. Her publications include "What American Renaissance? The Gendered Genealogy of a Critical Discourse," PMLA (1997); "The 'Red Roots' of White Feminism in Margaret Fuller's Writings," in Doing Feminism: Teaching and Research in the Academy, edited by Mary Anderson, Lisa Fine, Kathleen Geissler, and Joyce R. Ladenson (1997); and "Catharine Sedgwick and the Art of Conversation," in Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Critical Perspectives, edited by Lucinda L. Damon-Bach and Victoria Clements (2003). Oral Tradition

Eric Baker is a senior English major at Calvin College, widely traveled and academically distinguished. He followed work on this essay with a hike up Mt. Kilimanjaro and research in Nairobi. Religious Periodicals

Louise Barnett is Professor of English and American Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey. She has written a number of books, among them, The Ignoble Savage: American Literary Racism (1976); Touched by Fire: The Life, Death, and Mythic Afterlife of George Armstrong Custer (1996); and Ungentlemanly Acts: The Army's Notorious Incest Trial (2000). She is coeditor of The Art of Leslie Marmon Silko: A Collection of Critical Essays (1999). Indians

Dale M. Bauer is Professor of English at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She has published Feminist Dialogics (1988), Edith Wharton's Brave New Politics (1994), and is completing a book titled "Sex Expression and American Women, 1860–1940." Marriage

Mark Bauerlein is Professor of English at Emory University. He is the author of several books and articles on American literature, history, and philosophy, and he contributes frequently to national magazines and newspapers. "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking"

Nina Baym is Swanlund Endowed Chair and Center for Advanced Study Professor of English Emerita, and Jubilee Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences, at the University of Illinois, Urbana. Among books not cited in her article, she is author of The Shape of Hawthorne's Career (1976); American Women Writers and the Work of History, 1790–1860 (1995); and American Women of Letters and the Nineteenth-Century Sciences: Styles of Affiliation (2002). In 2000 she was awarded the Jay B. Hubbell medal for lifetime achievement in furthering American literary study. Feminism

Damien-Claude Bélanger is a course lecturer at the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. He is a founding coeditor of Mens, Quebec's journal of intellectual history and historical commentary, and is currently completing a doctoral dissertation at McGill University entitled "Pride and Prejudice: Canadian Intellectuals Confront the United States, 1891–1945." Canada

Klaus Benesch is Professor of English and Director of the American Studies Program at the University of Bayreuth (Germany). He is the author of Romantic Cyborgs: Authorship and Technology in the American Renaissance (2002); editor of African Diasporas in the Old and the New World (2004) and Space in America: Theory, History, Culture (2005); and general editor (with David Nye, Miles Orvell, and Joseph Tabbi) of "Architecture—Technology—Culture" (ATC), A Rodopi International Book series. Technology

James M. Bergquist is Emeritus Professor at Villanova University, where he taught from 1963 to 2001. He has written numerous articles and essays on the immigrant experience, including "The German-American Press," in The Ethnic Press in the United States, edited by Sally M. Miller (1987); "Germans and German-Speaking Peoples," in Our Multicultural Heritage: A Guide to American Ethnic Groups, edited by Elliott Barkan (1999); and "The Forty-Eighters: Catalysts of German-American Politics," in Being Present in the Other Culture: The Dynamic of German-American Interactions, edited by Frank Trommler and Elliott Shore (2001). Immigration

Lawrence I. Berkove is Professor Emeritus in English at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, where he was Chair of the Humanities Department and Director of the American Studies Program. He is a specialist in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature, and has published extensively in his field, including two previous articles on Hawthorne. Most of his work centers on the literature of the American West, especially that of Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, Jack London, and the authors of Nevada's Sagebrush School. He is the author or editor of ten books and monographs, including The Fighting Horse of the Stanislaus: Stories & Essays by Dan De Quille (1990), Ethical Records of Twain and His Circle of Sagebrush Journalists (1994), and A Prescription for Adversity: The Moral Art of Ambrose Bierce (2002). He is currently completing a collection of Sagebrush literature. "Young Goodman Brown"

Rebecca Berne is a doctoral candidate in the Department of English Language and Literature at Yale University. Short Story

Dennis Berthold is Professor of English at Texas A&M University, the coeditor of Dear Brother Walt: The Letters of Thomas Jefferson Whitman (1984) and Hawthorne's American Travel Sketches (1989), and the author of articles on American literature and cultural politics in such journals as American Literary History, American Literature, and Nineteenth-Century Literature. Political Parties

Michael Berthold is an Associate Professor of English at Villanova University and has published a variety of essays on Melville, American slave narratives, and other aspects of American literature and culture. Battle-Pieces

Michael L. Birkel teaches at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. His works include A Near Sympathy: The Timeless Quaker Wisdom of John Woolman (2004) and Silence and Witness: Quaker Spirituality (2005). Quakers

Steven Blakemore, Associate Professor of English, Florida Atlantic University, has published on a variety of topics in English and American literature. His publications include Intertextual War: Edmund Burke and the French Revolution in the Writings of Mary Wollstonecraft, Thomas Paine, and James Mackintosh (1997) and Crisis in Representation: Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft, Helen Maria Williams, and the Rewriting of the French Revolution (1997). "Rip Van Winkle"

Shelley R. Block is a doctoral candidate in American literature at the University of Missouri–Columbia. She has articles published in American Periodicals (2002) and Legacy (2003) and is working on her dissertation, which examines the cultural work of American temperance literature of the nineteenth century. Blake

Cheryl D. Bohde is a Professor at McLennan Community College, where she teaches American literature. Her most recent publications are "Anne Moody" and "Harlem," forthcoming in Greenwood Publishing's Encyclopedia of African American Literature. Young America

Michael Borgstrom is Assistant Professor of English at San Diego State University. He is the author of "Passing Over: Setting the Record Straight in Uncle Tom's Cabin," PMLA (2003). Same-Sex Love

Kristin Boudreau is Associate Professor of English at the University of Georgia. She is the author of Sympathy in American Literature: American Sentiments from Jefferson to the Jameses (2002). Friendship

Dana Brand is Professor of English and American Literature at Hofstra University. He is the author of The Spectator and the City in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (1991) and numerous articles on nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature and film. Urbanization

James R. Britton is a Lecturer at the University of Miami, where he teaches writing and literature. He has published on antebellum social reform in the journal Nineteenth-Century Prose and is working on an essay on Edgar Allan Poe soon to be published in the MLA Approaches to Teaching series. Suffrage

Nick Bromell is Professor of American Literature at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is the author of By the Sweat of the Brow: Labor and Literature in Antebellum America (1993) and Tomorrow Never Knows: Rock and Psychedelics in the 1960s (2000), both published by the University of Chicago Press. Labor

Candy Gunther Brown is an Assistant Professor of American Studies at Saint Louis University. She is the author of The Word in the World: Evangelical Writing, Publishing, and Reading in America, 1789–1880 (2004). Evangelicals

Stephen Howard Browne is Professor of Rhetorical Studies at Pennsylvania State University. He is the author of Edmund Burke and the Discourse of Virtue (1993); Angelina Grimké: Rhetoric, Identity, and the Radical Imagination (1999); and Jefferson's Call for Nationhood (2003). "Letters on the Equality of the Sexes"; "Plymouth Rock Oration"

Dickson D. Bruce Jr. is Professor of History, University of California, Irvine. His books include Violence and Culture in the Antebellum South (1979); Black American Writing from the Nadir: The Evolution of a Literary Tradition, 1877–1915 (1989); and The Origins of African American Literature, 1680–1865 (2001). The Bondwoman's Narrative

A fulltime software developer, Patrick W. Bryant's doctoral thesis (in progress at Georgia State University) is an "online, fluid text" edition of Herman Melville's Typee. Using custom software Bryant is writing for the project, the edition comprises a website that will allow readers to collate all extant materials that contribute to "Typee's many texts" along with "revision narratives" explicative annotations describing differences among textual variants. Typee

Louis J. Budd, James B. Duke Professor of English (Emeritus), Duke University, has written Mark Twain: Social Philosopher (1962, new ed. 2001) and Our Mark Twain (1983) and has edited Mark Twain: The Contemporary Reviews (1999). The Innocents Abroad

Martin T. Buinicki is an Assistant Professor of English at Valparaiso University, specializing in nineteenth-century American literature and the history of the book and authorship. He has published articles in American Literary History and American Literary Realism. His book Negotiating Copyright: Authorship and the Discourse of Literary Property Rights in Nineteenth-Century America is forthcoming from Routledge Press. Periodicals

Bruce Burgett is Professor of American Studies in the Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Program at the University of Washington–Bothell and graduate faculty in the English Department at the University of Washington–Seattle. He is the author of Sentimental Bodies: Sex, Gender, and Citizenship in the Early Republic (1998) and has published widely on American cultural studies. Sexuality and the Body

Robert E. Burkholder is Associate Professor of English at Penn State University, University Park. He is coauthor of Ralph Waldo Emerson: An Annotated Bibliography of Criticism (1994), a member of the Editorial Board of the Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and a past president of the Ralph Waldo Emerson Society. Concord, Massachusetts

John A. Burrison is Regents Professor of English and Director of the Folklore Curriculum at Georgia State University. His publications include "'The Golden Arm': The Folk Tale and Its Literary Use by Mark Twain and Joel C. Harris," Arts and Sciences Research Paper no. 19 (1968) and Storytellers: Folktales and Legends from the South (1989). Folklore

William E. Cain is the Mary Jewett Gaiser Professor of English at Wellesley College. His publications include (as coeditor) The Norton Anthology of Literary Theory and Criticism (2001), and the section on "Literary Criticism" for The Cambridge History of American Literature, vol. 5 (2003). The Blithedale Romance

Barbara Cantalupo is Associate Professor of English at the Pennsylvania State University and founding editor of The Edgar Allan Poe Review. She has published essays on Poe, Hawthorne, and Emma Wolf, among others. She edited and wrote an introduction for the reissue of Emma Wolf's 1892 novel, Other Things Being Equal, and is coeditor of Prospects for the Study of American Literature, Volume II (forthcoming). "The Philosophy of Composition"

Lorrayne Carroll is Associate Professor of English at the University of Southern Maine. Her book "Rhetorical Drag: Gender, Captivity and the Writing of History" is forthcoming from Kent State University Press. Captivity Narratives

Scott E. Casper is Associate Professor of History at the University of Nevada, Reno. He is the author of Constructing American Lives: Biography and Culture in Nineteenth-Century America (1999) and the coeditor, with Joanne D. Chaison and Jeffrey D. Groves, of Perspectives on American Book History: Artifacts and Commentary (2002). Biography

Russ Castronovo is Jean Wall Bennett Professor of English and American Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is the author of Fathering the Nation: American Genealogies of Slavery and Freedom (1995) andNecro Citizenship: Death, Eroticism, and the Public Sphere in the Nineteenth-Century United States (2001). He coedited, with Dana Nelson, Materializing Democracy: Toward a Revitalized Cultural Politics (2002). Death

Nancy D. Chase is Associate Professor in the Department of English at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia. She teaches American literature and has published about family alcoholism and parentified children. She edited and contributed to the first volume of collected essays on parentification, Burdened Children: Theory, Research, and Treatment of Parentification (1999), and has coedited a monograph, High-Performing Families: Causes, Consequences, and Clinical Solutions (Family Psychology and Counseling series, 2001). Childhood

Eileen Ka-May Cheng teaches history at Sarah Lawrence College. She is editor of Women in American History: Civil War, Reconstruction, and Industrialization, 1820–1900, vol. 2 (2002), and author of "American Historical Writers and the Loyalists, 1788–1856: Dissent, Consensus, and American Nationality," Journal of the Early Republic (winter 2003). History

Amanda Claybaugh is Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. She is the author of a forthcoming book about the nineteenth-century novel and Anglo-American social reform. Temperance

Samuel Chase Coale teaches American literature at Wheaton College in Massachusetts. He has taught in several countries, such as India, Pakistan, Brazil, Greece, and Belarus, and his most recent books include Mesmerism and Hawthorne: Mediums of American Romance (1998); The Mystery of Mysteries: Cultural Differences and Designs (2000); and Paradigms of Paranoia: The Culture of Conspiracy in Contemporary American Fiction (2005). Popular Science

Lorinda B. Cohoon is an Assistant Professor in the English Department at the University of Memphis, where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in children's literature and culture. Her current research focuses on children's periodicals of the nineteenth century and constructions of childhood citizenship. Gift Books and Annuals; Pictorial Weeklies

Carol Colatrella is Professor of Literature and Cultural Studies and Codirector of the Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She is the author of Evolution, Sacrifice, and Narrative: Balzac, Zola, and Faulkner (1990) and Literature and Moral Reform: Melville and the Discipline of Reading (2002) and coeditor, with Joseph Alkana, of Cohesion and Dissent in America (1994). Crime and Punishment

William Conlogue is Associate Professor of English at Marywood University. In addition to articles in several journals, he has published a book, Working the Garden: American Writers and the Industrialization of Agriculture (2001). Agrarianism

Susan Coultrap-McQuin earned her Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in American Studies. She is the author of articles on nineteenth-century women writers and publishing as well as on women's studies and teaching topics. Her book Doing Literary Business (1990) won a Choice Award and other recognition. She edited the book Gail Hamilton: Selected Writings (1992) and coedited Explorations in Feminist Ethics: Theory and Practice (1992). She currently serves as Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at the State University of New York College (SUNY) at Oswego. Female Authorship

Amy Cummins, Assistant Professor of English at Fort Hays State University, specializes in American literature and women's history. Seneca Falls Convention

John Patrick Daly is Associate Professor of History at the State University of New York College at Brockport. He is the author of When Slavery Was Called Freedom: Evangelicalism, Proslavery, and the Causes of the Civil War, 1830–1865 (2003), which won honorable mention for the 2002 Seaborg Prize for Civil War Scholarship. Proslavery Writing

Michael J. Davey is Assistant Professor of early and nineteenth-century American literature at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Georgia. He has published on Henry James, Susan Fenimore Cooper, and Herman Melville. The Romance

Cynthia J. Davis is an Associate Professor of English at the University of South Carolina in Columbia. She is the author of Bodily and Narrative Forms: The Influence of Medicine on American Literature, 1845–1915 (2000); coeditor of Approaches to Teaching Gilman's "The Yellow Wall-Paper" and Herland (2003); and coauthor of Women Writers in the United States: A Timeline of Social, Cultural, and Literary History (1996). She is working on a biography of Charlotte Perkins Gilman for Stanford University Press. Health and Medicine

David A. Davis is Georgia Carroll Kyser Fellow in American Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is managing editor of Southern Literary Journal and associate editor of North Carolina Slave Narratives.The Confessions of Nat Turner

Marcy J. Dinius is a visiting Assistant Professor at Northwestern University. She has published articles on antebellum American literature and publishing, including "Slavery in Black and White: Daguerreotypy and Uncle Tom's Cabin," ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance (2005); and "Poe's Moon Shot: 'Hans Phaall' and the Art and Science of Antebellum Print Culture," Poe Studies/Dark Romanticism (2005). Publishers

Stacey Lee Donohue is the Chair of the Fine Arts Department and Professor of English at Central Oregon Community College in Bend, Oregon, where she teaches American, Native American, African American, and immigrant literatures as well as composition. Irish

Amy E. Earhart is Coordinator of Instructional Technology and Lecturer in the English Department at Texas A&M University. She is the developer of the 19th Century Concord: A Historical and Literary Place digital database website. Her publications include "Representative Men, Slave Revolt, and Emerson's 'Conversion' to Abolitionism" in ATQ: American Transcendental Quarterly (1999), and "Elizabeth Peabody on 'the Temperament of the Colored Classes': African-Americans, Progressive History, and Education in a Democratic System" in the forthcoming Reinventing the Peabody Sisters. Underground Railroad

Gregory Eiselein is Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of English at Kansas State University, where he teaches American literature and cultural studies. He is the author of Literature and Humanitarian Reform in the Civil War Era (1996) and editor, with Anne K. Phillips, of The Louisa May Alcott Encyclopedia (2001) and the Norton critical edition of Little Women (2003). Reform

Monika Elbert, Professor of English at Montclair State University, has published widely on Hawthorne and is associate editor of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review.The House of the Seven Gables

R. J. Ellis teaches at the University of Birmingham, U.K., and edits Comparative American Studies. His publications include "Liar! Liar!": Jack Kerouac, Novelist (1999); Harriet Wilson's Our Nig: A Cultural Biography of a "Two-Story" African American Novel (2003); and "African American Fiction and Poetry," in A Companion to the Literature and Culture of the American South, edited by Richard Gray and Owen Robinson (2004). Walker's Appeal

Allan Moore Emery is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio. He has published articles on Melville's tales in American Literature, Nineteenth-Century Fiction, New England Quarterly, and ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance. He is completing a book on Melville's short fiction of the 1850s as well as an article on Edgar Allan Poe's "The Pit and the Pendulum." "Benito Cereno"

Paul J. Erickson earned his Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of "Judging Books by Their Covers: Format, the Implied Reader, and the 'Degeneration' of the Dime Novel," ATQ (1998); "Help or Hindrance? The History of the Book and Electronic Media," in Rethinking Media Change: The Aesthetics of Transition (2003); and "New Books, New Men: City-Mysteries Fiction, Authorship, and the Literary Market," Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal (2003). Dime Novels

John Evelev is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Missouri–Columbia. He is the author of Tolerable Entertainment: Herman Melville and Professionalism in Antebellum New York City (2006). New York

Ann Fabian teaches American Studies and History at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey. She is the author of Card Sharps, Dream Books, and Bucket Shops: Gambling in Nineteenth-Century America (1990) and The Unvarnished Truth: Personal Narratives in Nineteenth-Century America (2000). Amateurism and Self-Publishing

Mark Fackler is Professor of Communications at Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is coauthor of Media Ethics: Cases and Moral Reasoning (1983, 1987); Good News: Social Ethics and the Press (1993); and Popular Religious Magazines of the United States (1995). He teaches and conducts research in East Africa. Religious Periodicals

Steven Fink is Associate Professor of English, the Ohio State University. He is the author of Prophet in the Marketplace: Thoreau's Development as a Professional Writer (1992, 1999) and coeditor of Reciprocal Influences: Literary Production, Distribution, and Consumption in America (1999). Book Publishing

Paul Finkelman is the Chapman Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Tulsa College of Law. His recent books include Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South and Landmark Decisions of the United States Supreme Court, both published in 2003. He coedited The Library of Congress Civil War Desk Reference (2002). Dred Scott v. Sandford

Elz˙bieta Foeller-Pituch, Associate Director of the Alice Berline Kaplan Center for the Humanities at Northwestern University, has published articles on contemporary authors such as John Barth and John Gardner, on Henry James, and on aspects of the classical tradition in nineteenth-century American fiction. She has also contributed chapters to As Others Read Us: International Perspectives on American Literature (1991) and The Classical Tradition and the Americas (forthcoming). Her research interest in the classical tradition in American culture stems from an American Council of Learned Societies postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University. She is working on a book-length study of nineteenth-century American writers' use of Greek and Roman myths. Classical Literature

Ed Folsom is the Carver Professor of English at the University of Iowa, where he edits the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, the Whitman Series for the University of Iowa Press, and coedits the online Walt Whitman Archive (www.whitmanarchive.org). He is the author or editor of numerous books and essays on Whitman and American poetry, including Walt Whitman's Native Representations (1994) and Re-Scripting Walt Whitman: An Introduction to His Life and Work (2005). "Song of Myself"

Janet Gabler-Hover is a Professor of nineteenth-century American literature in the Department of English at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia. She is the author of Truth in American Fiction: The Legacy of Rhetorical Idealism (1990) and Dreaming Black/Writing White: The Hagar Myth in American Cultural History (2000). She has also published numerous essays in book collections and journals. Clotel; Spiritualism

Lynée Lewis Gaillet is Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Composition at Georgia State University and Executive Director of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association. She is the editor of Scottish Rhetoric and Its Influences (1998) and author of numerous articles and book chapters examining the history of rhetorical practices. Her work has appeared in journals such as Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Rhetoric Review, Journal of Advanced Composition, Writing Program Administrator, Issues in Writing, and Composition Studies. Curricula

Christopher Gair is Senior Lecturer in American Studies at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. He is the author of Complicity and Resistance in Jack London's Novels: From Naturalism to Nature (1997) and The AmericanCounterculture (forthcoming). He is managing editor of Symbiosis: A Journal of Anglo-American Literary Relations. Literary Nationalism

Granville Ganter is Associate Professor of English at St. John's University, Queens, New York. He writes on nineteenth-century oratory and is presently completing an edition of the collected speeches of the Seneca orator Red Jacket. Rhetoric

Eric Gardner is Associate Professor of English at Saginaw Valley State University and the editor of Major Voices: The Drama of Slavery (2005). His "The Complete Fortune Teller and Dream Book: An Antebellum Text 'By Chloe Russel, A Woman of Colour,'" was published in the New England Quarterly (2005). Our Nig

LeAnne Garner, an English instructor at Shorter College and Georgia State University, is a doctoral candidate at Georgia State University. Cincinnati

Roger L. Geiger is Distinguished Professor of Higher Education at Pennsylvania State University and head of the higher education program. His study Knowledge and Money: Research Universities and the Paradox of the Marketplace was published in 2004. His volumes on American research universities in the twentieth century, To Advance Knowledge: The Development of American Research Universities, 1900–1940 and Research and Relevant Knowledge: American Research Universities since World War II, were published in 2004. In 2000 he published The American College in the Nineteenth Century. He has edited the History of Higher Education Annual since 1993 and is senior associate editor of the American Journal of Education. Colleges

Gregory Scott George is a doctoral candidate at Georgia State University. He is a scholar of nineteenth-century American Romantics and is interested in textual criticism of Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass. Baltimore

Peter Gibian teaches in the English Department at McGill University. His publications include Mass Culture and Everyday Life (editor and contributor; 1997) and Oliver Wendell Holmes and the Culture of Conversation (2001). The Autocrat at the Breakfast-Table

Paul Giles is Reader in American Literature at the University of Oxford, U.K., and the author of American Catholic Arts and Fictions (1992), Transatlantic Insurrections (2001), and Virtual Americas (2002). English Literature

Terryl Givens is the author of The Viper on the Hearth: Mormons, Myths, and the Construction of Heresy (1997) and By the Hand of Mormon: The American Scripture That Launched a New World Religion (2002) as well as other books and articles in religious and literary studies. He teaches at the University of Richmond, where he is Professor of Literature and Religion and holds the James A. Bostwick Chair of English. Mormonism

William Gleason is Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Professor of English at Princeton University. He is the author of The Leisure Ethic: Work and Play in American Literature, 1840–1940 (1999). Leisure

Everett C. Goodwin is the Senior Minister of the Scarsdale Community Baptist Church, Scarsdale, New York, and from 1981 to 1994 was the Senior Minister of the First Baptist Church of the City of Washington, D.C., a church unique for its historic affiliation with Baptists of divergent expression or identity. He is a third-generation Baptist minister and a noted authority on Baptist history and life. He is the author or editor of three books about Baptists, The New Hiscox Guide for Baptist Churches (1995); Baptists in the Balance: The Tension between Freedom and Responsibility (editor, 1997); and Down by the Riverside: A Brief History of Baptist Faith (2002), all published by Judson Press. Baptists

Philip Gould is Professor of English at Brown University. He is the author of Barbaric Traffic: Commerce and Antislavery in the 18th Century Atlantic World (2003). Hope Leslie

John M. Grammer is Professor of English and Director of the Sewanee School of Letters at the University of the South and the author of Pastoral and Politics in the Old South (1996). His essays and reviews have appeared in The Sewanee Review, American Literary History, and other publications. Sociology for the South

Bruce Greenfield, Associate Professor of English, Dalhousie University, is the author of Narrating Discovery: The Romantic Explorer in American Literature, 1790–1855 (1992). His articles on travel and discovery writing include "The Mi'kmaq Hieroglyphic Prayer Book: Writing and Christianity in Maritime Canada, 1675–1921," in The Language Encounter in the Americas, 1492 to 1800, edited by Edward Gray and Norman Fiering (2000); "The West/California: The Site of the Future," in The Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing (2002); "Creating the Distance of Print: The Memoir of Peter Pond, Fur Trader," Early American Literature (2002). Exploration and Discovery

Farah Jasmine Griffin is Professor of English and Director of the Institute for Research in African American Studies at Columbia University. Author of Who Set You Flowin': The African American Migration Narrative (1995) and If You Can't be Free, Be a Mystery: In Search of Billie Holiday (2001), she is also the editor of Beloved Sisters and Loving Friends: Letters from Addie Brown and Rebecca Primus (1999); coeditor, with Cheryl Fish, of Stranger in the Village: Two Centuries of African American Travel Writing (1998); and coeditor, with Robert O'Meally and Brent Hayes Edwards, of Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies (2004). "The Two Offers"

Dean Grodzins is Associate Professor of History at Meadville Lombard Theological School. Unitarians

Paul C. Gutjahr is Associate Professor of English, American Studies, and Religious Studies at Indiana University. He is the author of An American Bible: A History of the Good Book in the United States, 1777–1880 (1999); the editor of Popular American Literature of the 19th Century (2001); and the coeditor of Illuminating Letters: Typography and Literary Interpretation (2001). The Bible

Bruce A. Harvey teaches a variety of American literature and American studies courses at Florida International University. He has published American Geographics: U.S. National Narratives and the Representation of the Non-European World, 1830–1865 (2001), and his current project, "After Elvis after Cook: From Anthropology to Pop Culture," focuses on representations of Polynesia. Foreigners

Susan Carol Hauser is Professor of English at Bemidji State University. She received an M.F.A. from Bowling Green State University. She is the author of Wild Rice Cooking: History, Natural History, Harvesting and Lore (2000); You Can Write a Memoir (2001); and Outside after Dark: New & Selected Poems (2002). Lyric Poetry

Kevin J. Hayes, Professor of English at the University of Central Oklahoma, is the author of Folklore and Book Culture (1997), Melville's Folk Roots (1999), and Poe and the Printed Word (2000) and editor of The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe (2000). His essays on Poe have appeared in Biography, Nineteenth-Century Literature, and Prospects. "The Big Bear of Arkansas"; "Fall of the House of Usher"; Swallow Barn

April Rose Haynes is a doctoral candidate in history and women's studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is currently a Social Science Research Council Sexuality Dissertation Fellow. See also her article "The Trials of Frederick Hollick: Obscenity, Sex Education, and Medical Democracy in the Early American Republic," in Journal of the History of Sexuality (2003). Sex Education

David K. Heckerl is Assistant Professor of English at Saint Mary's University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. His most recent publications include articles on Emerson and historicism in the Canadian Review of American Studies and on Edmund Burke and modern liberalism in the Dalhousie Review. He is currently preparing research for a book on Lionel Trilling's conception of the "liberal imagination" in relation to questions raised in the political thought of Hannah Arendt, Isaiah Berlin, and Leo Strauss. Democracy in America

Desirée Henderson is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Texas at Arlington. Her articles have appeared in Early American Literature, American Drama, and Walt Whitman Quarterly Review. Compromise of 1850 and Fugitive Slave Law; Gettysburg Address; Native American Literature

T. Walter Herbert is Brown Professor of English and University Scholar at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas. He has been awarded an NEH Junior Humanist Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a Residency at the Rockefeller Foundation Study Center at Bellagio, Italy. His publications include Marquesan Encounters: Melville and the Meaning of Civilization (1980); Dearest Beloved: The Hawthornes and the Making of the Middle-Class Family (1993); and Sexual Violence and American Manhood (2002). Manhood

Kay Seymour House was Professor of English and American Literature at San Francisco State University and is the retired editor in chief of the ongoing edition of James Fenimore Cooper's works. She also edited the texts of Cooper's The Pilot and Satanstoe. She is the author of Cooper's Americans (1966); "Francesco Caracciolo, Fenimore Cooper, and 'Billy Budd,'" in Studi Americani (1973–1974); and "James Fenimore Cooper: Cultural Prophet and Literary Pathfinder," in American Literature to 1900 (1986, 1993). Leatherstocking Tales

Michael Householder is an Assistant Professor of English at Southern Methodist University. He is currently revising a book-length study on European discourses of intercultural encounter during the early modern period. Miscegenation

Nikolas Huot is a doctoral candidate at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia. His research interests and recent publications include analyses of Asian American, Asian Canadian, and multicultural literatures. Chinese

Christoph Irmscher is Professor of English and Chair of the English Department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. The recipient of two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and book awards from the Association of American Publishers and the American Studies Network, he is the author of Masken der Moderne (1992), The Poetics of Natural History (1999), and has edited John James Audubon's Writings and Drawings for the Library of America. His new book, Longfellow Redux, will be published by the University of Illinois Press. Several of his recent articles are about Longfellow, notably "Longfellow Redux," Raritan (2002); and "Mediterranean Metamorphoses: Enrico Longfellow's Contribution to Multilingual American Literature," in America and the Mediterranean (2003). He is currently writing a biography of Louis Agassiz. Fireside Poets; The Song of Hiawatha

Gavin Jones is Associate Professor of English at Stanford University. He is the author of Strange Talk: The Politics of Dialect Literature in Gilded Age America (1999) as well as a range of articles on nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature. Dialect

Daniel Heath Justice, an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation, is Assistant Professor of Aboriginal literatures at the University of Toronto. Among his publications are "We're Not There Yet, Kemo Sabe: Positing a Future for American Indian Literary Studies," American Indian Quarterly (2001); "Seeing (and Reading) Red: Intellectual Sovereignty and the Study of Native Literatures," in Indigenizing the Academy: Transforming Scholarship and Empowering Communities, edited by Devon A. Mihesuah and Angela Cavender Wilson (2004); andOur Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History (forthcoming). Cherokee Memorials

Carolyn L. Karcher, currently visiting Professor at the University of Maryland, is the author of Shadow over the Promised Land: Slavery, Race, and Violence in Melville's America (1980); "The Riddle of the Sphinx: Melville's 'Benito Cereno' and the Amistad Case," in Critical Essays on Herman Melville's "Benito Cereno," edited by Robert E. Burkholder (1992); and The First Woman in the Republic: A Cultural Biography of Lydia Maria Child (1994). She is also the editor of Child's Hobomok and Other Writings on Indians, An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans (1986, 1995); A Lydia Maria Child Reader (1997); and the Melville selections in the Heath Anthology of American Literature.An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans; Moby-Dick

Merit Kaschig is a doctoral student in American Studies at the College of William and Mary. Her paper "'Vice Breeds Crime': The Germs of Mark Twain's Puddn'head Wilson" appeared in American Periodicals. Calvinism; Methodists

Louis J. Kern teaches in the History Department of Hofstra University. He is the author of An Ordered Love: Sex Roles and Sexuality in Victorian Utopias: The Shakers, the Mormons and the Oneida Community (1981). Free Love

Carol Farley Kessler is Professor Emerita of English, American Studies, and Women's Studies at the Delaware County Campus of the Pennsylvania State University. She is also author of Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1982) and Charlotte Perkins Gilman: Her Progress toward Utopia (1995) and editor of the anthology Daring to Dream: Utopian Fiction by United States Women before 1950 (2nd ed., 1995), including Phelps's "A Dream within a Dream." The Gates Ajar

Daniel Kilbride is Associate Professor of History at John Carroll University. He is writing a book on American travelers in Europe, 1700–1870. His book An American Aristocracy: Culture and Community in Antebellum Philadelphia is forthcoming from the University of South Carolina Press. Americans Abroad; Revolutions of 1848

M. Jimmie Killingsworth, Professor of English at Texas A&M University, is the author of many articles, chapters, and books on American literature and rhetoric, including Whitman's Poetry of the Body (1989), The Growth of Leaves of Grass (1993), and the forthcoming Walt Whitman and the Earth: A Study in Ecopoetics.Leaves of Grass

Lovalerie King is Assistant Professor of English and Affiliate Faculty in Women's Studies at the Pennsylvania State University–University Park. Her special foci include intertextual and extratextual relationships among African American writers, African American women writers, and African American feminist and womanist thought. Her publications include A Students' Guide to African American Literature (2003); "African American Womanism from Zora Neale Hurston to Alice Walker," in The Cambridge Companion to the African American Novel (2004); and "Counterdiscourses on the Racialization of Theft and Morality in Douglass's 1845 Narrative and Jacobs's Incidents," MELUS (2003). Projects in progress include a monograph, "Expropriations and Reparations: A Study of Property, Race, and Ethics in African American Literature" (under review); a coedited essay collection, "James Baldwin and Toni Morrison: Comparative Critical and Theoretical Essays"; and "Zora Neale Hurston: An Introduction." Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Denise D. Knight is Professor of English at the State University of New York at Cortland, where she specializes in nineteenth-century American literature. She is the author of Charlotte Perkins Gilman: A Study of the Short Fiction (1997) and editor of the two-volume edition of The Diaries of Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1994) as well as volumes of Gilman's poems and fiction. Declaration of Sentiments

Michael Kowalewski is Professor of English at Carleton College. From 2001 to 2004 he was Director of the Program in American Studies at Carleton. He is a former president of the Western Literature Association. He is the author of Deadly Musings: Violence and Verbal Form in American Fiction (1993) and the editor of Reading the West: New Essays on the Literature of the American West (1996) and Gold Rush: A Literary Exploration (1997). California Gold Rush

Arnold Krupat teaches in the Global Studies Faculty Group at Sarah Lawrence College. Among his many books, the most recent are The Turn to the Native: Studies in Criticism and Culture (1996); Red Matters: Native American Studies (2002); and the forthcoming "All that Remains: Studies in Native American Literatures." "An Indian's Looking-Glass for the White Man"; Indian Wars and Dispossession

An Associate Professor of English at George Mason University, David Kuebrich is the author of Minor Prophecy: Walt Whitman's New American Religion (1989) and various articles on American literature. "Bartleby, the Scrivener"

Ross Labrie, who teaches in the Arts One interdisciplinary program at the University of British Columbia, is the author of several books on American literature. These include a general study of Catholic American literature and specific studies of the American Catholic authors Thomas Merton and Daniel Berrigan. Catholics

Emma J. Lapsansky-Werner is Professor of History, Haverford College. Her publications include Quaker Aesthetics (with Anne Verplanck, 2003) and Back to Africa (with Margaret Hope Bacon, 2005). Philadelphia

William E. Lenz is Professor of English and Chair of the Division of Writing, Literary and Cultural Studies, at Chatham College. He is the author of articles on American literature, American humor, and American exploration and of Fast Talk and Flush Times: The Confidence Man as a Literary Convention (1985) and The Poetics of the Antarctic: A Study in Nineteenth-Century American Cultural Perceptions (1995). His current research is tentatively called "The Narrative Construction of Central America." Confidence Men

Philip W. Leon is a Professor of American literature at The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina. He is the author of Walt Whitman and Sir William Osler: A Poet and His Physician (1995); Mark Twain and West Point (1996); Bullies and Cowards: The West Point Hazing Scandal, 1898–1901 (2000); and Nanny Wood: From Washington Belle to Portland's Grande Dame (2003). Mental Health; Presbyterians

James S. Leonard is Professor and Head of the Department of English at The Citadel. He is coauthor of The Fluent Mundo: Wallace Stevens and the Structure of Reality (1988); coeditor of Satire or Evasion? Black Perspectives on Huckleberry Finn (1992); editor of Making Mark Twain Work in the Classroom (1999); and coeditor of Prentice Hall's two-volume Anthology of American Literature (8th ed., 2004). "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County"

Lázaro Lima teaches Spanish and Latino Studies at Bryn Mawr College were he codirects the Program in Hispanic Studies. His articles have appeared in various national and international journals and collections including The Wallace Stevens Journal, Dactylys, Voz latina, and Cuba Transnational. He is completing a book on Latino literature, tentatively titled "The Latino Body in American Literary and Cultural Memory." Spanish Speakers and Early "Latino" Expression

Kent P. Ljungquist, Professor of English at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, is the author of The Grand and the Fair: Poe's Landscape Aesthetics and Pictorial Techniques, editor of Nineteenth-Century American Fiction Writers, and coeditor of James Fenimore Cooper's The Deerslayer. Knickerbocker Writers; Lyceums
Helen Lock is Professor of English at the University of Louisiana at Monroe and author of A Case of Mis-Taken Identity: Detective Undercurrents in Recent African American Fiction (1994) and of numerous articles on African American, American, and multicultural fiction. Slave Rebellions

Lisa M. Logan is Associate Professor of English and Director of the Women's Studies Program at the University of Central Florida. She has published several articles on American women writers that have appeared in journals such as Legacy and Early American Literature and several edited collections. Domestic Fiction

Mason I. Lowance Jr. is a Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His publications include The Language of Canaan: Metaphor and Symbol in New England from the Puritans to the Trancendentalists (1980); The Stowe Debate: Rhetorical Strategies in Uncle Tom's Cabin (1994); Against Slavery: An Abolitionist Reader (2000); and A House Divided: The Antebellum Slavery Debates in America, 1776–1865 (2003). Puritanism

Dana Luciano teaches sexuality and gender studies and nineteenth-century U.S. literature in the English Department at Georgetown University. She is the author of a forthcoming study entitled "Styling Grief: Loss and Time in Nineteenth-Century America." Recent publications include "Passing Shadows: Melancholy Nationality and Black Publicity in Pauline Hopkins's Of One Blood," in Loss: The Psychic and Social Contexts of Melancholia, edited by David Eng and David Kazanjian (2003); and "Melville's Untimely History: 'Benito Cereno' as Counter-Monumental Narrative," Arizona Quarterly (2004). Mourning

Roger Lundin is the Blanchard Professor of English at Wheaton College. His publications include The Culture of Interpretation: Christian Faith and the Postmodern World (1993); Emily Dickinson and the Art of Belief (1998; 2nd rev. ed., 2004); and From Nature to Experience: The American Search for Cultural Authority (2005). Protestantism

Sarah Luria teaches in the English Department of Holy Cross College and is the author of "The Architecture of Manners: Henry James, Edith Wharton, and The Mount," in American Quarterly (1997); "National Domesticity in Early Washington, D.C.," Common-Place: Special Issue on Early Cities of the Americas (2003); and Capital Speculations: Writing and Building Washington, D.C. (2005). Washington, D.C.

Anne Scott MacLeod is Professor Emerita, University of Maryland, College Park. She is author of A Moral Tale: Children's Fiction and American Culture, 1820–1860 (1975) and American Childhood: Essays on Children's Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (1994) as well as numerous articles on children's literature and American culture. Children's and Adolescent Literature

R. D. Madison is Professor of English at the U.S. Naval Academy. He has edited many volumes of literature and history, including Jack London's The Cruise of the Snark (2004) for Penguin Classics. He is an editorial associate of the Northwestern-Newberry edition of The Writings of Herman Melville and is on the editorial board of The Writings of James Fenimore Cooper. Maritime Commerce

W. Barksdale Maynard teaches art and architectural history at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Delaware. He is the author of three books: Architecture in the United States, 1800–1850 (2002); Walden Pond: A History (2004); and "Buildings of Delaware" for the Buildings of the United States series (forthcoming). Architecture

Jeffrey Alan Melton is Associate Professor of English at Auburn University Montgomery. He is the author of "Keeping the Faith in Mark Twain's The Innocents Abroad," South Atlantic Review (1999); "Touring Decay: Nineteenth-Century American Travel Writers in Europe," in Papers on Language and Literature (1999); and Mark Twain, Travel Books, and Tourism: The Tide of a Great Popular Movement (2002). Tourism

Robert Milder, Professor of English at Washington University in St. Louis, has written widely on American Renaissance subjects, including essays in The Cambridge Companion to Herman Melville (1998) and The Cambridge Companion to Ralph Waldo Emerson (1999). He is the author of Reimagining Thoreau (1995) and of "Exiled Royalties: Melville and the Life We Imagine" (forthcoming). "Experience"

David C. Miller is Professor of English at Allegheny College. He is currently completing a book on the interaction of words and images in nineteenth-century New England titled "Beyond the Sister Arts Idea." Art

Domhnall Mitchell is Professor of Nineteenth-Century American Literature at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. He has written articles on Dickinson for American Literature, Legacy, Nineteenth-Century Literature, and The Emily Dickinson Journal and has a chapter on poetry and class in The Cambridge Companion to Emily Dickinson (2002). He is the author of Emily Dickinson: Monarch of Perception (2000) and Emily Dickinson: Measures of Possibility (2005). Poems of Emily Dickinson

William M. Morgan is a Lecturer in the Expository Writing Program at New York University. He is the author of Questionable Charity: Gender, Humanitarianism, and Complicity in U.S. Literary Realism (2004). Philosophy

Wesley T. Mott is Professor of English at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. In 1989 he organized the Ralph Waldo Emerson Society, which he has served as secretary/treasurer, president, and managing editor of Emerson Society Papers. He has written "The Strains of Eloquence": Emerson and His Sermons (1989) and edited volume 4 of The Complete Sermons of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1992) as well as five reference books on New England transcendentalism and antebellum literature. "Self-Reliance"

Elsa Nettels is a Professor Emeritus at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, where she taught in the Department of English from 1967 to 1997. She is the author of James and Conrad (1977); Language, Race, and Social Class in Howells's America (1988); and Language and Gender in American Fiction: Howells, James, Wharton, and Cather (1997). American English

Frederick Newberry is Professor of English at Duquesne University and author of Hawthorne's Divided Loyalties: England and America in His Works (1987). He is also editor of Nathaniel Hawthorne Review. "The Custom-House"

Michael Newbury is an Associate Professor of American Literature and Civilization at Middlebury College and the author of Figuring Authorship in Antebellum America (1997). Lowell Offering

Lance Newman, Associate Professor of Literature and Writing Studies, California State University, San Marcos, is the author of Our Common Dwelling: Henry Thoreau, Transcendentalism, and the Class Politics of Nature (2005). Nature

Kevin E. O'Donnell is Professor of English at East Tennessee State University and editor of Seekers of Scenery: Travel Writing from Southern Appalachia, 1840–1900 (2004). Book and Periodical Illustration

Patricia Okker is Professor of English at the University of Missouri–Columbia, and is the author of Our Sister Editors: Sarah J. Hale and the Tradition of Nineteenth-Century Women Editors (1995) and Social Stories: The Magazine Novel in Nineteenth-Century America (2003). Editors; Fashion; Godey's Lady's Book

Kelli M. Olson teaches college composition and American literature at Piedmont Virginia Community College in Charlottesville, Virginia. Her literary interests and publications concentrate on the works of Henry David Thoreau and other nineteenth-century American writers. Ethnology

Frank Palmeri is Professor of English at the University of Miami and author of Satire in Narrative: Petronius, Swift, Gibbon, Melville, Pynchon (1990); Satire, History, Novel: Narrative Forms 1665–1815 (2003); and several articles on Thomas Pynchon. Satire, Burlesque, and Parody

William Pannapacker is Assistant Professor of English and Towsley Research Scholar at Hope College in Holland, Michigan. He is the author of Revised Lives: Walt Whitman and Nineteenth-Century Authorship (2004) and numerous articles on American literature and culture. Autobiography

Donald H. Parkerson is Distinguished Professor of Teaching and Professor of History at East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina. He has a doctorate from the University of Illinois–Chicago (1983). His publications include The Agricultural Transition in New York State (1995); The Emergence of the Common School in the U.S. Countryside (1998); and Transitions in American Education (2001). Education

Jo Ann Parkerson is Professor Emeritus of Education at Methodist College in Fayetteville, North Carolina. She completed her doctorate from the University of South Carolina (1989). She has published in the Journal of Educational Psychology and is coauthor of The Emergence of the Common School in the U.S. Countryside and Transitions in American Education (2001). Education

Donald E. Pease is the Avalon Foundation Chair of the Humanities at Dartmouth College. He is the author of Visionary Compacts: American Renaissance Writing in Cultural Context (1987), which won the Mark Ingraham Prize for the best book in the humanities in 1987. Pease is also the editor of eight volumes, including The American Renaissance Reconsidered, Cultures of U.S. Imperialism (with Walter Benn Michaels, 1985); Cultures of American Imperialism (with Amy Kaplan, 1993); Revisionist Interventions into the American Canon, Postnational Narratives (1994); and The Futures of American Studies (with Robyn Wiegman, 2002). The recipient of Guggenheim, Mellon, NEH, Dickey, Hewlett and Rockefeller Foundation Fellowships, Pease is the General Editor for the book series New Americanists at Duke University Press, the Founding Director of a Summer Institute for American Studies at Dartmouth, and the Head of Dartmouth's Liberal Studies Program. Mexican-American War

John Peck is Reader in Victorian Literature at Cardiff University. He is the author of War, the Army and Victorian Literature (1998) and Maritime Fiction: Sailors and the Sea in British and American Novels, 1719–1917 (2001). He is also the coauthor of A Brief History of English Literature (2002). Nautical Literature; Two Years before the Mast

Scott Peeples, Associate Professor of English at the College of Charleston, is the author of Edgar Allan Poe Revisited (1998) and The Afterlife of Edgar Allan Poe (2004). "The Raven"

Melissa McFarland Pennell is Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. She is the author of the Student Companion to Nathaniel Hawthorne (1999), the Student Companion to Edith Wharton (2003), and numerous essays on American literature. The Scarlet Letter

Mark A. Peterson teaches history at the University of Iowa. He is the author of The Price of Redemption: The Spiritual Economy of Puritan New England (1997) and is currently at work on a history of Boston in the Atlantic World, 1630–1865. History of the Conquest of Mexico

Joseph M. Petrulionis is a graduate student of history at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Harpers Ferry

Sandra Harbert Petrulionis is Associate Professor of English at Penn State Altoona. She is the editor of Journal 8: 1854 (2002) in The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau series and has published articles on Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, and other nineteenth-century figures. The Liberator

Anne K. Phillips is Associate Professor in English at Kansas State University where she specializes in American children's literature. With Gregory Eiselein, she coedited The Louisa May Alcott Encyclopedia (2001) and Little Women (2003); with Chris Doyle, she is coediting a forthcoming special issue of the annual Children's Literature on Louisa May Alcott's literature for young readers. Little Women

Ed Piacentino, Professor of English at High Point University in North Carolina, has published widely in American and southern literature and culture. He is coeditor, with M. Thomas Inge, of The Humor of the Old South (2001) and author of "The Enduring Legacy of Old Southwest Humor," to be published by Louisiana State University Press. Humor; Tall Tales

Yolanda Pierce is Associate Professor of English and African American Studies, University of Kentucky, and teaches and publishes in the fields of cultural studies, African American literature, and American religious studies. Her most recent book is Hell without Fires: Slavery, Christianity, and the Antebellum Spiritual Narrative (2005). Slave Narratives

An Assistant Professor at Texas Christian University, Ronald L. Pitcock researches the history of U.S. literacy and publishes work on nineteenth-century Native American literacy and schooling. Life and Adventures of Joaquín Murieta

Carole Policy teaches literature and composition at Palm Beach Community College. She earned her B.A. at the University of Virginia, her M.A. at Florida Atlantic University, and her Ph.D. at Florida State. The Hidden Hand

Julie Prebel teaches literature at Occidental College in Los Angeles. Her articles include "Engineering Womanhood: The Politics of Rejuvenation in Gertrude Atherton's Black Oxen," American Literature (2004), and essays on Anzia Yezierska, Theodore Dreiser, and Fanny Fern. She is currently completing a book examining the interaction between science and nineteenth- and twentieth-century women's fiction. Democracy

Tom Quirk is a Professor of English at the University of Missouri–Columbia. He is the author of five scholarly books on American literature and editor or coeditor of a dozen other volumes. His most recent publications include The Portable Mark Twain (2004) and Nothing Abstract: Investigations in the American Literary Imagination (2001). The Confidence-Man

Harriet Rafter teaches California literature at San Francisco State University. San Francisco

Judith A. Ranta is an independent scholar who has taught at Queens College and York College of the City University of New York (CUNY). In 1999 she received a doctorate in American literature from the CUNY Graduate Center. Her publications include Women and Children of the Mills: An Annotated Guide to Nineteenth-Century American Textile Factory Literature (1999); The Life and Writings of Betsey Chamberlain: Native American Mill Worker (2003); and "'A True Woman's Courage and Hopefulness': Martha W. Tyler's A Book without a Title; or, Thrilling Events in the Life of Mira Dana (1855–56)," Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers (2004). She continues to research the lives and writings of nineteenth-century U.S. female factory workers, including Harriot F. Curtis, Charlotte Hilbourne, and Jennie Collins. Factories

Gregory J. Renoff is Assistant Professor of History at Drury University in Springfield, Missouri. His primary field of specialization is the nineteenth-century American South, with an interest in the history of race relations, popular culture, consumerism, and labor. His publications include "Circuses in Georgia," in the New Georgia Encyclopedia and "'Wait for the Big Show!': The Circus in Georgia, 1865–1930," in Atlanta History (2004). Circuses and Spectacles

David S. Reynolds is a Distinguished Professor at Baruch College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His books include Faith in Fiction: The Emergence of Religious Literature in America (1981); George Lippard (1982); Beneath the American Renaissance: The Subversive Imagination in the Age of Emerson and Melville (1988; winner of the Christian Gauss Award); Walt Whitman's America: A Cultural Biography (1995; winner of the Bancroft Prize); and John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil Rights (2005). Sensational Fiction

Judith Richardson, author of Possessions: The History and Uses of Haunting in the Hudson Valley (2003), is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Stanford University. "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow"

LaVern J. Rippley is a Professor in the German Department at St. Olaf College and the editor/publisher of the Newsletter of the Society for German-American Studies. He is the author of numerous articles and books on German Romanticism and the influence of German culture in the United States, including The German-Americans (1976) and German-Bohemians: The Quiet Immigrants (1995). German Scholarship

David M. Robinson is Oregon Professor of English and Director of the Center for the Humanities, Oregon State University. He is author of Emerson and the Conduct of Life (1993) and Natural Life: Thoreau's Worldly Transcendentalism (2004), and since 1988 he has been the author of the annual chapter "Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, and Transcendentalism" for American Literary Scholarship. Romanticism; Transcendentalism

Angelic Rodgers holds a Ph.D. in American literature (1865–1914). She has taught at a variety of schools, including the University of Central Arkansas, the University of Southern Mississippi, and Auburn University. She is an independent scholar and managing editor of the online journal Virtually Employed. Her publications include "Diving for Pearls: Using the Tarot as Subtext in The Waste Land," Yeats Eliot Review (1999), and "Jim Crow and Veiled Ladies: Mesmerism and the Rise of the Middle-Class in Hawthorne's House of the Seven Gables," VictorianLiterary Mesmerism (forthcoming). She is working on a critical biography of Alice French. Bachelors and Spinsters

Deane L. Root is Professor of Music and Chair of the Department of Music, Director and Fletcher Hodges, Jr., Curator of the Center for American Music in the University Library System, and Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh. The Center for American Music is the world repository for materials concerning Stephen Foster. Music

Jane E. Rose is Associate Professor of English at Purdue University North Central in Westville, Indiana, where she teaches courses in American literature, including African American and women's literature. Her publications include "Expanding Woman's Sphere, Dismantling Class, and Building Community: The Feminism of Elizabeth Oakes Smith," College Language Association Journal (2001); and "Conduct Books for Women, 1830–1860: A Rationale for Women's Conduct and Domestic Role in America," in Nineteenth-Century Women Learn to Write, edited by Catherine Hobbs (1995). Life in the Iron Mills

Patricia Spence Rudden is Associate Professor of English, New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. She has published on Melville and Whitman, nineteenth-century American literature, and American popular music of the twentieth century. "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry"

James Emmett Ryan is Associate Professor of English at Auburn University. His essays on nineteenth-century American literature and culture have appeared in American Quarterly, American Literary History, and Studies in American Fiction. His current book project examines representations of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in early American literature. Literary Criticism

Ingrid Satelmajer is a Lecturer in the English Department at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her publications on nineteenth-century American poetry and periodicals include "Dickinson as Child's Fare: The Author Served up in St. Nicholas," Book History (2002) and "Unbinding the Book: Bryant's 'The Fountain' in the Democratic Review," American Periodicals (2003). Popular Poetry

Robert Sattelmeyer is Regents Professor of English at Georgia State University and the author and editor of numerous studies of such nineteenth-century American writers as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, and Mark Twain, including Thoreau's Reading: A Study in Intellectual History with Bibliographical Catalogue (1988). "The American Scholar"; Fur Trade; Walden

Gary Scharnhorst is Professor of English at the University of New Mexico, author or editor of over thirty books, editor of American Literary Realism, and editor in alternating years of the research annual American Literary Scholarship.Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to Loyalty

Richard J. Schneider is Professor of English at Wartburg College. He is the author o f Henry David Thoreau (1987) and editor of Approaches to Teaching Thoreau's Walden and Other Works (1996) and Thoreau's Sense of Place: Essays in American Environmental Writing (2000). "Resistance to Civil Government"

Robert J. Scholnick is Professor of English and American Studies at the College of William and Mary and author of Edmund Clarence Stedman (1977), editor of American Literature and Science (1992), and editor of the forthcoming Jamaica in 1850. He has published numerous articles on nineteenth-century American literature and culture and is at work on a study of theories of evolution in America in the years before Darwin. Manifest Destiny

James J. Schramer is a Professor of English and Professional Writing at Youngstown State University, Youngstown, Ohio. Among his publications, he has coedited, with Donald Ross, two collections of essays on American travel writers as part of the Dictionary of Literary Biography series. He has also written articles for this series on Charles Wilkes and Richard Harding Davis. For the Dictionary of Literary Biography series on British Travel Writers, he has written essays on Bruce Chatwin, Jonathan Raban, and Colin Thubron. In addition to his work on travel writing, he has published essays on the Vietnam War fiction of Tim O'Brien. Landscape Architecture; Travel Writing

Malini Johar Schueller is Professor of English at the University of Florida. She is the author of The Politics of Voice: Liberalism and Social Criticism from Franklin to Kingston (1992) and U.S. Orientalisms: Race, Nation, and Gender in Literature, 1790–1890 (1998); with Edward Watts she is coeditor of Messy Beginnings: Postcoloniality and Early American Studies (2003). She has published essays in journals such as American Literature, SIGNS, and Cultural Critique. Orientalism

Nancy Lusignan Schultz is Professor and Coordinator of Graduate Programs in English and American Studies at Salem State College in Salem, Massachusetts. She is the editor of Fear Itself: Enemies Real and Imagined in American Culture (1999) and coeditor of Salem: Place, Myth, and Memory (2004). She is the author of Fire and Roses: The Burning of the Charlestown Convent, 1834 (2002). Her current project, "A Capital Miracle," a social history of a miraculous cure that took place in Washington, D.C., in 1824, will be published by Yale University Press. Foreign Conspiracy against the Liberties of the United States

Larry Schweikart is Professor of History at the University of Dayton and is the coauthor of A Patriot's History of the United States (2005). Banking, Finance, Panics, and Depressions

Thomas E. Scruggs is the Director of the Ph.D. in Education Program, College of Education and Human Development, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia. His recent articles on David Crockett include "The Physical Stature of David Crockett: A Re-Analysis of the Historical Record," Journal of South Texas (1996); and "Davy Crockett and the Thieves of Jericho: An Analysis of the Shackford-Parrington Conspiracy Theory," Journal of the Early Republic (1999). Narrative of the Life of David Crockett of the State of Tennessee

Ellery Sedgwick is Professor Emeritus of English at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, and the author of A History of the Atlantic Monthly, 1857–1909 (1994). The Atlantic Monthly

Mary Lamb Shelden is Assistant Editor for The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau and Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Northern Illinois University. She contributed the gender entry for The Louisa May Alcott Encyclopedia (2001) and the cross-dressing entry for An Encyclopedia of African-American Literature (2005). Her dissertation, "Novel Habits for a New World" (2003), which she is currently revising for a book, surveys cross-dressing used in American novels throughout the nineteenth century, tracing the tradition back to European American, Native American, and African American literary and folkloric origins. Shelden also serves as inaugural secretary for the recently established Louisa May Alcott Society. Cross-Dressing

Johanna Nicol Shields is Professor Emerita of History at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Her publications include The Line of Duty: Maverick Congressmen and the Development of American Political Culture, 1836–1860 (1985); "White Honor, Black Humor, and the Making of a Southern Style," Southern Cultures (1995); and "A Sadder Simon Suggs: Freedom and Slavery in the Humor of Johnson Hooper," in The Humor of the Old South, edited by M. Thomas Inge and Edward J. Piacentino (2001). Some Adventures of Captain Simon SuggsRobert Shulman is Professor of English at the University of Washington, interested in the intersection of American literature, politics, and history. He is the author of Social Criticism and Nineteenth-Century American Fictions (1987); the chapter "Realism" in The Columbia History of the American Novel, edited by Emory Elliott et al. (1991); and The Power of Political Art: The 1930s Literary Left Reconsidered (2000). Individualism and Community

Joseph W. Slade III is Professor of Telecommunications and Codirector of the Central Region Humanities Center at Ohio University in Athens. He is the coeditor of Beyond the Two Cultures: Essays on Science, Technology and Literature (1990) and The Midwest (2004), a volume in the Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Regional Cultures series, and author of Thomas Pynchon (1974; 1990), Pornography in America (2000), and Pornography and Sexual Representation, 3 vols. (2001), as well as several dozen articles on literature, technology, film, and culture. Pornography

John Stauffer is Professor of English and the History of American Civilization at Harvard. He is the author of The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race (2002), which received the Frederick Douglass Book Prize, the Avery O. Craven Award, and the Lincoln Prize runner-up. He edited Frederick Douglass's My Bondage and My Freedom (2003) for the Modern Library and has published numerous essays on the Civil War and race relations. Civil War; Photography

Richard F. Teichgraeber III is Director of the Murphy Institute and Professor of History at Tulane University. He is the author of Sublime Thoughts/Penny Wisdom: Situating Emerson and Thoreau in the American Market (1995) and coeditor, with Thomas L. Haskell, of The Culture of the Market: Historical Essays (1993). Literary Marketplace

Joseph M. Thomas, Associate Dean at Caldwell College and advisory editor of the Harriet Jacobs Papers Project, is author of "Late Emerson: Selected Poems and the 'Emerson Factory,'" ELH (1998), and "'The Property of My Own Book': Emerson and the Literary Marketplace," New England Quarterly (1996). "The Poet"

Shirley E. Thompson works in the Department of American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She has published articles in American Quarterly and the Journal of Ecology, Culture, and Community. She is finishing a manuscript on the racial, cultural, and political identities of Creoles of color in mid-nineteenth-century New Orleans. New Orleans

Karen Tracey is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Northern Iowa. She is the author of Plots and Proposals: American Women's Fiction, 1850–1890 (2000) and coauthor of The Craft of Argument with Readings (2003). Courtship

Natalie Collins Trice is a doctoral student at Georgia State University. Specializing in twentieth-century American literature, she has presented on various authors including William Faulkner and Thomas Pynchon. Charleston

Gustaaf Van Cromphout is Professor of English at Northern Illinois University. He is the author of Emerson's Modernity and the Example of Goethe (1990) and Emerson's Ethics (1999). Nature

Emily E. VanDette is a doctoral candidate at the Pennsylvania State University. Abolitionist Writing

Wil Verhoeven is Professor of American Culture at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. His publications include two edited collections: Revolutionary Histories: Transatlantic Cultural Nationalism, 1775–1815 (2002) and Epistolary Histories: Letters, Fiction, Culture (with Amanda Gilroy, 1999). He is general editor of a series of anti-Jacobin novels (10 vols., 2005); he has also edited George Walker's The Vagabond (2004) and coedited Gilbert Imlay's The Emigrants (with Amanda Gilroy, 1998). He is the general editor of a forthcoming volume of novels and selected plays of Thomas Holcroft. The Oregon Trail

Daniel R. Vollaro is a writer and teacher who lives in Atlanta, Georgia. He teaches American literature and writing at Georgia State University. The Dial; Utopian Communities

Laura Dassow Walls is the Bennett Chair of Southern Letters at the University of South Carolina. She has published widely on literature and science in the nineteenth century, including Seeing New Worlds: Henry David Thoreau and Nineteenth-Century Natural Science (1995); Emerson's Life in Science: The Culture of Truth (2003); and "Romancing the Real: Thoreau's Technology of Inscription," in A Historical Guide to Henry David Thoreau, edited by William E. Cain (2000). Science

Ronald G. Walters is Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University. He is a U.S. social and cultural historian who works in two different areas, nineteenth-century radical and reform movements and twentieth-century popular culture. His major publications include The Antislavery Appeal: American Abolitionism after 1830 (1976) and American Reformers: 1815–1860 (rev. ed, 1996). More recently he contributed "Harriet Beecher Stowe and the American Reform Tradition" to The Cambridge Companion to Harriet Beecher Stowe, edited by Cindy Weinstein (2004). The Impending Crisis of the South

James Perrin Warren is S. Blount Mason Jr. Professor of English at Washington and Lee University. He earned his Ph.D. at Yale University in 1982. He has published Walt Whitman's Language Experiment (1990); Culture of Eloquence (1999); and John Burroughs and the Place of Nature (2006), and is the author of several articles on nineteenth-century American literature and environmental writing. Oratory; "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd"

Joyce W. Warren is a Professor of English and Director of Women's Studies at Queens College, CUNY. She is the author of The American Narcissus: Individualism and Women in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction (1984); Fanny Fern: An Independent Woman (1992); and Women, Money, and the Law: Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Gender, and the Courts (2005). She is editor of Ruth Hall and Other Writings (1986) and The (Other) American Traditions (1993) and coeditor of Challenging Boundaries (2000). Ruth Hall; Sentimentalism

Margaret Washington is Professor of History at Cornell University. She is the editor of the Narrative of Sojourner Truth (originally published 1850; 1993) and author of A Peculiar People: Slave Religion and Community-Culture among the Gullahs (1988) and the forthcoming "Sojourner Truth's America: Slavery, Race, and Reform in the Nineteeth Century." "Ain't I a Woman?"

Ellen Weinauer is the coeditor, with Robert McClure Smith, of American Culture, Canons, and the Case of Elizabeth Stoddard (2003) and the author of articles on Hawthorne, Melville, Stoddard, and others. She is Associate Professor of English at the University of Southern Mississippi. Gothic Fiction

Cindy Weinstein is Associate Professor of English at the California Institute of Technology. She is the author of The Literature of Labor and the Labors of Literature: Allegory in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction (1995) and Family, Kinship, and Sympathy in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (2004). She is also the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Harriet Beecher Stowe (2004). "The Birth-mark"; Uncle Tom's Cabin

An Assistant Professor of English at Georgia State University, Elizabeth J. West conducts research and teaches with particular interest in intersections of gender, race, class, and the spiritual in literary works. She has published essays and reviews in the Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History, MELUS, South Atlantic Review, South Central Review, Womanist, and CLA Journal. Blacks; Slavery

Brenda Wineapple is the author of Sister Brother: Gertrude and Leo Stein (1997); Hawthorne: A Life (2003); and an edition of the poems of John Greenleaf Whittier for the American Poets Project of the Library of America (2004).

She teaches at Union College and Columbia University. "Hawthorne and His Mosses"

Jennifer M. Wing is a doctoral candidate in early-nineteenth-century American literature at Georgia State University. She is also an instructor of English composition and American literature and the author of "Defining Women in Moby Dick," in Misogynism in Literature: Any Place, Any Time, edited by Britta Zangen (2004). Trail of Tears

Bertram Wyatt-Brown is Richard J. Milbauer Professor Emeritus, University of Florida. His publications include Yankee Saints and Southern Sinners (1985); The Shaping of Southern Culture: Honor, Grace and War, 1770s–1890s (2001); and Hearts of Darkness: Wellsprings of a Southern Literary Tradition (2003). Honor

Longman Professor of English at Oberlin College, Sandra A. Zagarell is a senior editor of the Heath Anthology of American Literature; editor of collections of writing by Caroline M. Kirkland, Elizabeth Stoddard, and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman; and author of essays on Herman Melville, Sarah Orne Jewett, Elizabeth Stoddard, and other nineteenth-century writers. The Morgesons; A New Home—Who'll Follow?

Mary Saracino Zboray, a Research Associate in the Department of Communication at the University of Pittsburgh, is coauthor with Ronald J. Zboray of over a dozen scholarly articles and essays on the sociocultural history of mid-nineteenth-century New England, as well as A Handbook for the Study of Book History in the United States (2000), Literary Dollars and Social Sense: A People's History of the Mass Market Book (2005), and Everyday Ideas: Socio-Literary Experience among Antebellum New Englanders (forthcoming). Boston; Harper's New Monthly Magazine; Journals and Diaries; Letters; Literacy

Ronald J. Zboray, Associate Professor of Communication and History at the University of Pittsburgh, is author of A Fictive People: Antebellum Economic Development and the American Reading Public (1993) and coauthor, with Mary Saracino Zboray, of A Handbook for the Study of Book History in the United States (2000), Literary Dollars and Social Sense: A People's History of the Mass Market Book (2005), and Everyday Ideas: Socio-Literary Experience among Antebellum New Englanders (forthcoming). Boston; Harper's New Monthly Magazine; Journals and Diaries; Letters; Literacy

Michael G. Ziser is Assistant Professor of English at the University of California, Davis. He is the author of " Walden and the Georgic Mode," Nineteenth Century Prose (2004). Wilderness

Christina Zwarg, Associate Professor of English, teaches at Haverford College in Pennsylvania. Author of Feminist Conversations: Fuller, Emerson, and the Play of Reading (1995) and articles on Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, and W. E. B. Du Bois, she is writing a book on trauma and Reconstruction in the writing of Douglass, Henry James, Du Bois, and Pauline Hopkins. Woman in the Nineteenth Century