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Ingersoll, Jared (American jurist)

Jared Ingersoll, 1749–1822, American jurist, b. New Haven, Conn.; son of Jared Ingersoll (1722–81) and father of Charles Jared Ingersoll. After studying law in England, he was admitted (1773) to the bar in Philadelphia and became a leading attorney; he later argued many important cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. He served (1780–81) in the Continental Congress and was (1787) a delegate to the Federal Constitutional Convention. In Pennsylvania he was attorney general (1790–99, 1811–17), U.S. district attorney (1800–1801), and presiding judge (1821–22) of the district court of Philadelphia co. In 1812 he was the unsuccessful candidate for Vice President, running on the antiwar Republican and Federalist ticket headed by De Witt Clinton.

See H. Binney, The Leaders of the Old Bar of Philadelphia (1859).

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Ingersoll, Jared (American colonial official)

Jared Ingersoll, 1722–81, American colonial official, b. Milford, Conn. He was made (1751) king's attorney in New Haven, and later he sailed (1758) for England as a colonial agent. From a second trip (1763) he returned (1765) with a commission to distribute stamps under the highly unpopular Stamp Act. A mob, led by John Durkee, forced Ingersoll to resign. He was later crown judge of the Philadelphia vice-admiralty court until, in the American Revolution, Loyalist-hunting colonials forced him to return to New Haven. His son, Jared Ingersoll, however, supported the Revolution.

See biography by L. H. Gipson (1920, repr. 1971).

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