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engine

engine Machine that produces useful energy of motion from some other form of energy. The term is usually restricted to combustion engines, which burn fuel. These machines include the steam engine, diesel engine, jet engine, and rocket engine. Such engines are distinguished from electric motors which, in providing their power, do not directly alter the chemical or physical composition of a substance. Combustion engines are of two main kinds: an external combustion engine burns its fuel outside the chamber in which motion is produced. In a steam locomotive, for example, the fire box is separate from the cylinders. An internal combustion engine burns its fuel and develops motion in the same place.

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engine

en·gine / ˈenjən/ • n. 1. a machine with moving parts that converts power into motion. ∎  a thing that is the agent or instrument of a particular process: exports used to be the engine of growth. 2. a railroad locomotive. ∎  hist. a mechanical device or instrument, esp. one used in warfare: a siege engine. DERIVATIVES: en·gined adj. [in comb.] a twin-engined helicopter.

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engine

engine
A. †contrivance, artifice XIII; †ingenuity, genius XIV;

B. machine of war XIII; mechanical contrivance XIV; complex machine (later spec. as source of power) XVII. — OF. engin :- L. ingenium natural quality or disposition, talents, genius, clever device.

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engine

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engine

engine •Aladdin • stand-in •Dunedin, lead-in •Blondin, Girondin •Odin •paladin, Saladin •Borodin • Baffin • elfin •biffin, griffin, tiffin •boffin, coffin •dolphin • endorphin • bowfin •yellowfin •muffin, puffin •ragamuffin • paraffin • perfin •bargain • Begin • Kosygin •hoggin, noggin •imagine • margin • engine •pidgin, pigeon, smidgen, wigeon •stool pigeon • wood pigeon • origin •Pugin • virgin

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