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wit

wit1 / wit/ • n. 1. mental sharpness and inventiveness; keen intelligence: he does not lack perception or native wit. ∎  (wits) the intelligence required for normal activity; basic human intelligence: he needed all his wits to figure out the way back. 2. a natural aptitude for using words and ideas in a quick and inventive way to create humor: a player with a sharp tongue and a quick wit. ∎  a person who has such an aptitude: she is such a wit. PHRASES: be at one's wits' end be overwhelmed with difficulties and at a loss as to what to do next.be frightened (or scared) out of one's wits be extremely frightened; be immobilized by fear.gather (or collect) one's wits allow oneself to think calmly and clearly in a demanding situation.have (or keep) one's wits about one be constantly alert and vigilant.live by one's wits earn money by clever and sometimes dishonest means, having no regular employment.pit one's wits against compete with (someone or something).DERIVATIVES: wit·ted adj. [in comb.] slow-witted. wit2 • v. (wot / wät/ , wit·ting ; past and past part. wist / wist/ ) [intr.] 1. archaic have knowledge: I addressed a few words to the lady you wot of | [tr.] I wot that but too well. 2. (to wit) that is to say (used to make clearer or more specific something already said or referred to): the textbooks show an irritating parochialism, to wit an almost total exclusion of papers not in English.

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wit

wit2 know; surviving in phr. to wit that is to say, namely, viz., short for that is to wit. OE. preterite-present vb. witan = OS. witan (Du. weten), OHG. wizzan (G. wissen), ON. vita, Goth. witan, f. Gmc. *wait- *wīt :- IE. *woid- *weid- *wid-, whence Skr. véda knows, Gr. oîda, L. vidēre see, OSl. vidĕti see, vĕdĕti know.

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wit

wit1
A. †mind, understanding, sense OE.;

B. right mind, good judgement, (pl.) senses XII;

C. (power of) giving pleasure by combining or contrasting ideas XVI.

D. †wise man XVI; witty man XVII. OE. (ġe)wit(t), corr. to OS. wit (Du. weet), OHG. wizzi (G. witz), ON. vit, Goth. unwiti ignorance, f. *wit- (see next).

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wit

wit the five wits the five (bodily) senses of hearing, sight, smell, taste, and touch; the term is recorded from Middle English.

See also when the wine is in, the wit is out.

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wit

witacquit, admit, backlit, bedsit, befit, bit, Brit, Britt, chit, commit, demit, dit, emit, fit, flit, frit, git, grit, hit, intermit, it, kit, knit, legit, lickety-split, lit, manumit, mishit, mitt, nit, omit, outsit, outwit, permit, pit, Pitt, pretermit, quit, remit, retrofit, shit, sit, skit, slit, snit, spit, split, sprit, squit, submit, tit, transmit, twit, whit, wit, writ, zit •albeit, howbeit •poet •bluet, cruet, intuit, suet, Yuit •Inuit • floruit • Jesuit •Babbitt, cohabit, habit, rabbet, rabbit •ambit, gambit •jackrabbit • barbet • Nesbit • rarebit •adhibit, exhibit, gibbet, inhibit, prohibit •titbit (US tidbit) • flibbertigibbet •Cobbett, gobbet, hobbit, obit, probit •orbit • Tobit •cubit, two-bit •hatchet, latchet, ratchet •Pritchett •crotchet, rochet

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