hue and cry

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hue and cry. Early English common law process of pursuing felons ‘with horn and with voice’ (hutesium et clamor), also a proclamation for capture of a criminal or recovery of stolen goods. The outcry could be raised by peace-officer or private citizen, whereupon everyone was duty bound to search and pursue on horse or foot, from town to town and county to county; both constables of the vill or hundred and citizens could make the arrest. Seizure while in possession of incriminating evidence boded ill. The main statutes and amendments (1285, 1585, 1735) were repealed in 1827, though the element of ‘citizen's arrest’ has persisted.

A. S. Hargreaves

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hue and cry • n. a loud clamor or public outcry. ∎ hist. a loud cry calling for the pursuit and capture of a criminal. In former English law the cry had to be raised by the inhabitants of a hundred in which a robbery had been committed if they were not to become liable for the damages suffered by the victim.

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Hue and Cry ★★★ 1947

Nobody believes a young boy when he discovers crooks are sending coded messages in a weekly children's magazine. A detective writer finally believes his story and they set off to capture the crooks. 82m/B VHS . GB Alastair Sim, Jack Warner, Frederick Piper, Jack Lambert, Joan Dowling; D: Charles Crichton.

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hue and cry outcry calling for the pursuit of a felon. XVI. — legal AN. hu e cri, i.e. hu outcry (f. huer shout, of imit. orig.), e and, cri CRY.

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hue and cry a loud cry calling for the pursuit and capture of a criminal. In former English law, the cry had to be raised by the inhabitants of a hundred in which a robbery had been committed, if they were not to become liable for the damages suffered by the victim.

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