Skip to main content

House Made of Dawn

HOUSE MADE OF DAWN

HOUSE MADE OF DAWN by N. Scott Momaday was published in 1968 and won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1969, the only book by a Native American to receive this honor. It is widely regarded as his masterpiece. Momaday, who is of Kiowa and Cherokee-Anglo descent, was born in Lawton, Oklahoma, in 1934 and later lived on reservations in the southwest. A scholar as well as a writer, he received a bachelor's degree from the University of New Mexico and a Ph.D. from Stanford.

Taking its title from a Navajo ceremonial song, the book details the life of a young Indian man named Abel, who is caught between the traditional Navajo life and the more destructive, urban world of postwar America. The novel's structure is intricate and combines a modernist form with references to Native ceremonial practices to create a haunting and redemptive work. The book has earned Momaday comparisons to William Faulkner and James Joyce. House Made of Dawn is now considered one of the significant novels of the twentieth century and the impetus for the renaissance in American Indian literature.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Schubnell, Matthias. N. Scott Momaday: The Cultural and Literary Background. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985.

StephanieGordon

See alsoLiterature: Native American Literature .

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"House Made of Dawn." Dictionary of American History. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"House Made of Dawn." Dictionary of American History. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 15, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/house-made-dawn

"House Made of Dawn." Dictionary of American History. . Retrieved August 15, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/house-made-dawn

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.