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hot spring

hot spring, natural discharge of groundwater having an elevated temperature. Most hot springs result from the emergence of groundwater that has passed through or near recently formed, hot, igneous rocks. Iceland, Yellowstone Park in the United States, and North Island of New Zealand are noted for their hot springs. In recent years the depletion of fossil fuels has resulted in a renewed interest in utilizing the energy contained in hot springs. This type of geothermal energy is already being utilized in California, Italy, and Iceland. See energy, sources of.

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Hot Springs

Hot Springs, city (1990 pop. 32,462), seat of Garland co., W central Ark.; settled 1807, inc. 1876. The city nearly surrounds Hot Springs National Park, whose hot mineral springs made the city a famous health resort. Bottled mineral water is produced, and there is diversified manufacturing. Situated in the Ouachita Mts., the city is at the center of the reservoir system of the Ouachita River. The area was visited by the Spanish explorer Hernando De Soto in 1541. The properties of the local mineral waters were investigated in 1804 under the authorization of President Thomas Jefferson.

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hot spring

hot spring A continuous flow of hot water through a small opening on to the Earth's surface. The water is usually groundwater heated at depth by hot rocks and recycled to the surface by convection. Hot spring waters are rich in dissolved minerals which are often precipitated around the spring mouth.

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hot spring

hot spring • n. a spring of naturally hot water, typically heated by subterranean volcanic activity.

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"hot spring." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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