Drezner, Daniel W. 1968- (Daniel William Drezner)

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Drezner, Daniel W. 1968- (Daniel William Drezner)

PERSONAL:

Born August 23, 1968, in Syracuse, NY; son of Alan David and Esther Barbara Drezner; married Erika Wynne Golub, May 24, 1997; children: Lauren, Samuel. Education: Williams College, B.A. (highest honors), 1990; Stanford University, M.A. (one in economics and one in political science), 1995, Ph.D., 1996. Politics: "A small-‘l’ libertarian Republican." Hobbies and other interests: Ultimate Frisbee, hiking, biking, travel, and taking his children to the park.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Fletcher School, Tufts University. 160 Packard Ave., Medford, MA 02155. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

RAND Corporation, Washington, DC, research consultant, 1994; University of Colorado at Boulder, assistant professor of political science, 1996-99; University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, assistant professor of political science, 1999-2006; U.S. Department of the Treasury, Office of International Banking and Securities Markets, Washington, DC, international economist, 2000-01; Tufts University, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Medford, MA, professor of international politics, 2006—. Donetsk Technical University, Donetsk, Republic of Ukraine, Civic Education Project, visiting lecturer in economics, 1993-94. Grawemeyer World Order Award reviewer; Commitment to Global Development Index advisory board member. Has appeared as a commentator on the Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network (C-SPAN), Cable News Network Financial (CNNfn), CNN International, and American Broadcasting Company, (ABC) World News Tonight. Also a regular commentator for Newsweek International and the National Public Radio (NPR) program Marketplace.

MEMBER:

American Political Science Association (panelist, 1999; panel chair, 2004), International Political Science Association, International Studies Association, Midwestern Political Science Association, Council on Foreign Relations Academic Outreach Committee, American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, Public Choice Society.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Junior Faculty Development Award, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1998; Council on Research and Creative Work Conference Grant, 1999; Special Act Award, U.S. Department of the Treasury, 2001; Social Science Division Research Grants, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 2002, 2003, 2005; Outstanding Academic Title, Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, 2003, for Locating the Proper Authorities. Received fellowships from the Department of Political Science, Stanford University, 1994-96, Stanford Center on Conflict and Negotiation, 1995, Harvard University, Center for International Affairs, 1996-97, Institute for Technology and Scholarship, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1998, Council on Foreign Relations, 1999-2000, Salzburg Seminar, Salzburg, Austria, 2002, British-American Project; 2003, and the German Marshall Fund of the United States, 2005-06.

WRITINGS:

The Sanctions Paradox: Economic Statecraft and International Relations, Cambridge University Press (New York, NY), 1999.

(Editor) Locating the Proper Authorities: The Interaction of Domestic and International Institutions, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 2003.

All Politics Is Global: Explaining International Regulatory Regimes, Princeton University Press (Princeton, NJ), 2007.

Author of a monthly column for the New Republic Online. Contributor to periodicals, including Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, New York Times, Slate, Tech Central Station, and Wall Street Journal. Editorial advisory board member, Council on Foreign Relations Web site (Cfr.org), 2006—.

SIDELIGHTS:

Daniel W. Drezner was born on August 23, 1968, in Syracuse, New York. He earned his bachelor of arts degree at Williams College, then continued his education at Stanford University, where he earned two master of arts degrees, in economics and political science, and his doctorate in political science. A writer, educator, and political scientist, he is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. Over the course of his career, he has held faculty positions at several other institutions, including the University of Colorado at Boulder and the University of Chicago, and was a visiting lecturer at Donetsk Technical University in the Republic of Ukraine. Drezner has also worked outside the academic world as a research consultant for the RAND Corporation and an international economist for the U.S. Department of the Treasury Office of International Banking and Securities Markets. Beyond his immediate academic duties, Drezner has appeared as a commentator on the Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network (C-SPAN), Cable News Network Financial (CNNfn), CNN International, and American Broadcasting Company, (ABC) World News Tonight. In addition, he is a regular contributor to various periodicals, such as Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, the New York Times, Slate, Tech Central Station, and the Wall Street Journal. He also writes a monthly column for the New Republic Online. Drezner is the author of The Sanctions Paradox: Economic Statecraft and International Relations and All Politics Is Global: Explaining International Regulatory Regimes, and is the editor of Locating the Proper Authorities: The Interaction of Domestic and International Institutions.

In The Sanctions Paradox, Drezner examines the effectiveness of the use of economic sanctions in foreign policy as an alternative to other, more forceful methods of persuading another nation to take or abstain from certain actions or policies. The use of economic sanctions by the United States resulted in a market rise during the latter years of the twentieth century, as the government shied away from resorting to military actions in reaction to other countries' policies with which they strongly disagreed. However, during the same time period, studies by various analysts revealed that the use of economic sanctions generally seems to have no effect on the policies targeted in protest. The question, then, is whether U.S. policy makers were aware of these findings and disregarded them—because they had their own data that differed on the effectiveness of economic sanctions—or they simply proceeded with sanctions despite their likeliness to fail. In the latter case, U.S. citizens are inconvenienced at the very least, since economic sanctions ultimately have an effect on both parties. Drezner addresses this concern by analyzing the relevant research and positing other potential, significant benefits from economic sanctions that government policy makers might have believed would outweigh the negative side effects. T. Clifton Morgan, in a review for the American Political Science Review, remarked that "this book makes a very real contribution to the literature on economic sanctions and should be taken seriously by all who work in this area."

All Politics Is Global takes a view contrary to the popular theory that the role of the state is slowly diminishing as global concerns take a more prominent position in daily political dealings. Even as other theorists insist that the state is a dying concept, Drezner insists that it still has an important role to play and a valid function despite the increased changes to the global stage. Addressing global concerns and the world economy as a whole, Drezner points out that the most powerful players remain those that have the strongest economies and the most control over their internal business. The United States falls into this category, with its structure that relies upon the individual states' self-government under the auspices of the whole. The European Union also qualifies as a powerful player. Drezner regards the European Union as similar to the United States, as a whole that is comprised of various smaller parts capable of functioning independently from the entire unit. The size of these markets, plus the diversity of their economies, puts the United States and the European Union in the position to remain powerhouses in the global arena. Working from a position of power, these entities are able to sway economic and political decisions made in other nations. Less powerful nations that disagree with the powerhouse nations risk having limited options in trade and regulations. Issues subject to international influence include Internet regulations, international finance, intellectual property rights, and distribution of AIDS and HIV drugs. Drezner addresses the choices that less powerful nations and organizations have when they find themselves pitted against more powerful governing entities, such as the United States and the European Union. Jonathan Bach, in a review of All Politics Is Global for Ethics & International Affairs, remarked that Drezner's argument is in essence a temporary one, noting that "the bipolar regulatory world Drezner describes is impermanent, and the inevitable approach of multipolarity means an increased likelihood of policy divergence. As the number of economic great powers (read China and India) increases, the chances for agreement on common preferences that enable effective regulation declines."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

American Political Science Review, September 1, 2000, T. Clifton Morgan, review of The Sanctions Paradox: Economic Statecraft and International Relations, p. 762.

Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, December 1, 2003, S.P. Duffy, review of Locating the Proper Authorities: The Interaction of Domestic and International Institutions, p. 784; August 1, 2007, S. Waalkes, review of All Politics Is Global: Explaining International Regulatory Regimes, p. 2175.

Chronicle of Higher Education, October 21, 2005, "Political-Science Professor with Well-Known Blog Denied Tenure; Florida State U. Lures Professor and Entire Research Center from U. of Wisconsin," author information; November 25, 2005, "LSU Health Sciences Chancellor Resigns; UC-Santa Barbara Lures Noted Neuroscientist; Blogger Who Was Denied Tenure Finds a Home at Tufts," author information.

Ethics & International Affairs, December 22, 2007, Jonathan Bach, review of All Politics Is Global, p. 482.

Europe-Asia Studies, January 1, 2000, review of The Sanctions Paradox, p. 187.

Foreign Affairs, September 1, 2003, review of Locating the Proper Authorities, p. 170.

Journal of Australian Political Economy, December 1, 2007, Frank Stilwell, review of All Politics Is Global, p. 157.

Journal of Economic Literature, June 1, 2000, review of The Sanctions Paradox, p. 498; September 1, 2003, review of Locating the Proper Authorities, p. 973.

Journal of Peace Research, March 1, 2001, review of The Sanctions Paradox, p. 251.

Journal of Politics, May 1, 2001, A. Cooper Drury, review of The Sanctions Paradox, p. 691.

Times Literary Supplement (London, England), October 29, 1999, review of The Sanctions Paradox, p. 33.

ONLINE

Cato Unbound Web site,http://www.cato-unbound.org/ (August 13, 2008), author profile.

Daniel W. Drezner Home Page,http://www.danielwdrezner.com (October 21, 2005).

Fletcher School at Tufts University Web site,http://fletcher.tufts.edu/ (August 13, 2008), faculty profile.