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United States Suffrage Movement in the 19th Century: Representative Works

UNITED STATES SUFFRAGE MOVEMENT IN THE 19TH CENTURY: REPRESENTATIVE WORKS

Susan B. Anthony

"Letter to the Colored Men's State Convention in Utica, New York" (letter) 1868

United States of America v. Susan B. Anthony (court records) 1873

Amelia Barr

"Discontented Women" (essay) 1896

Elizabeth Burrill Curtis

"The Present Crisis" (essay) 1897

Frances D. Gage

"Woman's Natural Rights, Address to the Woman's Rights Convention in Akron" (essay) 1851

Matilda Joslyn Gage

"Woman's Rights Catechism" (speech) 1871

The National Citizen and Ballot Box [editor] (journal) 1878-1881

Angelina Grimké

"An Appeal to the Christian Women of the South" (essay) 1836

"Appeal to the Women of the Nominally Free States" (essay) 1837

Sarah Grimké

"Address to Free Colored Americans" (essay) 1837

Ida Husted Harper

The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony 2 vols. (biography) 1899

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper

"Dialogue on Woman's Rights" (poem) 1857

Isabella Beecher Hooker

"Two Letters on Women's Suffrage" (essay) 1868

Julia Ward Howe

Reminiscences, 1819-1899 (autobiography) 1899

Anna Garlin Spencer

"The Fitness of Women to Become Citizens from the Standpoint of Moral Development" (essay) 1898

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

"Address to The New York Legislature" (speech) 1854

"Suffrage for All, White and Black, Male and Female" (speech) 1868

"Petitions for a Sixteenth Amendment" (speech) 1876

"An Educational Suffrage Qualification Necessary" (speech) 1897

Eighty Years and More (autobiography) 1898

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and Matilda Joslyn Gage

History of Women Suffrage 4 vols. [editors] (essays, speeches, letters, nonfiction) 1881-1902

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lydia Mott, Ernestine L. Rose, Martha C. Wright, and Susan B. Anthony

"Appeal to the Women of New York" (speech) 1860

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Martha C. Wright, Mary Ann McClintock, and Jane C. Hunt

Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions at the First Woman's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls (pamphlet) 1848

Lucy Stone and Julia Ward Howe

The Woman's Journal [editors] (periodical) 1870-90

Charlotte Carmichael Stopes

British Freewoman (nonfiction) 1894

Sojourner Truth

"A'n't I A Woman?" (speech) 1851

"Colored Men Will Be Masters Over the Women" (speech) 1867

Victoria Woodhull

"Declaration of Candidacy" (speech) 1870

"The Argument for Woman's Electoral Rights under Amendment XIV and XV of the Constitution of the United States" (essay) 1887

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