Parthenon

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Parthenon. The C5 bc Greek Temple of Athena Parthenos on the Acropolis in Athens, widely regarded as the most refined building featuring Greek Hellenic Doric architecture, and the model for much Greek Revival work, despite the fact that many details, e.g. the relationships of columns to soffits, are less than satisfactory). The Parthenon had a peristyle surrounding the naos and Virgin's chamber, with seventeen columns on the flanks and eight at each pedimented end. The metopes contained exquisite sculptures, as did the pediments (much is now in the British Museum, London), while subtle optical refinements such as entasis and curved stylobates further contributed to its stature as a canonic work. Within the Virgin Goddess's chamber were four elegant Ionic columns, so in some respects it was a synthesis of Doric and Ionic architecture.

Bibliography

M. Beard (2002);
Chrisp (1997);
Dinsmoor (1950);
Korres (2000)

Parthenon

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Parthenon Temple to the goddess Athena erected (447–432 bc) by Pericles on the Acropolis in Athens. The finest example of a Doric order temple, it was badly damaged by an explosion in 1687. Most of the surviving sculptures were removed by Lord Elgin in 1801–03. See Elgin Marbles

http://www.culture.gr; http://www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk

Parthenon

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Parthenon the temple of Athene Parthenos, built on the Acropolis in 447–432 bc by Pericles to honour Athens' patron goddess and to commemorate the recent Greek victory over the Persians. It was designed by Ictinus and Callicrates with sculptures by Phidias, including a colossal gold and ivory statue of Athene. It remains standing, despite being severely damaged by Venetian bombardment in 1687. (See also Elgin Marbles.)