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D-Day

D-Day, 6 June 1944, and the following days, were decisive in the war on Germany. British and American troops, in roughly equal numbers, including Canadians in the British total, established themselves on the Normandy coast; Rommel, commanding the German side, could not concentrate sufficiently powerful forces to dislodge them. D-Day, though cloudy and windy, justified Eisenhower's decision, as supreme commander, to accept, at the last minute, a comparatively hopeful weather forecast. Montgomery, in command of ground forces, dispatched five infantry divisions, to five separate beaches, plus three airborne divisions, landing over 150,000 men on the first day. The landings were supported by more than 100 warships, with 4-inch or larger guns, bombarding coastal defences. On one American beach, Omaha, against a good-quality German division and well-prepared German defensive works, casualties were high. The British and American air forces virtually stopped German movement of troops or supplies by day and made impossible a co-ordinated German counter-attack. Allied air forces contributed decisively to the 1st US Army break-out which led to the liberation of France and Belgium in August and September 1944.

R. A. C. Parker

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D-Day

D-Day (June 6, 1944) Codename for the Allied invasion of Normandy during World War II. Commanded by General Eisenhower, Allied forces landed on the French coast between Cherbourg and Le Havre. It was the largest amphibious operation in history, involving c.5000 ships. Despite fierce resistance, bridgeheads were established by June 9. It was the first step in the liberation of Europe.

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D-Day

D-Day the day on which a particular operation is scheduled to begin; especially, (an anniversary of) 6 June 1944, when Allied forces invaded German-occupied northern France.

In Britain, D-Day was later also used for 15 February 1971, the day on which decimal currency came into official use.

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D-Day

D-Day • n. the day (June 6, 1944) in World War II on which Allied forces invaded northern France by landing in Normandy. ∎  the day on which an important operation is to begin or a change to take effect.

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D-day

D-day: see Normandy campaign.

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D-Day

D-Day Day Day (the specified day, i.e. 6 June 1944, for the Allied invasion of Europe)

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