Skip to main content

Pagano Pogatschnig, Giuseppe

Pagano Pogatschnig, Giuseppe (1896–1945). Italian Rationalist, Fascist architect, and polemicist, who was a leading player in the arguments about the renaissance of Italian architecture in the 1930s, largely through his leadership (from 1931) of the influential architectural journal Casabella. His early works had a suggestion of Perret, Behrens, and the Vienna Sezession about them, but in 1928, with Gino Levi-Montalcini (1902–74), he designed one of the first monuments of Italian Rationalism, the Gualino Office Building, Turin (1928–9—destroyed). He prepared a plan for the Via Roma, Turin (1931—with the Turin branch of MIAR), designed a standardized industrialized system for building housing (1933) for the Fifth Triennale, and in 1932–5 built the Istituto di Fisica, University of Rome (destroyed). The Università Commerciale Bocconi (1937–41—destroyed) was remarkable for its adherence to geometry and schemes of proportion throughout the design. He died in Mauthausen concentration-camp, Austria, having renounced Fascism in 1942.

Bibliography

Melograni (1955);
Placzek (ed.) (1982);
Seta (1978, 1979);
Seta (ed.) (1976);
Jane Turner (1996);
Veronesi (1953)

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Pagano Pogatschnig, Giuseppe." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Oct. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Pagano Pogatschnig, Giuseppe." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 17, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pagano-pogatschnig-giuseppe

"Pagano Pogatschnig, Giuseppe." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved October 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pagano-pogatschnig-giuseppe

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.