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lard

lard / lärd/ • n. fat from the abdomen of a pig that is rendered and clarified for use in cooking. ∎ inf. excess human fat that is seen as unhealthy and unattractive. • v. [tr.] 1. insert strips of fat or bacon in (meat) before cooking. ∎  smear or cover (a foodstuff) with lard or fat, typically to prevent it from drying out during storage. 2. (usu. be larded with) embellish (talk or writing) with a variety of expressions: his conversation is larded with quotations from Coleridge. ∎  cover or fill thickly or excessively: the pages were larded with corrections and crossings-out. DERIVATIVES: lard·y adj.

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lard

lard, hog's fat melted and strained from the tissues, an important byproduct of the meatpacking industry. The highest grade, leaf lard, is from the fat around the kidneys; the next best is from the back, and the poorest from the small intestines. Lard is classed by method of preparation as prime steam, rendered in a closed vessel into which steam is injected; neutral, melted at low temperature; kettle-rendered, heated with added water in steam-jacketed kettles; and dry-rendered, hashed, then heated in cookers equipped with agitators. Good lard melts quickly and is free from disagreeable odor. Pure lard (99% fat) is highly valued as a cooking oil because it smokes very little when heated.

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lard

lard Rendered fat from pig carcasses (sheep and cattle are also used). The best quality is from the fat surrounding the kidneys; neutral lard is the highest quality, prepared by agitating the minced fat with water at a temperature below 50 °C; kidney fat provides No. 1 quality; back fat provides No. 2 quality.

Leaf lard is made from the residue of kidney and back fat after the preparation of neutral lard by heating with water above 100 °C in an autoclave. Prime Steam Lard is fat from any part of the carcass, rendered in the autoclave.

Lard used to be stored in pig's bladder, hence the expression ‘bladder of lard’ for a grossly obese person.

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lard

lard †(fat) bacon or pork; internal fat of swine's abdomen. XV. —(O)F. lard bacon :- L. lār(i)dum; cf. Gr. lārīnós fat.
So lard vb. XIV. larder XIV. —AN. larder, OF. -ier, medL. lardārium.

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lard

lardAssad, aubade, avant-garde, backyard, ballade, bard, Bernard, bombard, canard, card, charade, chard, couvade, croustade, Cunard, facade, glissade, guard, hard, ill-starred, interlard, lard, Montagnard, nard, pard, petard, pomade, promenade, regard, retard, rodomontade, roulade, saccade, Sade, salade, sard, shard, unmarred, unscarred, yard •Bayard • galliard • Savoyard •Svalbard •bombarde, Lombard •Goddard • blackguard • vanguard •Asgard • safeguard • Midgard •bodyguard • lifeguard • Bogarde •coastguard • mudguard • rearguard •fireguard • Kierkegaard • diehard •blowhard •Jacquard, placard •flashcard • railcard • racecard • Picard •scorecard • showcard • phonecard •Ballard, mallard •Willard • Abelard • bollard • Barnard •Maynard, reynard •communard • Oudenarde • Stoppard •Gerard • Everard • brassard •Hansard, mansard •Trenchard • Ostade • leotard •boulevard • scrapyard • farmyard •barnyard • graveyard • brickyard •shipyard •dockyard, stockyard •foreyard • courtyard • boatyard •woodyard • junkyard • churchyard

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