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witness

wit·ness / ˈwitnis/ • n. 1. a person who sees an event, typically a crime or accident, take place: police are appealing for witnesses to the accident I was witness to one of the most amazing comebacks in sprinting history. ∎  a person giving sworn testimony to a court of law or the police. ∎  a person who is present at the signing of a document and signs it themselves to confirm this. 2. evidence; proof: the memorial service was witness to the wide circle of his interest. ∎  used to refer to confirmation or evidence given by signature, under oath, or otherwise: in witness thereof, the parties sign this document. ∎  open profession of one's religious faith through words or actions: he told us of faithful Christian witness by many in his country. 3. a member of the Jehovah’s Witnesses. • v. 1. [tr.] see (an event, typically a crime or accident) take place: a bartender who witnessed the murder. ∎  have knowledge of (an event or change) from personal observation or experience: what we are witnessing is the birth of a dangerously liberal orthodoxy. ∎  (of a time, place, or other context) be the setting in which (a particular event) takes place: the 1980s witnessed an unprecedented increase in the scope of the electronic media. ∎  be present as someone signs (a document) or gives (their signature) to a document and sign it oneself to confirm this: the clerk witnessed her signature. ∎  [in imper.] look at (used to introduce a fact illustrating a preceding statement): the nuclear family is a vulnerable institution—witness the rates of marital breakdown. 2. [intr.] (witness to) give or serve as evidence of; testify to: his writings witness to an inner toughness. ∎  (of a person) openly profess one's religious faith in: one of the purposes of his coming was to nerve the disciples to witness to Jesus. PHRASES: as God is my witness (or God be my witness) an invocation of God as confirmation of the truth of a statement: God be my witness, sir, I didn't!call someone or something to witness archaic appeal or refer to someone or something for confirmation or evidence of something: his hands extended upward as if to call the heavens to witness this injustice.

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"witness." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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witness

witness Legal term referring to a person who testifies in court to facts within his/her knowledge. In most western legal systems, a witness is usually required to take an oath swearing truthfulness prior to testifying, and he/she is then first examined (questioned) by the party who offers him/her and then cross-examined by the opposing party.

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witness

witness †knowledge, wisdom; attestation of a fact, etc., testimony. OE. (ġe)witnes (ME. iwitnesse), f. WIT1 + -NESS; cf. OHG. giwiznessi, MDu. wetenisse, ON. vitni, vitnis-.
Hence witness vb. bear witness to XIII; be a witness of XVI.

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Witness

703. Witness

  1. cranes of Ibycus called on by the dying poet to bear witness, the birds lead to the murderers conviction. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 1307]

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"Witness." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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witness

witness: see evidence.

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witness

witnessanise, Janice •Daphnis • Agnes •harness, Kiwanis •Dennis, Ennis, Glenys, menace, tennis, Venicefeyness, gayness, greyness (US grayness) •finis, penis •Glynis, Innes, pinnace •Widnes • bigness • lychnis • illness •dimness • hipness •fitness, witness •Erinys • iciness •dryness, flyness, shyness, slyness, wryness •cornice •Adonis, Clones, Issigonis •coyness •Eunice, TunisBernice, furnace •Thespis • precipice • coppice • hospice •auspice • Serapis

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