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reader

read·er / ˈrēdər/ • n. 1. a person who reads or who is fond of reading: the books of Roald Dahl appeal to young readers she's an avid reader. ∎  a person who reads a particular newspaper, magazine, or text: Times readers. ∎  short for lay reader. ∎  a person entitled to use a particular library. ∎  a person who reads and reports to a publisher or producer on the merits of manuscripts submitted for publication or production, or who provides critical comments on the text prior to publication. ∎  a person who reads and grades examinations and papers for a professor. ∎  short for proofreader (see proofread). ∎  a person who interprets the significance of tarot cards, horoscopes, lines in the palm of a hand, etc., so as to predict the future: a tarot reader. 2. a person who inspects and records the figure indicated on a measuring instrument: a meter reader. 3. a book containing extracts of a particular author's work or passages of text designed to give learners of a language practice in reading. 4. (usu. Reader) Brit. a university lecturer of the highest grade below professor. 5. a machine for producing on a screen a magnified, readable image of any desired part of a microfiche or microfilm. ∎  Comput. a device or piece of software used for reading or obtaining data stored on tape, cards, or other media.

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"reader." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"reader." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved September 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/reader-0

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reader

reader A device for holding or moving a data medium and sensing the data encoded on it. See card reader, document reader.

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reader

readerbedder, cheddar, Edda, Enzedder, header, Kedah, shedder, shredder, spreader, tedder, threader, treader, Vedda •elder, Griselda, welder, Zelda •addenda, agenda, amender, ascender, attender, bender, blender, Brenda, contender, corrigenda, descender, engender, extender, fazenda, fender, gender, Glenda, Gwenda, hacienda, Länder, lender, mender, offender, pudenda, recommender, referenda, render, sender, slender, spender, splendour (US splendor), surrender, suspender, tender, Venda, weekender, Wenda •parascender • bartender •homesteader • newsvendor •spot-welder •abrader, Ada, blockader, crusader, dissuader, evader, fader, grader, Grenada, invader, masquerader, Nader, parader, persuader, raider, Rigveda, Seder, serenader, trader, upgrader, Veda, wader •attainder, remainder •rollerblader •Aïda, bleeder, Breda, breeder, cedar, conceder, corrida, Derrida, Elfreda, Etheldreda, feeder, follow-my-leader, interceder, interpleader, kneader, leader, Leda, Lieder, misleader, pleader, reader, seceder, seeder, speeder, stampeder, succeeder, weeder •fielder, midfielder, wielder, yielder •outfielder • bandleader • ringleader •cheerleader • copyreader •mind-reader • sight-reader •stockbreeder • proofreader •newsreader

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