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appendix

appendix The appendix is more correctly known as the ‘vermiform appendix’, meaning worm-like. It is present only in man, certain anthropoid apes, and the wombat (a nocturnal, burrowing Australian marsupial). Many herbivores are provided with a comparable, but larger structure, in which bacterial breakdown of cellulose, the main constituent of cell walls in plant fibre, takes place. In man the appendix is thought to represent a vestigial organ — one that remains in diminished form after it has ceased, in evolutionary terms, to have any significant function.

The appendix is a short, blind-ended tube arising from the caecum, the first part of the large intestine, within the lower right part of the abdominal cavity. In about half the population, the appendix is ‘retrocaecal’ — behind the caecum; in most cases, it is mobile within the abdominal cavity, suspended from the rest of the bowel by a sling-like fold of tissue (a mesentery), which has the artery to the appendix running in its free edge. The appendix first appears in the fetus at about 6 weeks of development, being initially high up in the abdomen but later descending to its final position. Approximately 1 in 100 000 people are born without an appendix — and very rarely there are two. The appendix is typically 6–9 cm long, but the length varies considerably, from 2 to 30 cm; on average it is 0.5 cm longer in the male than in the female. It is longer in the child than in the adult and shrinks further after mid life. The internal diameter of the appendix is described as wide enough to admit a matchstick, but this lumen may be partially or completely obliterated after middle age. The structure of the tube is basically the same as that of the large intestine: it has an outer muscular coat lined by a much-folded lining (mucosa). It also has aggregates of lymphoid tissue within its walls, which may replace the muscle coat in places.

The appendix in man is medically important because of its propensity to become inflamed in the condition known as acute appendicitis. In this condition, the appendix becomes swollen and the wall fills with inflammatory cells. The process may be initiated by blockage with material from the bowel. If this inflammatory process is allowed to continue, the appendix will become gangrenous and perforate, leading to peritonitis. Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of intra-abdominal infection in developed countries and appendicectomy is the most commonly performed emergency surgical operation. It is less common in developing countries where the diet contains significantly more fibre than our own. In the UK, 1.9 females and 1.5 males per thousand of the population each year get acute appendicitis and have their appendix removed. At the current rate, one in every 6 or 7 people will eventually undergo appendicectomy, even though the incidence of acute appendicitis in the UK has decreased by 50% since the 1970s. The mortality from acute appendicitis has also fallen dramatically, due to a number of factors including better general nutrition, earlier presentation to hospital, and improved anaesthetics. Post- operative problems, such as wound infection, have also become rarer due to the widespread use of antibiotics before surgery. Although appendicitis can occur at any age, it is commonest between 8 and 14 years. It is rare in the elderly and in infants below the age of 2. The cardinal sign of appendicitis is abdominal pain, which is often rather vague and poorly localized initially. As the inflammatory process proceeds, however, the pain usually localizes to the right side of the lower abdomen over the site of the appendix. There is tenderness over the appendix, often accompanied by a slight fever, a facial flush, and a rapid pulse. Despite this apparently typical picture the diagnosis is often difficult to make, particularly in females in whom gynaecological problems are also common and may closely mimic appendicitis. A percentage of appendices removed prove to be normal when examined under the microscope.

The first record of what may have been appendicitis was made by Aretaios around the third century ad. Though the appendix appeared in the anatomical drawings of Leonardo da Vinci from 1492, it was not until 1521 that it was described by an Italian anatomist, Berengario da Carpi. While there is some debate as to who first removed an appendix in England, the first deliberate appendicectomy for acute appendicitis was undertaken by a gynaecologist, Robert Lawson Tait, in May 1880 in Birmingham. The patient recovered. Prior to this Claudius Amyand, physician to Queen Anne, in 1736 successfully removed an acutely inflamed appendix from inside the hernial sac of a young boy.

A. Winter, and P. J. O'Dwyer

Bibliography

Knut, H., (ed.) (1989). The illustrated history of surgery. Harold Starke, London.


See also alimentary system.

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appendix

appendix, small, worm-shaped blind tube, about 3 in. (7.6 cm) long and 1/4 in. to 1 in. (.64–2.54 cm) thick, projecting from the cecum (part of the large intestine) on the right side of the lower abdominal cavity. The structure, also called the vermiform appendix, has no function in people and is considered a vestigial remnant of some previous organ or structure, having a digestive function, that became unnecessary to people in their evolutionary progress (see digestive system). Infection of accumulated and hardened waste matter in the appendix may give rise to appendicitis, the symptoms of which are severe pain in the abdomen, nausea, vomiting, fever, abdominal tenderness, and muscle spasm. A blood count usually shows a rise in the number of white corpuscles. Appendicitis may occur at any age, although it is more prevalent in persons under 40 years of age. The danger in appendicitis is that the appendix can rupture, either spontaneously or because the patient has injudiciously been given laxatives or an enema, and that the infection can spread to the peritoneum (see peritonitis). Surgery is indicated in appendicitis, preceded and followed by antibiotic therapy.

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appendix

appendix In some Mammalia, a vermiform, cul-de-sac termination to the caecum, located close to the junction of the large and small intestines. It contains a concentration of lymphoid tissue. In herbivorous animals (e.g. Lagomorpha) whose large intestine is involved in the digestion of cellulose, the caecum and appendix are large. In most Primates it is absent and the caecum ends bluntly. In Hominoidea, the caecum is very small, but the appendix is large.

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appendix

ap·pen·dix / əˈpendiks/ • n. (pl. -di·ces / -diˌsēz/ ; -dix·es ) 1. Anat. a tube-shaped sac attached to and opening into the lower end of the large intestine in humans and some other mammals.Also called vermiform appendix. 2. a section or table of additional matter at the end of a book or document.

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appendix

appendix (vermiform appendix) A residual part of the intestinal tract, a small sac‐like process extending from the caecum, some 4–8 cm long. Acute inflammation, caused by an obstruction (appendicitis) can lead to perforation and peritonitis if surgery is not performed in time. See also gastro‐intestinal tract.

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appendix

appendix In some mammals, finger-shaped organ, c.10cm (4in) long, located near the junction of the small and large intestines, usually in the lower right part of the abdomen. It has no known function in humans but can become inflamed or infected (appendicitis).

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appendix

appendix (vermiform appendix) An outgrowth of the caecum in the alimentary canal. In humans it is a vestigial organ containing lymphatic tissue and serves no function in normal digestive processes. Appendicitis is caused by inflammation of the appendix.

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appendix

appendix (vermiform appendix) (ă-pen-diks) n. the short thin blind-ended tube, 7–10 cm long, that is attached to the end of the caecum. It has no known function in humans and is liable to become infected and inflamed (see appendicitis).

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appendix

appendix (pl. -ices, -ixes XVI. — L. appendix, -ic-, f. appendere (see prec.).
Hence appendicitis XIX.

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appendix

appendixadmix, affix, commix, fix, Hicks, intermix, MI6, mix, nix, Nyx, pix, Pnyx, prix fixe, pyx, Ricks, six, Styx, transfix, Wicks •Aquarobics • radix • appendix •crucifix • suffix • Alex • calyx •Felix, helix •kylix • Horlicks • prolix • spondulicks •hydromechanics • phoenix •Ebonics, onyx •mechatronics • sardonyx •Paralympics • semi-tropics •subtropics • Hendrix •dominatrix, matrix •administratrix • oryx • tortrix •executrix • Beatrix • cicatrix •Essex, Wessex •kinesics • coccyx • Sussex •informatics, mathematics •Dianetics • geopolitics • bioethics •cervix • astrophysics • yikes

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Appendix

Appendix

Agriculture Law

The Pollinator Protection Act of 2007

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the ‘Pollinator Protection Act’.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

Congress finds the following:

(1) Many of the crops that humans and livestock consume rely on pollinators for healthy growth. More specifically, pollination by honey bees adds over $15,000,000,000 annually to the value of United States crops.

(2) One-third of our food supply depends on honey bee pollination, which makes the management and protection of pollinators an issue of paramount importance to the security of the United States food supply system.

(3) Colony Collapse Disorder is the name that has been given to the latest die-off of honey bee colonies, exacerbating the continual decline of pollinators in North America. Colonies in more than 23 states have been affected by this disorder.

(4) If the current rate of decline continues, the United States will be forced to rely more heavily on imported foods. Thus, American food security would be destabilized through adverse affects on availability, price, and quality of the many fruits, vegetables, and other products that depend on animal pollination.

(5) Enhanced funding for research on honey bees, parasites, pathogens, toxins, and other environmental factors affecting bees and pollination of cultivated and wild plants will yield responses to Colony Collapse Disorder and other factors causing the decline of pollinators in North America.

SEC. 3. SUSTAINED APICULTURAL RESEARCH AND COLONY COLLAPSE DISORDER WORKING GROUP.

(a) Agricultural Research Service- There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Agriculture, acting through the Agricultural Research Service, the following:

(1) $3,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2008 through 2012 for new personnel, facilities improvement, and additional research at Department of Agriculture Apicultural Research Laboratories.

(2) $2,500,000 for each of fiscal years 2008 and 2009 for research on honey bee physiology, insect pathology, insect chemical ecology, and honey bee toxicology at other Department of Agriculture facilities in New York, Florida, California, and Texas.

(3) $1,750,000 for each of fiscal years 2008 through 2010 for an area-wide research program to identify causes and solutions for Colony Collapse Disorder in affected States.

(b) Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service- There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Agriculture, acting through the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, $10,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2008 through 2012 to fund Department of Agriculture research grants to investigate—

(1) honey bee immunology;

(2) honey bee biology and ecology;

(3) pollination biology;

(4) honey bee genomics;

(5) honey bee bioinformatics;

(6) sublethal effects of insecticides, herbicides and fungicides on honey bees and other beneficial insects; and

(7) effects of genetically modified crops and their interaction with honey bees and other pollinators.

Copyright

Heirs Claim Share of ‘Superman’ Copyright: Ruling Excerpt

The following excerpt from the judge's ruling provides some of the background on the treatment of Superman's creators as they pursued remuneration for their work, and later the copyright.

After the conclusion of the 1970s Superman litigation, the New York Times “ran a story about how the two creators of Superman were living in near destitute conditions” …

Apparently in response to the bad publicity associated with this and similar articles, the parties thereafter entered into a further agreement, dated December 23, 1975. See id. (“‘There is no legal obligation,’ Mr. Emmett[, executive vice-president of Warner Communications, Inc.,]said, ‘but I sure feel that there is a moral obligation on our part”’). In the agreement, Siegel and Shuster reacknowledged the Second Circuit's decision that “all right, title and interest in” Superman (“including any and all renewals and extensions of … such rights”) resided exclusively with DC Comics and its corporate affiliates and, in return, DC Comics' now parent company, Warner Communications, Inc. (“WCI”), provided Siegel and Shuster with modest annual payments for the remainder of their lives; provided them medical insurance under the plan for its employees; and credited them as the “creators of Superman.” In tendering this payment, Warner Communications, Inc. specifically stated that it had no legal obligation to do so, but that it did so solely “in consideration” of the pair's “past services … and in view of [their] present circumstances,” emphasizing that the payments were “voluntary.”

The 1975 agreement also made certain provisions for Siegel's spouse Joanne, providing her with certain monthly payments “for the balance of her life if Siegel” died before December 31, 1985. Finally, Warner Communications, Inc. noted that its obligation to make such voluntary payments would cease if either Siegel or Shuster (or their representatives) sued “asserting any right, title or interest in the ‘Superman’ … copyright.” As the years went by Warner Communications, Inc. increased the amount of the annual payments, and on at least two occasions paid the pair special bonuses.

As the time grew nearer to the December 31, 1985, cutoff date for surviving spouse benefits, Joanne Siegel wrote the CEO for DC Comics expressing her “terrible worry” over the company's refusal to provide Jerome Siegel life insurance in the 1975 agreement. (Decl. Michael Bergman, Ex. NN). She voiced her concern that, should anything happen to her husband after the cutoff date, she and their daughter “would be left without any measure of [financial] security.” (Decl. Michael Bergman, Ex. NN). The parties thereafter agreed by letter dated March 15, 1982, that Warner would pay Joanne Siegel the same benefits it had been paying her husband if he predeceased her, regardless of the time of his death. (Decl. Michael Bergman, Ex. OO). Jerome Siegel died on January 28, 1996, and Joanne Siegel has been receiving these voluntary survival spouse benefits since that time.

In the meantime, changes in the law resurrected legal questions as to the ownership rights the parties had to the Superman copyright. With the passage of the Copyright Act of 1976 (the “1976 Act”), Congress changed the legal landscapeconcerning artists' transfers of the copyrights in their creations. First, the 1976 Act expanded by nineteen years the duration of the renewal period for works, like the initial release of Superman in Action Comics, Vol. 1, that were already in their renewal term at the time of the Act's passage. See 17 U.S.C.§304(b). Second, and importantly for this case, the 1976 Act gave artists and their heirs the ability to terminate any prior grants of the rights to their creations that were executed before January 1, 1978, regardless of the terms contained in such assignments, e.g., a contractual provision that all the rights (the initial and renewal) belonged exclusively to the publisher. Specifically, section 304(c) to the 1976 Act provides that, “[i]n the case of any copyright subsisting in either its first or renewal term on January 1, 1978, other than a copyright in a work made for hire, the exclusive or nonexclusive grant of a transfer or license of the renewal copyright or any right under it, executed before January 1, 1978, … is subject to termination … notwithstanding any agreement to the contrary….” It is this right of termination that Joanne Siegel and Laura Siegel Larson now seek to vindicate in this case.

Freedom of Speech

Ninth Circuit Upholds Online Vote-swapping: Ruling Excerpt

Excerpted from the court's ruling:

Whatever the wisdom of using vote-swapping agreements to communicate these positions, such agreements plainly differ from conventional (and illegal) vote buying, which conveys no message other than the parties' willingness to exchange votes for money (or some other form of private profit). The Supreme Court held in Brown v. Hartlage, 456 U.S. 45, 55 (1982), that vote buying may be banned “without trenching on any right of association protected by the First Amendment.” Vote swapping, however, is more akin to the candidate's pledge in Brown to take a pay cut if elected, which the Court concluded was constitutionally protected, than to unprotected vote buying. Like the candidate's pledge, vote swapping involves a “promise to confer some ultimate benefit on the voter, qua … citizen[ ] or member of the general public”—i.e., another person's agreement to vote for a particular candidate. Id. at 58-59. And unlike vote buying, vote swapping is not an “illegal exchange for private profit” since the only benefit a vote swapper can receive is a marginally higher probability that his preferred electoral outcome will come to pass. Id. at 55 (emphasis added); cf. Marc John 9358 Porter v. Bowen Randazza, The Other Election Controversy of Y2K: Core First Amendment Values and High-Tech Political Coalitions, 82 Wash. U.L.Q. 143, 221 (2004). (“There can be no … serious assertion, that anyone entered into a vote-swap arrangement for private profit or any other form of enrichment.”)

Both the websites' vote-swapping mechanisms and the communication and vote swaps that they enabled were therefore constitutionally protected. At their core, they amounted to efforts by politically engaged people to support their preferred candidates and to avoid election results that they feared would contravene the preferences of a majority of voters in closely contested states. Whether or not one agrees with these voters' tactics, such efforts, when conducted honestly and without money changing hands, are at the heart of the liberty safeguarded by the First Amendment. Cf. Brown, 456 U.S. at 52-53; Buckley, 424 U.S. at 14-15; Monitor Patriot, 401 U.S. at 271-72; Mills, 384 U.S. at 218-19.12

We do not decide, however, whether the vote-swapping mechanisms and the communication and vote swaps they made possible were pure speech or expressive conduct. The distinction between the two concepts is often difficult to discern. See, e.g., FAIR, 126 S. Ct. at 1308-11 (considering law schools' policies toward military recruiters first as speech and then in the alternative as expressive conduct). It is also a distinction that makes no practical difference here, because our conclusion would be the same under the strict scrutiny that applies to restrictions of pure speech as it is under the intermediate scrutiny applicable to the burdening of expressive conduct that we employ below.

Terrorism

Waterboarding and Other Tactics: Department of Justice “Torture Memo”

Excerpted from the Department of Justice “torture memo” that laid out reasoning allowing the president to make use of such techniques:

Section II.6. Commander-in-Chief Authority:

Even if these statutes were misconstrued to apply to persons acting at the direction of the President during the conduct of war, the Department of Justice could not enforce this law or all of the other criminal statutes applicable to the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction against federal officials acting pursuant to the President's constitutional authority to direct a war. Even if an interrogation method arguably were to violate a criminal statute, the Justice Department could not bring a prosecution because the statute would be unconstitutional as applied in this context. This approach is consistent with previous decisions of our Office involving the application of federal criminal law. For example, we have previously construed the congressional contempt statute not to apply to executive branch officials who refuse to comply with congressional subpoenas because of an assertion of executive privilege

We have even greater concerns with respect to prosecutions arising out of the exercise of the President's express authority as Commander in Chief than we do with prosecutions arising out of the assertion of executive privilege. Any effort by Congress to regulate the interrogation of enemy combatants would violate the Constitution's sole vesting of the Commander-in-Chief authority in the President. There can be little doubt that intelligence operations, such as the detention and interrogation of enemy combatants and leaders, are both necessary and proper for the effective conduct of a military campaign. Indeed, such operations may be of more importance in a war with an international terrorist organization than one with the conventional armed forces of a nation-state, due to the former's emphasis on covert operations and surprise attacks against civilians. It may be the case that only successful interrogations can provide the information necessary to prevent future attacks upon the United States and its citizens. Congress can no more interfere with the President's conduct of the interrogation of enemy combatants than it can dictate strategic or tactical decisions on the battlefield. Just as statutes that order the President to conduct warfare in a certain manner or for specific goals would be unconstitutional, so too are laws that would prevent the President from gaining the intelligence he believes necessary to prevent attacks upon the United States.

Section II.C.2.b: “Severe Pain or Suffering”

The key statutory phrase in the definition of torture is the statement that acts amount to torture if they cause “severe physical or mental pain or suffering.” In examining the meaning of a statute, its text must be the starting point. See INS v. Phinpathya, 464 U.S. 183, 189 (1984). Section 2340 makes plain that the infliction of pain or suffering per se, whether it is physical or mental, is insufficient to amount to torture. Instead, the pain or suffering must be “severe.” The statute does not, however, define the term “severe.” “In the absence of such a definition, we construe a statutory term in accordance with its ordinary or natural meaning.” FDIC v. Meyer, 510 U.S. 471, 476 (1994). The dictionary defines “severe” as “[u]nsparing in exaction, punishment, or censure” or “[I]nflicting discomfort or pain hard to endure; sharp; afflictive; distressing; violent; extreme; as severe pain, anguish, torture.” Webster's New International Dictionary 2295 (2d ed. 1935); see American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language 1653 (3d ed. 1992) (“extremely violent or grievous: severe pain”) (emphasis in original); IX The Oxford English Dictionary 572(1978) (“Of pain, suffering, loss, or the like: Grievous, extreme” and “of circumstances … hard to sustain or endure”). Thus, the adjective “severe” conveys that the pain or suffering must be of such a high level of intensity that the pain is difficult for the subject to endure.

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Appendix

APPENDIX


RESOURCES


WHAT IS DISTANCE EDUCATION?

You can find countless sources of information about distance education by doing an Internet search. One Web site that lists links to distance learning resources is dmoz.org/Reference/Education/Distance_Learning. Some other good sources of information include the following:

The Chronicle of Higher Education
1255 23d Street, NW
Washington, DC 20037
Telephone: 202-466-1000
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://chronicle.com

Distance Learning in Higher Education. Council for Higher Education Accreditation, CHEA Update No. 3, June 2000. Available at www.chea.org/Commentary/distance-learning-3.cfm.

Russell, Thomas L. The No Significant Difference Phenomenon. Available at teleeducation.nb.ca/nosignificantdifference/.

Survey on Distance Education at Postsecondary Education Institutions, 1997–1998. NCES 2000-13, by Laurie Lewis, Kyle Snow, Elizabeth Farris, Douglas Levin. Bernie Green, project officer. U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Washington, DC, 1999. Available online at http://nces.ed.gov.

U.S. Distance Learning Association
140 Gould Street
Needham, MA 02494-2397
Telephone: 800-275-5162 (toll-free)
Web site: www.usdla.org

IS DISTANCE LEARNING RIGHT FOR YOU?

Sometimes it helps to have some objective help when you are assessing your goals, aptitudes, strengths, and weaknesses:

National Board for Certified Counselors
3 Terrace Way, Suite D
Greensboro, NC 27403-3660
Telephone: 800-398-5389 (toll-free)
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.nbcc.org

WHAT CAN YOU STUDY VIA DISTANCE LEARNING?

Internet Databases

Peterson's: www.petersons.com/dlearn

Print Directories

Guide to Distance Learning Programs in Canada 2001. Education International, 2001.

Peterson's MBA Distance Learning Programs 2000. Princeton, NJ: Peterson's, 1999.

Peterson's Guide to Distance Learning Programs 2005. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2004.

Equivalency Examinations

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
P.O. Box 6600
Princeton, NJ 08541-6600
Telephone: 609-771-7865
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.collegeboard.org/clep

CLEP Success. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2003. Lieberman, Leo, et al. CLEP. Arco, 2002.

DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs)
Telephone: 609-720-6740
E-mail: [email protected] or [email protected]
Web site: www.chauncey.com/dantes or www.voled.doded.mil/dantes/exam

Excelsior College Examination Program (formerly Regents College Examinations)
Test Administration Office
Excelsior College
7 Columbia Circle
Albany, NY 12203-5159
Telephone: 888-647–2388 (toll-free)
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.excelsior.edu/100.htm

GRE Subject Area Tests
GRE-ETS
P.O. Box 6000
Princeton, NJ 08541-6000
Telephone: 609-771-7670
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.gre.org

Assessment for Life Experience

Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL)
55 East Monroe Street, Suite 1930
Chicago, IL 60603
Telephone: 312-499-2600
Web site: www.cael.org

Credit for Work Training

American Council on Education
Center for Adult Learning Educational Credentials
One Dupont Circle NW
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: 202-939-9475
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.acenet.edu

Credit for Military Training

Servicemembers Opportunities Colleges
1307 New York Avenue NW, fifth floor
Washington, DC 20005-4701
Telephone: 800-368-5622 (toll-free)
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.soc.aascu.org

SELECTING A GOOD DISTANCE LEARNING PROGRAM

The names and contact information of all agencies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education (www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/accreditation/natlagencies.html) and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (www.chea.org) are listed below.

Institutional Accrediting Agencies—Regional

Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools

Accredits institutions in Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

Jean Avnet Morse, Executive Director
Commission on Higher Education
3624 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2680
Telephone: 215-662-5606
Fax: 215-662-5950
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.msache.org

New England Association of Schools and Colleges

Accredits institutions in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

Charles M. Cook, Director
Commission on Institutions of Higher
Education 209 Burlington Road
Bedford, MA 01730-1433
Telephone: 781-271-0022
Fax: 781-271-0950
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.neasc.org

North Central Association of Colleges and Schools

Accredits institutions in Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Steve Crow, Executive Director
Commission on Institutions of Higher Education
30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
Chicago, IL 60602-2504
Telephone: 312-263-0456
Fax: 312-263-7462
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org

Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities

Accredits institutions in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington.

Sandra E. Elman, Executive Director
Commission on Colleges
11130 Northeast 33rd Place, Suite 120
Bellevue, WA 98004
Telephone: 425-827-2005
Fax: 425-827-3395
E-mail: s[email protected]
Web site: www.cocnasc.org

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools

Accredits institutions in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

James T. Rogers, Executive Director
Commission on Colleges
1866 Southern Lane
Decatur, GA 30033-4097
Telephone: 404-679-4500
Fax: 404-679-4558
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.sacs.org

Western Association of Schools and Colleges

Accredits institutions in California, Guam, and Hawaii.

Ralph A. Wolff, Executive Director
Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities
985 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 100
Alameda, CA 94501
Telephone: 510-748-9001
Fax: 510-748-9797
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.wascweb.org

Institutional Accrediting Agencies—Other

Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools

Stephen D. Parker, Executive Director
750 First Street, NE, Suite 980
Washington, DC 20002-4241
Telephone: 202-336-6780
Fax: 202-842-2593
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.acics.org

Distance Education and Training Council

Michael P. Lambert, Executive Secretary
1601 Eighteenth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20009-2529
Telephone: 202-234-5100
Fax: 202-332-1386
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.detc.org

Specialized Accrediting Agencies

Acupuncture

Dort S. Bigg, Executive Director
Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine
1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1270
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Telephone: 301-608-9680
Fax: 301-608-9576
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ccaom.org

Art and Design

Samuel Hope, Executive Director
National Association of Schools of Art and Design
11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21
Reston, VA 20190
Telephone: 703-437-0700
Fax: 703-437-6312
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.arts-accredit.org

Chiropractic

Paul D. Walker, Executive Director
The Council on Chiropractic Education
8049 North 85th Way
Scottsdale, AZ 85258-4321
Telephone: 480-443-8877
Fax: 480-483-7333
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.cce-usa.org

Clinical Laboratory Science

Betty Craft, Chairman
National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences
8410 West Bryn Mawr Avenue, Suite 670
Chicago, IL 60631
Telephone: 312-714-8880
Fax: 312-714-8886
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.naacls.org

Dance

Samuel Hope, Executive Director
National Association of Schools of Dance
11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21
Reston, VA 20190
Telephone: 703-437-0700
Fax: 703-437-6312
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.arts-accredit.org

Dentistry

Laura M. Neumann, D.D.S., M.P.H., Associate Executive Director, Education
American Dental Association
211 East Chicago Avenue, 18th Floor
Chicago, IL 60611
Telephone: 312-440-2500
Fax: 312-440-2800
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ada.org

Education

Arthur Wise, President
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
2010 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036-1023
Telephone: 202-466-7496
Fax: 202-296-6620
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ncate.org

Engineering

George D. Peterson, Executive Director
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
Baltimore, MD 21202
Telephone: 410-347-7700
Fax: 410-625-2238
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.abet.org

Environment

National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council
720 South Colorado Boulevard, Suite 970-S
Denver, CO 80246-1925
Telephone: 303-756-9090
Fax: 303-691-9490
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.neha.org/AccredCouncil.html

Forestry

Michele Harvey, Director, Science and Education
Committee on Education
Society of American Foresters
5400 Grosvenor Lane
Bethesda, MD 20814-2198
Telephone: 301-897-8720 Ext. 119
Fax: 301-897-3690
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.safnet.org

Health Services Administration

Andrea Barone-Wodjouatt, Executive Director
Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration
730 11th Street, NW, Fourth Floor
Washington, DC 20001-4510
Telephone: 202-638-5131
Fax: 202-638-3429
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: monkey.hmi.missouri.edu/acehsa

Interior Design

Kayem Dunn, Director
Foundation for Interior Design Education Research
60 Monroe Center, NW, Suite 300
Grand Rapids, MI 49503-2920
Telephone: 616-458-0400
Fax: 616-458-0460
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.fider.org

Journalism and Mass Communications

Susanne Shaw, Executive Director
Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications
School of Journalism
Stauffer-Flint Hall
University of Kansas
Lawrence, KS 66045
Telephone: 785-864-3986
Fax: 785-864-5225
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ukans.edu/P5acejmc

Landscape Architecture

Ronald C. Leighton, Accreditation Manager
Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board
American Society of Landscape Architects
636 Eye Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001-3736
Telephone: 202-898-2444
Fax: 202-898-1185
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.asla.org/asla/

Law

Carl Monk, Executive Vice President and Executive Director
Accreditation Committee
Association of American Law Schools
1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036-2605
Telephone: 202-296-8851
Fax: 202-296-8869
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aals.org

John A. Sebert, Consultant on Legal Education
American Bar Association
750 North Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, IL 60611
Telephone: 312-988-6746
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.abanet.org/legaled

Library

Mary Taylor, Assistant Director
Committee on Accreditation
American Library Association
50 East Huron Street
Chicago, IL 60611
Telephone: 800-545-2433 (toll-free)
Fax: 312-280-2433
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ala.org/accreditation

Marriage and Family Therapy

Michael Bowers, Executive Director
American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
1133 15th Street, NW, Suite 300
Washington, DC 20005-2710
Telephone: 202-452-0109
Fax: 202-232-2329
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aamft.org

Medical Illustration

William C. Andrea, Chair
Accreditation Review Committee for the Medical Illustrator
St. Luke's Hospital
Instructional Resources
232 South Woods Mill Road
Chesterfield, MO 63017
Telephone: 314-205-6158
Fax: 314-205-6144
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.caahep.org/accreditation/mi/mi-accreditation.htm

Medicine

Liaison Committee on Medical Education

The LCME is administered in even-numbered years, beginning each July 1, by:

David P. Stevens, M.D., Secretary
Association of American Medical Colleges
2450 N Street, NW
Washington, DC 20037
Telephone: 202-828-0596
Fax: 202-828-1125
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aamc.org

The LCME is administered in odd-numbered years, beginning each July 1, by:

Frank Simon, M.D., Secretary
American Medical Association
515 North State Street
Chicago, IL 60610
Telephone: 312-464-4657
Fax: 312-464-5830
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ama-assn.org

Music

Samuel Hope, Executive Director
National Association of Schools of Music
11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21
Reston, VA 20190
Telephone: 703-437-0700
Fax: 703-437-6312
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.arts-accredit.org

Naturopathic Medicine

Robert Lofft, Executive Director
Council on Naturopathic Medical Education
P.O. Box 11426
Eugene, OR 97440-3626
Telephone: 541-484-6028
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.cnme.org

Nurse Anesthesia

Betty J. Horton, Director of Accreditation
Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs
222 South Prospect Avenue, Suite 304
Park Ridge, IL 60068-4010
Telephone: 847-692-7050
Fax: 847-693-7137
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aana.com/coa

Nurse Midwifery

Betty Watts Carrington, Chair
Division of Accreditation
American College of Nurse-Midwives
818 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 900
Washington, DC 20006
Telephone: 202-728-9877
Fax: 202-728-9897
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.midwife.org/educ

Nursing

Geraldene Felton, Executive Director
National League for Nursing
61 Broadway, 33rd Floor
New York, NY 10006
Telephone: 800-669-1656 (toll-free)
Fax: 212-812-0393
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.nln.org

Occupational Therapy

Doris Gordon, Director of Accreditation
American Occupational Therapy Association
4720 Montgomery Lane
P.O. Box 31220
Bethesda, MD 20824-1220
Telephone: 301-652-2682
Fax: 301-652-7711
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aota.org

Optometry

Joyce Urbeck, Administrative Director
Council on Optometric Education
American Optometric Association
243 North Lindbergh Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63141
Telephone: 314-991-4100
Fax: 314-991-4101
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aoanet.org

Osteopathic Medicine

John B. Crosby, Executive Director
Bureau of Professional Education, Council on Predoctoral Education
American Osteopathic Association
142 East Ontario Street
Chicago, IL 60611
Telephone: 800-621-1773 (toll-free)
Fax: 312-202-8200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aoa-net.org

Pastoral Education

Reverend Teresa E. Snorton, Executive Director
Accreditation Commission
Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, Inc.
1549 Clairmont Road, Suite 103
Decatur, GA 30033-4611
Telephone: 404-320-1472
Fax: 404-320-0849
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.acpe.edu

Pharmacy

Peter H. Vlasses, Executive Director
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education
311 West Superior Street
Chicago, IL 60610
Telephone: 312-664-3575
Fax: 312-664-4652
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.acpe-accredit.org

Physical Therapy

Mary Jane Harris, Director
Department of Accreditation
American Physical Therapy Association
1111 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria, VA 22314-1488
Telephone: 800-999-2782 (toll-free) or 703-684-2782
Fax: 703-684-7343
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.apta.org

Planning

Beatrice Clupper, Director
American Institute of Certified Planners/Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning
Merle Hay Tower, Suite 302
3800 Merle Hay Road
Des Moines, IA 50310
Telephone: 515-252-0729
Fax: 515-252-7404
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://netins.net/web/pab_fi66

Podiatric Medicine

Alan R. Tinkleman, Director
Council on Podiatric Medical Education
American Podiatric Medical Association
9312 Old Georgetown Road
Bethesda, MD 20814-1698
Telephone: 301-571-9200
Fax: 301-530-2752
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.apm.org/cpme

Psychology and Counseling

Susan F. Zlotlow, Director
Committee on Accreditation
American Psychological Association
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Telephone: 202-336-5979
Fax: 202-336-5978
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.apa.org/ed/accred.html

Carol L. Bobby, Executive Director
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
American Counseling Association
5999 Stevenson Avenue, Fourth Floor
Alexandria, VA 22304
Telephone: 800-347-6647 Ext. 301 (toll-free)
Fax: 703-823-1581
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.counseling.org/CACREP

Public Affairs and Administration

Michael A. Brintnall, Executive Director
Commission on Peer Review and Accreditation
National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
1120 G Street, NW, Suite 730
Washington, DC 20005
Telephone: 202-628-8965
Fax: 202-626-4978
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.naspaa.org

Public Health

Patricia Evans, Executive Director
Council on Education for Public Health
800 I Street, NW, Suite 202
Washington, DC 20001-3710
Telephone: 202-789-1050
Fax: 202-789-1895
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ceph.org

Rabbinical and Talmudic Education

Bernard Fryshman, Executive Vice President
Association of Advanced Rabbinical and Talmudic Schools
175 Fifth Avenue, Suite 711
New York, NY 10010
Telephone: 212-477-0950
Fax: 212-533-5335

Rehabilitation Education

Jeanne Patterson, Executive Director
Council on Rehabilitation Education
Commission on Standards and Accreditation
1835 Rohlwing Road, Suite E
Rolling Meadows, IL 60008
Telephone: 847-394-1785
Fax: 847-394-2108
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.core-rehab.org

Social Work

Nancy Randolph, Director
Council on Social Work Education
1725 Duke Street, Suite 500
Alexandria, VA 22314
Telephone: 703-683-8080
Fax: 703-683-8099
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.cswe.org

Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Sharon Goldsmith, Director
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
10801 Rockville Pike
Rockville, MD 20852
Telephone: 301-897-5700
Fax: 301-571-0457
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.asha.org

Theater

Samuel Hope, Executive Director
National Association of Schools of Theatre
11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21
Reston, VA 20190
Telephone: 703-437-0700
Fax: 703-437-6312
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.arts-accredit.org

Theology

Daniel O. Aleshire, Executive Director
Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada
10 Summit Park Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15275-1103
Telephone: 412-788-6505
Fax: 412-788-6510
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ats.edu

Veterinary Medicine

Donald G. Simmons, Director of Education and Research Division
American Veterinary Medical Association
1931 North Meacham Road, Suite 100
Schaumburg, IL 60173
Telephone: 847-925-8070
Fax: 847-925-1329
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.avma.org

Accreditation in Canada

To get general information about accreditation in Canada, visit the Web site of the Council of Ministers of Education. Their Web site also has contact information and links to the provincial departments of education.

Council of Ministers of Education, Canada
95 St. Clair Avenue West, Suite 1106
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M4V 1N6
Telephone: 416-962-8100
Fax: 416-962-2800
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.cmec.ca

Other Resources for Evaluating Programs

Bear, Mariah P., John Bear, and John B. Bear. Bear's Guide to Earning Degrees Nontraditionally, 13th ed.

Ten Speed Press, 1999.

Quality on the Line: Benchmarks for Success in Internet-Based Distance Education. Washington, DC: The Institute for Higher Education Policy, March 2000. Available at www.ihep.com/qualityonline.pdf.

TAKING STANDARDIZED ADMISSIONS TESTS

SATs

For information about the SATs, contact the College Board:

SAT Program
The College Board
P.O. Box 6202
Princeton, NJ 08541-6202
Telephone: 609-771-7600
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.collegeboard.org

The College Board offers free preparation advice and a practice test in Taking the SAT I: Reasoning Test and preparation suggestions in Taking the SAT II: Subject Area Test. Call them to get a copy. The Web site also offers other test-preparation materials, including books, videos, and software, for a charge. Order at www.collegeboard.org or call 609-771-7243:

10 Real SATs. 600 pp. 1997.

Real SAT II: Subject Tests. 840 pp. 1998.

Look Inside the SAT I. Video, 30 minutes, 1994.

One-on-One with the SAT. Software, 1995.

Other test-preparation resources:

Crystal, Michael R. SAT Math Flash. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2001.

SAT Success 2003. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2002.

ACT Assessment

ACT Registration
P.O. Box 414
Iowa City, IA 52243-0414
Telephone: 319-337-1270
Web site: www.act.org/aap

The Web site offers test-preparation strategies, sample questions, and information about other ACT resources.

Bender, Elaine, et al. ACT Success (with CD). Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2002.

GREs

For information about the GREs, contact the Educational Testing Service:

GRE-ETS
PO Box 6000
Princeton, NJ 08541-6000
Telephone: (609) 771-7670
E-mail: [email protected] Web site (GRE Online): www.gre.org

The Web site offers a lot of material that can be downloaded: information bulletins, practice tests, descriptions of the subject area tests, and preparation software. Order from ETS at www.gre.org:

GRE Big Book

GRE Powerprep Software. Includes test preparation for both the General Test and the Writing Assessment.

GRE Practicing to Take the General Test

Practice Books for Subject Area Tests

Other resources:

GRE CAT Success. A workbook and online CD that provide strategies and practice for the GRE. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2002.

Practice Books for Subject Area Tests.

MAT

The Psychological Corporation
555 Academic Court
San Antonio, TX 78204
Telephone: (800) 622-3231 (toll-free)
Web site: www.tpcweb.com/mat

Bader, William, and Daniel S. Burt. Master the MAT. Arco, s2000.

GMAT

GMAT Distribution and Receiving Center
225 Phillips Boulevard
Ewing, NJ 08628-7435
Telephone: 609-771-7330
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site (MBA Explorer): www.gmac.com

GMAT Success. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2002.

TOEFL and TSE

Information on both the TOEFL and the TSE can be obtained from the Educational Testing Service:

TOEFL
PO Box 6151
Princeton, NJ 08541-6151
Telephone: 609-771-7100
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.toefl.org

Rogers, Bruce. TOEFL Practice Tests. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2002. Can be purchased with audiocassettes to prepare for the listening section.

TOEFL Success. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2002.

APPLYING FOR ADMISSION TO DEGREE PROGRAMS

Davidson, Wilma, and Susan McCloskey. Writing a Winning College Application Essay. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2002.

Hayden, Thomas C. Insider's Guide to College Admissions. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2000.

Stelzer, Richard J. How to Write a Winning Personal Statement for Graduate and Professional School, 3rd ed. Princeton, NJ: Peterson's, 1997. Lots of suggestions, both from the author and admissions representatives of graduate and professional schools, along with many sample essays.

PAYING FOR YOUR EDUCATION

General Information

Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org). The best place to start an Internet search for financial aid information.

McWade, Patricia. Financing Graduate School. Princeton, NJ: Peterson's, 1996. The best, most detailed treatment of financial aid for graduate students, written by the dean of student financial services at Georgetown University.

National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (www.nasfaa.org). Lots of essays explain various aspects of financial aid, including educational tax credits.

Turlington, Shannon R. The Unofficial Guide to Financing a College Education. Arco, 1999.

State Residency

Todd, Daryl F., Jr. How to Cut Tuition: The Complete Guide to In-State Tuition. Linwood, NJ: Atlantic Educational Publishing, 1997.

Federal Aid

Federal Student Aid Information Center
P.O. Box 84
Washington, DC 20044-0084
Telephone: 800-4-FED-AID (toll-free) (general information, assistance, and publications)
Web sites:
General information and home page: www.ed.gov/studentaid

For a copy of 2000–2001 Financial Aid: The Student Guide: www.ed.gov/prog_info/SFA/StudentGuide.

For the FAFSA, go to FAFSA Online: www.fafsa.ed.gov.

For more on the Distance Education Demonstration Program: www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/PPI/DistEd/proginfo.html

State Agencies of Higher Education

Alabama: 334-242-2274
Alaska: 907-465-6741
Arizona: 602-229-2591
Arkansas: 800-547-8839 (toll-free)
California: 916-526-7590
Colorado: 303-866-2723
Connecticut: 860-947-1855
Delaware: 800-292-7935 (toll-free)
District of Columbia: 202-698-2400
Florida: 888-827-2004 (toll-free)
Georgia: 770-724-9030 or 404-656-5969
Hawaii: 808-956-8213
Idaho: 208-334-2270
Illinois: 800-899-4722 (toll-free)
Indiana: 317-232-2350
Iowa: 515-242-3344
Kansas: 785-296-3517
Kentucky: 800-928-8926 (toll-free)
Louisiana: 800-259-5626 (toll-free)
Maine: 800-228-3734 (toll-free)
Maryland: 410-260-4565
Massachusetts: 617-727-9420
Michigan: 877-323-2287 (toll-free)
Minnesota: 800-657-3866 (toll-free)
Mississippi: 601-432-6997
Missouri: 800-473-6757 (toll-free)
Montana: 800-537-7508 (toll-free)
Nebraska: 402-471-2847
Nevada: 775-687-9228
New Hampshire: 603-271-2555
New Jersey: 800-792-8670 (toll-free)
New Mexico: 800-279-9777 (toll-free)
New York: 800-642-6234 (toll-free)
North Carolina: 800-600-3453 (toll-free)
North Dakota: 701-328-4114
Ohio: 888-833-1133 (toll-free)
Oklahoma: 800-858-1840 (toll-free)
Oregon: 800-452-8807 (toll-free)
Pennsylvania: 800-692-7392 or 7435 (toll-free)
Rhode Island: 800-922-9855 (toll-free)
South Carolina: 803-737-2260
South Dakota: 605-773-3134
Tennessee: 800-342-1663 (toll-free)
Texas: 800-242-3062 (toll-free)
Utah: 800-418-8757 (toll-free)
Vermont: 800-642-3177 (toll-free)
Virginia: 804-786-1690
Washington: 360-753-7850
West Virginia: 888-825-5707 (toll-free)
Wisconsin: 608-267-2206
Wyoming: 307-777-7763
Guam: 671-475-0457
Northern Marianas: 670-234-6128
Puerto Rico: 787-724-7100
Republic of Palau: 680-488-2471
Virgin Islands: 340-774-4546

CSS Financial Aid Profile

Contact the College Scholarship Service at www.collegeboard.org or 305-829-9793.

Grants, Fellowships, and Scholarships

AJR Newslink (www.newslink.org). Awards, grants, and scholarships for journalism students.

Annual Register of Grant Support: A Directory of Funding Sources. Wilmette, IL.: National Register Publishing Company.

College Money Handbook 2005. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2004.

Corporate Foundation Profiles. New York: Foundation Center, 1999 (http://fdncenter.org or 212-620-4230).

Fast Web (http://fastweb.com). Online searchable database of scholarships and fellowships.

Petersons.com. Online searchable database of scholarships and fellowships.

Peterson's Grants for Graduate & Postdoctoral Study, 5th ed. Compiled by the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Princeton, NJ: Peterson's, 1998.

Scholarships and Loans for Adult Students. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2000.

Scholarships, Grants, & Prizes 2005. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2004.

Cooperative Education

Re, Joseph M. Earn and Learn. Octameron Associates, 1997.

Credit Reporting Agencies

It's a good idea to check your credit rating before you apply for any loans. Call first to find out if there is a fee.

Experian
PO Box 9530
Allen, TX 75013
Telephone: 888-397-3742 (toll-free)

Equifax
PO Box 105873
Atlanta, GA 30348
Telephone: 800-685-1111 (toll-free)

CSC Credit Services
Consumer Assistance Center
PO Box 674402
Houston, TX 77267-4402
Telephone: 800-759-5979 (toll-free)

Trans Union Corporation
PO Box 390
Springfield, PA 19064-0390
Telephone: 800-888-4213 (toll-free)

Tax Issues

Educational Expenses, IRS Publication 508.

Tax Benefits for Higher Education. IRS Publication 970.

To get a copy of these publications, visit the Internal Revenue Service Web site at www.irs.ustreas.gov/prod/forms_pubs/pubs or call 800-829-3676 (toll-free).

Women, Minority Students, Disabled Students, and Veterans

Bruce-Young, Doris M., and William C. Young. Higher Education Money Book for Women and Minorities. Young Enterprises International, 1997.

Minority and Women's Complete Scholarship Book; plus Scholarships for Religious Affiliations and People with Disabilities. Sourcebooks, 1998.

Olson, Elizabeth A. Dollars for College (Women). Garrett Park Press, 1995.

Saludos Web Education Center (www.saludos.com). Internships and scholarships targeted to Hispanic Americans as well as those not considering race or ethnicity.

Schlachter, Gail Ann, and R. David Weber. Financial Aid for African Americans. Reference Service Press, 1997.

Schlachter, Gail Ann, and R. David Weber. Financial Aid for the Disabled and Their Families. Reference Service Press, 1998.

Schlachter, Gail Ann, and R. David Weber. Financial Aid for Veterans, Military Personnel, and Their Dependents. Reference Service Press, 1996.

Schlachter, Gail Ann. Directory of Financial Aid for Women. Reference Service Press, 1997.

International Students

Funding for U.S. Study—A Guide for International Students and Professionals and Financial Resources for International Study. New York: Institute of International Education (www.iiebooks.org).

SUCCEEDING AS A DISTANCE LEARNER

Bruno, Frank J. Going Back to School: College Survival Strategies for Adult Students. New York, Arco, 1998.

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Appendix

APPENDIX


RESOURCES


WHAT IS DISTANCE EDUCATION?

You can find countless sources of information about distance education by doing an Internet search. One Web site that lists links to distance learning resources is dmoz.org/Reference/Education/Distance_Learning. Some other good sources of information include the following:

The Chronicle of Higher Education
1255 23d Street, NW
Washington, DC 20037
Telephone: 202-466-1000
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://chronicle.com

Distance Learning in Higher Education. Council for Higher Education Accreditation, CHEA Update No. 3, June 2000. Available at www.chea.org/Commentary/distance-learning-3.cfm.

Russell, Thomas L. The No Significant Difference Phenomenon. Available at teleeducation.nb.ca/nosignificantdifference/.

Survey on Distance Education at Postsecondary Education Institutions, 1997–1998. NCES 2000-13, by Laurie Lewis, Kyle Snow, Elizabeth Farris, Douglas Levin. Bernie Green, project officer. U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Washington, DC, 1999. Available online at http://nces.ed.gov.

U.S. Distance Learning Association
140 Gould Street
Needham, MA 02494-2397
Telephone: 800-275-5162 (toll-free)
Web site: www.usdla.org

IS DISTANCE LEARNING RIGHT FOR YOU?

Sometimes it helps to have some objective help when you are assessing your goals, aptitudes, strengths, and weaknesses:

National Board for Certified Counselors
3 Terrace Way, Suite D
Greensboro, NC 27403-3660
Telephone: 800-398-5389 (toll-free)
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.nbcc.org

WHAT CAN YOU STUDY VIA DISTANCE LEARNING?

Internet Databases

Peterson's: www.petersons.com/distancelearning

Print Directories

Guide to Distance Learning Programs in Canada 2001. Education International, 2001.

Peterson's MBA Distance Learning Programs 2000. Princeton, NJ: Peterson's, 1999.

Peterson's Guide to Distance Learning Programs 2005. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2004.

Equivalency Examinations

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
P.O. Box 6600
Princeton, NJ 08541-6600
Telephone: 609-771-7865
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.collegeboard.org/clep

CLEP Success. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2003. Lieberman, Leo, et al. CLEP. Arco, 2002.

DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs)
Telephone: 609-720-6740
E-mail: [email protected] or [email protected]
Web site: www.chauncey.com/dantes or www.voled.doded.mil/dantes/exam

Excelsior College Examination Program (formerly Regents College Examinations)
Test Administration Office
Excelsior College
7 Columbia Circle
Albany, NY 12203-5159
Telephone: 888-647–2388 (toll-free)
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.excelsior.edu/100.htm

GRE Subject Area Tests
GRE-ETS
P.O. Box 6000
Princeton, NJ 08541-6000
Telephone: 609-771-7670
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.gre.org

Assessment for Life Experience

Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL)
55 East Monroe Street, Suite 1930
Chicago, IL 60603
Telephone: 312-499-2600
Web site: www.cael.org

Credit for Work Training

American Council on Education
Center for Adult Learning Educational Credentials
One Dupont Circle NW
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: 202-939-9475
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.acenet.edu

Credit for Military Training

Servicemembers Opportunities Colleges
1307 New York Avenue NW, fifth floor
Washington, DC 20005-4701
Telephone: 800-368-5622 (toll-free)
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.soc.aascu.org

SELECTING A GOOD DISTANCE LEARNING PROGRAM

The names and contact information of all agencies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education (www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/accreditation/natlagencies.html) and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (www.chea.org) are listed below.

Institutional Accrediting Agencies—Regional

Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools

Accredits institutions in Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

Jean Avnet Morse, Executive Director
Commission on Higher Education
3624 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2680
Telephone: 267-284-5000
Fax: 215-662-5501
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.msache.org

New England Association of Schools and Colleges

Accredits institutions in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

Jacob Ludes III, Executive Director
Commission on Institutions of Higher Education
209 Burlington Road
Bedford, MA 01730-1433
Telephone: 781-271-0022
Fax: 781-271-0950
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.neasc.org

North Central Association of Colleges and Schools

Accredits institutions in Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Steve Crow, Executive Director
The Higher Learning Commission
30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
Chicago, IL 60602-2504
Telephone: 800-621-7440
Fax: 312-263-7462
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org

Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities

Accredits institutions in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington.

Sandra E. Elman, Executive Director
Commission on Colleges
8060 165th Avenue, NE, Ste 100
Redmond, WA 98052
Telephone: 425-558-4224
Fax: 425-376-0596
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.nwccu.org

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools

Accredits institutions in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

Belle Wheelan, President
Commission on Colleges
1866 Southern Lane
Decatur, GA 30033-4097
Telephone: 404-679-4500
Fax: 404-679-4528
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.sacscoc.org

Western Association of Schools and Colleges

Accredits institutions in California, Guam, and Hawaii.

Ralph A. Wolff, Executive Director
Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities
985 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 100
Alameda, CA 94501
Telephone: 510-748-9001
Fax: 510-748-9797
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.wascweb.org

Institutional Accrediting Agencies—Other

Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools

Stephen A. Eggland, Executive Director
750 First Street, NE, Suite 980
Washington, DC 20002-4241
Telephone: 202-336-6780
Fax: 202-842-2593
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.acics.org

Distance Education and Training Council

Michael P. Lambert, Executive Secretary
1601 Eighteenth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20009-2529
Telephone: 202-234-5100
Fax: 202-332-1386
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.detc.org

Specialized Accrediting Agencies

Acupuncture

Dort S. Bigg, Executive Director
Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine
1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1270
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Telephone: 301-608-9680
Fax: 301-608-9576
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ccaom.org

Art and Design

Samuel Hope, Executive Director
National Association of Schools of Art and Design
11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21
Reston, VA 20190
Telephone: 703-437-0700
Fax: 703-437-6312
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.arts-accredit.org

Chiropractic

Paul D. Walker, Executive Director
The Council on Chiropractic Education
8049 North 85th Way
Scottsdale, AZ 85258-4321
Telephone: 480-443-8877
Fax: 480-483-7333
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.cce-usa.org

Clinical Laboratory Science

Betty Craft, Chairman
National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences
8410 West Bryn Mawr Avenue, Suite 670
Chicago, IL 60631
Telephone: 312-714-8880
Fax: 312-714-8886
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.naacls.org

Dance

Samuel Hope, Executive Director
National Association of Schools of Dance
11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21
Reston, VA 20190
Telephone: 703-437-0700
Fax: 703-437-6312
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.arts-accredit.org

Dentistry

Laura M. Neumann, D.D.S., M.P.H., Associate Executive Director, Education
American Dental Association
211 East Chicago Avenue, 18th Floor
Chicago, IL 60611
Telephone: 312-440-2500
Fax: 312-440-2800
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ada.org

Education

Arthur Wise, President
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
2010 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036-1023
Telephone: 202-466-7496
Fax: 202-296-6620
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ncate.org

Engineering

George D. Peterson, Executive Director
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
Baltimore, MD 21202
Telephone: 410-347-7700
Fax: 410-625-2238
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.abet.org

Environment

National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council
720 South Colorado Boulevard, Suite 970-S
Denver, CO 80246-1925
Telephone: 303-756-9090
Fax: 303-691-9490
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.neha.org/AccredCouncil.html

Forestry

Michele Harvey, Director, Science and Education
Committee on Education
Society of American Foresters
5400 Grosvenor Lane
Bethesda, MD 20814-2198
Telephone: 301-897-8720 Ext. 119
Fax: 301-897-3690
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.safnet.org

Health Services Administration

Andrea Barone-Wodjouatt, Executive Director
Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration
730 11th Street, NW, Fourth Floor
Washington, DC 20001-4510
Telephone: 202-638-5131
Fax: 202-638-3429
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: monkey.hmi.missouri.edu/acehsa

Interior Design

Kayem Dunn, Director
Foundation for Interior Design Education Research
60 Monroe Center, NW, Suite 300
Grand Rapids, MI 49503-2920
Telephone: 616-458-0400
Fax: 616-458-0460
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.fider.org

Journalism and Mass Communications

Susanne Shaw, Executive Director
Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications
School of Journalism
Stauffer-Flint Hall
University of Kansas
Lawrence, KS 66045
Telephone: 785-864-3986
Fax: 785-864-5225
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ukans.edu/P5acejmc

Landscape Architecture

Ronald C. Leighton, Accreditation Manager
Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board
American Society of Landscape Architects
636 Eye Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001-3736
Telephone: 202-898-2444
Fax: 202-898-1185
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.asla.org/asla/

Law

Carl Monk, Executive Vice President and Executive Director
Accreditation Committee
Association of American Law Schools
1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036-2605
Telephone: 202-296-8851
Fax: 202-296-8869
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aals.org

John A. Sebert, Consultant on Legal Education
American Bar Association
750 North Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, IL 60611
Telephone: 312-988-6746
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.abanet.org/legaled

Library

Mary Taylor, Assistant Director
Committee on Accreditation
American Library Association
50 East Huron Street
Chicago, IL 60611
Telephone: 800-545-2433 (toll-free)
Fax: 312-280-2433
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ala.org/accreditation

Marriage and Family Therapy

Michael Bowers, Executive Director
American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
1133 15th Street, NW, Suite 300
Washington, DC 20005-2710
Telephone: 202-452-0109
Fax: 202-232-2329
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aamft.org

Medical Illustration

William C. Andrea, Chair
Accreditation Review Committee for the Medical Illustrator
St. Luke's Hospital
Instructional Resources
232 South Woods Mill Road
Chesterfield, MO 63017
Telephone: 314-205-6158
Fax: 314-205-6144
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.caahep.org/accreditation/mi/mi-accreditation.htm

Medicine

Liaison Committee on Medical Education
The LCME is administered in even-numbered years, beginning each July 1, by: David P. Stevens, M.D., Secretary
Association of American Medical Colleges
2450 N Street, NW
Washington, DC 20037
Telephone: 202-828-0596
Fax: 202-828-1125
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aamc.org
The LCME is administered in odd-numbered years, beginning each July 1, by: Frank Simon, M.D., Secretary
American Medical Association
515 North State Street
Chicago, IL 60610
Telephone: 312-464-4657
Fax: 312-464-5830
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ama-assn.org

Music

Samuel Hope, Executive Director
National Association of Schools of Music
11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21
Reston, VA 20190
Telephone: 703-437-0700
Fax: 703-437-6312
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.arts-accredit.org

Naturopathic Medicine

Robert Lofft, Executive Director
Council on Naturopathic Medical Education
P.O. Box 11426
Eugene, OR 97440-3626
Telephone: 541-484-6028
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.cnme.org

Nurse Anesthesia

Betty J. Horton, Director of Accreditation
Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs
222 South Prospect Avenue, Suite 304
Park Ridge, IL 60068-4010
Telephone: 847-692-7050
Fax: 847-693-7137
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aana.com/coa

Nurse Midwifery

Betty Watts Carrington, Chair
Division of Accreditation
American College of Nurse-Midwives
818 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 900
Washington, DC 20006
Telephone: 202-728-9877
Fax: 202-728-9897
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.midwife.org/educ

Nursing

Geraldene Felton, Executive Director
National League for Nursing
61 Broadway, 33rd Floor
New York, NY 10006
Telephone: 800-669-1656 (toll-free)
Fax: 212-812-0393
E-mail: [email protected]lnac.org
Web site: www.nln.org

Occupational Therapy

Doris Gordon, Director of Accreditation
American Occupational Therapy Association
4720 Montgomery Lane
P.O. Box 31220
Bethesda, MD 20824-1220
Telephone: 301-652-2682
Fax: 301-652-7711
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aota.org

Optometry

Joyce Urbeck, Administrative Director
Council on Optometric Education
American Optometric Association
243 North Lindbergh Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63141
Telephone: 314-991-4100
Fax: 314-991-4101
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aoanet.org

Osteopathic Medicine

John B. Crosby, Executive Director
Bureau of Professional Education, Council on Predoctoral Education
American Osteopathic Association
142 East Ontario Street
Chicago, IL 60611
Telephone: 800-621-1773 (toll-free)
Fax: 312-202-8200
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.aoa-net.org

Pastoral Education

Reverend Teresa E. Snorton, Executive Director
Accreditation Commission
Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, Inc.
1549 Clairmont Road, Suite 103
Decatur, GA 30033-4611
Telephone: 404-320-1472
Fax: 404-320-0849
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.acpe.edu

Pharmacy

Peter H. Vlasses, Executive Director
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education
311 West Superior Street
Chicago, IL 60610
Telephone: 312-664-3575
Fax: 312-664-4652
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.acpe-accredit.org

Physical Therapy

Mary Jane Harris, Director
Department of Accreditation
American Physical Therapy Association
1111 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria, VA 22314-1488
Telephone: 800-999-2782 (toll-free) or 703-684-2782
Fax: 703-684-7343
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.apta.org

Planning

Beatrice Clupper, Director
American Institute of Certified Planners/Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning
Merle Hay Tower, Suite 302
3800 Merle Hay Road
Des Moines, IA 50310
Telephone: 515-252-0729
Fax: 515-252-7404
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: http://netins.net/web/pab_fi66

Podiatric Medicine

Alan R. Tinkleman, Director
Council on Podiatric Medical Education
American Podiatric Medical Association
9312 Old Georgetown Road
Bethesda, MD 20814-1698
Telephone: 301-571-9200
Fax: 301-530-2752
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.apm.org/cpme

Psychology and Counseling

Susan F. Zlotlow, Director
Committee on Accreditation
American Psychological Association
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Telephone: 202-336-5979
Fax: 202-336-5978
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.apa.org/ed/accred.html

Carol L. Bobby, Executive Director
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
American Counseling Association
5999 Stevenson Avenue, Fourth Floor
Alexandria, VA 22304
Telephone: 800-347-6647 Ext. 301 (toll-free)
Fax: 703-823-1581
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.counseling.org/CACREP

Public Affairs and Administration

Michael A. Brintnall, Executive Director
Commission on Peer Review and Accreditation
National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
1120 G Street, NW, Suite 730
Washington, DC 20005
Telephone: 202-628-8965
Fax: 202-626-4978
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.naspaa.org

Public Health

Patricia Evans, Executive Director
Council on Education for Public Health
800 I Street, NW, Suite 202
Washington, DC 20001-3710
Telephone: 202-789-1050
Fax: 202-789-1895
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ceph.org

Rabbinical and Talmudic Education

Bernard Fryshman, Executive Vice President
Association of Advanced Rabbinical and Talmudic Schools
175 Fifth Avenue, Suite 711
New York, NY 10010
Telephone: 212-477-0950
Fax: 212-533-5335

Rehabilitation Education

Jeanne Patterson, Executive Director
Council on Rehabilitation Education
Commission on Standards and Accreditation
1835 Rohlwing Road, Suite E
Rolling Meadows, IL 60008
Telephone: 847-394-1785
Fax: 847-394-2108
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.core-rehab.org

Social Work

Nancy Randolph, Director
Council on Social Work Education
1725 Duke Street, Suite 500
Alexandria, VA 22314
Telephone: 703-683-8080
Fax: 703-683-8099
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.cswe.org

Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Sharon Goldsmith, Director
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
10801 Rockville Pike
Rockville, MD 20852
Telephone: 301-897-5700
Fax: 301-571-0457
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.asha.org

Theater

Samuel Hope, Executive Director
National Association of Schools of Theatre
11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21
Reston, VA 20190
Telephone: 703-437-0700
Fax: 703-437-6312
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.arts-accredit.org

Theology

Daniel O. Aleshire, Executive Director
Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada
10 Summit Park Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15275-1103
Telephone: 412-788-6505
Fax: 412-788-6510
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.ats.edu

Veterinary Medicine

Donald G. Simmons, Director of Education and Research Division
American Veterinary Medical Association
1931 North Meacham Road, Suite 100
Schaumburg, IL 60173
Telephone: 847-925-8070
Fax: 847-925-1329
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.avma.org

Accreditation in Canada

To get general information about Accreditation in Canada, visit the Web site of the Council of Ministers of Education. Their Web site also has contact information and links to the provincial departments of education.

Council of Ministers of Education, Canada
95 St. Clair Avenue West, Suite 1106
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M4V 1N6
Telephone: 416-962-8100
Fax: 416-962-2800
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.cmec.ca

Other Resources for Evaluating Programs

Bear, Mariah P., John Bear, and John B. Bear. Bear's Guide to Earning Degrees Nontraditionally, 13th ed.

Ten Speed Press, 1999.

Quality on the Line: Benchmarks for Success in Internet-Based Distance Education. Washington, DC: The Institute for Higher Education Policy, March 2000. Available at www.ihep.com/qualityonline.pdf.

TAKING STANDARDIZED ADMISSIONS TESTS

SATs

For information about the SATs, contact the College Board:

SAT Program
The College Board
P.O. Box 6202
Princeton, NJ 08541-6202
Telephone: 609-771-7600
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.collegeboard.org

The College Board offers free preparation advice and practice tests. The Web site also offers other test-preparation materials, including books, videos, and software, for a charge. Order at www.collegeboard.org or call 609-771-7243:

The Official SAT Study Guide. 889 pp. 2004.

Real SAT Subject Tests. 740 pp. 2005.

Other test-preparation resources:

Carris, Joan. Panic Plan for the SAT. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2004.

Ultimate SAT Toolkit. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2004.

ACT Assessment

ACT Registration
P.O. Box 414
Iowa City, IA 52243-0414
Telephone: 319-337-1270
Web site: www.act.org/aap

The Web site offers test-preparation strategies, sample questions, and information about other ACT resources.

ACT Inc., The Real ACT Prep Guide. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2004.

GREs

For information about the GREs, contact the Educational Testing Service:

GRE-ETS
PO Box 6000
Princeton, NJ 08541-6000
Telephone: (609) 771-7670
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site (GRE Online): www.gre.org

The Web site offers a lot of material that can be downloaded: information bulletins, practice tests, descriptions of the subject area tests, and preparation software. Order from ETS at www.gre.org:

GRE Big Book

GRE Powerprep Software. Includes test preparation for both the General Test and the Writing Assessment.

GRE Practicing to Take the General Test

Practice Books for Subject Area Tests

Other resources:

Ultimate GRE Toolkit. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2004.

MAT

The Psychological Corporation
555 Academic Court
San Antonio, TX 78204
Telephone: (800) 622-3231 (toll-free)
Web site: www.tpcweb.com/mat

Bader, William, and Daniel S. Burt. Master the MAT. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2001. 2000.

GMAT

GMAT
Distribution and Receiving Center
225 Phillips Boulevard
Ewing, NJ 08628-7435
Telephone: 609-771-7330
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site (MBA Explorer): www.gmac.com

Ultimate GMAT Toolkit. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2004.

TOEFL

Information on the TOEFL can be obtained from the Educational Testing Service:

TOEFL
PO Box 6151
Princeton, NJ 08541-6151
Telephone: 609-771-7100
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.toefl.org

Sullivan, Patricia, et al. Master the TOEFL CBT (w/CD). Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2004.

TOEFL Success CBT. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2004.

APPLYING FOR ADMISSION TO DEGREE PROGRAMS

Davidson, Wilma, and Susan McCloskey. Writing a Winning College Application Essay. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2002.

Hayden, Thomas C. Insider's Guide to College Admissions. Lawrenceville, NJ: Peterson's, 2000.

Stelzer, Richard J. How to Write a Winning Personal Statement for Graduate and Professional School, 3rd ed. Princeton, NJ: Peterson's, 1997. Lots of suggestions, both from the author and admissions representatives of graduate and professional schools, along with many sample essays.

PAYING FOR YOUR EDUCATION

General Information

Financial Aid Information Page (www.finaid.org). The best place to start an Internet search for financial aid information.

McWade, Patricia. Financing Graduate School. Princeton, NJ: Peterson's, 1996. The best, most detailed treatment of financial aid for graduate students, written by the dean of student financial services at Georgetown University.

National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (www.nasfaa.org). Lots of essays explain various aspects of financial aid, including educational tax credits.

State Residency

Todd, Daryl F., Jr. How to Cut Tuition: The Complete Guide to In-State Tuition. Linwood, NJ: Atlantic Educational Publishing, 1997.

Federal Aid

Federal Student Aid Information Center
P.O. Box 84
Washington, DC 20044-0084
Telephone: 800-4-FED-AID (toll-free) (general information, assistance, and publications)
Web sites: General information and home page: www.ed.gov/studentaid

For a copy of Financial Aid: The Student Guide: www.ed.gov/prog_info/SFA/StudentGuide.

For the FAFSA, go to FAFSA Online: www.fafsa.ed.gov.

For more on the Distance Education Demonstration Program: www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/PPI/DistEd/proginfo.html.

State Agencies of Higher Education

Alabama: 334-242-2274
Alaska: 907-465-6741
Arizona: 602-229-2591
Arkansas: 800-547-8839 (toll-free)
California: 916-526-7590
Colorado: 303-866-2723
Connecticut: 860-947-1855
Delaware: 800-292-7935 (toll-free)
District of Columbia: 202-698-2400
Florida: 888-827-2004 (toll-free)
Georgia: 770-724-9030 or 404-656-5969
Hawaii: 808-956-8213
Idaho: 208-334-2270
Illinois: 800-899-4722 (toll-free)
Indiana: 317-232-2350
Iowa: 515-242-3344
Kansas: 785-296-3517
Kentucky: 800-928-8926 (toll-free)
Louisiana: 800-259-5626 (toll-free)
Maine: 800-228-3734 (toll-free)
Maryland: 410-260-4565
Massachusetts: 617-727-9420
Michigan: 877-323-2287 (toll-free)
Minnesota: 800-657-3866 (toll-free)
Mississippi: 601-432-6997
Missouri: 800-473-6757 (toll-free)
Montana: 800-537-7508 (toll-free)
Nebraska: 402-471-2847
Nevada: 775-687-9228
New Hampshire: 603-271-2555
New Jersey: 800-792-8670 (toll-free)
New Mexico: 800-279-9777 (toll-free)
New York: 800-642-6234 (toll-free)
North Carolina: 800-600-3453 (toll-free)
North Dakota: 701-328-4114
Ohio: 888-833-1133 (toll-free)
Oklahoma: 800-858-1840 (toll-free)
Oregon: 800-452-8807 (toll-free)
Pennsylvania: 800-692-7392 or 7435 (toll-free)
Rhode Island: 800-922-9855 (toll-free)
South Carolina: 803-737-2260
South Dakota: 605-773-3134
Tennessee: 800-342-1663 (toll-free)
Texas: 800-242-3062 (toll-free)
Utah: 800-418-8757 (toll-free)
Vermont: 800-642-3177 (toll-free)
Virginia: 804-786-1690
Washington: 360-753-7850
West Virginia: 888-825-5707 (toll-free)
Wisconsin: 608-267-2206
Wyoming: 307-777-7763
Guam: 671-475-0457
Northern Marianas: 670-234-6128
Puerto Rico: 787-724-7100
Republic of Palau: 680-488-2471
Virgin Islands: 340-774-4546

CSS Financial Aid Profile

Contact the College Scholarship Service at www.collegeboard.org or 305-829-9793.

Grants, Fellowships, and Scholarships

AJR Newslink (www.newslink.org). Awards, grants, and scholarships for journalism students.

Annual Register of Grant Support: A Directory of Funding Sources. Wilmette, IL.: National Register Publishing Company.

College Money Handbook 2006. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2005.

Corporate Foundation Profiles. New York: Foundation Center, 1999 (http://fdncenter.org or 212-620-4230).

FastWeb (http://fastweb.com). Online searchable database of scholarships and fellowships.

Petersons.com. Online searchable database of scholarships and fellowships.

Getting Money for Graduate School. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2002.

Scholarships, Grants, & Prizes 2006. Lawrenceville, NJ: Thomson Peterson's, 2005.

Cooperative Education

Re, Joseph M. Earn and Learn. Octameron Associates, 1997.

Credit Reporting Agencies

It's a good idea to check your credit rating before you apply for any loans. Call first to find out if there is a fee.

Experian
PO Box 9530
Allen, TX 75013
Telephone: 888-397-3742 (toll-free)

Equifax
PO Box 105873
Atlanta, GA 30348
Telephone: 800-685-1111 (toll-free)

CSC Credit Services
Consumer Assistance Center
PO Box 674402
Houston, TX 77267-4402
Telephone: 800-759-5979 (toll-free)

Trans Union Corporation
PO Box 390
Springfield, PA 19064-0390
Telephone: 800-888-4213 (toll-free)

Tax Issues

Educational Expenses, IRS Publication 508.

Tax Benefits for Higher Education. IRS Publication 970.

To get a copy of these publications, visit the Internal Revenue Service Web site at www.irs.ustreas.gov/prod/forms_pubs/pubs or call 800-829-3676 (toll-free).

Women, Minority Students, Disabled Students, and Veterans

Bruce-Young, Doris M., and William C. Young. Higher Education Money Book for Women and Minorities. Young Enterprises International, 1997.

Minority and Women's Complete Scholarship Book; plus Scholarships for Religious Affiliations and People with Disabilities. Sourcebooks, 1998.

Olson, Elizabeth A. Dollars for College (Women). Garrett Park Press, 1995.

Saludos Web Education Center (www.saludos.com). Internships and scholarships targeted to Hispanic Americans as well as those not considering race or ethnicity.

Schlachter, Gail Ann, and R. David Weber. Financial Aid for African Americans. Reference Service Press, 1997.

Schlachter, Gail Ann, and R. David Weber. Financial Aid for the Disabled and Their Families. Reference Service Press, 1998.

Schlachter, Gail Ann, and R. David Weber. Financial Aid for Veterans, Military Personnel, and Their Dependents. Reference Service Press, 1996.

Schlachter, Gail Ann. Directory of Financial Aid for Women. Reference Service Press, 1997.

International Students

Funding for U.S. Study—A Guide for International Students and Professionals and Financial Resources for International Study. New York: Institute of International Education (www.iiebooks.org).

SUCCEEDING AS A DISTANCE LEARNER

Bruno, Frank J. Going Back to School: College Survival Strategies for Adult Students. New York, Arco, 1998.

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