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proto-

proto-. Primitive, first, early, or precursor of something. Proto-Doric was an early primitive harbinger of the Doric Order, as in the rock-cut tombs at Beni-Hasan, Egypt (c.2133–1786 bc). Proto-Ionic refers to precursors of aspects of the Ionic Order, especially the Aeolic type of capital and certain features from Mesopotamia. Proto-Romanesque is a term embracing various round-arched styles that evolved from Early Christian and Byzantine exemplars including Carolingian, Lombardic, and Ottonian architecture. Proto-Renaissance was a late-C11 style in which Antique elements were copied: examples include the baptistery, Church of San Miniato, and Santi Apostoli, Florence, and the late-C13 façades of Cività Castellana Cathedral and San Lorenzo fuori le Mura, Rome.

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proto-

proto- comb. form of Gr. prôtos first, obscurely rel. to pró PRO-2; in many techn. terms. protomartyr first martyr, e.g. St. Stephen. XV. — medL. protonotary principal notary, chief clerk. XV. — medL. protoplasm substance constituting the physical basis of life. XIX. — G. protoplasma (see PLASMA). prototype XVII. — F. or late L. protozoa (zool.) division of animals of the most primitive type. XIX. — modL., f. Gr. zôia animals; see ZOOLOGY.

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proto-

proto- From the Greek protos meaning ‘first’, a prefix meaning ‘original’ or ‘primitive’.

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proto-

proto- combining form denoting
1. first.

2. primitive; early.

3. a precursor.

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