facade

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Façade. ‘Entertainment’ by Walton, being acc. for small chamber ens. (9 players) to poems by Edith Sitwell declaimed in notated rhythm by a speaker or speakers. Comp. 1921, f.p. (private) 1922, (public) 1923. This version has been several times rev. with many substitutions of items. Final pubd. version (1951) contains 21 items. 8 unpubd. nos. perf. under title Façade Revived, London 1977, 3 of these were rejected before publication and 3 others (Nos. 4, 6, 7) substituted by composer; rev. and re-worked version perf. 1979 as Façade II. Prin. revs. of Façade I 1926, 1928, 1942. Also arr. by composer for larger orch. (without poems) as 2 Suites (No.1, of 5 items, f.p. London 1926; No.2, of 6 items, f.p. NY and London 1938). Also arr. as ballet, with choreog. by Gunter Hess, f.p. Hagen, Westphalia, 1929; with choreog. by Frederick Ashton f.p. London 1931 (7 items), extra item 1935, 2 further addns. 1940; Ashton ballet of work with reciter and chamber ens. f.p. Snape, Suffolk, and London 1972. Many arrs. by others of items from Façade for a variety of combinations.

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fa·cade / fəˈsäd/ (also fa·çade) • n. the face of a building, esp. the principal front that looks onto a street or open space. ∎ fig. an outward appearance maintained to conceal a less pleasant or creditable reality.

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Facade ★★ 1998 (R)

American real-estate whiz, Colin Wentworth, and Frenchman Frederic Colbert team up for a shady business deal to build a luxury hotel in Malibu. They use murder, so no one will stand in their way. Frederic even encourages Colin to kill his murdered partner's wife, Caroline. But strange things keep happening and what Colin believes to be true, turns out to be very far from reality. 93m/C VHS . Eric Roberts, Angus MacFadyen, Camilla Overbye Roos, Joe (Johnny) Viterelli; D: Carl Colpaert; W: Carl Colpaert, Lance Smith. VIDEO

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facade (fəsäd´), exterior face or wall of a building. The term implies ordered placement of its openings and other features and thus seems inapplicable to a wall without design. Any freestanding structure may have four or more facades, designated by their orientation (e.g., north facade); a building flanked by other buildings on either side generally has only a front and a rear facade. In medieval churches the chief facade is that of the building's west end, which contains the principal entrance portals.

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façade. External face or elevation of a building, especially the principal front.

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façade XVII. — F., f. face, after It. facciata; see next and -ADE.