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Gambier, James, Baron

Gambier, James, Baron

GAMBIER, JAMES, BARON. (1756–1833). British admiral and evangelist. Nephew of James Gambier and son of the lieutenant governor of the Bahamas, Gambier was born in New Providence (modern Nassau) on 13 October 1756. He went to sea at an early age and on 12 February 1777 became a lieutenant on the American station. In 1778 he was in command of the bomb ketch Thunder when it was captured by Estaing. Promptly exchanged, on 9 October he was made post in the Raleigh (thirty-two guns). In her he took several prizes, participated in the May 1779 expedition to relieve Jersey, and in May 1780 was present at the fall of Charleston. He served in the French wars of 1793–1815, being awarded a peerage in 1807 and rising to admiral of the fleet in 1830. A devout Anglican evangelical, he zealously cared for the spiritual needs of his crews and in retirement became first president of the Church Missionary Society.

SEE ALSO Gambier, James.

                         revised by John Oliphant

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