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drift

drift / drift/ • v. [intr.] 1. be carried slowly by a current of air or water: the cabin cruiser started to drift downstream | fig. excited voices drifted down the hall. ∎  (of a person) walk slowly, aimlessly, or casually: people began to drift away. ∎  move passively, aimlessly, or involuntarily into a certain situation or condition: I was drifting off to sleep | Lewis and his father drifted apart. ∎  (of a person or their attention) digress or stray to another subject: I noticed my audience's attention drifting. 2. (esp. of snow or leaves) be blown into heaps by the wind: fallen leaves start to drift in the gutters | [as adj.] (drifting) drifting snow. • n. 1. [in sing.] a continuous slow movement from one place to another: there was a drift to the towns. ∎  the deviation of a vessel, aircraft, or projectile from its intended or expected course as the result of currents or winds: the pilot had not noticed any appreciable drift. ∎  a steady movement or development from one thing toward another, esp. one that is perceived as unwelcome: the drift toward a more repressive style of policing. ∎  a state of inaction or indecision: after so much drift, any expression of enthusiasm is welcome. 2. [in sing.] the general intention or meaning of an argument or someone's remarks: he didn't understand much Greek, but he got her drift. 3. a large mass of snow, leaves, or other material piled up or carried along by the wind. ∎  Geol. glacial and fluvioglacial deposits left by retreating ice sheets. ∎  a large mass of flowering plants growing together: a drift of daffodils. 4. Mining a horizontal or inclined passage following a mineral vein or coal seam. DERIVATIVES: drift·y adj.

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drift

drift, deposit of mixed clay, gravel, sand, and boulders transported and laid down by glaciers. Stratified, or glaciofluvial, drift is carried by waters flowing from the melting ice of a glacier. The flowing water sorts the particles, generally depositing layers of coarser particles nearer the point of origin. Till, or boulder clay, which makes up the greater part of the drift, is unstratified, consisting of disorganized heaps of rocks that range widely in size. Till is deposited directly by the glacier itself without water transport. The drift may take the form of a drumlin, a kame, an esker, a moraine, or an outwash plain; its thickness varies noticeably from place to place and is not dependent upon topographical factors. Presence of drift proved useful in establishing the existence of time periods when large parts of the surface of continents were covered with glaciers (see glacial periods). Large sections of continental Europe and North America are covered by drift.

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drift

drift
1. Any sediment laid down by, or in association with, the activity of glacial ice. The term is often widened to include related submarine and lacustrine deposits. The British Geological Survey has used it to refer to all superficial (i.e. draft) deposits. It was introduced by C. Lyell (1797–1875), who suggested that glacial deposits were laid down by melting icebergs which drifted across an ice-age sea covering Britain. This old term is now largely superseded by more recent classifications.

2. (Instrumental) The change in the output of a recording device due to internal factors. Systematic drift can be compensated for by repeat readings at a base station.

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Drift

Drift

a number of animals driven or moving along in a body; a mass of matter driven forward. See also creaght, drive.

Examples: drift of anglers; of bees; of birds; of cattle, 1613; of dust, 1725; of fishersBk. of St. Albans, 1486; of fishing nets, 1834; of gold, 1645; of hogs; of ice; of lace, 1889; of leaves of trees, 1600; of men, 1450; of oxen, 1552; of piles, 1721; of quailes, 1613; of rain, 1300; of sand, 1634; of sheep, 1816; of smoke, 1842; of snow, 1300; of swans; of swine [tame]Bk. of St. Albans, 1486; of wood [floating in the sea], 1627.

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drift

drift The British Geological Survey has used this term to refer to all superficial (i.e. drift) deposits (see drift map). Sometimes the term has been used to describe any sediment laid down by, or in association with, the activity of glacial ice and it is often widened to include related submarine and lacustrine deposits. The word was introduced by C. Lyell (1797–1875), who suggested that glacial deposits were laid down by melting icebergs which drifted across an ice-age sea covering Britain. This old term is now largely superseded by more recent classifications.

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drift

drift driving or driven snow XIII; driving or being driven XIV; (dial.) drove XV; course, direction; meaning, tenor XVI. orig. — ON. drift snowdrift, drifting snow; later — (M)Du. drift drove, course, current, impulse, impetuous action; f. base of DRIVE; see -T 1.

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drift

drift. Thrust or outward pressure of an arch or vault requiring the counter-thrust of a buttress.

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drift

drift See GENETIC DRIFT.

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drift

drift •Taft •abaft, aft, craft, daft, draft, draught, engraft, graft, haft, kraft, raft, shaft, understaffed, unstaffed, waft •backdraft • handcraft • aircraft •stagecraft • spacecraft • statecraft •needlecraft • priestcraft • witchcraft •kingcraft • handicraft • woodcraft •Wollstonecraft • bushcraft •watercraft • hovercraft • crankshaft •camshaft • layshaft • driveshaft •turboshaft • countershaft •bereft, cleft, deft, eft, heft, klepht, left, reft, theft, weft •adrift, drift, gift, grift, lift, rift, shift, shrift, sift, squiffed, swift, thrift, uplift •airlift, chairlift, stairlift •facelift • skilift • shoplift • Festschrift •spendthrift • spindrift • snowdrift •makeshift • downshift • upshift •aloft, croft, loft, oft, soft, toft •hayloft • Ashcroft • Cockcroft •undercroft • Lowestoft •tuft, unstuffed •Delft

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