Blatch, Harriot Stanton (1856–1940)

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Blatch, Harriot Stanton (1856–1940)

American reformer. Born Harriot Eaton Stanton in Seneca Falls, New York, Jan 20, 1856; died in Greenwich, Connecticut, Nov 20, 1940; dau. of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902, the suffragist) and Henry B. Stanton (abolitionist, politician, and journalist); Vassar College, BA, 1878, MA, 1894; m. William Henry Blatch (English businessman), 1882 (died 1915); children: 2 daughters (one died in infancy).

Assisted her mother and Susan B. Anthony on History of Woman Suffrage; after marriage, lived in England for 20 years (1882–1902), during which she was prominent in the reform work of the Fabian Society and also collaborated with British sociologist Charles Booth on a statistical study of English villages; on return to US, became involved with Women's Trade Union League and National American Woman Suffrage Association; founded Equality League of Self Supporting Women (1907), which became Women's Political Union (1910), until it merged in 1916 with Congressional Union (later National Woman's Party) under Alice Paul; during WWI, was head of the speakers bureau of the wartime Food Administration and a director of Woman's Land Army; writings include Mobilizing Woman-Power (1918), and A Woman's Point of View and Roads to Peace (both 1920); co-edited Elizabeth Cady Stanton, as Revealed in Her Letters, Diary and Reminiscences (1922).

See also autobiography (with Alma Lutz), Challenging Years (1940); and Women in World History.