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formula

for·mu·la / ˈfôrmyələ/ • n. 1. (pl. -las or -lae / -ˌlē; -ˌlī/ ) a mathematical relationship or rule expressed in symbols. ∎  (also chemical formula) a set of chemical symbols showing the elements present in a compound and their relative proportions, and in some cases the structure of the compound. See empirical formula, molecular formula, structural formula. 2. (pl. -las) a fixed form of words, esp. one used in particular contexts or as a conventional usage: a legal formula. ∎  a method, statement, or procedure for achieving something, esp. reconciling different aims or positions: the forlorn hope of finding a peace formula. ∎  a rule or style unintelligently or slavishly followed: [as adj.] one of those formula tunes. ∎  a statement that formally enunciates a religious doctrine. ∎  a stock epithet, phrase, or line repeated for various effects in literary composition, esp. epic poetry. 3. (pl. -las) a list of ingredients for or constituents of something: the soft drink company closely guards its secret formula. ∎  a formulation: an original coal tar formula that helps prevent dandruff. ∎  an infant's liquid food preparation based on cow's milk or soy protein, given as a substitute for breast milk. 4. (usually followed by a number) a classification of race car, esp. by engine capacity.

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formula (in mathematics and physics)

formula, in mathematics and physics, equation expressing a definite fixed relationship between certain quantities. The quantities are usually expressed by letters, and their relationship is indicated by algebraic symbols. For example, Ar2 is the formula for the area A of a circle of radius r, and s=1/2at2 is the formula for the distance s traveled by a body experiencing an acceleration a during a time interval t.

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