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stub

stub / stəb/ • n. 1. the truncated remnant of a pencil, cigarette, or similar-shaped object after use. ∎  a truncated or unusually short thing: he wagged his little stub of tail. ∎  [as adj.] denoting a projection or hole that goes only part of the way through a surface: a stub tenon. 2. the part of a check, receipt, ticket, or other document torn off and kept as a record. • v. (stubbed , stub·bing ) [tr.] 1. accidentally strike (one's toe) against something: I stubbed my toe, swore, and tripped. 2. extinguish (a lighted cigarette) by pressing the lighted end against something: she stubbed out her cigarette in the overflowing ashtray. 3. dig up (a plant) by the roots.

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"stub." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"stub." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 21, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/stub-0

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stub

stub
1. A substitute component that is employed temporarily in a program so that progress can be made, e.g. with compilation or testing, prior to the genuine component becoming available. To illustrate, if it is required to test the remainder of a program before a particular procedure has been developed, the procedure could be replaced by a stub. Dependent upon circumstances, it might be possible for this stub always to return the same result, return values from a table, return an approximate result, consult someone, etc.

2. See decision table.

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stub

stub stump. OE. stub(b) = MLG., MDu. stubbe, ON. stubbr, stubbi :- Gmc. *stubbaz, *stubban-; OE. had also styb (:- *stubbjaz), which coalesced with the other form; rel. to MLG. stūve, ON. stúfr, Gr. stúpos stump, stock.

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"stub." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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stub

stub A tree that is intermediate between a stool and a pollard.

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stub

stubblub, bub, chub, Chubb, club, cub, drub, dub, flub, grub, hub, nub, pub, rub, scrub, shrub, slub, snub, stub, sub, tub •Beelzebub • hubbub • syllabub •wolfcub • nightclub • bathtub •twintub • washtub

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