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stool

stool / stoōl/ • n. 1. a seat without a back or arms, typically resting on three or four legs or on a single pedestal. ∎  a support on which to stand in order to reach high objects. ∎ short for footstool. 2. a piece of feces. 3. a root or stump of a tree or plant from which shoots spring. 4. a decoy bird in hunting. • v. [intr.] (of a plant) throw up shoots from the root. ∎  [tr.] cut back (a plant) to or near ground level in order to induce new growth. PHRASES: at stool Med. when defecating.

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stool

stool
A. wooden seat for one person OE.;

B. base, support, stand XIV;

C. seat enclosing a chamber utensil XV; evacuation of the bowels XVI;

D. (figure of) a bird secured to a stool or perch, serving as a decoy XIX. OE. stōl = OS. stōl (Du. stoel), OHG. stuol (G. stuhl), ON. stóll, Goth. stōls throne :- Gmc. *stōlaz, f. *stō- *stā- STAND + -LE1, the basic sense being ‘stand’, ‘station’; cf. OSl. stolŪ throne, seat, Gr. stḗlē pillar.

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stool

stool fall between two stools fail to be or take one of two satisfactory alternatives; with allusion to the proverb between two stools one falls to the ground.
stool of repentance traditionally in the Presbyterian Church, on which a person sat to do formal penance before the rest of the congregation.
stool pigeon a police informer, a person acting as a decoy, so named from the original use in wildfowling of a pigeon fixed to a stool as a decoy.

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stool

stool
1. A tree stump that is capable of producing new shoots.

2. The permanent base of a coppiced tree.

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stool

stool
1. A tree stump that is capable of producing new shoots
.
2. The permanent base of a coppiced tree.

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stool

stool (stool) n. faeces discharged from the anus.

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stool

stoolBanjul, befool, Boole, boule, boules, boulle, cagoule, cool, drool, fool, ghoul, Joule, mewl, misrule, mule, O'Toole, pool, Poole, pul, pule, Raoul, rule, school, shul, sool, spool, Stamboul, stool, Thule, tomfool, tool, tulle, you'll, yule •mutule • kilojoule • playschool •intercool • Blackpool •ampoule (US ampule) • cesspool •Hartlepool • Liverpool • whirlpool •ferrule, ferule •curule • cucking-stool • faldstool •toadstool • footstool • animalcule •granule • capsule • ridicule • molecule •minuscule • fascicule • graticule •vestibule • reticule • globule •module, nodule •floccule • noctule • opuscule •pustule • majuscule • virgule

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