Skip to main content

Bachiarius

BACHIARIUS

Fourth-century monk and theologian; b. probably in Galicia, Spain, c. 350; d. time and place unknown. He became a monk, was suspected of priscillianism, and had to leave Spain (c. 380). He was the author of two books: Libellus fidei, written probably in Rome in 383 or 384 as a profession of faith to refute the accusation of heresy; and De reparatione lapsi, in which he pleaded for a monk who had sinned but was now repentant, and in so doing gave an excellent presentation of the Spanish penitential system (see penitentials). His explanations of the Trinity, the Incarnation, and the perpetual virginity of Mary are admired for their clarity and orthodoxy. G. morin regards him as the author of two letters on asceticism. Bachiarius's style has been compared to that of jerome, and gennadius calls him a "Christian philosopher" (De vir. ill. c. 24).

Bibliography: j. madoz, Revista Española de Teología 1(1941) 45788. g. morin, "Pages inédites de deux Pseudo-Jérômes," Revue Bénédictine 40 (1928) 289318. h. rahner, Lexikon für Theologie und Kirche (Freiburg 195765) 1:1180. f. x. murphy, "Bachiarius," Leaders of Iberian Christianity, ed. j. m.f. marique (Boston 1962) 12126. a. lambert, Dictionnaire d'histoire et de géographie ecclésiastiques (Paris 1912 ) 6:5868.

[s. j. mckenna]

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Bachiarius." New Catholic Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Bachiarius." New Catholic Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 17, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/bachiarius

"Bachiarius." New Catholic Encyclopedia. . Retrieved August 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/bachiarius

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.