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Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe. This fictional autobiography, published anonymously in 1719 by Daniel Defoe, has attained the status of myth. Although its indebtedness to the true story of the experiences of Alexander Selkirk has been greatly exaggerated, Crusoe's shipwreck and subsequent desert-island experience is central whether it is approached as traveller's tale, religious allegory, or proto-novel. Modern critics tend to follow Marx in discounting its religious burden, viewing it as an allegory either for the growth of capitalism or of western imperialism. Defoe cashed in on the original's tremendous success, publishing Farther Adventures (1719) and Serious Reflections (1720). The many imitations are known as Robinsonades.

J. A. Downie

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Crusoe, Robinson

Crusoe, Robinson the hero of Daniel Defoe's novel Robinson Crusoe (1719), who survives a shipwreck and lives on a desert island; the story is said to be based on that of the Scottish sailor Alexander Selkirk (1676–1721), who was marooned alone on one of the uninhabited Juan Fernandez Islands, 1704–9.

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Selkirk (town, Canada)

Selkirk, town (1991 pop. 9,815), SE Man., Canada, on the Red River. Just S of Lake Winnipeg, it is a port for products from N Manitoba. There are steel mills, foundries, and shipyards in the town. It is named for the 5th earl of Selkirk, who established (1812) the Red River Settlement in the region.

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Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoebasso, El Paso, Picasso, Sargasso, Tasso •fatso, paparazzo, terrazzo •Brasso •espresso, gesso •intermezzo, mezzo •scherzo •peso, say-so •calypso, dipso •schizo • Mato Grosso • torso • also •amoroso, capriccioso, oloroso, so-so •Caruso, Robinson Crusoe, Rousseau, trousseau •so-and-so •Curaçao, curassow •Thurso, verso

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