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Saskatchewan (province, Canada)

Saskatchewan (səskăch´əwən, –wän´, săs´–), province (2001 pop. 978,933), 251,700 sq mi (651,903 sq km), W Canada.

Geography

Saskatchewan is bounded by the Northwest Territories (N), Manitoba (E), North Dakota and Montana (S), and Alberta (W). One of the Prairie Provinces, its northern third is part of the Canadian Shield. The principal rivers are the Churchill, North and South Saskatchewan, and Qu'Appelle. Between the Saskatchewan and Churchill rivers lies a mixed forest belt that provides much timber; a section is preserved as Prince Albert National Park.

Only in S Saskatchewan has there been substantial settlement and development. Regina is the capital and second largest city; Saskatoon is the largest city, and Prince Albert and Moose Jaw are other important centers.

Economy and Higher Education

Except for a semiarid section in the southwest used for grazing and an area in the east and central portion given over to mixed farming and dairying, the land is devoted to the raising of hard wheat. Saskatchewan normally produces two thirds of Canada's wheat. The vast expanses of unbroken plain are well suited to large-scale mechanized farming. Oats, barley, rye, rapeseed, and flax are also grown throughout this region. The historic occupation of fur trapping is still practiced.

Saskatchewan is rich in minerals. Oil and natural gas, found under the prairie, are by far the province's most important minerals. The region north of Lake Athabaska has been exploited for ores yielding uranium. The area around Flin Flon, in the northeast, is mined for copper, zinc, and gold. Coal is mined in the southwest. Potash mining began in the 1950s near Saskatoon and Esterhazy, and Canada is now a leading producer of the mineral. Most of the province's industries process raw materials.

Institutions of higher education include Aldergate College, at Moose Jaw; the Univ. of Regina; and the Univ. of Saskatchewan, at Saskatoon.

History and Politics

Original inhabitants of Saskatchewan include tribes of three linguistic groups: the Athabascan, Algonquian, and Siouan. Henry Kelsey of the Hudson's Bay Company was probably the first European to see (c.1690) the area. The earliest trading posts were established (c.1750) by the French, but the first permanent settlement was made at Cumberland House in 1774 by the HBC. Subsequently many other posts were set up by British fur traders along the region's waterways.

In 1870 the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC), which had merged with the North West Company in 1821, ceded its rights to the Canadian government, and the area became part of the Northwest Territories. The construction of a rail line (1882) brought many settlers from E Canada (and later from Europe) and opened up trade through the Great Lakes ports. Most Canadians of indigenous descent in the Northwest Territories sold their lands to the government in the 1870s and were placed on reservations. Other native peoples and Métis—people of mixed French and indigenous Canadian ancestry, led by Louis Riel—rebelled in 1884–85 and were suppressed.

Saskatchewan became a province in 1905. In the early 20th cent. Saskatchewan farmers formed cooperative organizations to stabilize grain marketing. During the drought and depression of the 1930s the population declined as immigration almost stopped and many families left. Conservation programs and the increased demand for grain during World War II revived the economy.

Except for the period 1964–71, when the Liberals were in power, Saskatchewan was governed (1944–82) by the socialist New Democratic party (NDP, until 1961 called the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation). Among the NDP's achievements was the enactment of compulsory hospital and medical insurance. The Progressive Conservative party, with Grant Divine as premier, was in power from 1982 until 1991, when Roy Romanow led the NDP back to power (in coalition with the Liberals after 1999). In 2001, Lorne Calvert of the NDP became premier, succeeding Romanow, who resigned. The 2003 elections also resulted in an NDP victory, giving the party a slim majority in the legislative assembly. In 2007 the Saskatchewan party, a center-right party formed in 1997, won a legislative majority and Brad Wall became premier; the party won in 2011 as well.

Saskatchewan sends 6 senators and 14 representatives to the national parliament.

Bibliography

See E. A. McCourt, Saskatchewan (1968); S. M. Lipset, Agrarian Socialism (new and enl. ed. 1972); D. E. Smith, Prairie Liberalism (1975); J. H. Archer, Saskatchewan: A History (1980); Canadian Plains Research Centre, The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan (2005).

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Saskatchewan (river, Canada)

Saskatchewan, river, c.340 mi (550 km) long, formed by the confluence of the North Saskatchewan (c.760 mi/1,220 km long) and the South Saskatchewan (c.550 mi/890 km long) rivers near Prince Albert, central Sask., Canada; the system drains most of the Canadian prairie provinces. It flows generally east past Nipawin, across the Manitoba line, then past The Pas and through Cedar Lake to Lake Winnipeg. The North Saskatchewan River rises in the Columbia ice field at the foot of Mt. Saskatchewan, SW Alta., and flows generally east past Edmonton, into Saskatchewan prov., and then past North Battleford to Prince Albert. Its chief tributaries are the Clearwater, Brazeau, Vermillion, and Battle rivers. The South Saskatchewan River is formed in S Alberta by the junction of the Bow and Oldman rivers. It flows east past Medicine Hat, then northeast into Saskatchewan prov., past Saskatoon, to Prince Albert; it receives the Red Deer River. The Bow–South Saskatchewan–Saskatchewan system is c.1,200 mi (1,930 km) long. Completion (1967) of the Gardiner and Qu'Appelle Valley dams, major elements of the South Sasketchewan River Project, impound Lake Diefenbaker, a huge reservoir. The dams and reservoir provide hydroelectric power and irrigation for a large region south of Saskatoon. The Saskatchewan River and its branches were once important thoroughfares for explorers and trappers.

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Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan Province in w central Canada, the southern half on the fertile Great Plains and the northern half in the lake-strewn Canadian Shield. The cultivation of wheat is the most important agricultural activity, but oats, barley, rye, flax, and rapeseed are also grown. The province's rich mineral deposits include uranium, copper, zinc, gold, coal, oil, natural gas, and the world's largest fields of potash. Most industries process raw materials, and steel is also manufactured. The principal cities are Saskatoon (2001 pop. 225,927), Regina (the capital, pop. 192,800), Prince Albert (41,460), and Moose Jaw (33,519). The first permanent white settlement was in 1774, but development was slow until the construction of the transcontinental Canadian Pacific Railroad in 1885. Saskatchewan was admitted to the Dominion of Canada in 1905. Area: 570,113sq km (251,700sq mi). Pop. (2001) 978,933.

http://www.gov.sk.ca

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Saskatchewan

SaskatchewanBrian, cyan, Gaian, Geminian, Hawaiian, ion, iron, Ixion, lion, Lyon, Mayan, Narayan, O'Brien, Orion, Paraguayan, prion, Ryan, scion, Uruguayan, Zion •andiron •gridiron, midiron •dandelion • anion • Bruneian •cation, flatiron •gowan, Palawan, rowen •anthozoan, bryozoan, Goan, hydrozoan, Minoan, protozoan, protozoon, rowan, Samoan, spermatozoon •Ohioan • Chicagoan • Virgoan •Idahoan •doyen, Illinoisan, IroquoianEwan, Labuan, McEwan, McLuhan, Siouan •Saskatchewan • Papuan • Paduan •Nicaraguan • gargantuan •carbon, chlorofluorocarbon, graben, hydrocarbon, Laban, radiocarbon •ebon • Melbourne • Theban •gibbon, ribbon •Brisbane, Lisbon •Tyburn •auburn, Bourbon •Alban • Manitoban • Cuban •stubborn •Durban, exurban, suburban, turban, urban

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Saskatchewan

SASKATCHEWAN

SASKATCHEWAN , province in W. Canada; part of Canada's Northwest Territories until incorporated as a province in 1905.

Saskatchewan's first Jewish resident was Max Goldstein, a Russian-born tailor who opened a store in Fort Qu'Appelle in 1877. During the Second Riel Rebellion in 1885 he served as quartermaster. In 1882 a Jewish farm project, called New Jerusalem, was started in the Moosomin area, but adverse conditions forced the settlers to give up. Numerous Jews were among those who laid tracks for the Canadian Pacific Railroad in the early 1880s.

After 1888 farm colonies were started which survived several generations. Jewish farm colonies were sometimes utopian ventures directed from above, and sometimes independent initiatives. The first colony was established in 1888, near Wapella. In 1892 the Young Men's Hebrew and Benevolent Society, on behalf of the Jewish Colonization Association (ica), established the colony of Hirsch (named after Baron De Hirsch) in southern Saskatchewan; its initial group consisted of 47 Russian Jewish families. The first Jews to settle in the Wapella area were John Heppner and Abraham Kleiman. By 1892 there were 20 Jewish families, and young men interested in farming came to Wapella for their training. Hirsch had the oldest Jewish cemetery in the province, and was the site of the province's first synagogue building. The town had public schools, but also a Hebrew school, a shoḥet, and a Jewish community structure. Forty Jewish families (a total of 100 people) founded Lipton in 1901 with the help of ica. They were taught by nearby Indians and Metis how to erect log houses chinked with clay and roofed with sod. In Lipton, too, Jewish teachers were engaged and a cemetery laid out. Edenbridge, also helped in its founding (1906) by ica, was so named by its settlers. The name was conceived as "Yidn-Bridge" (Jews' Bridge), after a bridge across the Carrot River. The first settlers were 56 Lithuanian Jews who had lived in South Africa. Louis Vickar responded to an advertisement of the Canadian government offering 160 acres of virgin land for ten dollars. Edenbridge also had an active Jewish community. In the Sonnenfeld colony, which was aided in its founding (1906) by ica, the villages of Oungre and Hoffer sprang up, the latter named after Moses Hoffer, the father of two brothers who were among the founders of the Sonnenfeld colony.

As was the case with others who settled in the west, many Jews did not succeed at farming, and left for the larger Jewish communities of western Canada. In addition to personal hardships, the great drought of the 1930s and the trend to mechanization and urbanization hastened the decline of Jewish farming. Of every 100 gainfully employed Jewish men in Saskatchewan in 1936, 11 were farmers and five were farm laborers. While the great majority of Jewish farmers in Canada in previous years were in Saskatchewan, since World War ii the ica devoted most of its efforts in Canada to Ontario, particularly the Niagara peninsula. The Jewish farm colonies are now mostly alive in memory alone. The Canadian government has placed the beautiful Beth Israel synagogue at Edenbridge on its national register of historic sites.

Regina, the capital of the province, had nine Jews in 1891, but the true beginnings of the present community would have to wait about 20 years. By the time of the 1911 census there were 130 residents. That year a shoḥet was hired, and services were held in his home. Two years later the members of the community erected a synagogue, Beth Jacob, with the lieutenant-governor of the province laying the cornerstone. In 1914 a building was rented to serve as a talmud torah, and 10 years later a building was erected to house it. In 1926 a central budgeting structure was created, and the Regina Federated Community was established. In 1951 the Beth Jacob Congregation built a new synagogue, with a new annex added four years later to house the school and the community center under one roof. At its height in 1931 there were just over 1,000 Jews. By 1951 the number had fallen to 740 and the 2001 census enumerated 720 Jews in Regina. In 2006 there were two synagogues in Regina. In addition to Beth Jacob, with its Conservative-style service, there was the Reform Temple Beth Tikvah, established in 1990. Because of the relatively high rate of interfaith marriages, some members of the community took the initiative to build a burial ground where Jewish and non-Jewish partners could lie next to each other, separated by a fence deemed halakhically acceptable. It opened in the summer of 2005.

The first known settlers of Saskatoon were William and Fanny Landa, who arrived in 1907 with their two children. The first minyan was on Rosh ha-Shanah in 1908. The members of the congregation Agudas Israel built a synagogue in 1912 and a new one was erected in 1919. In 1958 a Jewish community center was built that also served as a house of worship. Saskatoon had a Jewish mayor, Sydney Buckwold, for several terms. Agudas Israel became a Conservative congregation, and in March, 2000 Congregation Shir Chadash, also Conservative, was established. In 1911 the census counted 77 Jews. Since 1931 the number has hovered around 700 Jews, with as many as 793 Jews in 1961. The census of 2001 enumerated 700 Jews exactly, making it roughly the same size as Regina's community.

In addition to the settlements in the farm colonies and in the large urban centers, Jews settled in many of the small towns of rural Saskatchewan in the interwar period. In their time, Jewish general stores, like Chinese cafes, were part of small-town Saskatchewan. In the 1931 census there was at least one Jew in almost 200 cities, towns, villages or hamlets in the province. Sometimes Jews constituted a remarkably high percentage of the total population. Thus, for 1931, the demographer Louis Rosenberg noted that the "urban centre with the largest percentage of Jews in its population is not Montreal, Toronto, or some larger Eastern city, but is the little village of Lipton in Saskatchewan, where the Jewish population of 53 formed 15.01 % of its total population."

In 2002, the Jewish community of Saskatchewan was unexpectedly thrust into the national spotlight. In December of that year, David Ahenakew, former president of both the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations and the Chief of the Canada-wide Assembly of First Nations, gave an interview to the Saskatoon StarPhoenix where he explained that the Holocaust was a way of getting over a "disease" and that without the Holocaust "Jews would have owned the goddamned world." Ahenakew was arrested for willfully promoting hatred in June 2003, and was convicted in July 2005. Within days of the conviction, Ahenakew's membership in the prestigious Order of Canada was revoked. As a result of this incident, there have been the attempts to create and strengthen relations between Jews and First Nations groups. The leaders of the organizations that Ahenakew had once dominated were quick to denounce his remarks. In 2003 leaders from the Aboriginal community went to the Yom ha-Shoah ceremonies in Saskatoon and attended a Friday night dinner, and members of the Jewish community participated in ceremonies led by First Nations groups. Canadian Jewish organizations have organized missions to Israel for aboriginal leaders, and have been conducting ongoing meetings.

The Jewish population of Saskatchewan, although quite diverse because of the relatively large rural presence of its past, has never been very large. In 1911 the census counted some 2,060 Jews. At its peak in 1931, there were only 5,047 recorded, and the numbers have been declining ever since. In 1951 there were 3,017, and over the next 10 years the numbers fell to 2,710. The 2001 census enumerated 2,090 Jews in the province. Although this downward trend seemed relentless, it was hoped that an improving economy in the province would attract more Jews in the coming years.

bibliography:

L. Rosenberg, Canada's Jews (1939). add. bibliography: G. Tulchinsky, Taking Root (1991); idem, Branching Out (1998); F. Curtis, Our Heritage: The History of the Regina and Region Jewish Community (1989); C. Golumb (ed.), Heritage & History: The Saskatoon Jewish Community (1998/9).

[Benjamin G. Kayfetz /

Richard Menkis (2nd ed.)]

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Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan

■ BRIERCREST COLLEGE

510 College Dr.
Caronport, SK, Canada S0H 0S0
Tel: (306)756-3200
Fax: (306)756-5500
Web Site: http://www.briercrest.ca/

Description:

Independent interdenominational, 4-year, coed. Part of Briercrest Family of Schools. Awards associate and bachelor's degrees. Founded 1935. Setting: 300-acre rural campus. Endowment: $950,000. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $7800 per student. Total enrollment: 725. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 16:1. 573 applied, 59% were admitted. Students come from 11 provinces and territories, 5 other countries, 76% from out-of province, 14% 25 or older, 75% live on campus. Retention: 69% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, accelerated degree program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, external degree program, adult/continuing education programs, internships. Off campus study at Summit College.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Options: Common Application, electronic application, early admission, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 2 recommendations. Required for some: interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 8/15. Notification: continuous until 9/1. Preference given to applicants interested in religious studies or ministries.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $11,886 includes full-time tuition ($7086) and college room and board ($4800). College room only: $2719.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run radio station. Social organizations: 20 open to all. Most popular organizations: Student Missions Fellowship, Student Families Association, yearbook committee, Weekend Activities Committee. Major annual events: Global Focus Conference, Christmas Musical, Youth Quake. Student services: legal services, health clinic, personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour patrols. 625 college housing spaces available; 536 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. On-campus residence required through senior year. Options: men-only, women-only housing available. Archibald Library with 76,000 books, 508,153 microform titles, 350 serials, 5,125 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $264,475. 30 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ CENTRAL PENTECOSTAL COLLEGE K-6

1303 Jackson Ave.
Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7H 2M9
Tel: (306)374-6655
Fax: (306)373-6968
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cpc-paoc.edu/

Description:

Independent, 4-year, coed, affiliated with Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada. Administratively affiliated with University of Saskatchewan. Awards bachelor's degrees. Founded 1930. Setting: 5-acre urban campus. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4864 per student. Total enrollment: 61. Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 14:1. 24 applied, 96% were admitted. Full-time: 50 students, 48% women, 52% men. Part-time: 11 students, 45% women, 55% men. Students come from 6 provinces and territories, 42% from out-of province, 5% Native American, 5% Asian Canadian, 18% 25 or older, 27% live on campus, 2% transferred in. Retention: 85% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Core. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, self-designed majors, independent study, distance learning, part-time degree program, internships. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: Common Application, electronic application, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: essay, high school transcript, 3 recommendations. Required for some: interview. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadline: 9/15.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $45 Canadian dollars. Tuition, fee, and room and board charges are reported in Canadian dollars. Comprehensive fee: $9279 includes full-time tuition ($4864), mandatory fees ($415), and college room and board ($4000). Part-time tuition: $152 per credit hour.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group. Major annual events: Christmas Banquet, Graduation Exercises, Graduation Banquet. Student services: personal-psychological counseling. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices, late night transport-escort service. 72 college housing spaces available; 28 were occupied in 2003-04. Freshmen guaranteed college housing. A. C. Schindel Library with 18,204 books, 5,892 microform titles, 4,161 serials, 362 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $20,221. 30 computers available on campus for general student use. Computer purchase/lease plans available. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

■ COLLEGE OF EMMANUEL AND ST. CHAD K-6

1337 College Dr.
Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 0W6
Tel: (306)975-3753
Admissions: (306)975-1558
Fax: (306)934-2683
Web Site: http://www.usask.ca/stu/emmanuel/

Description:

Independent Episcopal, comprehensive, coed. Awards bachelor's and master's degrees. Founded 1879. Setting: urban campus. Endowment: $2.2 million. Educational spending for 2005 fiscal year: $4750 per student. Total enrollment: 23. Faculty: 3 (all full-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 8:1. Students come from 4 provinces and territories, 4% from out-of province, 100% 25 or older. Retention: 100% of full-time freshmen returned the following year. Academic area with the most degrees conferred: theology and religious vocations. Core. Calendar: Canadian standard year. Academic remediation for entering students, services for LD students, distance learning, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at 3 members of the Saskatoon Theological Union.

Entrance Requirements:

Open admission. Required: essay, high school transcript, 3 recommendations, interview. Entrance: noncompetitive. Application deadline: 6/30. Notification: 8/1. Preference given to Anglicans.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $50. Tuition: $4750 full-time, $475 per course part-time. Mandatory fees: $515 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course level and course load.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Major annual events: Color Night, Spring Festival. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. H. E. Sellers Library plus 11 others with 15,000 books and 93 serials. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $15,797. 1 computer on campus for general student use.

■ UNIVERSITY OF REGINA N-8

3737 Wascana Parkway
Regina, SK, Canada S4S 0A2
Tel: (306)585-4111
Free: 800-664-4756
Admissions: (306)585-5166
Fax: (306)585-5203
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.uregina.ca/

Description:

Province-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1974. Setting: 930-hectare urban campus. Endowment: $20 million. Research spending for 2004 fiscal year: $12.5 million. Total enrollment: 12,670. Faculty: 425 (424 full-time, 1 part-time). Student-undergrad faculty ratio is 22:1. 1,663 applied, 91% were admitted. Full-time: 7,232 students, 61% women, 39% men. Part-time: 4,041 students, 62% women, 38% men. Students come from 11 provinces and territories, 76 other countries, 5% from out-of province, 30% 25 or older, 7% transferred in. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: education; business/marketing; security and protective services. Calendar: semesters. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, self-designed majors, honors program, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships, graduate courses open to undergrads. Off campus study at Athol Murray College of Notre Dame, Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research, Western Christian College, Canadian Theological Seminary, Canadian Bible College, Laval University. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: early admission, early action, deferred admission, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript, minimum 2.3 high school GPA. Required for some: essay, recommendations, interview, SAT or ACT. Entrance: minimally difficult. Application deadlines: 7/1, 6/15 for early action. Preference given to province residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $60 Canadian dollars. Tuition, fee, and room and board charges are reported in Canadian dollars. Province resident tuition: $136 per credit hour part-time. Canadian resident tuition: $4551 full-time, $136 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $412 full-time, $92 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. College room and board: $5767. College room only: $3960. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. International student tuition: $8627 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper. Social organizations: 35 open to all. Most popular organizations: Administration Students' Society, Education Students' Society, Engineering Students Society, Chinese Students and Scholars Association, Luther Student Association. Major annual events: May Convocation, October Convocation, Welcome Week. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, student patrols, late night transport-escort service, controlled dormitory access. 1,125 college housing spaces available; 644 were occupied in 2003-04. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Option: coed housing available. Dr. John Archer Library plus 3 others with 1.5 million books, 1.2 million microform titles, 10,772 serials, 39,791 audiovisual materials, an OPAC, and a Web page. Operations spending for 2004 fiscal year: $6.2 million. 300 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from student residence rooms and from off campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Regina, population 185,000 is the capital city of Saskatchewan. Serving as a business and industrial center of the mainly agricultural province, Regina offers a wide range of cultural activities.

■ UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN K-6

105 Administration Place
Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5A2
Tel: (306)966-4343
Fax: (306)966-7026
Web Site: http://www.usask.ca/

Description:

Province-supported, university, coed. Awards bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Founded 1907. Setting: 363-acre urban campus. Total enrollment: 19,639. 6,865 applied, 81% were admitted. Students come from 13 provinces and territories, 75 other countries, 0% from out-of province. Academic areas with the most degrees conferred: visual and performing arts; health professions and related sciences; education. Calendar: Canadian standard year. Academic remediation for entering students, ESL program, services for LD students, advanced placement, accelerated degree program, honors program, independent study, distance learning, double major, summer session for credit, part-time degree program, adult/continuing education programs, co-op programs and internships. Off campus study at Regional Colleges, SIAST Campuses. Study abroad program.

Entrance Requirements:

Options: electronic application, early admission, early action, international baccalaureate accepted. Required: high school transcript. Required for some: essay, 3 recommendations, interview. Entrance: moderately difficult. Application deadline: 5/1. Notification: continuous. Preference given to province residents.

Costs Per Year:

Application fee: $75 Canadian dollars. Tuition, fee, and room and board charges are reported in Canadian dollars. Area resident tuition: $4560 full-time, $152 per credit part-time. Province resident tuition: $395 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $448 full-time, $114 per year part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, location, and program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, location, and program. College room and board: $4894. College room only: $2226. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location. International student tuition: $11,850 full-time.

Collegiate Environment:

Orientation program. Drama-theater group, choral group, student-run newspaper, radio station. Most popular organizations: Ballroom Dancing Club, Ski Club, AIESEC. Major annual events: Welcome Week, December 6th Candlelight Vigil, Miracle Dance. Student services: health clinic, personal-psychological counseling, women's center. Campus security: 24-hour emergency response devices and patrols, late night transport-escort service. 2,070 college housing spaces available. No special consideration for freshman housing applicants. Options: coed, men-only, women-only housing available. University of Saskatchewan Main Library plus 7 others with 1.8 million books, 16,900 serials, an OPAC, and a Web page. 900 computers available on campus for general student use. A campuswide network can be accessed from off-campus. Staffed computer lab on campus.

Community Environment:

Saskatoon (population 215,000), on the banks of the South Saskatchewan River, is known as the City of Bridges with its riverfront and many parks. It is the home of the Western Development Museum featuring Boomtown 1910, museums of Ukrainian arts and culture, the Mendel Art Gallery (Canadian, European, and Eskimo art), the Forestry Farm Park, and Saskatchewan Place (local and international sports, entertainment, and cultural events.)

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Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan

BRIERCREST COLLEGE

510 College Dr.
Caronport, SK, Canada S0H 0S0
Tel: (306)756-3200
Fax: (306)756-5500
Web Site: http://www.briercrest.ca/
President/CEO: Dr. Dwayne Uglem
Admissions: Mike Benallick
Financial Aid: Joan Ballantyne
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: interdenominational; Briercrest Family of Schools % Accepted: 59 Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: August 15 Application Fee: $35.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $35. Comprehensive fee: $11,886 includes full-time tuition ($7086) and college room and board ($4800). College room only: $2719. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 629, PT 96 Faculty: FT 22, PT 34 Student-Faculty Ratio: 16:1 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 75 Library Holdings: 76,000 Credit Hours For Degree: 126 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AABC Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Ice Hockey M; Soccer M & W; Volleyball M & W

CENTRAL PENTECOSTAL COLLEGE

1303 Jackson Ave.
Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7H 2M9
Tel: (306)374-6655
Fax: (306)373-6968
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.cpc-paoc.edu/
President/CEO: Dr. D. Munk
Registrar: Angie Hume
Admissions: Dr. David Munk
Type: Four-Year College Sex: Coed Affiliation: Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada; University of Saskatchewan % Accepted: 96 Admission Plans: Deferred Admission Application Deadline: September 15 Application Fee: $45.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED accepted Costs Per Year: Application fee: $45 Canadian dollars. Tuition, fee, and room and board charges are reported in Canadian dollars. Comprehensive fee: $9279 includes full-time tuition ($4864), mandatory fees ($415), and college room and board ($4000). Part-time tuition: $152 per credit hour. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Not available Enrollment: FT 50, PT 11 Faculty: FT 4, PT 6 Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 % Residing in College-Owned, -Operated, or -Affiliated Housing: 27 Library Holdings: 18,204 Credit Hours For Degree: 128 semester hours, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: AABC

COLLEGE OF EMMANUEL AND ST. CHAD

1337 College Dr.
Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 0W6
Tel: (306)975-3753
Admissions: (306)975-1558
Fax: (306)934-2683
Web Site: http://www.usask.ca/stu/emmanuel/
President/CEO: Walter Deller
Registrar: Dr. Beverly Cushman
Admissions: Colleen Walker
Type: Comprehensive Sex: Coed Affiliation: Episcopal Admission Plans: Open Admission; Preferred Admission Application Deadline: June 30 Application Fee: $50.00 Costs Per Year: Application fee: $50. Tuition: $4750 full-time, $475 per course part-time. Mandatory fees: $515 full-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course level and course load. Part-time tuition varies according to course level and course load. Calendar System: Miscellaneous, Summer Session Available Enrollment: , Grad 23 Faculty: FT 3, PT 0 Student-Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Library Holdings: 15,000 Credit Hours For Degree: 32 courses, Bachelors

UNIVERSITY OF REGINA

3737 Wascana Parkway
Regina, SK, Canada S4S 0A2
Tel: (306)585-4111
Free: 800-664-4756
Admissions: (306)585-5166
Fax: (306)585-5203
E-mail: [email protected]
Web Site: http://www.uregina.ca/
President/CEO: Dr. David Barnard
Admissions: Susan Husum
Type: University Sex: Coed % Accepted: 91 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Early Action; Deferred Admission Application Deadline: July 01 Application Fee: $60.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED not accepted. For Mature Admission (over age 21).: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $60 Canadian dollars. Tuition, fee, and room and board charges are reported in Canadian dollars. Province resident tuition: $136 per credit hour part-time. Canadian resident tuition: $4551 full-time, $136 per credit hour part-time. Mandatory fees: $412 full-time, $92 per term part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load and program. College room and board: $5767. College room only: $3960. Room and board charges vary according to board plan and housing facility. International student tuition: $8627 full-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Semester, Summer Session Available Enrollment: FT 7,232, PT 4,041, Grad 1,397 Faculty: FT 424, PT 1 Student-Faculty Ratio: 22:1 Exams: SAT I or ACT Library Holdings: 1,471,017 Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit hours, Bachelors Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Ice Hockey M & W; Soccer W; Swimming and Diving M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W; Wrestling M & W

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

105 Administration Place
Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5A2
Tel: (306)966-4343
Fax: (306)966-7026
Web Site: http://www.usask.ca/
President/CEO: R. Peter MacKinnon
Financial Aid: Kelly McInnes
Type: University Sex: Coed % Accepted: 81 Admission Plans: Preferred Admission; Early Admission; Early Action Application Deadline: May 01 Application Fee: $75.00 H.S. Requirements: High school diploma required; GED not accepted. For adult students: High school diploma or equivalent not required Costs Per Year: Application fee: $75 Canadian dollars. Tuition, fee, and room and board charges are reported in Canadian dollars. Area resident tuition: $4560 full-time, $152 per credit part-time. Province resident tuition: $395 per credit part-time. Mandatory fees: $448 full-time, $114 per year part-time. Full-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, location, and program. Part-time tuition and fees vary according to course load, degree level, location, and program. College room and board: $4894. College room only: $2226. Room and board charges vary according to board plan, housing facility, and location. International student tuition: $11,850 full-time. Scholarships: Available Calendar System: Miscellaneous, Summer Session Available Library Holdings: 1,789,000 Credit Hours For Degree: 120 credit units, Bachelors Professional Accreditation: ADA, APA, AVMA, LCMEAMA Intercollegiate Athletics: Basketball M & W; Cross-Country Running M & W; Football M; Ice Hockey M & W; Soccer M & W; Track and Field M & W; Volleyball M & W; Wrestling M & W

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Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan

BRIERCREST COLLEGE

Accounting, B

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Business Administration and Management, B

Child Development, B

Divinity/Ministry (BD, MDiv.), B

Ethnic and Cultural Studies, B

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, B

Religion/Religious Studies, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

CENTRAL PENTECOSTAL COLLEGE

Bible/Biblical Studies, B

Christian Studies, B

Missions/Missionary Studies and Missiology, B

Pastoral Counseling and Specialized Ministries, B

Pastoral Studies/Counseling, B

Religious/Sacred Music, B

Theological and Ministerial Studies, B

Theology and Religious Vocations, B

Theology/Theological Studies, B

Youth Ministry, B

COLLEGE OF EMMANUEL AND ST. CHAD

Theology and Religious Vocations, MP

Theology/Theological Studies, B

UNIVERSITY OF REGINA

Accounting, B

Acting, B

Actuarial Science, B

Adult and Continuing Education and Teaching, BMO

American History (United States), B

American Indian/Native American Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

American Indian/Native American Studies, BM

Analytical Chemistry, MD

Anthropology, BM

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Art Teacher Education, B

Art/Art Studies, General, B

Asian History, B

Bilingual and Multilingual Education, B

Biochemistry, BMD

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MD

Biological and Physical Sciences, B

Biology Teacher Education, B

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Business Administration and Management, AB

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business Teacher Education, B

Canadian History, B

Canadian Studies, BMD

Ceramic Arts and Ceramics, B

Chemical Technology/Technician, B

Chemistry, BMD

Chemistry Teacher Education, B

Chinese Language and Literature, B

Cinematography and Film/Video Production, B

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Computer Engineering, MD

Computer Science, BMD

Computer Software Engineering, B

Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Administration, B

Criminal Justice/Police Science, B

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies, B

Curriculum and Instruction, M

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

Dramatic/Theatre Arts and Stagecraft, B

Drawing, B

Early Childhood Education and Teaching, B

Economics, BM

Education, BMDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MO

Educational Psychology, BMDO

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician, B

Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering, B

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MD

English, MD

English Language and Literature, B

English/Language Arts Teacher Education, B

Environmental Biology, B

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, MD

Environmental Studies, B

Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering, B

Ethnic, Cultural Minority, and Gender Studies, B

European History, B

Film/Cinema Studies, B

Finance, B

Fine Arts and Art Studies, BM

French Language and Literature, BM

French Language Teacher Education, B

Geography, BM

Geology/Earth Science, BMD

German Language and Literature, B

Health Teacher Education, B

History, BM

Human Resources Development, M

Human Resources Management and Services, M

Humanities/Humanistic Studies, B

Indian/Native American Education, B

Industrial Engineering, B

Industrial/Management Engineering, MD

Inorganic Chemistry, MD

Intermedia/Multimedia, B

Japanese Language and Literature, B

Journalism, B

Junior High/Intermediate/Middle School Education and Teaching, B

Kindergarten/PreSchool Education and Teaching, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Kinesiology and Movement Studies, MD

Kinesiotherapy/Kinesiotherapist, B

Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies and Humanities, B

Linguistics, BM

Manufacturing Engineering, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, BMD

Mathematics and Computer Science, B

Mathematics and Statistics, B

Mathematics Teacher Education, B

Music, BMD

Music History, Literature, and Theory, B

Music Performance, B

Music Teacher Education, B

Music Theory and Composition, BM

Musicology and Ethnomusicology, BMD

Organic Chemistry, MD

Painting, B

Petroleum Engineering, BMD

Philosophy, BM

Physical Chemistry, MD

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physics, BMD

Physics Teacher Education, B

Political Science and Government, BM

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Printmaking, B

Psychology, BMD

Public Administration, ABM

Public Policy Analysis, M

Religion/Religious Studies, BM

Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education, B

Sculpture, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Social Sciences, BM

Social Studies Teacher Education, B

Social Work, BMD

Sociology, BM

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Statistics, BMD

Systems Engineering, BMD

Technical Theatre/Theatre Design and Technology, B

Technology Teacher Education/Industrial Arts Teacher Education, B

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

Visual and Performing Arts, B

Women's Studies, B

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

Accounting, BM

Agribusiness, B

Agricultural Economics, BMD

Agricultural Engineering, MD

Agricultural Sciences, MD

Agricultural/Biological Engineering and Bioengineering, B

Agriculture, B

Agronomy and Crop Science, B

Agronomy and Soil Sciences, MD

Allopathic Medicine, P

American Indian/Native American Studies, B

American/United States Studies/Civilization, B

Anatomy, BMD

Animal Physiology, B

Animal Sciences, BMD

Anthropology, BM

Archeology, BMD

Art History, Criticism and Conservation, B

Astronomy, B

Biochemistry, BMDO

Bioinformatics, B

Biological and Biomedical Sciences, MDO

Biology/Biological Sciences, B

Biomedical Engineering, MD

BioTechnology, BM

Business Administration, Management and Operations, M

Business/Commerce, B

Business/Managerial Economics, B

Canadian Studies, MD

Cell Biology and Anatomy, MD

Chemical Engineering, BMD

Chemistry, BMD

Civil Engineering, BMD

Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Community Health and Preventive Medicine, MD

Computer Science, BMD

Curriculum and Instruction, MDO

Dentistry, P

Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, B

East European and Russian Studies, M

Economics, M

Education, BMDO

Educational Administration and Supervision, MDO

Educational Psychology, MDO

Electrical Engineering, MD

Elementary Education and Teaching, B

Engineering, B

Engineering and Applied Sciences, MDO

Engineering Physics, BMD

English, MD

English Language and Literature, B

Environmental Engineering Technology/Environmental Technology, MDO

Environmental Studies, B

Epidemiology, MD

Family and Consumer Sciences/Home Economics Teacher Education, B

Finance, B

Finance and Banking, M

Fine Arts and Art Studies, M

Fine/Studio Arts, B

Food Science, B

Food Science and Technology, MD

Foundations and Philosophy of Education, MDO

French Language and Literature, BM

Gender Studies, MD

Geography, BMD

Geological/Geophysical Engineering, B

Geology/Earth Science, BMDO

Geophysics and Seismology, B

German Language and Literature, BM

Health Services Administration, M

Hebrew Language and Literature, B

History, BMD

Horticultural Science, B

Human Resources Management/Personnel Administration, B

Industrial and Labor Relations, M

Information Science/Studies, B

International Business/Trade/Commerce, M

International Relations and Affairs, B

Kinesiology and Exercise Science, B

Kinesiology and Movement Studies, MDO

Land Use Planning and Management/Development, B

Latin Language and Literature, B

Law and Legal Studies, MP

Linguistics, B

Marketing, M

Marketing/Marketing Management, B

Mathematics, BMD

Mechanical Engineering, BMD

Medical Microbiology and Bacteriology, B

Microbiology, BMD

Modern Greek Language and Literature, B

Music, BM

Music Teacher Education, B

Nursing, M

Nursing - Registered Nurse Training, B

Nursing Administration, B

Nutritional Sciences, B

Operations Management and Supervision, B

Organizational Behavior Studies, M

Pathology/Experimental Pathology, MD

Pharmaceutical Sciences, MD

Pharmacology, MD

Pharmacy, B

Philosophy, BM

Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, B

Physical Therapy/Therapist, B

Physics, MD

Physiology, BMD

Plant Sciences, BMD

Political Science and Government, BM

Pre-Dentistry Studies, B

Pre-Law Studies, B

Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies, B

Pre-Pharmacy Studies, B

Pre-Veterinary Studies, B

Psychology, BMD

Public Administration, B

Range Science and Management, B

Religion/Religious Studies, BM

Reproductive Biology, MD

Russian Language and Literature, B

Secondary Education and Teaching, B

Slavic Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, B

Sociology, BMD

Soil Science and Agronomy, B

Spanish Language and Literature, B

Special Education and Teaching, MDO

Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, B

Statistics, BMD

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language/ESL Language Instructor, B

Technical Teacher Education, B

Theater, M

Theoretical and Mathematical Physics, B

Toxicology, BMDO

Trade and Industrial Teacher Education, B

Ukrainian Language and Literature, B

Urban Studies/Affairs, B

Veterinary Medicine, MDP

Veterinary Sciences, MD

Women's Studies, BMD

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Saskatchewan

SASKATCHEWAN

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Saskatchewan

SASKATCHEWAN


Legislative Assembly - Saskatchewan
Lieutenant Governors - Saskatchewan
The Calvert Administration - Saskatchewan
Legislatures Since 1905 - Saskatchewan
List of Members - Saskatchewan
List of Constituencies - Saskatchewan
Biographies - Saskatchewan
Principal Officials of the Legislative Assembly - Saskatchewan
General Election - 2003: Saskatchewan
Previous General Elections - Saskatchewan
Standing of Parties - Saskatchewan

Confederation Date / Fit son entrée dans la Confédération
September 1, 1905 / le 1er septembre 1905


Area / Superficie
Land / Terre - 570,700 sq.km/km2
Water / Eau - 81,630 sq.km/km2
Total - 652,330 sq.km/km2


Population
(Census / Recensement): 1901 - 91,000; 1911 - 492,000; 1921 - 757,000; 1931 - 921,800; 1941 - 896,000; 1951 - 831,700; 1956 - 880,700; 1961 - 925,200; 1966 - 955,300; 1971 - 926,200; 1976 - 921,300; 1981 - 968,300; 1986 - 1,010,200; 1991 - 988,928; 1996 - 990,237; 2001 - 978,933; (Estimate/Estimation 2004) 995,391.

Capital / Capitale
Regina


Major Cities and Metropolitan Areas / Villes et régions métropolitaines principales (Estimate/ Estimation 2004)
Metropolitan Saskatoon: 230,000
Metropolitan Regina: (2001)
Prince Albert: (2001)
Moose Jaw: 33,000
Yorkton: (2001)

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Saskatchewan

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