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alibi

al·i·bi / ˈaləˌbī/ • n. (pl. -bis ) a claim or piece of evidence that one was elsewhere when an act, typically a criminal one, is alleged to have taken place: she has an alibi for the whole of yesterday evening | a defense of alibi. ∎ inf. an excuse or pretext: a catch-all alibi for failure and inadequacy. • v. (-bis, -bied, -bi·ing) [tr.] inf. offer an excuse or defense for (someone), esp. by providing an account of their whereabouts at the time of an alleged act. ∎  [intr.] make excuses: not once do I recall him whining or alibiing.

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alibi

alibi (leg.) †elsewhere; plea of having been elsewhere. XVIII. — L. alibī elsewhere, f. alius (see ELSE).

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alibi

alibi •rabbi • standby • lay-by • nimbi • alibi •rhombi • go-by • incubi • succubi •syllabi • lullaby • hushaby

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Alibi

Alibi ★★ 1929

Low-budget crime drama from independent producer/director West. Gangster Chick Williams (Morris) reclaims his mob role after being released from prison. But when a cop is killed during a robbery, Williams is suspected of the crime and the detective squad will employ any method to bring him to justice. Noted for its experimental use of sound, its dazzling Art Deco sets, and its eccentric composition. 84m/B VHS . Chester Morris, Mae Busch, Regis Toomey, Harry Stubbs; D: Roland West; W: Roland West, C. Gardner Sullivan; C: Ray June; M: Hugo Riesenfeld.

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