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Norfolk, Charles Howard, 11th duke of

Norfolk, Charles Howard, 11th duke of (1746–1815). Known as Lord Surrey until he succeeded to the dukedom in 1786, Howard renounced the catholic faith in 1780 and embarked upon a political career as an advanced Whig. He served as MP for Carlisle 1780–6, spoke often in the Commons, was a keen advocate of parliamentary reform, and held office in the coalition ministry as a lord of the Treasury. Though he built up an electoral empire of eleven seats, his political standing was scarcely commensurate. But in 1798 he offered a toast to the ‘Majesty of the People’ at a public dinner at the Crown and Anchor tavern to celebrate Fox's birthday. Despite an apology to the king for ‘unguarded expressions’ he was dismissed his post as lord-lieutenant of the West Riding and lost his colonelcy in the militia. He was replaced as lord-lieutenant by Fitzwilliam, who was also dismissed in 1819 for condemning the massacre at Peterloo. Norfolk received partial restoration in 1807 when he was appointed lord-lieutenant of Sussex. Boswell found him a ‘lively, affable, talking man’ but some of his conviviality seems to have been due to drink.

J. A. Cannon

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