Horowitz, Shale A. 1965–

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Horowitz, Shale A. 1965–

PERSONAL:

Born August 28, 1965; married Kristin Trenholm; children: Azariah, Anika. Education: University of California, Berkeley, B.A., 1986; University of California, Los Angeles, M.A., 1991, Ph.D., 1996.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Department of Political Science, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

KNBC-TV, Burbank, CA, segment producer for the Sunday Show, 1984; San Francisco Magazine, San Francisco, CA, editorial staff member, 1985; Center for Communication Policy, University of California, Los Angeles, research fellow, 1994-96; Central European University, Budapest, Hungary, visiting assistant professor, 1996-97; University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, assistant professor, 1997-2003, associate professor of political science, 2003—. Associate member, Center for East Asian Studies, University of Chicago, 2005—.

MEMBER:

International Studies Association, American Political Science Association, Association of Korean Political Studies, Association for the Study of Nationalities (member of executive committee, 2001—), Phi Beta Kappa.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Central European University travel grant and research grant, 1996; Center for International Studies grants, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000; Annette J. Roberts and Joan R. Robertson Fund grant, 1999; Franke Idea Fund grant, Wisconsin Humanities Council, 2000; Center for International Education grant, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, 2004.

WRITINGS:

(Editor, with Uk Heo, and contributor) The Political Economy of International Financial Crisis: Interest Groups, Ideologies, and Institutions, Rowman & Littlefield (Lanham, MD), 2001.

(Editor, with Uk Heo, and contributor) Conflict in Asia: Korea, China-Taiwan, and India-Pakistan, Praeger (Westport, CT), 2003.

(Editor, with Albrecht Schnabel, and contributor) Human Rights and Societies in Transition: Causes, Consequences, Responses, United Nations University Press (New York, NY), 2004.

From Ethnic Conflict to Stillborn Reform: The Former Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, Texas A&M University Press (College Station, TX), 2005.

(Editor, with Uk Heo and Alexander C. Tan, and contributor) Identity and Change in East Asian Conflicts: The Cases of China, Taiwan, and the Koreas, Palgrave Macmillan (New York, NY), 2007.

Contributor to books, including Resurrecting the Phoenix, edited by David C. Durst and others, EOS (Sofia, Bulgaria), 1998; Democracy in the New Europe: The Politics of Post-Communism, edited by Julie Smith and Elizabeth Teague, Greycoat (London, England), 1999; Ethnic Conflict and International Politics: Explaining Diffusion and Escalation, edited by Steven Lobell and Philip Mauceri, Palgrave-Macmillan (New York, NY), 2004; Pécs Political Studies, edited by Péter S. Szabó, Pécsi Tudományegyetem (Pécs, Hungary), 2005; Defense and Security: A Guide to National Armed Forces and Security Policies of the World, edited by Karl DeRouen and Uk Heo, ABC-Clio (New York, NY), 2005; Civil Wars of the World, edited by Karl DeRouen and Uk Heo, ABC-Clio (New York, NY), 2005; Neo-Liberalism, edited by Arthur Denzau, Ravi Roy, and Thomas Willett, Routledge (London, England), 2005. Contributor to periodicals, including Communist and Post-Communist Studies, Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Studies in Society and History, East Asia, European Journal of International Relations, International Interactions, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Peace Research, Party Politics, and East European Politics and Societies.Analysis of Current Events, associate editor, 1998-99, coeditor, 1999-2004; editorial board, Journal of Public Policy, 2003—, Nationalities Papers, 2005—.

SIDELIGHTS:

Shale A. Horowitz is a political science professor whose interests include ethnic conflict, politics in international finance and trade, agricultural policy, and the transition of former communist countries in East Asia as they create new market policy and institutions. His 2005 work From Ethnic Conflict to Stillborn Reform: The Former Soviet Union and Yugoslavia concerns how war and ethnic violence hamper market reform and efforts to transition into a democracy in a postcommunist world. In this book, Horowitz notes that when former communist countries enjoy periods of economic stability or growth, they are much more likely to begin implementing democratic changes. Similarly, countries that have enjoyed stronger economic development and political achievement during a communist reign were also more likely to employ democratic and capitalistic changes in order to regain their former glory.

A major theme in the book, however, is that long periods of war significantly retard economic and democratic development in postcommunist countries. Using statistical analysis, Horowitz shows a correlation between the amount of time a state spends in armed conflict and the amount of liberalization of economic and political policies. He studies eight countries in some depth, including Tajikistan, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Moldova, Serbia, Bosnia, and Croatia. Political Science Quarterly critic Julie George noted, however: "Although the larger argument is compelling, the case studies unfortunately vary in their depth. The methodology lacks transparency, so the reader is left to guess how the author assesses key variables." George observed, too, that the author does not include data tables or appendices to show his research and that "key factors are described rather than measured." The reviewer added: "Despite these methodological flaws, Horowitz's book is an important and unique effort" in comparative politics.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, July 1, 2001, J.M. Nowakowski, review of The Political Economy of International Financial Crisis: Interest Groups, Ideologies, and Institutions, p. 2006.

Journal of Asian Studies, May, 2002, Thomas R. Gottschang, review of The Political Economy of International Financial Crisis, p. 673; November, 2004, David Arase, review of Conflict in Asia: Korea, China-Taiwan, and India-Pakistan, p. 1079.

Journal of Economic Literature, June, 2002, review of The Political Economy of International Financial Crisis, p. 672.

Journal of Peace Research, May, 2006, Jim Headley, review of From Ethnic Conflict to Stillborn Reform: The Former Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, p. 354.

Political Science Quarterly, winter, 2006, Julie George, review of From Ethnic Conflict to Stillborn Reform.

Reference & Research Book News, May, 2001, review of The Political Economy of International Financial Crisis, p. 115; November, 2004, review of Human Rights and Societies in Transition: Causes, Consequences, Responses, p. 151.

ONLINE

University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee Department of Political Science Web site,http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/Polsci/ (April 17, 2008), faculty profile.

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Horowitz, Shale A. 1965–

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