In-Ho, Choi 1945-

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In-Ho, Choi 1945-

PERSONAL:

Born October 17, 1945, in Seoul, South Korea. Education: Yonsei University, Korea, B.A., 1972.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Department of Life Science, Yonsei University, 234 Maeji-ri, Heungup-myon, Wonju, Kangwon-Do 220-710, Republic of Korea.E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Writer.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Sasanggye Prize for New Writers, 1967; Hundae Munhak New Writers' Prize, 1972; Yi sang Literary Award, 1982.

WRITINGS:


Pyolt ur ui kohyang (title means "Stars' Hometown"), Yemungwan (Seoul, South Korea), 1972.

Cham chanun sinhwa: yonjak changp'yon, Yemungwan (Seoul, South Korea), 1974.

Ch'on'guk ui kyedan: changp'yon sosol, Yemungwan (Seoul, South Korea), 1979.

Kajok: yonjakchang p'yon (essays), Yemungwan (Seoul, South Korea), 1979.

Nuga ch'onjaerul chugyonnun'ga, Yemungwan (Seoul, South Korea), 1979.

Chiguin: ponkyok taeha sosol, Yemungwan (Seoul, South Korea), 1980.

Pulsae: changp'yon sosol, Yemungwan (Seoul, South Korea), 1980.

Todani ui kurim, Tonghwa Chulpan Kongsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1981.

(With others) Kipko p'urun pam oe: '82 che 6-hoe Yi Sang Munhaksang susang chakp'umjip (title means "The Deep Blue Night"), Munhak Sasangsa Chulpanbu (Seoul, South Korea), 1982.

Chokto ui kkot, Chungang Ilbosa (Seoul, South Korea), 1982.

Nae maum ui p'ungch'a; Kaemi ui t'ap oe 3-p'yon,Samjungdang (Seoul, South Korea), 1982.

Chollamhoe kurim: "cham chanun sinhwa" yonjak changp'yon, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1983.

Kamyon mudoho, Minumsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1983.

Korae sanyang, Tonghwa Chulpan Kongsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1983.

Mul wi ui sama, Kabin Chulpansa (Seoul, South Korea), 1983.

Songnyo wa angnyorul wihayo, Sosol Munhaksa (Seoul, South Korea), 1983.

Ch'oe In-ho munhak chonjip, Tonghwa Chulpan Kongsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1984-89.

Kajok: sosollo ssun chasojon (essays), Saemto (Seoul, South Korea), 1984-2002.

Kyoul nagune: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sosol, Munye Chulpansa (Seoul, South Korea), 1984.

T'ain ui pangg: Ch'oe In-ho susang chakp'umjip,(title means "The Stranger's Room"), Tonghwa Chulpan Kongsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1984.

Hwanghol yonsup: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sosol,Chungang Ilbosa (Seoul, South Korea), 1985.

Chilp'ung nodo: Ch'oe In-ho taeha yoksa sosol, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1986.

Ch'oe In-ho, Munhak Sasangsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1986.

Hwang Chin-i: Ch'oe In-ho usu tanp'yon sonjip,Tonghwa Chulpan Kongsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1986.

Iroborin wangguk: Ch'oe In-ho taeha yoksa sosol,Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1986-88.

Pimil ui mun: Ch'oe In-ho taeha yoksa sosol, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1986.

(With Yi Chong-jun and Kim Won-il) Pam kwa an'gae ui tosi, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1986.

Sarang ui chongyom: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sarang sosol, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Sin Paekcherul ch'ajaso, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Sinario sonjip, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Sulkkun: Ch'oe In-ho taep'yo chakp'umson, Tonga (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Tasi mannal ttae kkaji, Nanam (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Tosi ui sanyangkkun: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sarang sosol, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Tulkkot han songi to sarang in kot ul: sam kwa kodok kwa sarang ui sinjak esei, Chesam Kihoek (Kyonggi-do Suwon-si, South Korea), 1987.

Annyong haseyo Hananim: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sosol, Tonghwa Chulpan Kongsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Ch'oe In-ho, Tonghwa Munhwasa (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Kkum kkunun noma: Ch'oe In-ho tonghwajip, Tonghwa Munhwasa (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Kodokhan pulkkot: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sarang sosol, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

O no nou: Ch'oe In-ho maenbal ro segye rul tolta = Oh, no no!, Tonghwa Chulpan Kongsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Paekche yo, Paekche yo: Ch'oe In-ho taeha yoksa sosol,Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1987.

Chamdulgi chon e kayahal mon kil: Ch'oe In-ho saero ssun insaengnon, Chesam kihoek (Seoul, South Korea), 1988.

Hwangdo ui norae, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1988.

Omoni ku kuriun irum iyo: Ch'oe In-ho omonirul wihan kul moumjip, Tonghwa Munhaksa (Seoul, South Korea), 1988.

Toroun son: Ch'oe In-ho usu tanp'yon sonjip, Tonghwa Chulpan Kongsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1988.

Turebak ul ollyora: Ch'oe In-ho usu sosolchip, Tonghwa Munhaksa (Seoul, South Korea), 1988.

Hundullinun song: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sosol,Tonghwa Chulpan Kongsa (Seoul, South Korea), 1989.

Todani: Ch'oe In-ho tonghwajip, Tonghwa Munhaksa (Seoul, South Korea), 1989.

Cham chanun sinhwa: Ch'oe In-ho yonjak sosol, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1990.

Ch'ossarang: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sosol, Munye Chulpansa (Seoul, South Korea), 1990.

Omoni ka karuch'yo chun norae: Ch'oe In-ho yonjak sosol, Sigan kwa Konggansa (Seoul, South Korea), 1991.

Pukkuroum e kwanhan myongsang: Ch'oe In-ho saenggak hanun kul, Chesam Kihoek (Seoul, South Korea), 1991.

Saramdul sai e som i itta: Ch'oe In-ho taep'yo esei,Sojokpo (Seoul, South Korea), 1991.

Lut, Saemtosa (Seoul, South Korea), 1992.

Sinario chonjip, Usok (Seoul, South Korea), 1992.

Tol ui ch'osang, Sojokpo (Seoul, South Korea), 1992.

Hosuabi: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sosol, Yollimwon (Seoul, South Korea), 1993.

Kil omnun kil: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sosol, Sasemtosa (Seoul, South Korea), 1993.

Wangdo ui pimil: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sosol,Saemo (Seoul, South Korea), 1995.

Ch'oe In-ho munhaksang susang chakp'umjip,Chongo wa Ppippi (Seoul, South Korea), 2000.

Nalk'aroun ch'ot k'isu ui ch'uok: Ch'oe In-ho p'angse, Yobaek (Seoul, South Korea), 2000.

Sangdo: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sosol, Yobaek (Seoul, South Korea), 2000.

Talk'omhan insaeng: Ch'oe In-ho sosolchip, Munhak Tongne (Seoul, South Korea), 2001.

Tower of Ants, Holly International (Elizabeth, NJ), 2004.

Hanul eso naeryo on ppang: Ch'oe In-ho ui muksang iyagi, Saemtot (Seoul, South Korea), 2005.

Also author of Mo Ru Nun Saram Aegae bo Nae Nun Pyon Chi (essays), Chae Sam Ki Haek, 1987; Palmy ongwang Dodani (children's book; title means "Great inventor Dodani"), 1992; Jak un maum ui nppn ero sarang hara (essays and diary), Jesam Ki Hek, 1998;Ku Mong, Yol Lim Won, 1999; and The March of Fools(novel and movie script).

ADAPTATIONS:

Sangdo was adapted as a television drama in Korea, 2001-02; Kipko p'urun pam oe was adapted as a feature film.

SIDELIGHTS:

Choi In-Ho is a Korean fiction writer and essayist who has written numerous best-selling works in Korea and highly-praised literary novels. A theme central to the author's more literary works is how modern ideology cannot hide the essential discord of the world and the false perceptions that people have of it. Often, he writes of children who, once they perceive these aspects of the world too early, fall into alienation and an emptiness or nothingness inside. In his famous short story "The Drunkard," for example, the author writes of the depravities of modern society and how a dictator tries to hide this reality from the people. Throughout his work, the author explores the dichotomy of responses to such a world. One the one hand, he presents the case that nihilism is an improper response in that it is only a form of escapism. On the other hand, people who try to overcome the depraved aspects of society usually fail and are able to achieve a certain compromise at best.

In his novella Kipko p'urun pam oe: '82 che 6-hoe Yi Sang Munhaksang susang chakp'umjip, which means "The Deep Blue Night," the author explores the experiences of two Korean men traveling in America and the Korean-Americans they meet along the way. Writing in the Korea Journal, Stephen J. Epstein called the book "one of the most interesting and detailed portrayals of the United States in Korean fiction." Epstein went on to note: "The simple economy of the plot allows for much philosophical and psychological exploration." Pointing out that the two men are flawed and have left Korea to perhaps create a better life in America, which they ultimately find not to their liking and return home, Epstein wrote: "In a sense, the two have been excommunicated and must enter a liminal space and undergo a rite of passage before they may be reintegrated into Korean society. The U.S. redefines [the two men] and redefines Korea for them."

The author's many other works include the novel Ku Mong, about a peeping tom who spies not only on other women but also on his wife, and the historical novel Wangdo ui pimil: Ch'oe In-ho changp'yon sosol,about a ruler in Korea 1,500 years ago. He is also the author of several books of essays. The "Kajok" books feature essays that focus on everyday life, including the author's own family life. In Jak un maum ui nppn ero sarang hara, the author presents a series of humorous essays and a diary of his travels through Manchuria.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:


PERIODICALS


Booklist, April 1, 1986, Wol Sue Lee, review of Kajok,p. 1120; October 15, 1987, Wol Sue Lee, review of Kajok, p. 371; October 1, 1988, Wol Sue Lee, review of Sil sok it nun chul pal, p. 996; June, 1996, Wol Sue Lee, review of Jak un maum ui nppn ero sarang hara, p. 1867; June 1, 1997, Wol Sue Lee, review of Wang Do Ui Bimil,p. 1670; June 1, 2000, Wol Sue Lee, review of Ku Mong, p. 1867.

Le Courrier de la Corée, February 9, 2002, "Choi In-Ho."

Korea Journal, winter, 1995, Stephen J. Epstein, "Wanderers in the Wilderness: Images of America in Ch'oe In-Ho's Kipko p'urun pam oe: '82 che 6-hoe Yi Sang Munhaksang susang chakp'umjip," pp. 72-79.