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Chase, Kerry A. 1969-

Chase, Kerry A. 1969-

PERSONAL:

Born March 6, 1969, in Ithaca, NY; son of Stephen U. (an educator), and Lorraine B. (an educator) Chase; married Stephanie A. Gray (a research psychologist), February 1, 2004; children: Ella K., Cameron S. Ethnicity: "White/Caucasian." Education: Cornell University, B.A. (magna cum laude), 1991; University of California, Los Angeles, M.A., 1994, Ph.D., 1998.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Department of Politics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02454-9110. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Academic. Tufts University, Medford, MA, adjunct assistant professor of law and diplomacy, 2000-01, 2002-06, assistant professor of political science, 1999-2007; Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, assistant professor of politics, 2007—. Visiting assistant professor at University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Political Science, 1998-99; visiting scholar at Harvard University's Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, 2001-02.

MEMBER:

American Political Science Association, International Studies Association, Phi Beta Kappa.

AWARDS, HONORS:

National Science Foundation, graduate fellow, 1992; University of California, San Diego, MacArthur fellow, 1996.

WRITINGS:

Trading Blocs: States, Firms, and Regions in the World Economy, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 2005.

Contributor to academic journals, including Review of International Political Economy, International Organization, World Trade Review, Perspectives on Politics, and Business and Politics. Reviewer and referee for a number of academic journals, including American Journal of Political Science, American Political Science Review, Business and Politics, Comparative Political Studies, International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, and publishing houses, including McGraw-Hill, Congressional Quarterly, and Thomson-Wadsworth.

SIDELIGHTS:

Kerry A. Chase, an American academic and political scientist, was born in Ithaca, New York, on March 6, 1969. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in government in 1991 while studying in his hometown at Cornell University. He graduated magna cum laude, completing a senior honors thesis on the foreign policy of the United States from 1977 to 1983 in Iran and Lebanon. In 1992 Chase served as a graduate fellow with the National Science Foundation. Chase moved across the country to pursue graduate studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. In 1994 he earned a master of arts degree in political science, writing a thesis titled: "Markets, States, and the Political Economy of Security Externalities." In 1996 Chase was a MacArthur fellow at the University of California, San Diego. Two years later, he had completed a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles, with a dissertation covering regional trade blocs.

Chase remained in academia upon finishing his doctoral studies. He worked as a visiting assistant professor at the University of California, Los Angeles's department of political science for the subsequent year. In 1999, however, he returned to the eastern United States, accepting an assistant professor of political science position at Tufts University. Chase served as a visiting scholar at Harvard University's Weatherhead Center for International Affairs from 2001 to 2002. He remained at Tufts University until 2007 when he became assistant professor of politics at nearby Brandeis University.

Chase has presented papers at a number of academic conferences. He is a contributor to a number of academic journals, including the Review of International Political Economy, International Organization, World Trade Review, Perspectives on Politics, and Business and Politics.

In 2005 Chase published his first book, Trading Blocs: States, Firms, and Regions in the World Economy, through the University of Michigan Press. Building on research experience from his doctoral dissertation, Chase looks at the domestic factors that impact the creation of international trading blocs. Chase fundamentally observes that large industries with key political ties are the largest factor in deciding the makeup of trading blocs. The book presents case studies of the trading blocs that existed between the Britain, Germany, and Japan in the war years; the United States from 1922 to 1967; the European Union; Japan in the 1980s and 1990s; and the North American Free Trade Agreement. In addition to what impacts the formation of trading blocs, Chase also looks at what impact the blocs have on external factors, including the globalization of the economy, world affairs, war, and military alliances. A contributor to Reference & Research Book News commented that Chase goes "beyond establishing the thesis of the significance of economies of scale on bloc" creation in his book.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Reference & Research Book News, May, 2006, review of Trading Blocs: States, Firms, and Regions in the World Economy.

ONLINE

Brandeis University, Department of Political Science Web site,http://www.brandeis.edu/ (January 8, 2008), author profile.

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