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Blauner, Susan Rose 1965-

BLAUNER, Susan Rose 1965-


PERSONAL: Born October 15, 1965, in NY. Education: Bridgewater State College, B.A. (cum laude), 1988.


ADDRESSES: Home—Cape Cod, MA. Agent—c/o Jane Rotrosen Agency, 318 East 51st St., New York, NY 10022.


CAREER: Writer, speaker, and advocate for suicide prevention. Previously worked in visual merchandising, therapeutic recreation, graphic design, photojournalism, and newspaper production.


WRITINGS:


How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to KillMe: One Person's Guide to Suicide Prevention, William Morrow (New York, NY), 2002.


WORK IN PROGRESS: A nonfiction book.

SIDELIGHTS: Susan Rose Blauner suffered from suicidal thoughts for nearly two decades before she wrote a book on dealing with them. In How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me: One Person's Guide to Suicide Prevention, Blauner provides a list of twenty-five "tricks of the trade" a person can use to sidestep taking suicidal action. They include having contact information handy, using a crisis plan, keeping a journal, and practicing meditation. Library Journal's Dale Farris called it a "heartfelt and important book."

Blauner, who was born in Westchester County, New York, but lived most of her life in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, began therapy at nineteen, overdosed on drugs three times, and was confined in three separate psychiatric hospitals before she took control of her life, with the help of family, friends, and therapists. Her book notes the triggers that can lead to suicidal thoughts, advises on choosing a therapist and antidepressants, and discusses how a person can outwit his or her own brain with the tricks that will help during times of crisis. Also included are hotline numbers, useful Web sites, and contact information for support organizations.

Curtis Edmonds, who reviewed the book for Bookreporter.com, wrote that Blauner's tricks "are extremely varied, and more than a little eccentric. (This is to be expected from an author who describes herself as a 'Jewish Unitarian Zen-Quakerish earth-loving type.') Not all of the 'Tricks' will help everyone, and more than a few of them may seem a little goofy, if not out-and-out weird." Edmonds said the book "is not incredibly well-written . . . but it is brave and courageous and helpful, full of resources and tips and ideas and strength for anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts or anyone with a friend or family member with such experiences."

A Publishers Weekly contributor called How I Stayed Alive "an extremely valuable and much-needed tool for both suicidal thinkers and their loved ones."


BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:


books


Blauner, Susan Rose, How I Stayed Alive When MyBrain Was Trying to Kill Me: One Person's Guide to Suicide Prevention, William Morrow (New York, NY), 2002.


periodicals


Library Journal, June 15, 2002, Dale Farris, review of How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me: One Person's Guide to Suicide Prevention, p. 81.

Publishers Weekly, June 3, 2002, review of How IStayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me, p. 77.


online


Bookreporter.com,http://www.bookreporter.com/ (December 3, 2002), Curtis Edmonds, review of How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me.

HealthScout,http://www.healthscout.com/ (September 13, 2002), Robert Preidt, review of How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me.

Susan Rose Blauner Home Page,http://www.howistayedalive.com (March 15, 2003).*

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