Praetorius (Latinized from Schulz, Schulze, Schultz, Or Schultze)

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Praetorius (Latinized from Schulz, Schulze, Schultz, Or Schultze)

Praetorius (Latinized from Schulz, Schulze, Schultz, Or Schultze) , family of distinguished German musicians:

(1) Jacob Praetorius , organist and composer; b. Magdeburg, c. 1530; d. Hamburg, 1586. He converted to Protestantism and settled in Hamburg, where he became clerk at St. Jacobi in 1550. He became asst. organist in 1554, then was 1st organist from 1558 until his death. He compiled a set of monophonie liturgical chants and German chorales in 1554. He also compiled a collection known as Opus musicum excellens et novum (1566), which contained 204 sacred compositions for 4, 5, 6, and 8 Voices by German and Netherlands composers (a majority of compositions are copies of pieces publ. by Georg Rhau). Praetorius’s only extant work, a Te Deum for 4 Voices, is included.

(2) Hieronymus Praetorius , organist and composer, son of the preceding; b. Hamburg, Aug. 10, 1560; d. there, Jan. 27, 1629. He studied organ with his father, then with Hinrich thor Molen (1573); also had instruction with Albinus Walran in Cologne (1574–76). He was organist in Erfurt (1580–82). He became asst. organist to his father at St. Jacobi in Hamburg in 1582; upon his father’s death in 1586, he became 1st organist, a position he held until his own death 43 years later. He composed masses, motets, and Magnificat settings, of which the 8 Magnificat settings for Organ (1611) are particularly noteworthy. He also prepared a collection of monophonie German and Latin service music for the churches of Hamburg under the title Cantiones sacrae chorales (1587), and the Melodeyen Gesangbuch (Hamburg, 1604), which includes 88 4-part German chorale settings; 21 of these are by him, the remaining by his son (3) Jacob Praetorius , Joachim Decker, and David Scheidemann.

Bibliography

B. Friederich, Der Vokalstil des H. P. (Hamburg, 1932); F. Gable, The Polychoml Motets of H. P. (diss., Univ. of Iowa, 1966).

(3) Jacob Praetorius , organist, pedagogue, and composer, son of the preceding; b. Hamburg, Feb. 8, 1586; d. there, Oct. 22, 1651. He studied organ with Sweelinck in Amsterdam. From 1603 until his death he was organist of St. Petri in Hamburg. He was a noted organ teacher and composer of organ music. He contributed 19 4-part chorale settings to his father’s Melodeyen Gesangbuch (Hamburg, 1604). See W. Brieg, ed., J. P.: Choralbearbeitungen für Orgel (Kassel, 1974).

(4) Johannes Praetorius , organist and composer, brother of the preceding; b. Hamburg, c. 1595; d. there, July 25, 1660. He studied organ with Sweelinck in Amsterdam (1608–11). From 1612 until his death he was organist of the Nikolaikirche in Hamburg.

—Nicolas Slonimsky/Laura Kuhn/Dennis McIntire

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Praetorius (Latinized from Schulz, Schulze, Schultz, Or Schultze)

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