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scald

scald / skôld/ • v. [tr.] injure with very hot liquid or steam: the tea scalded his tongue. ∎  heat (milk or other liquid) to near boiling point. ∎  immerse (something) briefly in boiling water for various purposes, such as to facilitate the removal of skin from fruit or to preserve meat. ∎  cause to feel a searing sensation like that of boiling water on skin: hot tears scalding her eyes. • n. a burn or other injury caused by hot liquid or steam. ∎  any of a number of plant diseases that produce a similar effect to that of scalding, esp. a disease of fruit marked by browning and caused by excessive sunlight, bad storage conditions, or atmospheric pollution. scald2 • n. variant spelling of skald.

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scald

scald
1. To pour boiling water over a food to clean it, loosen hairs (e.g. on a joint of pork), or remove the skin of fruit, tomatoes, etc.

2. To heat milk almost to boiling point, to retard souring or to make clotted cream.

3. Defect occurring in stored apples; the formation of brown patches under the skin, with browning and softening of the tissue underneath. Due to accumulation of gases given off during ripening.

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scald

scald1 burn with hot liquor; (dial.) burn. XIII. ME. sc(h)alde, aphetic — AN., ONF. escalder, OF. eschalder (mod. échauder):- L. excaldāre wash in hot water, f. EX1 + L. cal(i)dus hot, rel. to calēre be warm.
Hence sb. XVII.

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scald

scald (skawld) n. a burn produced by a hot liquid or vapour, such as boiling water or steam.

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scald

scald2 see SKALD.

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scald

scaldchild, Childe, mild, self-styled, undefiled, wild, Wilde •grandchild • stepchild • brainchild •godchild • Rothschild • schoolchild •love child • unreconciled •bald, scald, so-called, uncalled, unwalled •Archibald • piebald • skewbald •Theobald • Cumbernauld

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