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Renunciation

351. Renunciation

abdication
the formal act by a regent of resigning from his position.
abjuration
the act of renouncing upon oath, such as an alien applying for citizenship renouncing allegiance to a former country of nationality.
expatriation
the process of abandoning ones native land or of being exiled. expatriate, n., adj., v.
recusance
recusancy. recusant, adj.
recusancy
resistance to authority or refusal to conform, especially in religious matters, used of English Catholics who refuse to attend the services of the Church of England. Also recusance. recusant, n., adj.
tergiversation
1. the act or process of subterfuge or evasion.
2. the abandoning of a cause or belief; apostasy. tergiversator, n.

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renunciation

re·nun·ci·a·tion / riˌnənsēˈāshən/ • n. the formal rejection of something, typically a belief, claim, or course of action: entry into the priesthood requires renunciation of marriage| a renunciation of violence. ∎  Law a document expressing renunciation. DERIVATIVES: re·nun·ci·ant / riˈnənsēənt/ n. & adj.

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Renunciation

RENUNCIATION

Theabandonmentof a right; repudiation; rejection.

The renunciation of a right, power, or privilege involves a total divestment thereof; the right, power, or privilege cannot be transferred to anyone else. For example, when an individual becomes a citizen of a new country, that individual must ordinarily renounce his or her citizenship in the old country.

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