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Fry, Daniel (1908-)

Fry, Daniel (1908-)

One of the early 1950s flying saucer contactees. Fry was born July 19, 1908, in Vernon, Minnesota. A former technician of White Sands Proving Grounds, Fry claimed that in 1950 while he was walking in the New Mexico desert he found a flying saucer that had landed. He said he held a conversation by telepathy with an invisible spaceman called "Alan" and took a ride in the saucer over New York. Following the publication of his books White Sands Incident and Alan's Message: To Men of Earth in 1954, Fry became a celebrity in the contactee movement. He went on to found Understanding, Inc. (now World Understanding) in 1955, through which he teaches the metaphysical perspective he has derived from his space contacts.

Sources:

Fry, Daniel. Alan's Message: To Men of Earth. Los Angeles: New Age Publishing, 1954.

. Atoms, Galaxies, and Understanding. El Monte, Calif.: Understanding Publishing, 1960.

. Can God Fill Teeth? The Real Facts Behind the Miracle Ministry of Evangelist Willard Fuller. Lakemont, Ga.: CSA, 1970.

. The Curve of Development. Lakemont, Ga.: CSA, 1965.

. White Sands Incident. Los Angeles: New Age Publishing, 1954.

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