Skip to main content
Select Source:

predicate

pred·i·cate • n. / ˈpredikət/ Gram. the part of a sentence or clause containing a verb and stating something about the subject (e.g., went home in John went home): [as adj.] predicate adjective. ∎ Logic something that is affirmed or denied concerning an argument of a proposition. • v. / ˈpredəˌkāt/ [tr.] 1. Gram. & Logic state, affirm, or assert (something) about the subject of a sentence or an argument of proposition: a word which predicates something about its subject aggression is predicated of those who act aggressively. 2. (predicate something on/upon) found or base something on: the theory of structure on which later chemistry was predicated. DERIVATIVES: pred·i·ca·tion / ˌpredəˈkāshən/ n.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"predicate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"predicate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 18, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/predicate-0

"predicate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved July 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/predicate-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

PREDICATE

PREDICATE. A traditional grammatical term for a major constituent of the SENTENCE, part of a binary analysis that divides the sentence into subject and predicate. In the sentence Pat has joined our club, Pat is the subject and has joined our club is the predicate. In both grammar and logic, the predicate serves to make an assertion or denial about the subject of the sentence. In some analyses, the predicate does not include optional constituents, so that today is not part of the predicate in Pat has joined our club today.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"PREDICATE." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"PREDICATE." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 18, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/predicate

"PREDICATE." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Retrieved July 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/predicate

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

predicate

predicate (logic and gram.) that which is asserted of the subject. XVI. — late L. prædicātum, n. pp. of prædicāre proclaim, declare, in medL. predicate, f. præ- PRE- + dicāre make known, rel. to dīcere say; see DICTION, -ATE1.
So predicate (-ATE3) assert, affirm. XVI. predication † preaching XIV; assertion, affirmation XVI. — (O)F. or L. predicative (gram.) forming the whole or part of the predicate. XIX.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"predicate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"predicate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 18, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/predicate-1

"predicate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved July 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/predicate-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

predicate

predicate A function from some domain to a truth value. If the domain comprises n variables where n = 0,1,2,…

the function is called an n-place predicate. In the special case where n = 0, the predicate is a statement. Predicates are the fundamental building blocks of the predicate calculus.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"predicate." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"predicate." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 18, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/predicate

"predicate." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved July 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/predicate

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

predicate

predicate •defalcate • demarcate • cheapskate •eradicate • abdicate •dedicate, medicate, predicate •indicate, syndicate, vindicate •adjudicate • defecate •certificate, pontificate •confiscate • replicate • explicate •spifflicate • triplicate • implicate •complicate •duplicate, quadruplicate, quintuplicate •supplicate • fornicate •communicate, excommunicate, intercommunicate, tunicate •divaricate, prevaricate •fabricate • deprecate • metricate •extricate •lubricate, rubricate •desiccate • intoxicate • masticate •authenticate • domesticate •sophisticate • prognosticate •rusticate • hypothecate • manducate •educate • obfuscate • inculcate •bifurcate • suffocate • allocate •dislocate • reciprocate • coruscate •altercate • advocate • equivocate •furcate •braggart, faggot (US fagot), maggot •legate •bigot, gigot, Piggott, spigot •ingot • profligate • aggregate • yogurt •conjugate • abrogate • surrogate •ergot, virgate •Bagehot • patriarchate • wainscot •Sickert • predicate • syndicate •certificate, pontificate •Calicut • delicate • silicate • triplicate •duplicate, quadruplicate •intricate • Connecticut • Alcott •ducat • advocate •ballot, palate •charlotte, harlot •appellate, Helot, prelate, zealot •flagellate • distillate •Pilate, pilot •copilot • gyropilot • autopilot •triangulate •ejaculate, immaculate •amulet • spatulate •articulate, denticulate •consulate, proconsulate •postulate • ungulate •inviolate, ultraviolet •chocolate • cardinalate • desolate •isolate • disconsolate • Merlot

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"predicate." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"predicate." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 18, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/predicate

"predicate." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved July 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/predicate

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.