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Green Book

GREEN BOOK

The governing philosophy of Libya's ruler, Muammar al-Qaddafi.

The Green Book contains the brief, three-part statement of the Third International Theory, the governing philosophy of Muammar al-Qaddafi, ruler of Libya. Designed to be an alternative to both capitalism and communism, the Third International Theory is the theoretical basis for the institutions and policies of the Jamahiriyya. The first part, issued in 1976 and titled, "The Solution of the Problem of Democracy: The Authority of the People," discusses the dilemmas of just and wise government and declares the solution to be the rule of the people through popular congresses and committees. Part 2, "The Solution of the Economic Problem: Socialism," which appeared in 1978, calls for the end of exploitation implied by wages and rent, in favor of economic partnership and self-employment. Part 3, "The Social Basis of the Third International Theory," treats social issues, including the importance of family and tribe and the status of women and minorities.

See also jamahiriyya; qaddafi, muammar al-.


Bibliography

Deeb, Mary Jane, and Deeb, Marius K. Libya since the Revolution. New York: Praeger, 1982.

lisa anderson

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Green Book

Green Book
1. The coloured book defining the virtual terminal protocol used within the UK academic community.

2. See CD-ROM format standards.

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Green Book

Green Book (revolutionary text of Libyan leader): see QADHAFFI, MUʿAMMAR.

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