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Cyclamate

Cyclamate

Cyclamate is the name given to a family of organic compounds that became popular in the 1950s as artificial sweeteners. They are about 30 times as sweet as ordinary table sugar (sucrose) but have none of sugar's calories. By the mid-1960s, a combination of cyclamate and saccharin (another artificial sweetener) known as Sucaryl had become one of the most popular alternatives to sugar.

Trouble arose in 1969, however. A scientific study showed that among rats fed a high dose of Sucaryl for virtually their whole lives, about 15 percent developed bladder cancer. Presented with this information, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decided to ban the use of cyclamate in foods. In 1973, Abbott Laboratories, the makers of cyclamate, petitioned the FDA to change its mind and allow the use of cyclamates once more. Abbott presented a number of studies showing that cyclamate does not cause bladder cancer in rats or have other harmful health effects.

The FDA studied Abbott's petition for seven years before deciding to reject it. Cyclamate remained banned for use in foods. In 1982, Abbott submitted a second petition asking for approval of cyclamate. As of the beginning of 2001, the FDA had not acted on that petition.

What makes this case of special interest is that a potentially important food additive has been banned on the basis of a single scientific study. More than two dozen other studies on its safety reportedly failed to show the same results. Furthermore, the second component of Sucarylsaccharinhas also been shown to cause bladder cancer in experimental animals. Yet the FDA continues to allow its use in foods.

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cyclamate

cyclamate (sī´kləmāt´, –mət), any member of a group of salts of cyclamic acid (cyclohexanesulfamic acid). The sodium and calcium salts were commonly used as artificial sweeteners until 1969, when their use was banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration after reports that ingestion of large quantities of cyclamates appeared to cause cancer in some animals. There is no evidence that cyclamates are associated with cancer in humans.

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cyclamate

cyclamate A non‐nutritive sweetener, 30 times as sweet as sugar, used as the free acid or the calcium salt; synthesized in 1937, introduced commerically in the USA in 1950. Useful in low‐calorie foods. Unlike saccharin, it is stable to heat and can therefore be used in cooking. Chemically sodium cyclohexyl‐sulphamate.

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cyclamates

cyclamates Salts of the acid C6H11.NH.SO3H, where C6H11– is a cyclohexyl group. Sodium and calcium cyclamates were formerly used as sweetening agents in soft drinks, etc., until their use was banned when they were suspected of causing cancer.

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