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saccharin

saccharin (săk´ərĬn), C7H5NSO3, white, crystalline, aromatic compound. It was discovered accidentally by I. Remsen and C. Fahlberg in 1879. Pure saccharin tastes several hundred times as sweet as sugar. It is not readily soluble in water, but its sodium salt, which is sold commercially, dissolves readily. Saccharin has no nutritional value and is excreted unchanged by the body. It is used as a sweetener by persons who must limit their consumption of sugar. Despite the fact that saccharin causes cancer in laboratory rats, its ban was rescinded after a public outcry. In 1984 the World Health Organization suggested an intake limit of 2.5 mg/day per kg bodyweight. Other nonnutritive artificial sweeteners include sodium cyclamate and aspartame.

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saccharin

saccharin A synthetic chemical, benzoic sulphimide, 300–550 times as sweet as sucrose. Soluble saccharin is the sodium salt. It has no food value, but is useful as a sweetening agent for diabetics and slimmers. Discovered in the USA in 1879.

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saccharin

saccharin (C7H5NO3S) Synthetic substance used as a substitute for sugar. It derives from toluene. In 1977, it was tenuously linked with some forms of cancer in humans, and is no longer widely used.

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saccharin

sac·cha·rin / ˈsak(ə)rən/ • n. a sweet-tasting synthetic compound, C7H5NO3S, used in food and drink as a substitute for sugar.

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saccharin

saccharin •tannin •antivenin, Lenin •Kalinin • linen • bedlinen •underlinen • feminine •Cronin, phone-in, ronin, serotonin •Bakunin • run-in • melanin • santonin •crankpin • backspin • hatpin •tenpin • hairpin • tailspin • wheelspin •Crippen, pippin •stickpin • kingpin • Crispin • linchpin •tiepin • topspin • clothespin •lupin, lupine •pushpin • terrapin • Turpin • Karin •chagrin • aspirin • Catrin • Kathryn •Gagarin •Erin, Perrin, serin •Sanhedrin • epinephrine • dextrin •brethren • Montenegrin • pyrethrin •peregrine •Corin, florin, foreign •doctrine • sovereign • Aldrin •Paludrine • murrain •Kirin, stearin •Lohengrin •burin, urine •tambourin • mandarin • warfarin •saccharin, saccharine •tamarin • Catherine •navarin, savarin •culverin • Mazarin

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